Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

Goodspeed’s History of Hawkins County, Tennessee

Citizen Biographical Information


This data was transcribed by: Betty Mize from "Goodspeed's History of Tennessee", 1886.


 

Capt. William L. Armstrong, merchant and farmer, was born at his home in Stony Point, July 3, 1837, the son of William and Mary (Young) Armstrong, both of Irish origin, and natives of Hawkins County. The father was born in 1791, and died in August, 1860; the mother was born in 1792, and died in 1868, and both spent their lives in their native county. The father was a farmer, and an old line Whig, and he and his wife were Presbyterians. The grandfather, William, a native of Augusta, Va., built where our subject now lives, the first brick residence in the county, and here the great-grandfather also lived and died, who came from Virginia, and was among the first settlers of Hawkins County. Our subject, the youngest of seven children - three living - finished his education at the Piedmont (VA) Institute and the Roanoke (VA) College. When twenty-two years of age he married Sallie C. Buren, who was born in 1843. To this union five sons and seven daughters were born; one of the latter being deceased. One son, William, is the fifth male of that name in this family line. He came into possession of the old homestead, on which he settled in 1860, and, until he added the mercantile trade to his pursuits a few years since, he devoted his attention to farming. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-first Tennessee Infantry, as a private, and soon became captain. From 1862 he was on staff duty under Gens. Jackson and Vaughn, until he returned home in the spring of 1865. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and his wife are Presbyterians.

 

Henry C. Armstrong, sheriff, was born twelve miles northeast of Rogersville, at Stony Point, August 21, 1853, being the son of Alfred and Elizabeth Armstrong, natives of Hawkins County, Tenn., the former born December 29, 1823, and deceased at Winchester, Va. July 29, 1864. The latter was born December 31, 1830, and is now living in this county. The father was a successful farmer, and in 1863 joined the confederate service. Our subject, the second of seven children, completed his education at King’s College, Bristol, Tenn. He farmed on the old home place up to 1882, and then the 600-acre homestead was divided into seven shares, and all his share, but a small portion, including his home, he sold in 1882. In April, 1887, he came to Rogersvile to attend to the duties of the office to which he had been elected in August before, on the Republican ticket. On April 30, 1878, he married Florence Hickey, of Hawkins County, Tenn. Our subject is a Presbyterian, and a Prohibitionist. 

William M. Arnott was born near Persia, Hawkins Co., Tenn., December 12, 1827, and is the son of Jacob and Amy (Grigsby) Arnott. The ancestors of the Arnott family were from England, and settled in Virginia. The father was born in Hawkins County, Tenn., about 1800, and died in the same county in 1852. He learned the carpenter’s trade when young. In his latter years be bought a farm. He also worked at the blacksmith’s trade, and while at work in the shop, over the fire, got too hot, took sick, and died. He was very poor when young, but before his death had accumulated a good property. He held the office of magistrate at the time of his death. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and was a Democrat. He was the son of William, a native of Virginia, and was among the early settlers of the county. He was also a farmer. Amy Grigsby was born in Hawkins County, Tenn., about 1810, and died in that county May 28, 1867. She was also a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. She had a good education. Father’s education was good. She was the daughter of William Grigsby, whose ancestors came from Virginia. Farmer also. By the union of Jacob Arnott and Amy Grigsby there were ten children, eight sons and two daughters, nine of them now living. Our subject is the second son. One of the sons, Wickliff, was killed at the Battle of Bull’s Gap. Our subject lived on his father’s farm, and went to school until twenty-one years of age, when be began on his own resources. He taught school for two years, became dissatisfied, quit, and bought land in the Fourteenth District of Hawkins County, his first purchase being 77 ½ acres. Since that time he has added the balance of 1,000 acres. His start was $45. He has made what he has by hard work and good management. He is a very active and enterprising man, and at all times supports the causes of education and religion. He has no profession outside of morality; is a Democrat. In 1883 he purchased land and moved to his present place of residence; has 400 acres in this body of land. November 13, 1856, he married Charlotte Phillips, a daughter of William and Jemima (Pullen) Phillips. She has a liberal education. This union has resulted in ten children, six living: Nancy C., Newton F., Laura J., Louis M. Lida J., and Robert L. Those deceased are Cornelia, William M. and infants. Cornelia was thrown from a horse and killed, while on the way to the burial of her grandmother, May 28, 1867, aged seven years. William M., died in his tenth year, June 19, 1876. His wife was born Christmas day, 1837, in Hawkins County, Tenn. 

