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NARRATIVES OF SASKATOON


1882-1912

Genealogy, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, Pioneer,Saskatchewan history, Temperance Colony, Temperance Colonization Society, Pioneers,John N. Lake, John Lake, Saskatoon history, Saskatoon Gen Web, Genealogy, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, Pioneer,Saskatchewan history, Temperance Colony, Temperance Colonization Society, Saskatoon history, Saskatoon Gen Web


         selves.  We stopped the first night at Caswell's at Clark's Crosing as it was
         then called. We stopped at McIntosh's six miles from Fish Creek the next
         night.  On the third night we stopped at the telegraph office at St. Lau-
         rent and then drove into Prince Albert on the fourth day. The roads were
         fairly good and we travelled in a jumper. It was sixty degrees below zero
         the day we arrived in Prince Albert. The ceremony was performed by Mr.
         Williams of the Presbyterian Church. I gave the pastor a ten dollar bill
         but it grieved me very much. The wedding ring was made from a ten
         dollar gold piece contributed by Malloy, who was in charge of the telegraph
         office at Clark's Crossing. We were married on March 2nd and left for
         home the next day. We spent the first night at Cameron's 25 miles this
         side of Prince Albert. We made Stevenson's the next night and stopped
         at Caswell's the third night. The wedding presents were, of course, numer-
         ous and costly-chiefly kitchen utensils.
		 
            Let me tell of a trip to Battleford. It was in the winter time and
         there was no train service then. We didn't have the best of clothing, no
         fur mitts or fur overcoats as we had not expected to stay the winter. We
         slept in the snow drifts, putting our canvas down on the snow and wrapping
         it around us. In the morning we poured the balance of the tea on our
         mitts to keep them frozen so that the wind could not freeze our hands.
         When we got up in the morning there would be wolf tracks all around. All
         we had to eat was hard tack and pork which we cut with an axe.
		 
            My house was on the west side opposite the ferry, and I often helped
         people to cross, but I was never ferryman.  I was the only man in the
         settlement who knew how to splice wire ropes, and was of service in that
         way. When the Rebellion broke out I went to Clark's Crossing to offer my
         services. They wished to take me on by the day, but if I was to follow the
         army I wanted a better position. As they had no one else to splice their
         wire ropes they took me on as a combatant, and I took part in the expedi-
         tion of the S.S. Northcote against Batoche. But that is another story.

TRAVELLING IN SASKATCHEWAN

Thirty-five and Forty Tears Ago.
By Ex-Mayor Clinkskill
         
            In these days you often hear people who have occasion to travel com-
         plain after a trip in a palatial sleeping car, of the discomfort of the cars,
         too hot or too cold, the roughness of the railway track or the dust or the
         dirt. In former days before the advent of railways when anyone made a
         trip there was no grumbling about the hardship: everyone took it as a mat-
         ter of course, or all in the day's work. It was "Jack, I am going with you
         tomorrow, call for me at the house," and you got in with him in the morn-
         ing in a big democrat or a sleigh, and started off for a four or five days'
         drive as if it were an afternoon call you were making. Then, on your re~-
         turn probably the remark you would make would be about the baulkiness
         of that new broncho team Jack was driving, or the bad spill you had com-
         ing down the hill at Eagle Creek. The heat of the sun or the coldness of
         the wind was a matter of no moment. The "pioneering" people talk of to
         day is a picnic compared with the conditions thirty-five or forty years ago.
		 
            In the early eighties, when the Canadian Pacific was stretching its steel
         along the main line, the stage that ran from Winnipeg to Edmonton', via
         Shoal Lake and Battleford, was transferred to Troy (now Qu'Appelle) for a
         starting point. In 1882, Maclean (whose soubriquet was "Flat Boat" on a~
         count of his having run a lot of flat boats down the Red River to Winni-
         peg with freight) had the contract for the mail to Prince Albert and Ed-
         monton. The conveyance was a big democrat drawn by four horses.
         The stopping places were Touchwood, Salt Plain, Humboldt, Hoodoo (1),
         
.
            (1) The Hoodoo lakes are, roughly, 12 mIles east and 2 north from the
         present Cudworth.
         
                                       Page  47
         
         
         

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NARRATIVES OF SASKATOON


1882-1912


Genealogy, Saskatoon, Pioneer, Saskatchewan history, Temperance Colony, Temperance Colonization Society, Pioneers,John N. Lake, John Lake, Saskatoon history, Saskatoon Gen Web, Saskatoon Genealogy
BY
MEN OF THE CITY

PREPARED BY A COMMITTEE OF THE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
OF SASKATOON

PUBLISHED BY THE
UNIVERSITY BOOK-STORE


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