Rhode Island Reading Room
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Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892


NARRAGANSETT PIER

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The unsurpassed location of Narragansett Pier as a watering-place of unexceptional advantages has attracted visitors here from all parts of the world, and made it a famous summer resort and a worthy rival of Newport. Situated at the head of Narragansett Bay, it faces the broad Atlantic, and on its magnificent stretch of sandy beach the breakers roll in with all the grandeur and sublimity that the most vivid imagination could conjure, and in their soothing roar the hum of business activity and the city's bustle is forgotten, and tired brains are lulled into the repose that brings them much needed rest with the same benefits as a trip across the ocean.  Within a comparatively few years this noted resort has sprung into prosperity 'as from the stroke of an enchanter's wand', and to-day boasts about twenty magnificent hotels accommodating each from fifty to two hundred guests, and many elegant cottages are occupied.  In fact there never has been such a demand for cottages as there has been for this season (1892).  The improvements which have recently been made is almost astonishing and adds greatly to the comfort and convenience of guests as well as to the attractiveness of the Pier.  A durable sea-wall of one thousand feet, which is to be continued another thousand feet at the close of the season, has been erected which affords protection to those driving along the ocean front, and a fine broad walk has been built along this sea-wall, giving a thoroughly safe place to those who wish to enjoy a moonlight stroll.  In addition to these improvements a new passenger station will be finished by May, 1893, at a cost of $30,000.  It will be constructed of quarry-faced granite and hard pine after the style of the Casino, and every convenience is to be provided including a covered archway for private carriages, etc. The grounds adjoining are to be laid out as a park, and in many different ways the Pier is to be adorned everywhere.  The roads have all been recently repaired, and fine driving is to be had everywhere, and the district has been thoroughly policed.  The Casino is on the plan of that of Newport, and a magnificent orchestra is always in attendance.  Balls, amateur theatricals, concerts, etc., are held here which are of the highest order of merit, and which are largely attended at all times by the summer population which comprises the most select families and visitors from both continents. Besides this every amusement is provided that both sexes can indulge in, such as tennis tournaments, bowling, billiards, etc.; and with the addition of Sherry's this season, who is to form a rival to the Casino, the future of Narragansett Pier will not be outshone by any of its rivals on the coast, and presents an agreeable contrast to that beheld by our forefathers when the fierce conflicts raged for possession of this choice tract of country between them and the warlike tribe of Narragansett Indians that originally held possession here, and who realized as well as their white opponents that this beautiful spot, favored by climate, ocean, and land, was well worth fighting for - which has been realized in its brilliant prosperity.

illustration on page 269:  Photo of Narragansett Pier towers and walkway.



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THE ROCKINGHAM, J. G. Burns & Sons, Proprietors.  --  It is generally admitted by tourists and experts that the greatest consummation of hospitable ideas with practical business methods and marked ability of management is embodied in 'The Rockingham', at Narragansett Pier, above and beyond any other hotel on the Atlantic coast.  It was opened to the public in 1891, by Messrs. J. G. Burns & Son, the present popular proprietors, and quickly proved a magnet to the best people of the land.  Under its liberal and expert management its success has been unprecedented in the history of hotel enterprises at the Pier.  Its location is excellent.  No seashore hotel is its equal in this important regard. It is situated midway between the two great attractions, the Casino and the bathing beach, overlooking each, while the new addition reaches to the beach on the north, the pillars of the broad arched porches resting on the sea wall, where its guests can sit and view the bathing and its sports.  There are also charming views of Jamestown and Newport from the piazza.  With the improvements and additions that have been made by the proprietors, the Rockingham is now the largest and most commodious hotel at the Pier.  The house is five stories high; the two lower stories have broad verandas on all sides, while a beautiful lawn has been completed reaching the Casino, and first-class accommodations are provided for four hundred guests.  The house is thoroughly attractive in all its appointments, richly furnished, artistically decorated, and fitted with all modern improvements, including electric lights, an Otis Brothers' elevator, modern fire-escapes, electric bells, speaking tubes, private baths and improved sanitary arrangements, while the rooms are large and cool, and can be had single or en suite.  Such a hotel as the Rockingham has the population of a small village during the summer season. Yet its guests have extraordinary fare and every comfort.  Humanity is catered for by wholesale, yet at the same time each individual guest receives as much attention as if he had one entire hotel to himself.  It is this combination of large general figures with the closest attention to minute details which forms the chief problem for the hotel keeper, and constitutes the real mystery of modern hotel-keeping.  The Rockingham is patronized not only by people of great wealth, but by well-to-do persons of culture and refinement, and, considering the service and advantages extended, its rates are extremely moderate.  The cuisine of the Rockingham is justly renowned.  The Messrs. Burns are liberal caterers, believing in the best and plenty of it, and all the important markets of the country are made to pay tribute to their enterprise.  Clarke's Hall, the Rockingham Annex, is under the same management, and is desired by many because of its favorable location to the Casino. With all these advantages and facilities, with the Western Union Telegraph, telephone and post offices; with a livery giving every mode of conveyance, with sailing, boating and yachting, and a thousand and one other conveniences, the Messrs. Burns undertake to do everything for their guests that contributes to their pleasure and comfort, and which mades their experience at this popular hotel one to be remembered with pleasure and gratification.

