SLAVE NAMES IN FAYETTE COUNTY WILLS

RUNAWAY SLAVE NOTICES

This project is intended to document slave names that were printed in west Tennessee newspapers before the Civil War. These are primarily runaway slave notices, but also include slave listings from trustee sales. The notices are listed chronologically.

So far,  the following sources are used:

Original microfilm is available at the Central branch of the Memphis & Shelby County Library.

 

Randolph Recorder: 18 July 1834

$20 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber, four miles north of the Hatchey [Hatchie River] turnpike bridge, on the night of the 13th inst., a negro man by the name of ABRAM, a tall likely fellow. His head is rather small than otherwise, in proportion to his body; nose large and flat, with wide nostrils; has downcast looks when spoken to, and a hesitating speech, especially when questioned close. When he left he had on either a blue Jeans coat or a dark roundabout, and either dark or white linen pantaloons. He took with him a bundle of clothes containing shirts and pantaloons; also a black broadcloth coat. I will give the above reward if delivered or secured so I get him safe. If taken out of the State I will give twenty-five dollars, and all necessary expenses paid.

WILLIAM A. ANTHONY
Randolph, July 18

Randolph Recorder: 8 August 1834

$40 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber on the 16th of June last (and was seen shortly after at Fulton on the Mississippi river) a negro man named MIKE, about thirty-five years of age, of low, thick frame, and smiling countenance when addressed. I will give thirty dollars if caught in this State and pay all reasonable charges for the delivery of said boy to me, three miles west of Brownsville, Haywood County, Tenn., or forty dollars if caught out of the State and delivered as aforesaid, or I will give a liberal reward to have him confined so that I can get him.

SAMUEL OWEN

Randolph Recorder: 7 November 1834

RAN AWAY

From the subscriber, living in Yazoo County, State of Mississippi, on the 10th of August 1834, three negro men, of the following description:

SAMSON, aged about 35 years, 6 feet high, has no fingers or thumb on the right hand, except the two middle fingers.

ISAAC, aged twenty-eight years, about 6 feet two inches high, and a little hard of hearing; he pretends to be a shoemaker by trade, and can make a very good shoe.

ARTHUR, is yellow complexioned, aged about 35 or 40 years, he is a little bald headed, has lost some of his fore teeth, and is bow legged.

I think the said negroes are endeavoring to make their way to Tennessee or Arkansas. I will give $50 for the apprehension of said negroes, or $100 for the delivery of them at home.

H.D. WRIGHT
Benton, Miss., Oct. 13, 1834

Randolph Recorder: 12 December 1834

$50 Reward.

Ran away from the subscribers in April last, the negro man AMOS, about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, having rather a bad countenance, complexion rather yellow but dark, aged about 28 years. This negro was purchased from Mr. Austin Woolfolk, of Baltimore, by Mr. George Poindexter, and sold by him to William Farriday. He was taken up soon after he absconded and put in Yallabusha [Yalobusha, MS] jail; he got away and was afterwards taken and lodged in Raleigh jail, Shelby County, Tennessee, from which jail he cleared himself and several others in September last. He is no doubt in some jail not far from Raleigh. A reward of fifty dollars will be paid with all reasonable expenses for bringing him here; and if put in any jail so that we get him the same reward will be paid. Any information respecting the boy addressed to Tobias G. Turner, Benton; or to Shipp, Ferriday & Co., Natchez, will be gladly received.

FERRIDAY & TURNER
Benton, Yazoo County, Miss.
Nov. 20, 1834

N.B. Said negro is a shoemaker and has two brothers belonging to us, named MATTHEW and THOMAS.

Randolph Recorder: 19 December 1834

RAN AWAY

From the subscriber, living in Portersville, on Saturday the 20th of November last, one negro man named LEWIS, aged 23 years; about 5 feet 8 or 10 inches high, rather round shouldered; when he left me he had large whiskers; hair of bacon color and very bushy; had formerly belonged to J. J. Alston of Tipton County; no other marks recollected. I think said negro will try to go up the river on board a boat to some of the free States. I will give $20 for the said negro delivered to me in Portersville, Tipton County, or $15 if taken and confined in jail so that I can get him.

JOHN POLK

Randolph Recorder: 19 December 1834

TRUST SALE

By virtue of a deed of trust executed to the subscribers and bearing date the 18th day of January, 1824, we will, for the purposes therein specified, expose to public sale at the late residence of William B. McClellan, in Tipton County, Tenn., on the 1st day of January next, the following property, viz:

One negro Boy, named HENRY;
A negro Woman named DOLLY;
A negro man named JERRY;
A negro boy named MANDEVILLE;
Also - one GIG.

The terms of the sale will be Cash.

WILSON McCLELLAN
THOS. S. ANTHONY

Trustees

Randolph Recorder: 16 January 1835

$100 REWARD

Ran away from the Plantation of H. R. W. HILL, two miles northwest of Covington, about the 20th October last, a negro man named STEPHEN. He is about 30 years old, 5 feet two or three inches high, remarkably black, speaks very mildly, is obedient when sober but quarrelsome and impudent when intoxicated; he is very fond of spirits. He carried off with him a black wool hat, brown jeans roundabout lined throughout with heavy domestic, brown pantaloons, and generally wore check shirts, though he had others. The above reward will be paid on his safe delivery to me, or forty dollars for his confinement in jail so that I may get him.

WM. McINTOSH
Covington, Tipton County, Tenn.
January 16th, 1835

The Sun, Vincennes, Indiana, and Journal, Shawneetown, Illinois, will give the above three insertions and send their accounts to us for collection.