Ellis Cocke, lawyer, was born in Grainger County, September 1, 1850, the son of William M. and Sarah Cocke, both of Scotch, Irish stock, and natives of Grainger County. The former born July 6, 1815, and the latter March 5, 1818, and died in Asheville, N.C., November 30, 1866. They lived in Grainger County until 1859, then moved to Knox County, near McMillan Station, when they lived until February, 1864. Their next residence was where the mother died, and in 1872 the father married Amanda Grigsby, and settled at Winchester, Ky. The father is a lawyer, and has represented the Second Congressional District several Terms. The speech he made in Congress on the Mexican war was published in the Southern Orator. Our subject, one of a large family, graduated from Davidson College, N. C. in 1873, and at once began the study of law under Col. Frank M. Fulkerson, of Rogersville, and was admitted in 1874. In 1875, he was elected county superintendent of public schools, and while in the office he gave his spare time to the law, and today few lawyers in upper East Tennessee are better known in the criminal and Federal courts. He has distinguished himself in several cases in the last few years, and given much attention to practice in the Federal courts at Knoxville, Chattanooga and Asheville, N.C. His family has always been illustrious in East Tennessee as lawyers and politicians. He has been an active and prominent Democrat.

 

Hon. William M. Francisco, farmer, and the present representative of Hawkins County was born there August 2, 1842, the son of Jackson W. and Elizabeth (Crews) Francisco, natives of Hawkins County, and of English origin, with parents from Virginia. The father was born about 1820, the mother about 1821, and both are still living in Hawkins, the only county they ever called their home; both are Methodists, and accustomed to farm life. Our subject, one of a large family, finished his education in Prospect Academy, Virginia, and Boston Academy, Kentucky. Farming has been his chief calling in life, but in the spring of 1881 he was licensed to practice law, in which active practice he has never yet entered. Since 1858 he has been at his present home. In November 1886, the Republican party elected him to his present honorable position, over Mr. R. F. Powell, and has served one session of seventy-five days, on several important committees, and voted for the constitutional amendment against intoxicating liquors. In May, 1867, Kizzie, a daughter of George W. and Sallie Wells, became his wife. She was born May 21, 1850. They have two sons and two daughters. Our subject is a Republican, while in religion he is a Methodist and his wife a Presbyterian. 