illustration on page 270: Etching: the Rockingham as seen from the Casino.



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METATOXET HOUSE, J. H. Caswell, Proprietor.  -- The Metatoxet House is one of the representative institutions and a valued feature of Narragansett Pier, combining in the most perfect manner every comfort, elegance and convenience with the refined and quiet atmosphere of the best circles of home life.  It was opened to the public in 1866, and during all these years has been under the proprietorship of Mr. John H. Caswell, the pioneer hotel man at the Pier.  The house has been materially enlarged during the past year, by the addition of a new music room, 30 x 45 feet, together with numerous improvements, and now offers first-class accommodations for two hundred guests.  With its elegant appointments, superb situation and expert management, the Metatoxet is now recognized as one of the best kept, most luxurious and popular seaside resorts on the Atlantic coast.  The house is surrounded by beautiful lawns, several lawn-tennis courts, ample concrete walks, and shade trees in abundance, while every modern improvement has been introduced, including electric lights, hydraulic elevator, electric bells, and sanitary appliances.  The drinking-water is of the finest, never-failing wells being located on the premises. The cuisine of the house is made the constant study of expert caterers, and an experienced staff of assistants meet the demands of the elaborate bills of fare for which the Metatoxet is so widely noted.  Every want of families and tourists is promptly met, and at rates which are very moderate for such splendid accommodations - to praise which is like gilding refined gold.  Mr. Caswell, the founder and moving spirit of this enterprise, has devoted his life to hotel mangement, and there is no detail thereof of which he is not a perfect master.  He is a native of Narragansett, closely identified with the growth and prosperity of this community, and noted for his executive ability and conscientious attention to details.  He is assisted by Messrs. C. A. Chapman and C. D. Bennett as clerks, and every department runs smoothly, and the continued popularity of the Metatoxet under its present regime is well assured.

illustration on page 271: engraving: Metatoxet House



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A. N. NAHIKIAN, Turkish and Persian Rugs, Embroideries and Portieres; also, Japanese Jute Rugs, Etc., Etc., Clarke's Block.  --  Mr. A. N. Nahikian's Oriental Art Emporium is the recognized headquarters here for all kinds of Turkish and Persian goods, and it is the centre of an extensive connection among the wealthy summer visitors and permanent residents throughout this section of Rhode Island.  The main store is situated at No. 39 Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass., and with the branch here was established by the present proprietor in 1885. The store in Clarke's Block is finely fitted, and is a popular resort and rendezvous for ladies and the fashionable world generally.  A handsome collection is here to be seen, a description of which would defeat its own ends.  Suffice it to say that chief among the whole are direct imported Turkish and Persian rugs, a chaste assortment of embroideries and portieres, Japanese jute rugs in great variety, an elegant display of curios and bric-a-brac, all kinds of fine china, glass and crockery, baskets, lacquered boxes, trays, and all kinds of novelties.  In addition to this popular store, a temporary Japanese store is maintained during the season on the bathing beach; a choice stock being carried and a brisk trade conducted.  A large number of the goods sold are imported by the house direct from the Ottoman Empire and the Orient.  Mr. A. N. Nahikian is a native of Harpout, Armenia.