Randolph Recorder: 16 January 1835

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the Jail of Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 9th January, 1835, a negro man who says his name is NATHAN, and that he was brought to the western country about two years ago by his young master Eli Rigdon of Hartford County, Maryland. Nathan says that he has been running the Mississippi River the most of his time since he has been in the western country, and was employed as a fireman on the steamboat Huron, when she sunk. Nathan is about five feet 10 inches high - and between 28 and 30 years old; will weigh about 180 pounds; rather yellow complected, round full face, the white of his eyes show more than common, very white teeth, has a scar under his right eye which he says was occasioned by a boil; he had on when committed, an old cotton shirt, gray cassinet pantaloons, a blanket roundabout coat and an old wool hat; all of said clothing is nearly worn out. The owner is requested to prove property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL
Jailor of Tipton County, Tennessee

Randolph Recorder: 13 February 1835

$25 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber living three miles north of Porterville, on the morning of the 28th inst., a negro man named JERRY. Jerry is about six feet high, stout built, near 40 years old, sharp visaged, with a hole in one of his cheeks from the tooth ache, and wears a truss. If taken out of the county, the above reward will be paid to any person who will deliver him to me at Randolph, or secure him so that I may get him, or $15 if found within the county.

THOMAS COOKE

Randolph Recorder: 20 March 1835

100 Dollars Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber on the 16th inst., a Negro Man named JACK. Jack is about 5 feet 11 inches high, 22 years old, of a dark copper color, nearly black, has a smooth face, pleasant countenance, no beard, fond of talking and gets drunk; no particular mark recollected except a burn under the right ear in the shape of the letter O. Wore off a white woolen overcoat, and blue cotton pantaloons. He formerly belonged to Mr. Houston of Portersville, this county, and ran off about 6 weeks since and was taken about 25 miles above Randolph on the Arkansas side. I will give $20 if he be taken in the county and delivered to me at my plantation 4 miles below Randolph, or $40 if taken within 50 miles of Randolph, and $100 if taken at a greater distance, and secured in jail so that I can get him. As we have many negro thieves infesting the country, I will give $500 if he be taken in possession of any white man, and the fact of the theft proved against him.

O. SHELBY
Randolph, Tipton Co., Tenn., March 20

Randolph Recorder: 24 April 1835

Twenty Dollars Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber, living in Haywood County, 5 miles south of Wesley, a negro fellow named SHACK. He is a bricklayer and plasterer by trade, 6 feet two or three inches high, dark complexion, with very large lips, speaks quick, loud and bold, frequently impudent, and is very much addicted to whittling and singing. He has a considerable scar on one of his temples. He wore off a decent white hat, no other clothing recollected. His father and mother belong to and live on the plantation of Mr. Orville Shelby, of Tipton, about which place he is probably lurking. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and delivery to me, or for his being secured in Jail so that I can get him.

GEORGE TAYLOR [TAILOR?]
Haywood Co., April 24, 1835

Randolph Recorder: 20 June 1835

$10 REWARD.

Ran away on the 13th inst. from the subscriber, living ten miles east of Randolph on the Somerville road, a negro man named EPHRAIM, about twenty years old, five feet 7 or 8 inches high, weighing about 140 pounds, of dark complexion, thin visage, small wink-looking eyes, quick spoken and very saucy. He lived last year in Randolph, with Mr. Charles Agnick [?] and the year before with Mr. Charles Sullivan. He had on when he left, a cotton shirt and pantaloons, and an old fur cap. I think he will aim to get on board of a steamboat at Randolph to go up the river. I will give the above reward for his apprehension and delivery to myself.

WM. COWNEIL [?]
June 10, 1835

Randolph Recorder: 25 September 1835

$300 REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber on the night of the 22nd Sept., while being conveyed home from Covington jail, where he was lodged as a runaway, having been gone since July.

MOSES, about 23 years old, 5 feet 10 or 12 inches high, nearly black, small eyes, slightly knock-kneed, and inclines forward when walking. He was lately caught by Jacob P. Davis near James Walker's, in Dyer County, to whom he formerly belonged. Moses said he was harbored for nearly two months by the above Walker. I will give $25 for Moses if taken within the county, $50 if out of the county, and 100 dollars if taken 50 miles out of the State, with necessary expenses. If he be taken in possession of any white man, I will give 300 dollars for his conviction of harboring or stealing Moses.

O. SHELBY
Randolph, Ten., Sept. 22, 1835

Randolph Recorder: 25 September 1835

$250 REWARD.

Ran away or stolen from the subscriber on the night of the 16th, Sept., a negro woman named HANNAH. About 40 years old, 5 feet 3 or 4 inches high, thick built, speaks low and but little, black complected, has a sulky appearance, bushy hair, and wore a blue domestic frock but had other clothes. Hannah left me with six other negroes, four of whom have since been taken in Arkansas on their way to a free State, and the other two were drowned. She is most probably in Arkansas making her way up the river.

The negro LOWEL, who has been taken, says that they were under the guidance of Anson Moody, who enticed them away, and who lately received 100 lashes and a brand on the right cheek with the letter R, in Brownsville, this state, for stealing a negro; said Moody is about 30 years old, 6 feet high, of pleasant appearance and address and was lately stabbed in his right arm near the shoulder. I will give 250 dollars for the negro and Moody, or $200 for Moody. All necessary expenses paid.

GEORGE M. PENN
Randolph, Ten., Sept. 22, 1835

Randolph Recorder: 2 October 1835

Jailor's Notice.

