Legends Of Eutaw Springs
 
 
 Big Spring - Eutaw Springs                                                Little Springs - Eutaw Springs
 
Legend Of Eutaw Springs
By Mrs. Emily Glenn 
     The clear, cold springs gushed and bubbled from the head of a deep ravine, making a sizeable creek that meandered about a mile northwardly through dense, tangled woodland to the sluggish Santee. They flowed from two pink-tinged limestone orifices on either side of a forest-covered outcropping of porous rock called marl that, deep down, allowed a forceful under- ground current to flow from Little Spring to Big Spring.  
     Wahewawa, pride of the Eutaws and betrothed to their princess, Eulawana, had dived with other sportive braves into Little Spring and followed the strong current through the marl to surprise his fellows by reappearing in Big Spring on the opposite side of the ridge. But to swim back against the current was a feat successfully attempted by only a brave few.  
     White men enjoyed watching the sport, so encouraged it. One day, for a string of glistening glass beads offered by a British Redcoat, the brave Wahewawa attempted the dangerous feat. Eulawana smilingly watched his performance, but waited in anguish when Wahewawa failed to reappear in Big Spring. Many days and nights she spent beside the spring waters call- ing his name and praying to the Great Spirit for the return of her lost loved one. So earnest were her pleadings they entered the soul of the waters, since when they have eternally murmured, "Eu-la-wa-wa! Wa-he-wa-wa!" 
 
The Negro Legend of Eutaw Springs
From Belvidere Plantation
     To the west of Belvidere Plantation, a large brick gatepost topped with white urns marked the entrance to a wooded bluff where the Revolutionary Battle of Eutaw Spring was fought and where remnants of the British fortifications can still be seen.  
      At the crest of this bluff there were outcropping of cream limestone, and the Negroes of Belvidere Plantation had a favorite legend of mermaids sitting on these rocks on moonlight nights combing their long hair with silver combs.