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WATSON'S PHARMACY, opposite Casino.  --  No department of business in any city is of more direct value and importance to the community at large than that in which the practical pharmacist brings to bear his professional skill and experience.  In this connection special attention is directed to Watson's Pharmacy, opposite Casino, Frank Watson, proprietor.  This gentleman established business here in 1878, also having in successful operation a house in this line at Peasdale (sic), the Narragansett store being a branch.  The concern is centrally located, spacious and elegantly fitted up, and forms one of the most attractive features of this busy thoroughfare. Here is always to be found a complete stock of pure fresh drugs and chemicals, all the reliable and standard medicines and family remedies, and the latest novelties in perfumery, toilet articles, and fancy goods of both domestic and foreign production.  The goods are selected with scrupulous care and experienced judgment, and can be relied upon as the best that the markets afford.  The prescription department is under the most experienced and careful supervision, being supplied with the latest improved apparatus and appliances known to this important branch.  All orders are given prompt attention, and the wants of all classes of patrons are ministered to with eminent success and satisfaction.  Mr. Watson is a native of Peasdale, R.I.  He is a registered pharmacist, known and honored in this community for his professional skill, and as being a thoroughly responsible and representative business man.



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E. S. TAYLOR, Dry and Fancy Goods, Straw Goods, Window Shades and Draperies; Specialty, Tents and Awnings; No. 6 Casino Block.  --  Anyone acquainted with Narragansett Pier is aware that the leading dry goods house there is that of Mr. E. S. Taylor, at No. 6 Casino Block, now held in high repute for handling goods of the most genuine and reliable grades of quality, at fair and reasonable prices.  During the twenty years of its establishment under the able and skillful direction of the present proprietor, the house has gradually become the centre of a permanent, substantial trade in this section of the State, and the goods carried in each department are eminently suited to meet the requirements of the elite patronage catered to.  The store itself is 20 x 60 feet in area, situate in a fine granite structure, just under the Casino, is handsomely appointed and conveniently arranged for the systematic conduct of the brisk business carried on, and customers are waited upon promptly and intelligently by several competent and courteous assistants.  The heavy and carefully selected stock carried is complete and self-contained in each department and is peculiarly adapted to the requirements of a fashionable seaside watering place.  Here are to be found an elegant display of ladies', misses' and children's outdoor garments and generally, of the correct style for the season, ladies' and gentlemen's furnishing goods in great variety, dress goods of the latest introduction, small wares, straw goods, window shades, draperies and millinery, household linen and a full line of staple dry goods and fancy goods, novelties and notions.  Moreover, two departments have been added this year, one assigned entirely to tents, awnings and similar goods, and the other containing a choice collection of perfumes and toilet requisites. Mr. E. S. Taylor is a native of Rhode Island and personally directs every detail of the enterprise.



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WM. F. GRAHAM, Harness Maker.  --  For all kinds of fine harness-making at fair and reasonable prices, Mr. William F. Graham is held in high repute. In addition to the manufacture of single and double, light and heavy harness, the house deals in harness, saddles, bridles, whips, horse clothing, carriage rugs, gentlemen's leather portmanteaux, ladies' Saratoga tranks, valises, grips, pocket books, cases, and a full line of leather goods and novelties.  Of these, a large and varied assortment is always on hand at prices which command ready sales.  The store, shop, etc., 20 x 25 feet in area, are well fitted and fully equipped for turning out the finest work at short notice; three skilled workmen being there regularly employed. The house here is a branch establishment, and Mr. Graham's headquarters are at Wakefield, R. I., where he also conducts a flourishing business in this same line. He is a native of Newport, R.I., is a thoroughly practical harness-maker of long experience, and confines his operations exclusively to the finest grades of goods, alike as to material and make.