Committed to the Jail of Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 28th Sept., 1835, a negro man who says his name is JACOB, and that he belongs to Mrs. Caroline Neill, of Madison Co., Miss. Jacob says that he formerly belonged to Jos. Ralston of Rutherford Co., Tennessee. He is of dark complexion, about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, about 20 years of age, has lost nearly all of his upper and lower jaw teeth, and had on when committed, an old blue cassinet coat and pantaloons. The owner is requested to prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL, Jailor
Covington, Tenn., Oct. 2, 1835

Randolph Recorder: 16 October 1835

Jailor's Notice.

Committed to jail in Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 8th October, 1835, a negro man who said his name was GEORGE, but now says it is THOMPSON; says he belongs to Charles Douglass of Mercer County, Ky. He is about 30 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high, black, and has lost the middle finger of his left hand. The owner is requested to prove property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law in such cases directs.

ROBERT J. MITCHELL, Jailor

Randolph Recorder: 30 October 1835

Jailor's Notice.

Committed to the jail of Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 25th of October, 1835, a negro man who says his name is NED, and that he belongs to the heirs of Robert Edmondson, dec'd, and that he ran away from Fayette County near Summerville [Somerville]. Said negro is of dark complexion, about 23 years old, had on when committed an old cotton roundabout coat and pantaloons. The owner is requested to come and prove his property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL, Jailor

Randolph Recorder: 6 November 1835

$50 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber, living in Shelby County, two negroes, LEWIS and SANDY. Lewis is about 25 years old, about five feet high, pale black, appears very humble when spoken to, speaks low, had on home made clothing. I think said boy is lurking in the neighborhood of Portersville or Randolph, as I purchased him of John Polk, of Portersville; if not, he is aiming up the river. The other boy, Sandy, ran off on the 29th October, resembles the other boy very much in complexion and size, and has had the scald head which makes his hair very thin. I suppose he will aim for Memphis or Randolph and endeavor to get on a boat going up the river. I will give the above reward if taken out of the county and made safe so that I can get them, or twenty for either taken in the county.

MILES W. GOOLSLEY Shelby Co., Tenn.

Randolph Recorder: 23 March 1836

Runaway Negro.

A reward of $25 is offered to any person that may deliver to me, near Somerville, Fayette County, or commit to jail, my negro man PASCHAEL or WRIGHT. He is about 32 years old, stout and likely; no mark of distinction recollected; he carried away with him but few clothes, and those common laboring ones; but it is probable that he will improve his condition in this respect.

He once belonged to L.P. Cheatham, of Nashville, and has done some service on flat and steamboats; and will probably attempt to escape by obtaining employment on board some boat for Nashville or elsewhere. Owners of boats and others are cautioned against employing or in any way harboring this fellow, as the severity of the new law will not in such case prevent its enforcement.

E.M. FORD

Randolph Recorder: 6 May 1836

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the Jail of Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 29th April, 1836, a negro man who says that his name is ANDERSON, and that he belongs to George H. Wyatt of Shelby County, Tennessee. Said negro is of dark complexion, eighteen or twenty years old, five feet 8 or 9 inches high; he had on, when committed, an old cassinett coat, a wool hat, cotton shirt and linsey pantaloons. The owner is requested to come, bring proof, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL
Jailor of Tipton County

Randolph Recorder: 1 July 1836

$100 Reward.

Run away or stolen from the subscriber, living two miles south of Randolph, Tennessee, on the night of the 22nd inst., a Mulatto Girl named HARRIET, 22 years old, a middle size, rather chunky made, good countenance, hair inclined to be strait, but very bushy; a small scar on the inside of her left rist [sic], occasioned by a bile [boil?], had on when she went away, a new white domestic frock, square toed shoes, and white cotton stockings. She took away with her two painted muslin and two white muslin dresses, one plain and the other flowered, one new calico dress, and a pattern of the same not made up; also, 3 blankets, two bed quilts not quilted, and a plain tuskan bonnet, dressed with blue ribbon.

From the circumstances of her going off without the slightest provocation, it is thought she has been persuaded and conveyed off by some white man. I will give the above reward for the apprehension and conviction of the thief and the delivery of said girl, or I will give $50 for the girl alone, if taken out of the state, or $20 if taken in the county, and will pay all reasonable expenses.

MICAJAH PHELPS

Randolph Recorder: 5 August 1836

STOP THE ROGUES AND RUNAWAYS

I will give a liberal reward for the apprehension and confinement of TOM, AGGY, and three children, who made their escape from my premises on the 30th July, at night, and took with them a horse, about fifteen years old, yellow roan color, swab tail and short mane. Tom is a boy about six feet high, dark complexion, and thin visaged; supposed to be about thirty-five years of age. The girl is low, of a yellow complexion, and has long curly hair. The children are all three girls, the largest a very likely yellow girl, the smallest about six months old.

It is expected that there are in company with them one other fellow and woman from the same neighborhood, left on the same night, the fellow supposed to be about forty years of age, black complexion, the girl about sixteen years old, also black complexion, belonging to James D. Moseer. Also one other fellow, the property of A. Hunter, supposed to be about thirty-five or forty years of age - black complexion, heavy built, and quite impudent.

The first family belongs to the estate of ____ Freeman [Note: ____ is used instead of a first name in the notice], N. Carolina, and was hired by J.W. Wright for the past year. It is believed that they are conducted off by some infamous scoundrel. We are fearful that they are making for the Mississippi Swamp.