Samuel H. Gault, M.D., was born in Blount County, Tenn., February 24, 1843, son of John G. and Mary (Logan) Gault. John G. was born in Blount County, about 1798, and died in Blount County in 1869. The mother was of Dutch extraction; her ancestors came from Pennsylvania; she was born in Blount County about 1804, and died in Blount County, at Maryville, in 1874. They were married in their native county, and never lived anywhere else except in Blount County. The father was engaged in agricultural pursuits during life, and made life a fair success; was a Democrat, and a prominent member of the Presbyterian Church, and for a number of years served the church as a ruling elder; the mother was a member of the same church. Our subject is the youngest of a large family of children. He received a liberal education in his youth, which was commenced at the country schools and completed at Maryville, Porter Academy. In February, 1862, he left school to join the United States Army, and enlisted in the Third Tennessee Regiment Infantry; was received into the army of the Ohio, served the remainder of the war, and the last year he served as aid-de-camp on the staff of Gen. J. A. Cooper. He returned home in the spring of 1865, and early in 1866 he commenced to engage in the mercantile business at Maryville, in partnership with W. A. Walker; firm name Walker & Gault. He continued about three years, then sold out to his partner, and for the next two years read medicine under Dr. John Blankenship, of Maryville. In the winters of 1872-73 and 1873-74, he attended the lectures at the University of Nashville, Tenn., where he duly received his diplomas as M.D. In the spring of 1874, after graduating, he returned to Maryville and commenced the practice of his profession. He remained until the fall of 1876, he then went to Louisville, Blount Co., Tenn., on the Tennessee River, and remained there until April, 1884, at which time he came to Rogersville. On March 15, 1866, he married Miss Sarah E. Henry, of Blount County. This lady died September 1, 1877. On May 19, 1886, he took for his second wife Miss Mary E. White of Rogersville. He had three children by his first marriage, one son and two daughters. Our subject is a Republican and a worthy member of the Presbyterian Church. His first wife was a member of the same church. His present wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church North.

 

William P. Gillenwaters, a prominent lawyer of the Rogersville bar, was born in Effingham County, Ill. In July, 1842, and is the son of John and Elizabeth (Surgoin) Gillenwaters. The father’s descendants are not known, but were either German or English. The mother was of French descent. Both were native of Hawkins County, Tenn. Dates of birth not known. The father died in Illinois in the latter part of 1843, at about fifty years of age, and the mother died four months after the death of the father, at about forty-four years of age. They were married in Hawkins County, where they lived some ten years, and then went to Illinois where they died as above stated. The father was an old line Whig, and both father and mother were worthy members of the Methodist Church. Our subject is the ninth of eleven children, and before he was two years old his parents died, when he was brought to Hawkins County, and raised by a grandmother, Sugoin. At the age of fifteen he found himself forced to make his way in life by his unaided efforts. He began for himself by working one year in a saddler’s shop, at Surgoinville, Hawkins County. He had resolved on securing an education, and after working one year is the saddler’s shop, he went to the farm, where he could have more time for study. After working one year on the farm, at $5 a month, he went to Strawberry Plains, and with his small earnings and by working on Saturdays and vacation, he was enabled to attend school ten months, after which he was qualified to teach. He then alternately taught and went to school in the States of Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee, until he had mastered all the sciences and some of the languages. He read law while he was teaching, and after his return from the West, he gave one year to the study of law, and was admitted to the bar at Rogersville in 1865, and since that date his name has been on the roll of Tennessee attorneys. He is better known as a criminal lawyer, and the reputation he had made in this particular course is, perhaps, unequaled by that of any other lawyer in this section of the State. He is an ardent Republican, and has been prominent in that political party for the last then years. In 1880, he was on the Garfield and Arthur electoral ticket, and twice, when Dr. Wight and Hawkins were nominated, our subject lacked only a few votes of getting the nomination. On May 6, 1865, he married Miss Amanda E. Sexton, a cultivated lady, and born in Clay County, Ill., in 1843. There have been born to them five children, three sons and two daughters. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church (North).

 

John M. Gray, cashier of the Citizens’ Bank, was born in Greene County, August 14, 1849, the son of Robert and Nancy (Mays) Gray, the former of Scotch-Irish stock, and born in Greene County, in October, 1814, and the latter of German origin, and born about 1825, in the same county. They were married about 1847, and a year later came to this county, locating ten miles southeast of Rogersville, where they resided up to 1873. They then moved to Jefferson County, where the father, a cabinet-maker, devotes himself chiefly to farming. He is a Republican, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. The mother, who died April 5, 1885, was also a member of that church. Our subject is the only child, and finished his education at Tusculum College, after which he was a pedagogue for a time in Greene and Hawkins Counties. In November, 1873, he became clerk and master of the chancery court, and as he was at this time but twenty-four years old, he was the youngest clerk in the district, and continued to hold the office for twelve years. He had been studying law, and was licenses in February, 1886, but has never actively practiced. At the organization of the bank in March, 1887, he was made its cashier. The capital of the bank is $35,000. He married, March 10, 1875 Fannie S., a daughter of Richard and Louisiana Mitchell, and granddaughter of Joseph Rogers, in whose honor Rogersville received its name. They have two sons and two daughters. Our subject is a Republican, and is a member of the Baptist Church, while his wife is a Presbyterian. 