p. 272:

CHANDLER'S, James O. Chandler, Proprietor, Congdon Street.  --  Of the many excellent hostelries at Narransett Pier, there is perhaps not one that grows more steadily in public favor than "Chandler's", which is so eligibly and centrally located on Congdon Street.  This is an admirably conducted and deservedly popular house.  It is a first-class commercial hotel, and receives a very large and desirable patronage.  Established in 1890 by the present proprietor, Mr. James O. Chandler, it has been from the first a highly successful venture; and all the indications are that its popularity and prosperity are bound to endure and increase.  "Chandler's" is an all-the-year-round house, and is situated close to the railroad depot, and within two minutes' walk from the beach.  From the piazza there is a magnificent view of the ocean, and the prospect altogether is delightful. The hotel has accommodations for one hundred and fifty guests, and everything is new, neat, and of the best.  The house, which has recently been painted, renovated and refurnished, is lighted by electricity, thoroughly heated, and perfectly ventilated, the sanitary arrangements being particularly good.  All modern improvements and conveniences are provided, and the sleeping rooms are commodious, well-aired and comfortable.  The table is supplied with the best the market affords; the service is excellent, and the attendance leaves nothing to be desired, while the rates are very reasonable withal.  Altogether, the fare and accommodations to be found at "Chandler's" are of a distinctly superior character, terms considered. Mr. Chandler, the proprietor, is a gentleman in the prime of life, active, energetic, and of courteous manner.  He is man of good business qualities and thorough experience, and has won his success as a Boniface by deserving it.



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THE MASSASOIT HOUSE, John Babcock, Superintendent.  --  Next to a pleasant home, the best thing is a homelike hotel, under the management of those whose generous policy it is to spare no pains or expenditure to make their guests not only comfortable but happy, in the broadest sense of the term. Probably by no other hotel on the Atlantic coast are these objects more successfully attained than by the Massasoit House, at Narragansett Pier. Opened to the public in 1890, this house has already achieved a reputation and success seldom accorded to undertakings of this nature.  Mr. John Babcock, the superintendent, in opening this house as a summer resort, did more than just inaugurate an inn - he dedicated a home. It easily accommodates 130 guests, is first-class in all its arrangements and appointments, while there is not one room from the lowest to the topmost floor that is not like a beautiful apartment in a sumptuous house.  The walls are decorated with the finest works of art, and beds are as delicious resting-places and as daintily equipped as any couch of rest in the palace of a millionaire.  There are no frayed and dusty carpets, no worn and threadbare upholstery, no bedspreads and blankets eloquent with the record of the departed; everything is fresh and sweet, appealing alike to physical enjoyment and aesthetic taste.  One can at the Massasoit, combine the ease of boarding with the content and comfort of a well-ordered and beautiful home.  The hotel stands on the highest ground at the pier, commanding a magnificent view of the Atlantic Ocean and the surrounding country, is within five minutes' walk of the depot, two to the bathing beach, and a few rods to the Casino, and is convenient alike to families for the season, to the commercial tourist and the transient guest.  Every modern improvement has been introduced, including modern fire escapes, a Graves hydraulic passenger elevator, electric lights, electric bells, hot and cold water baths, telegraph and telephone communication, perfect ventilation and modern sanitary appliances; and every part and portion of the house carries with it the one idea of comfort and contentment.  The cuisine of the Massasoit is unsurpassed, and the menu embraces the best of viands and delicacies prepared in the most perfect manner.  Mr. Babcock, the moving spirit in the management, is a native of Narragansett Pier, and an agreeable and painstaking host.

