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Trousdale Place is a handsome old two-story brick house serenely shaded by large trees and has been proudly placed on the National Register of Historic Places as well as the Tennessee Civil War Trail.

It is located two city blocks west of the Gallatin, Tennessee Public Square. This historic home was built circa 1813 by John H. Bowen, a local attorney and member of Congress. Bowen died in 1822, and the house was later acquired by Governor William Trousdale. The city of Gallatin was developed on part of the original North Carolina land grant #1 awarded to Captain James Trousdale, Governor Trousdale’s father, for his service in the Revolutionary War. In 1812, lots were sold for the construction of the jail, courthouse and other Gallatin city buildings.

In 1899, Annie Berry Trousdale, daughter-in-law of William Trousdale, deeded the home to the Clark Chapter #13 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy to honor all veterans and in particular, veterans of the Confederacy. Then the mansion became known as The Trousdale Place.

Sumner County supplied the Confederate States Army with approximately 3,000 soldiers. To memorialize the Trousdale’s military history and the service of  these Confederate soldiers, a monument was erected on the front lawn of Trousdale Place on September 19, 1903.

In 1979, the Sumner County Museum Association was granted permission by Clark Chapter #13 UDC to build a museum on the property. Today, Trousdale Place is open for tours by appointment and private rentals and is part of the Sumner County Tour program. The home and grounds make a rich atmosphere for photographs and  planned events.