 

Lewis W. Guthrie, farmer, was born in Greene County, Tenn., February 11, 1834, the son of Andrew and Ibbie (Rader) Guthrie. The father, born in Green County in 1801, died there on August 3, 1867, a farmer and a Democrat. Andrew’s father left him, as a child with relatives, and went to Mississippi, and he was made to do for himself at a very early age. The mother, born in Greene County in 1813, died there in February, 1884, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject, the second of ten children (seven now living), worked for his father until twenty-two years of age, and began on his own resources. He moved to Hawkins County, and rented land until 1865, when he bought 80 acres of his present 560 acre farm. He is a Republican, an Odd Fellow and a Methodist. November 3, 1859, he married Rhoda N. Moore, who was born in Hawkins County, Tenn., in February, 1838, a daughter of Robert Moore. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Winnie N., Floyd, George R., Samuel, Mary C., Nora M., and Pearl are their living children, and those deceased are Sylvesta, Ida, Walter and John C.  

 

Phillip S. Hale, a prominent citizen and well-to-do farmer of Hawkins County, was born in that county December 10, 1830, son of Phillip S. and Elizabeth (Bachman) Hale. They were of Scotch-Irish and German descent, and natives of East Tennessee, the father of Greene County, and the mother of Sullivan County. They were married in the latter county, and lived at Kingsport, same county, after their marriage several years, then moved to Hawkins County, where the father died in 1867, at the good old age of seventy-four. The father was a farmer, and in his early days he was engaged in the mercantile business; was a Democrat, and a worthy member of the Presbyterian Church, to which the mother also belongs. Our subject is one of twelve children. He was born in Hawkins County, where he secured a good academical education, and, with the exception of one year, part of which (1865-66) he spent at Bristol, lived in that county all his life, engaged in farming. After living at different places in the county, about 1874 or 1875, he purchased and settled on the place where he now lives. He is an industrious citizen, his early lesson in life having been hard, and now owns upward of 210 acres in the fifth District, on the Holston River. July 23, 1857, he married Miss Margaret Smith, of Hawkins County, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Smith. Eight children - four sons and four daughters (one son deceased)- were born to this union; the deceased, Samuel Smith was born November 15, 1860, and died August 21, 1881. Our subject is a decided Democrat. He is not a member of any church, but is in sympathy with the Methodist faith. Mrs. Hale is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

 