J.W. WRIGHT
Wellwood, Haywood Co., Ten., August 5, 1836

Randolph Recorder: 5 August 1836

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the Jail of Tipton County, Ten., on the 5th of July, 1836, a Negro Man, of dark complexion, about 26 years old; 5 feet 10 inches high; says his name is HARRY and that he belongs to Thomas Nibbs, of Montgomery County, Ala. He has two large scars, which he says were occasioned by a burn; one of them on his back, between his shoulders, the other below the pit of his stomach.

Said negro had on when committed, a checked domestic shirt, lincy pantaloons. The owners is requested to come forward and prove his property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL, Jailor

Randolph Recorder: 23 September 1836

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the Jail of Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 18th of August, 1836, a negro man who says that his name is HENRY and that he belongs to WILLIAM P. MOORE, who lives on the Arkansas river in Crawford County, near the mouth of Big Mulberry. Henry is about 20 years of age, dark complected, five feet five inches high. He had on when committed, a pair of blue casinet pantaloons, and a yellow striped gingham shirt. The owner is requested to come forward and prove his property, pay charges and take him away, otherwise he will be dealt with as the law directs.

R.J. MITCHELL, Jailor

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

$25 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber on the first Monday in November last, my negro JACK. He is 45 years of age, a little gray, some of his upper front teeth out; is 5 feet 8 or 10 inches high, and is a blacksmith by trade; has a scar on one of his arms produced by a cut from a knife; he was hurt when a child, which makes his toes white. I will give the above reward for him if taken in the county and fifty dollars reward if caught out of the county. I purchased him in Richmond, Virginia, about two months since. He was raised in Ashe county, N.C., and he may be trying to get back. If he is delivered to Delap [?] and Co., Memphis, Tennessee, I will give the above reward. My post office is Tulip, Dallas county, Arkansas.

E.H. WESSON

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

$25 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber in the city of Memphis, a NEGRO MAN named JACK. He is very black, about 6 feet two inches high, weighs about 180 pounds, has a scar over one of his eyes, and speaks in a fine voice; is a very smart boy, and has a long stride when he walks. I will give $25 to anyone who can deliver said negro to me or to J.J. Murphy in this city, or half the amount if delivered to any jail in any slaveholding State in this Union.

JOHN McGRATH

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

JAILOR'S NOTICE

A negro man calling his name AMOS TIMMONS, is now confined in the Memphis City Jail, who claims to be free, as a runaway slave; he is of brown color, will weigh about 180 pounds; about 6 feet high; aged about 35 years; has a scar on the back of his neck running up and down his neck; also a scar on his left thumb, one joint stiffened.

Respectfully, C.A. MALLORY

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

JAILOR'S NOTICE

CHARLES, who says he belongs to James E. [illegible  ends with "k"] near Guide's [?] Landing, Arkansas, is confined in the Memphis City Jail as a runaway slave; he is a black color, aged about 21 years, will weigh about 150 pounds, about 5 feet 10 inches high, has a scar on his forehead, no other marks.

Respectfully, C.A. MALLORY, Jailor

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

CHANCERY SALE
of
Slaves and Other Property

Pursuant to a decree of the Chancery Court at Memphis in the October term, 1858, in the case of Wm. F. Campbell Ex'r and complainant against John McNairy Currin and others, defendants, I will, on the public square in the town of Ripley, Lauderdale county, Tennessee, on Wednesday, 29th December next sell at public sale to the highest bidder, upon a credit of four and eight months, the following likely slaves: BOB, aged about 47 years; SUSAN, aged about 34 years; MONROE, aged about 19 years; SARAH, aged about 17 years old; ANN, aged about 15 years old; ANDERSON, about 34 years old; AMERICA, about 13 years old; CHARLES, about 12 years old; SANDY, about 10 years old; BILL, about 1 years old; ISABELLA, about 5 years old; RACHEL, about 21 years old; BILLY, about 31 years old; and ABSOLEM, about 29 years old. [Description of livestock and payment method is omitted.] Sale to commence at 11 o'clock.

WM. F. CAMPBELL
Ex'r of N.P. CURRIN, dec'd, and Commissioner

Memphis Daily Appeal: 1 January 1859

Cotton Plantation, Negroes, &c., FOR SALE

By virtue of a degree of the Circuit Court of Jefferson county, Arkansas, made and rendered on the Chancery side thereof, on the 19th day of November, A.D., 1858, in a certain cause therein pending, wherein Francis M. Fergas, as Administrator, with the will annexed of Michael P. Morrel, deceased, and others, are complainants, and Nathaniel H. Fish is defendant, the object whereof is to settle the partnership business between said parties, we, as Commissioners of said Court will sell, at the Court House door of said county, on MONDAY, the 14th DAY OF FEBRUARY NEXT, between the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, at public auction, to the highest bidder therefor, the following described Real Estate, Negroes and Personalty, to-wit: [Omitted: surveyor's description of the "Reserve Plantation" in Jefferson County.] Also the following Negro slaves for life now on said Plantation, viz:
SAMPSON, 50 years old;
MARIAH, 36 years old;
WASHINGTON, 17 years old;
GEORGE, 15 years old;
WILLIAM and JOSEPHINE (twins), 13 years old;
JACK, 12 years old;
MIKE, 10 years old;
ADOLPHUS and LAPHESUS (twins), 2 years old;
IRENE, 2 months old;
TOM, 25 years old;
FRANK DAVIS, 50 years old;
JULIA, 30 years old,
CHARLOTTE, 12 years old;
FRANK, 10 years old;
ARTHUR, 2 years old;
QUEEN, 2 months old;
SILLA, 70 years old;
MILLIE, 40 years old;
PERRY, 22 years old;
PETER, 29 years old;
HARRIET, 22 years old;
GEORGE FLANNAKIN, 45 years old;
ANGELINE, 51 years old;
ANDERSON, 24 years old;
LIZZIE, 17 years old;
MOSE, 15 years old;
MINERVA, 11 years old;
EMELINE, 4 years old;
SAM JONES, 48 years old;
RACHEL, 36 years old;
ELIAS, 32 years old;
MARY, 28 years old;
JOHN, 4 years old;
MARY FRANCES, 6 months old;
ED RIDER, 40 years old;
HANNAH BIRD, 33 years old;
SAM, 15 years old;
LOUISA, 11 years old;
ELIZABETH, 5 years old;
ADELINE, 3 years old;
ISAAC, 2 years old;
DICK, 23 years old;
PATSEY, 30 years old;
WESLEY, 23 years old;
RACHEL, 25 years old;
FANNY
, 7 years old;
ELMIRA, 2 years old;
JAMES HENRY, 3 weeks old;
NED, 20 years old;
TONY, 19 years old;
ANDY, 20 years old;
BOB, 19 years old;
WILTON, 30 years old;
ALBERT, 30 years old;
NANCY, 25 years old;
DANIEL, 27 years old;
ANN, 24 years old;
LAURA, 4 years old;
ROXY ANN, 1 year old;
BRITTON, 29 years old;
PHILIP, 40 years old;
WILLIAM, 4 years old;
HARRY, 32 years old;
PATSY, 30 years old;
and WESLEY, 23 years old [possible duplicate?].

