Frog RootsWeb's Guide to
Tracing Family Trees

 

Guide No. 6

Chalkboafd

Vital Records: Births

 

 

 

Flag

U.S. States

Vital Records Information

 

 

 

Flag

Vital Records Research in Australia

 

 

 

Flag

Births, Marriage, and Deaths in England and Wales since 1837

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Vital Records
by
Rhonda McClure

 

 

 

Unpuzzling the Past via Naming Patterns

by Penny Bonnar

 

 

Sources of Genealogical Information

 

 

 

Research Aids for the Family Historian

 

 

 

 

Ancestry.com offers access to many databases containing birth records in its fee-based online subscription service

 

Printer Friendly Version

 

 

Birth Records

BibleOne of the most important issues to genealogists is proving the parentage of any of our ancestors. Often, we assume that the birth record will provide this information and therefore attempt to start by searching for this record first. You are more likely to be successful with your research if you do the search for vital records (birth, marriage and death) in the reverse order of life's events.

Start with death records, then seek the marriage records and finally hunt for birth records. Keep in mind that in many localities, particularly the United States, birth records are a modern record and outside of New England often do not exist prior to about 1900.

Death and marriage records should be located first because they are necessary to help determine enough information about your ancestor to be sure that when you do find a birth record, you have the right one. By the time you are looking for the birth record, you should already know a few pertinent pieces of information about your ancestor, most notably:

Push Pin full name

Push Pin date of birth

Push Pin place of birth

In addition, it is certainly helpful to have the name of one of the parents. Of course, you are probably saying, well if I already know all this, then why do I need to get the birth record? Just as you searched for the death and marriage records first to help find needed clues to the birth of your ancestor, the birth record will supply you with clues needed for pursuing the parents of your ancestor.

The fun part of genealogy is that for every person you can prove you create two new slots on the pedigree chart to fill. And it is always through the records on those you know about that you discover tidbits and hints to those you didn't know about.

Birth records vary from place to place in their:

Push Pin availability

Push Pin information included

Push Pin type of record

Like other vital records, Canadian and American birth records were usually begun in the late 1800s or early 1900s. In fact, you are more likely to discover a marriage record from the early 1800s than you are a birth record. For British research, births, marriages and deaths exist in civil records from about July 1, 1837.

The dates of availability of civil and church records pertaining to births in other countries varies greatly. Consult International Vital Records Handbook, by Thomas Jay Kemp, available from Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., for information regarding civil registration of births around the world.

Unlike other vital records, you are more likely to experience availability restrictions with birth records. This is to protect the privacy of living individuals and is especially true when requesting birth records from the state level in the United States. Whenever possible start at the county level. However, when it comes to most of the New England states, then the birth records will be found on the town level. Tips for adoptees.

Births may be recorded on certificates or in registers. The older the record, the less information you are likely to find. For the more recent births you are likely to find included:

Push Pin name of child

Push Pin date of birth

Push Pin exact place of birth

Push Pin name of father

Push Pin age of father at the time of the birth

Push Pin name of mother (sometimes maiden name)

Push Pin age of mother at the time of birth

Push Pin number of birth for mother

Push Pin number of living children

 

Flag   Where and how to order Vital Records Information
(U.S. States and territories)

As you go further back in the records, you find that you are eventually only seeing the name of the child, the date of birth and the name of the father (and possibly the mother's first name). In American records, if the birth information is found in town records then no place is usually listed. When found in county records, the town may or may not be included.

Most of us are used to birth certificates. If we had children we had to fill out forms and obtain birth certificates. However, vital records were also often recorded in registers. These were large volumes that included columns for the various important details such as have been listed above.

Fraktur

Fraktur

Fraktur


Frakturs are another type of birth document Americans with Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry might discover. Frakturs are hand-crafted documents and letters that were created by religious groups from southern Germany who came to America in the late 17th century.

Among these are the Geburts-Schein (birth certificate); Tauf-Schein (baptismal certificate); Trau-Schein (wedding certificate); and Familien Register (family record). Not only are Geburts-Schein valuable as birth documentation, but they are treasured as folk art.

How to obtain birth records

Obtaining birth records depends largely on the laws of the area your ancestor was born in. For those that are available, it is probable that they have been microfilmed by the Family History Library. At the very least, you will want to check to see if an index was microfilmed by visiting your local Family History Center. You also will want to check at the Family History Library online.

To find out the addresses and phone numbers for ordering birth records, be sure to check out the Vital Records Information Web page. In addition to offering the addresses and phone numbers, they have also set up links to websites, including the various county US GenWeb pages.

Search user-contributed databases of birth records

Use RootsWeb's Searchable Indexes

Flag FreeBMD Free BMD stands for Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths. The FreeBMD Project's objective is to provide free Internet access to Civil Registration index information for England and Wales. Civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths in the U.K. began in 1837. The FreeBMD Project will be allowed to publish online indexes from those records that are at least 100 years old.

 

Globe WorldGenWeb Archives

Caribbean GenWeb (Islands of the West Indies)

Push PinANTIGUA

Extracts from Antiguan Baptismal Records

(1788 and 1790)

Parish of Saint John in the Island of Antigua,
1820 to 1901

Push PinBARBADOS
Extracts from Barbados Christ Church Baptisms

(1643, 1645, 1646)

Push PinBRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
Wesleyan Methodist Church Baptisms, 1815-1933
Tortola Monthly Meeting of Friends [Quakers],

1740-1760

Push PinCUBA
Index to United States Citizens' Register
of Havana, Cuba, 1871-1872, L-M

[
From records of the U.S. Consulate at Havana, Cuba. The listing is chronological and includes the registration number which can be used to find the record of "Registration of American citizen, 24 January 1869-31 December 1935." These records contain notarized certificates of registration of American citizens at the Consulate General showing the name, date and place of birth, date and place of residence in foreign country, purpose of stay, wife's name and place of birth, children, how citizenship was obtained, and passport number.] From records of the U.S. Consulate at Havana, Cuba. The listing is chronological and includes the registration number which can be used to find the record of "Registration of American citizen, 24 January 1869-31 December 1935." These records contain notarized certificates of registration of American citizens at the Consulate General showing the name, date and place of birth, date and place of residence in foreign country, purpose of stay, wife's name and place of birth, children, how citizenship was obtained, and passport number.]

Push Pin PUERTO RICO
1910 Census of Leguisamo, Mayaguez

[Alphabetical listing contains for each household member his/her title (head, wife, son, daughter), double surnames, given name, age, etc.]

Push Pin U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
ST. CROIX 1841 CENSUS, Part I

[Contains for each free person on estate, sex, where born, age, religion (where baptized), marital status, title (office, trade, living, situation in the family or what they live by), possessing burgher briefs and from what date, in which military corps doing duty and in what capacity.]

 

Pencil


Books Suggested Reading
& References

Earnest, Corinne Pattie and Hoch, Beverly Repass, CGRS. The Genealogist's Guide to Fraktur: For Genealogists Researching German-American Families. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Russell D. Earnest Associates, 1990.

Kemp, Thomas Jay. International Vital Records Handbook. (4th edition). Baltimore, Md.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2000.

Sanborn, Melinda Lutz. Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts 1692 to 1745. Derry, New Hampshire: author, 1992.

 

Pencil

 

Dot Index to Guides Page
Dot RootsWeb Guides to Tracing Family Trees are written & compiled by professional genealogists Julia M. Case, Myra Vanderpool Gormley, CG & Rhonda McClure