illustration on page 273: engraving: The Massasoit House



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WEBSTER'S LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE, Kingstowne Road, opposite Hotel Gladstone; also near Clark's Block and Post Office; M. A. Webster, Proprietor.  --  Among the few high-class livery and boarding stables at Narragansett Pier, a leading place is occupied by that of Mr. M. A. Webster, located on the Kingstowne Road, opposite the Hotel Gladstone.  This stable enjoys as good a name as any here for moderate charges, promptitude in fulfilling all orders, and for the particular care and attention that are devoted to fine road stock, trotters and high-bred mounts, taken to board by the day, week, or under contract. Moreover, Mr. Webster's stables are favorably known throughout this section of Rhode Island as a reliable and expeditious mart for procuring, exchanging or disposing of horses of all kinds, on commission; while the establishment is freely recognized as a headquarters for elegant turnouts of all kinds and for all occasions; more especially, however, dual buckboards, Bar Harbor buckboards, surreys, phaetons, side-bar buggies, dog carts and road carts.  In addition, several carefully selected horses are kept in constant readiness for ladies' handling, and the whole livery department is characterized by the best of service.  Extensive barns and frame buildings are maintained, and were specially constructed for the purpose, with every regard for efficient light, ventilation, drainage, uniformity of temperature, facility of cleansing, good water supply, etc.; an ample stock of fine grade feed, fodder, bedding, etc, being always on hand.  The stalls and loose boxes provide comfortable quarters for fifty horses, and a force of ten skilled hostlers, grooms, stablemen, coachmen and others is regularly employed. This successful business was established in 1882 at the same location by the present proprietor, Mr. M. A. Webster, who was born in New York State, and is a popular figure in equestrian circles throughout this part of the State.



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J. K. HULL, Meats, Poultry, Game, Vegetables and Fruit, Clarke Building, Kingstowne Road.  --  The well-ordered establishment of Mr. J. K. Hull was established by Ruehl & Merkel in 1889, the present proprietor succeeding to the control in 1890.  The premises are spacious and provided with every convenience and facility for the successful prosecution of the business. The latest improvements in the way of refrigerators, etc., can here be found in successful operation.  Mr. Hull is a practical butcher and brings wide experience to bear on his enterprise. He is quick to recognize and supply the wants of his trade, and there is no better judge of meats in this city. He keeps constantly on hand large supplies of mutton, lamb, veal and poultry; also game and vegetables, and all kinds of fruit.  Four competent assistants are employed, and all orders are promptly filled and delivered. The trade of the house is widespread and influential, and is constantly increasing.  Mr. Hull is a native of Narragansett Pier, and is well-known and highly esteemed.



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CHARLES F. THURBER, Colorado View Co., Near the Sea View.  --  The steady and remarkable progress made in photography is one of the notable features that mark this age of progress in which we live.  The leading exponent of this art at Narragansett Pier is Mr. Chas. F. Thurber, known as 'Reckless Charlie', sole owner and proprietor of the celebrated Colorado View Co. This gentleman established his studio here in 1882 and made a specialty of residences, groups, models and machinery.  Horses are also taken by his own instantaneous process which cannot be excelled and is seldom equalled.  His work has taken the first premium at ten State fairs and at the Washington Country fair of Rhode Island in 1883.  Everything in the line of photography is executed in the highest style of the art at popular prices, while his assortment of views taken on a tour of the world are the most extensive in this section, and receive the commendations of critics and experts.  All kinds of photographs, engravings, wood cuts and steel engravings can be obtained here unsurpassed in quality and at prices that defy competition. 'Reckless Charlie' is also a sportsman and noted as a hunter's guide, being prepared to accompany hunting-parties to the Adirondacks, and Rocky Mountains of the West, or the ducking grounds of Maryland.  His terms are always reasonable and his services highly appreciated.  He is a native of Cranston, R. I. and a gentleman of wide observation, large acquaintance and eminent popularity.