Also the following described personal property, now on said Plantation, to-wit: 25 head of horses and mules, 4 yoke of oxen, 25 head of milch cows, 30 head of stock cattle, 50 head of sheep, 50 head of hogs, 2 ox wagons, 1 ox cart, 1 mule cart, 1 set of blacksmith's tools, and farming utensils.

The above Plantation is situated about six miles below Pine Bluff in said county on the south bank of the Arkansas river, entirely above the overflow, in the heart of the finest cotton region in the world, about 650 acres in the best state of cultivation, and being in an excellent neighborhood of good society, with dwelling house, negro cabins, cotton gins, cribs, stables and all necessary outbuildings, render it the most desirable place, in every point of view, ever offered for sale in this State.

MARCUS L. BELL
THOMAS S. JAMES

Commissioners

Pine Bluff, Ark., Nov. 26, 1858

Memphis Daily Appeal: 6 January 1859

Negroes in Demand
FOR HIRE

Monday the 10th day of January, 1859, we hire until the 1st day of January, 1860, the following SERVANTS, to-wit:

DAVID, 50 years old - a carpenter
BILLY, 38 years old - field hand
JOE, 40 years old - field hand
DRUMMOND, 50 years old - field hand
JEMIMA, 33 years old - cook; two children, LEVI, 9 years old, ISABEL, 12 years old
LUCY, 32 years old - seamstress and cook
CHLOE, 40 years old, and her child, 5 months old
MARY, 23 years old - housekeeper and cook
MISSOURI, 11 years old - nurse

Sale at our store, No. 331 Main Street.

M.C. CAYCE & SON
Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers

Memphis Daily Appeal: 8 January 1859

$25 Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber, on the 4th inst. in DeSoto county, Miss., a black negro man named MILEY, aged 24 or 25 years, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches. He had on a new wool hat, new gray blanket coat, gray pantaloons with knee patched; quick spoken, and snaps his eyes when spoken to. I will pay the above for his confinement in any jail so that I get him. Said boy is supposed to be making for Gibson county, Tennessee.

F. PATTON

Memphis Daily Appeal: 11 January 1859

CHANCERY SALE
of Forty-One Valuable Negroes
Together with other property
consisting of Mules, Horses, Cows,
Hogs, Carriages, Furniture, Cotton
Gin, and Farming Utensils of
Every Description.

Pursuant to a decree of the Chancery Court at Memphis, rendered at the November term, 1858, in the case of Lucy W. Stark, administratrix of Henry C. Stark, deceased, and others, vs. Margaret Stark, Louisiana Farabee, and others, creditors of Henry C. Stark, deceased, I will on THURSDAY, the 25th of January, 1859, at the late residence of Henry C. Stark, deceased, in Shelby county, Tennessee, near Fisherville, proceed to sell to the highest bidder:

Forty-One Valuable Negroes,
named as follows, to wit:

RANSOM aged about 35 years
JIM BROWN aged about 15 years
WARREN aged about 7 years
GUSS aged about 4 years
EUGENIE aged about 2 years
LITTLE aged about 40 years
GEORGE aged about 17 years
JIM GRAY aged about 15 years
ALEC aged about 11 years
SAM aged about 31 years
MARION aged about 14 years
BOB aged about 24 years
ROBERT aged about 2 years
POMPEY aged about 40 years
SILAS aged about 26 years
JOHN aged about 1 years
JOHN aged about 42 years
JACOB aged about 24 years
SILLER aged about 30 years
JULIA aged about 18 years
and her child aged about 4 mo.
EADIE aged about 12 years
ALICE aged about 10 years
MARY aged about 33 years
CANDICE aged about 16 years
EASTER aged about 15 years
ISABELLE aged about 10 years
LUCY aged about 3 years
BANER aged about 5 years
MATILDA aged about 2 years
MOLLIE aged about 35 years
ANNY aged about 3 years
LIZZIE aged about 45 years
RACHEL aged about 12 years
MARY ANN aged about 21 years
AILCEY aged about 60 years
HARRIET aged about 20 years
JENNY LIND aged about 5 years
ANNA aged about 3 years
SARAH aged about 45 years
MADALINE aged about 33 years

Among said negroes are blacksmiths, carpenters, house and field hands of every description. [Omitted: description of household goods and farming items.] The sale of the above mentioned property will commence at 10 o'clock A.M. on Tuesday, the 25th of January, 1859, and if not completed on that day will be continued from day to day until completed.

JOHN C. LANIER
Clerk and Master

Memphis Daily Appeal: 11 January 1859

CHANCERY SALE
of Sixteen Valuable Negroes

Pursuant to a decree of Chancery Court, at Memphis, rendered November term 1858, in the case of Newton Ford, Administrator of Thomas Mull, deceased, and others, vs. John S. Clayton and others, creditors of Thomas Mull, deceased, I will on TUESDAY February 1, 1859, in front of my office, in the City of Memphis, proceed to sell to the highest bidder, for cash,

Sixteen Valuable Negroes

belonging to the estate of Thomas Mull, deceased, and named as follows, to wit:

TOM aged about 30 years
ABB aged about 30 years
ADAM aged about 50 years
JOHN aged about 32 years
DANIEL aged about 30 years
TOM aged about 28 years
JERRY aged about 30 years
CAROLINE aged about 30 years
WINNEY aged about 22 years
HARRIET aged about 20 years
LUCY aged about 25 years
TOM aged about 35 years
SCY aged about 35 years

JOHN C. LANIER
Clerk and Master

[Note: There are only 13 names listed in this notice.]

Memphis Daily Appeal: 14 January 1859

CLOSING OUT
NEGROES FOR SALE
AND
HOUSES FOR RENT

The Corporation charging more than I am able to pay for license, having been totally raised to about eight hundred dollars, including auction and negro license, brought forward by one of our city fathers in the same business as myself, so I have been told, but it is immaterial who was the originator of the outrageous tax, I for one, cannot pay it, therefore I wish to change my business, and will sell all the negroes on hand low for cash, viz:

JOHN aged 24 years
BILL aged 20 years
PHILLIP aged 25 years
MARY aged 37 years
CATHERINE aged 19 years
FANNY aged 14 years
HARRIETT aged 14 years
CAROLINE aged 11 years

The above consists of field hands, house servants, &c. I wish also to rent the houses I occupy on Court Square.

A. WALLACE
South Side Court Square

Memphis Daily Appeal: 14 January 1859

$50 Reward.

Will be paid for the apprehension of a dark mulatto slave named JERRY, who escaped from the depot of the Memphis and Charlotte Railroad, on the night of the 7th inst. Hight about 6 feet. Had locked to his right leg a pair of shackles, his left leg being swolen. Wore dark-colored clothes. He is owned in Cleveland, Tenn.

Apply to B. AYRES
Superintendent, M&C Railroad

Memphis Daily Appeal: 15 January 1859

Stop the Runaway

MY NEGRO MAN TOM, aged 24 years, 5 feet 7 inches high, copper colored, ran away from the island three miles above Memphis. I think he is lurking about Memphis, and hope the police will keep a sharp look out for him.

PETER AMMON

Memphis Daily Appeal: 15 January 1859

Sheriff's Sale

By virtue of an execution issued from the Circuit Court of Shelby County, in favor of R.E. Orne, vs. John Coleman, R.T.G. Hart, et. al., issued 19th September 1858, I will expose to public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, in front of the Sheriff's office on Madison street, in the city of Memphis, Tenn., on FRIDAY the 18th day of February, 1859, a negro woman named BETTY, levied on as the property of R.T.G. Hart, to satisfy said execution.

W.L. SMITH
Sheriff, Shelby County

By Thos. B. Mynatt, Deputy Sheriff, S.C.

Memphis Daily Appeal: 21 January 1859

$50 Reward.

Ran away from this subscriber, living near Senatobia, Miss., about the 13th of October last, my negro man named MARSH, aged between 30 and 35 years; slender built; about five feet ten or eleven inches high; dark complexion; small hands and feet, and perhaps a scar about temple.

I will pay the above reward for the apprehension of said negro or his delivery to me, or lodgment in jail so that I can get him.

WM. POAG
Senatobia, DeSoto county, Miss.

Memphis Daily Appeal: 21 January 1859

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the jail of Shelby County, Tennessee, on the 10th of January, 1859, as a runaway slave, a negro man by the name of BOB. Said negro is about 17 or 18 years old; black color; about five feet high, and will weigh about 125 or 130 pounds; no scars or marks recollected, and states that he belongs to Daniel Butts of Fayette County, Tenn., near Fayette Depot.

The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

L.D. WELLS
Jailer of Shelby Co., Tenn.

Memphis Daily Appeal: 21 January 1859

$50 Reward.

Ran away from my negro yard about the middle of December, a negro man named DAVE, about five feet seven or eight inches high, dark copper complexion, and weighs about 160 or 170 pounds. Said negro was placed in my yard for sale by Dr. Robert Temple of Hernando, Miss., and lately belonged to Crawford Jones of Tunica County, Miss.

I will pay the above reward for his delivery to me at my yard in the city of Memphis.

N.B. FORREST

[Note: In the 1850s, Nathan Bedford Forrest's slave yard was located at 87 Adams Street in downtown Memphis.]

Memphis Daily Appeal: 22 January 1859

Jailor's Notice

Committed to the Memphis Jail, December 19th, a Negro Man about 52 or 53 years old, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, weighs about 180 pounds, calling himself HENRY; says he belongs to John Shelton of Clarksville, Tennessee.