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WM. H. BILLINGTON, Narragansett Pier Fish Market; Fish, Lobsters and Clams; Market at Billington's Pier.  --  A leading fish market at Narragansett Pier is that very ably and successfully conducted by Mr. Wm. H. Billington.  This gentleman established business here in 1873 as a dealer in fish and oysters, and also runs a cafe, bar and billiard room.  The premises occupied for the market are spacious, well ordered, and completely equipped with all the latest improved appurtenances for the storage and preservation of fish, and a corps of fifteen assistants contribute to the successful operation of the house.  An extensive and varied stock is constantly kept on hand to meet the requirements of a widespread and influential trade, including everything in the line of fresh and pickled fish, lobsters, oysters, and clams, which are supplied to hotels and families in quantities to suit, at the shortest possible notice.  Mr. Billington is a native of Narragansett, and of large experience as a dealer and caterer.



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H. V. GARDINER, Representing the R. L. Rose Company, Importers and Grocers, No. 5 Casino.  --  The well-known R. L. Rose Company of Providence, whole and retail dealers and importers of fine groceries, are ably represented in this community by Mr. H. V. Gardiner.  The branch of the business was established in 1884.  The elegant store occupied is arranged in the most convenient and systematic manner, every appliance or accommodation peculiar to the business being provided. The heavy stock carried embraces a complete line of staple and fancy groceries of every description, including the choicest teas, coffees, spices, canned and bottled goods in immense variety, bakers' and laundry supplies, and table delicacies of all kinds.  A full staff of clerks and associates is employed, and all orders invariably meet with the same prompt and satisfactory fulfilment.  These goods, which are purchased of first hands by the company, are warranted to be of the purest and best quality, and are offered to customers at prices rarely duplicated elsewhere.  Mr. Gardiner, the popular manager, is a native of Providence, and a business man of thorough experience and is thoroughly deserving of his popularity.



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D. E. ROAKE, Choice Confections and Bon-bons, Books, Stationery, Etc., Bijon Apartment House.  --  A prominent and well-known dealer in choice confections and bon-bons at Narragansett Pier is Mr. E. D. Roake, whose store is largely resorted to be the fashionable summer visitors, and presents a busy scene of activity throughout the day. The business was established in 1883 by the present proprietor, who is now held in high repute for handling the finest procurable confections and bon-bons, wholesome and luscious candies, etc., at the lowest commensurate prices. The stock carried is constantly replenished by the arrival of fresh invoices several times a week from the best manufacturers in the nearest cities; and in the store a choice and tempting display of sweetmeats, etc., is made. Mr. D. E. Roake is also the proprietor of the well-known 'Bijou', where a very complete collection of the latest literature, books, stationery and periodicals can always be found.  The 'Bijou' is a gentlemen's bachelor apartment house of the highest calibre, and contains furnished apartments, both en suite and in single rooms.  It is much patronized by Boston, New York and Philadelphia single men, and is so popular that during the entire season it is usually fully occupied.  The worthy proprietor, Mr. D. E. Roake, is a native of Boston.



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JOHN M. TOBIN, Prescriptionist.  --  The representative and progressive house of Mr. John M. Tobin was established in 1882.  This gentleman is also proprietor of another house in this line at No. 341 Fifth Avenue, N. Y.  The premises occupied are spacious, convenient and elegant, and contain a large stock of pure drugs, chemicals, proprietary medicines of acknowledged merit and reputation, fancy toilet articles, perfumery, mineral waters, surgeons' and physicians' requisites and, indeed, every article that may be thought of in connection with a first-class pharmacy. The careful, conscientious compounding of physicians' prescriptions and family recipes holds a paramount position in this establishment.  All modern appliances have been provided to secure accuracy, and no person more fully appreciates the responsibility that rests upon him than Mr. Tobin.  For this purpose he is supplied with the purest possible drugs and chemicals, and is ably assisted by graduates from our best pharmaceutical colleges.  Mr. Tobin is a registered pharmacist, and a native of New York.