C.A. MALLORY, Jailor

Memphis Daily Appeal: 22 January 1859

Notice - Trust Sale

By virtue of a deed of trust, to be executed by R.L. Waller, bearing date the 24th day of February, 1858, and duly recorded in the Register's office of Fayette County, Tennessee, I will, on SATURDAY the 19th day of February 1859, at the residence of said R.L. Waller, below Macon, near Elba, for the purposes therein contained, sell to the highest bidder, for cash, the following negro slaves, to-wit: LUCINDA, ELIZA, JACOB, ISAAC, HUMPRHEY [sic], CINTHIA, JENNIE and NEAL, and increase of the females thereof, since the execution of said deed of trust, if any, or so many of the said negro slaves as may be sufficient to pay off and discharge the debts, with interest thereon mentioned in said deed of trust.

G.W. REED, Trustee

Memphis Weekly Avalanche: 25 October 1859

RUNAWAYS - $750 REWARD.

Ran away from my place, near Sunflower, Mississippi, on Tuesday, October 4th, 1869, three Negro men, PETER, REUBEN and READ.

PETER is about thirty or thirty-five years old, dark copper color, weighs about 200 pounds, six feet and one inch high, slow walk, and slow spoken; had on when he left heavy cotton jeans pants, with a blue stripe down the leg, and black wool hat. He has a wife near Tatesville, Miss.

REUBEN is about twenty-four or twenty-five years old, black, very light beard, about five feet eleven inches high, weighs 160 pounds, rather quick spoken; had on when he left heavy cotton jeans pants, with a blue stripe down the leg, white round-about, black wool hat.

READ is about thirty years old, light copper color, weighs about 155 pounds, about five feet ten inches high, slow and plain spoken; had on when he left heavy cotton jeans pants with blue stripe down the leg, green cloth coat with velvet collar, black satin vest and black hat. Read has been to the free States before, and they all three are, no doubt, trying to get back again.

I will give the above reward, $750, for the three negroes described, or $250 for any one of them, if taken in a free State, or $100 for any one of them, if arrested in a slave State and confined in jail so that I can get him.

N.B. FOREST, Memphis, Tenn.
October 10, 1859

[Note: "N.B. Forest" is Nathan Bedford Forrest, who was a Memphis slave trader until 1859 and owned a 1,900-acre cotton plantation near Sunflower Landing, Coahoma Co., MS, from 1858 to 1866.]

Memphis Weekly Avalanche: 25 October 1859

JAILOR'S NOTICE

Was committed to jail at Troy, Obion county, Tennessee, on the 16th of September last, a bright mulatto who calls himself John Hannibal, says he belongs to Wm. Bradford of Memphis. Said boy is about six feet high, weighs about 180 lbs, has a scar over the left eye and one on his right hand caused by a burn, and appears to be about 21 years old. The owner of said slave is hereby notified to come forward, prove property and pay charges, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

T. PICKEREN
Jailer of Obion county, Tenn.

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 22 February 1860

$25 REWARD

Ran away from my plantation in DeSoto county, Mississippi, on the 12th inst., a negro man by the name of NUDHAM: dark copper color, a little gray about the temples, very high forehead, apparently nearly bald, five feet ten or eleven inches high, quick spoken but at times has a hitch or sort of stammer in his voice, will weigh 175 or 180 pounds, aged about forty-five years, and is the property of Col. Blackman Lee or Newton Grove, Sampson county, North Carolina. Said negro will either attempt to return to North Carolina or to a free State. The above reward will be paid upon the delivery of the negro to me or to his owner, or for confinement in any jail so that we can get him. My post office is Watson's, Marshall county, Mississippi.

JULIUS A. STEVENS

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 14 March 1860

$100 REWARD.

Ran away from my residence 3 miles south of Hernando, Miss., two negro men named respectively GEORGE and WILLIAM, described as follows: George aged about 23 years, black color, will weigh about 160 pounds, had on a cap and black frock coat when he left; no marks recollected. William aged about 18 or 20 years, black color, had on a black frock coat, brown pantaloons and check shirt; will weigh about 150 or 160 lbs, is very strong and chunky. I purchased said boys on the 14th of February, of Nevill and James, and I think they will endeavor to make their way back to St. Louis, Mo., from whence they came a short time ago. They left my home together on Saturday night, the 18th inst. I will give the above reward for their apprehension and confinement in jail so that I can get them, or $50 for either.

WM. K. LOVE
Hernando, Miss.

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 28 March 1860

$25 REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, living in Poinsett county, Arkansas, some time in the month of January last, a negro man, JASPER, aged about thirty-five years; weighs about one hundred sixty pounds. Jasper is thought to be lurking about Memphis or making his way to Texas. I will pay the above reward if delivered to me or secured in any jail in Arkansas or Tennessee.

G.W. COGBILL
Wittsburg, Arkansas

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 18 April 1860

$500 REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, about the 27th February last, a certain mulatto boy about 18 years old named DAN. Said boy is nearly white, sandy hair, weighs 155 pounds - about five feet eight inches in height, has good teeth, good countenance, and would nearly pass for a white person - has black eyes. Any person apprehending said boy and delivering him to the undersigned will receive the above reward.

THOS. P. BALLARD
South Bend, Arkansas county, Ark.

Memphis Weekly Avalanche: 8 May 1860

STOP THE THIEF.

Gillen's Landing, Phillip county, Ark.

Run away from the Plantation of E.N. Saunders & Brother, near the above place on the 3d instant, a negro boy, ALFRED, aged about 23 years, about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, light copper color, had light whiskers when he left, and very intelligent. Said boy was taken up, as pretended, on the 5th instant in this county, near head of Island No. 64, on the Mississippi River, and taken on board the steamboat Victoria by a man by the name of Louis B. Choate, who said he was going to take said negro to jail at Helena, and that is the last that has been heard of them. Said Choate is about 25 years old, about 6 feet high, spare built, rough boned, and what is called a muscular man, light hair and blue eyes, loves whisky, and when drinking is very quarrelsome. It is thought he will take railroad and go up into some part of the State of Tennessee, or go to the lower part of Missouri, as we learn he has lived in both places.

I am authorized to offer one hundred dollars reward for said Choate and the boy delivered to me at this place or lodged in jail so that the owner can get said boy, and the thief be dealt with according to law.

JOHN GILLEN

P.S. I understand the boy called his name JOHN when he left.

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 29 August 1860

$300 REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber living one mile west of Oakland post office, Yalobusha county, Mississippi, three negro men, to wit:

BILL, a very dark copper colored negro; round face; small hands and feet; somewhat knock-kneed; with holes in his ears for rings; rather a side or down look when spoken to; stout built; about five feet eight inches high; and would weigh near one hundred and sixty pounds; walks rather brisk, with a hitch in his gait.

Also, GEORGE, a black negro about twenty-eight years of age; straight; about five feet eleven inches high and would weigh probably one hundred seventy-five pounds; is slow spoken; a slight scar over one of his eyebrows; countenance rather dull, but exhibits sense when spoken to; his walk slow; square face; stout and square built.

Also, ISHAM, a dark copper colored negro; full six feet high; would weight one hundred eighty pounds; about thirty-five years of age; stout built; heavy shouldered; moves and speaks quick, and talks pleasantly and intelligently when spoken to.

These three negroes left my plantation on Yockanapatafa [Yoknapatawpha] River about the first of July last. The first named, Bill, will probably make his way to Des Arc, Arkansas, where he has a wife. The second, George, left with Bill and is probably in his company. The third negro, Isham, may endeavor to make his way to Bowling Green, Kentucky, as he has relatives there.

For the above described negroes, if taken together and delivered to me, or put in some jail so that I can get them, I will pay the sum of three hundred dollars, or two hundred dollars for Bill and fifty each for George and Isham if taken separately.

Any information lodged with Stratton, McDavitt & Co., Memphis, will be suitably rewarded.

ROBT. S. RAYBURN
Oakland, Yalobusha county, Mississippi

(St. Louis Republican and Des Arc (Ark.) Citizen copy two months in weekly.)

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 5 September 1860

$1000 REWARD

For NED. $500 will be given on his committal to any jail so that I can get him, and for any person, white or black, who may have stolen, employed, or harbored said negro, on their conviction $500 more will be paid. Ned ran away from my plantation in Yazoo county, Mississippi, on 1st June 1859 and has been seen about Memphis in the last three or four months. He is black, twenty-four years old; said in Memphis he belonged to a man named Brown or Brooster in Mississippi; about five feet eleven inches high; fine teeth, which he shows when he smiles; high forehead; somewhat round-shouldered and knock-kneed; weighs commonly one hundred and sixty pounds; hair rather long for a negro of his complexion, and usually platted [plaited]; dull look; slow of speech; well disposed; silent, rarely saying anything except in reply, when he is very apt to grin, but seldom or never laughs.

WM. BATTAILE
Yazoo City, Mississippi

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 7 November 1860

$500 REWARD

Ran away from the subscriber, living on the Yazoo River near Sidon, Carroll county, Mississippi, on the night of the 2d of September, the following slaves, viz:

ALBERT, a dark mulatto, about five feet ten inches high, about thirty years old, is a blacksmith by trade, his arms are large and very heavily muscled, he has the scar of a very severe cut on his left thumb where it joins the hand, and I think the scar of a burn on the back of one of his hands, has a rather downcast countenance, slow spoken, and is inclined to put his hand to his head when spoken to, wears a No. 10 russet [shoe].

DUDLEY, a sallow mulatto, about twenty-six years old, five feet six or seven inches high, bushy head, has had a tick in one of his eyes, and it looks a little smaller than the other. It is probable that he has the marks of cupping on his side and blisters on his stomach, wears a No. 8 russet.

FRED, an octaroon, fair complexion, though very much sunburned, straight brown hair, gray eyes, a little crossed, about five feet four or five inches high, twenty two years old. It is probable that he has the marks of cupping and blisters on his breast and side, wears a No. 7 shoe.

I will give one hundred dollars for the apprehension and confinement in jail (so that I can get them) for each of said negroes, if taken out of this State, or fifty dollars if taken in this State. And I will give two hundred for the arrest and evidence to convict any white man that may have been connected with the escape of said slaves.

H. H. SOUTHWORTH
Sidon Post Office, Carroll county, Miss.

Memphis Weekly Appeal: 28 November 1860

$50 REWARD

Ran away on the 2d of October last, two negro men - HENRY and TAYLOR.

Henry is a dark mulatto, with a full bushy head of hair and a large unshaven beard, above the medium height, intelligent, can read and write, and is very pompous in his language and actions, and about thirty years of age.

Taylor is a small, well-set, black negro with one leg a little shorter than the other, small round eyes, and a very small receding chin, so much that he has very nearly no chin.

They took a carpet bag apiece and may have several changes of clothing. The above reward ($50) will be given to any person who will deliver them to me, in Germantown, Tennessee, or to Dr. T.M. Dupree, Harrisburg, Pontotoc county, Mississippi, or lodge them in jail so that I can get them.

J. M. M. CORNELIUS