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F. L. BOND, Stoves, Ranges, Glass, Tin and Wooden Ware, Furniture and General House Furnishings.  --  One of the leading and oldest established house furnishing goods businesses at Narragansett Pier is that conducted by Mr. F. L. Bond, who controls a permanent, substantial trade throughout this section of Rhode Island.  The enterprise was initiated in 1851 by Mr. G. W. Sheldon who was succeeded by his two sons, James L. and Jerry, and conducted by them with uninterrupted prosperity up to 1892, when they retired in favor of the present proprietor. The store, 20 x 60 feet in area, situate in the Hazard Block, is well arranged for the systematic conduct of the business and handsomely fitted up; two courteous assistants being in regular attendance upon customers.  The comprehensive and carefully selected stock carried embraces, among other goods, an assortment of furniture of the latest styles, and everything comprised under the head of house furnishings. Mr. F. L. Bond was born at Charlton, Mass.



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E. W. WATTS, All Kinds of Fresh Fish and Ice, Market, No. 2 Alcazar Block. --  This enterprising gentleman established business here in 1891, and has been eminently successful in gaining a wide-spread, influential patronage. Mr. Watts is thoroughly experienced in this business.  He occupies spacious quarters, which are thoroughly equipped in every particular with the best facilities for keeping and supplying fresh fish of all kinds, a specialty being made of Little Neck clams; and the stock also includes cod, halibut, herring, mackerel, smelts, salmon, blue-fish, etc.  Mr. Watts is prepared to furnish fishing parties with boats and tackle for deep-sea fishing.  He is a native of Bridgetown, R. I., and his success in this business is well-merited.

********* END - Narrangansett Pier; Next:  Bristol. ************



BRISTOL.

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Bristol is one of the most interesting towns in Rhode Island, both in the beauty of its location and the antiquity of its history, which dates back to the earliest ages of American history, and which is supposed to the exact spot upon which the Vikings of the North made their home while they sojourned upon our shores, and where in the year 1000 the pioneer vessel of Lief Ericsson sailed up the Seaconnet River to Mount Hope, where the Indians held full sway, and where the wild beasts roamed untrammelled through the forests.  Unlike the wild scene that presented itself to the Norsemen, the beautiful town of Bristol is now one of the finest and most prosperous in Rhode Island.  It is the capital of Bristol County, and is beautifully located on a peninsula between Narragansett Bay and Mount Hope Bay, and commands a beautiful view of the harbor.  It was at one time a seaport town of some commercial importance, but is now a thriving manufacturing town, its population in 1890 being 5,475.  It contains large ship-yards, refineries, and various manufactories, the principal of the last being cotton and rubber goods.  The town contains several churches and schools, and has good railroad and telegraph communications, and no finer location could be chosen for a home than amid its broad streets and verdant lanes, beneath the waving branches of its magnificent elms and the splendid views obtained from all sides of the town.



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W. H. BUFFINGTON, Registered Pharmacist, No. 135 Hope Street.  --  At the well-ordered and excellent pharmacy of W. H. Buffington physicians' prescriptions and family recipes are prepared in the most careful and trustworthy manner, from strictly pure and fresh ingredients.  This is one of the oldest and best-appointed drug-stores in town, and receives quite a large patronage.  It was established some twenty years ago by Mr. Buffington, and from the first has been steadily growing in popular favor. The store is compact, ample, and neatly fitted up, and is connected by telephone.  A large and first-class stock is constantly kept on hand here, and includes besides everything in the line of drugs, chemicals, acids, extracts, etc., all the standard proprietary remedies and patent medicines, pure medicinal wines, liquors, and mineral waters, herbs, barks, roots, seeds, spices, etc.; also a fine assortment of toilet articles perfumery, soaps, sponges, chamois skins, druggists' sundries generally, fancy goods, confectionery, stationery, soda water, etc., a handsome soda fountain being a feature.  Several competent assistants are employed, and night-bell calls receive prompt response, while the prices charged here are extremely moderate.  Mr. Buffington, the proprietor, who is a gentleman of middle age, born in Bristol, is a registered pharmacist, and is a member of the Rhode Island Pharmaceutical Association.

********* END ************


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