Jacob Hamilton (deceased), a planter, was born near Blountville, Tenn., February 2, 1828, the son of John B. and Elizabeth (Hicks) Hamilton, the former born in 1796, where the wife of our subject now lives, and deceased in Blountville in 1863. The Hamilton ancestors were from Ireland. John B. was a successful farmer and trader, and acquired considerable property. He was sheriff several years and in politics a Democrat, while his religious faith was Presbyterian. The mother, born also near Blountville about 1780, died in Sullivan County, about sixty five years of age, a member of the Baptist Church. Our subject, the third of nine children (but three living), left home at twenty-two and came to the farm where he lived so long and which he rented until 1864 and soon bought. He was then a merchant at Bristol, Tenn., until 1866, then for two years a hotel keeper in Blountville, when he returned to the farm. This consists of 1,200 acres on the Holston river and Bays Mountain. He was very successful, but his generous nature led him to suffer as a surety, a great deal. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Col. Samuel Powell’s Confederate Infantry, and was at Shiloh, Chickamauga and other actions, serving until March, 1864, when he returned home on account of ill health. Our subject entered the war as a lieutenant, but afterward became captain. He represented Hawkins County in the Lower House of the Legislature in 1856-57. He was the first Master of the lodge at Fall Branch and at Church Hill in the Masonic lodges. He was moderator at the Holston Baptist association several years in succession. He was in many respects a remarkable man, and in every respect one of the most worthy and generally esteemed Christian gentlemen of his day. Ida D., his daughter, died, when but twelve years of age, in 1865. Olivia M., their eldest daughter, married A. C. Smith. He was a member of the Baptist Church from his eighteenth year, and was long a Mason. In politics he was a Democrat. He was educated at Blountville. March 12, 1850, he married Margaret E. Maxwell, who was born in Mecklenburg County, N.C., September 28, 1825, the daughter of J. J. and Margaret (Wallace) Maxwell who where of Scotch-Irish origin. She is an educated lady, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and the postoffice of Margaret, established in 1882, and of which she became postmistress, was named in her honor. She has also proved herself an able farm superintendent since her husband’s death. 

Rufus Hunter, a prominent citizen of Hawkins County, is a native of East Tennessee, and born in Greene County, July 22, 1837, son of John and Lettie (Self) Hunter. They were of Irish and English descent, and natives of Greene County, Tenn.; the father born in 1794 and died in Greene County, in January, 1857; the mother was about ten years younger than the father, and died in Greene County about August, 1882. They were married in Greene County, where they lived ever afterward. The father was engaged in agricultural pursuits during life, and made life a good success. He was a Whig. Our subject is one of nine children. He secured a good academical education in his youth in Greene County, and began life as a farmer, has been farming ever since, and has made the raising of live stock rather a specialty; was engaged in the farming interest in Greene County up to 1877, at which time he came to Hawkins County, and settled where he now lives, having purchased the farm (1874) three years previous. In 1866 he went to Alabama, and for two years he was engaged in raising cotton in Morgan County. He trades in stock in the Carolina States. Subject has been successful in life, and now owns over 700 acres in Hawkins and Greene Counties - 550 in Hawkins, and 170 in Greene. In April, 1872, he married Miss Martha J. Spears, of Hawkins County, who was born in October, 1842. To this union seven children were born, two sons and five daughters, one son being deceased. Our subject is a Democrat. He is not a member of any church, but is a firm believer in the Christian religion, and in sympathy with the Methodist Church. His wife is a member of the same church. Our subject’s father served in the War of 1812. 

Robert M. Kyle, farmer and miller, was born near his present location forty-eight years ago on March 23, 1839, son of William C. and Alice (Massengill) Kyle. Both were of Irish descent. The former was born in Hawkins County, June 6, 1813, and is now living at Whitesburg, Hamblen Co., the mother born in Grainger County, in Dec., 1815, and died at Whitesburg, in October, 1886. They were married in Grainger County, and immediately settled at Rogersville, Hawkins County, where they resided some fourteen years, then moved onto a farm two miles west of Rogersville and lived until the year 1867, at which time they went to Whitesburg, Hamblen County. Before the war the father was engaged in the mercantile business and the slave trade, and since the war in farming. He is a Democrat, and not a member of any church. The mother is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Subject is the eldest of five children. He secured a good academic education at Rogersville, in his youth. Before the war he was engaged in agricultural pursuits; during the war and one year after the war, in merchandising. At Knoxville during the war, and at Whitesburg after the war, he was engaged in the mercantile interest. In 1867 he settled on a farm near Rogersville, where he was engaged in farming two years and in 1869 he purchased and settled on a farm in Jefferson County, and after five years farming in Jefferson County he sold out and came to Hawkins County and purchased and settled where he now lives. He gave his attention exclusively to farming and the live stock trade up to the fall of 1886, at which time he built the Walnut Hill Rolling Process Flouring Mills. Since then he has been engaged in farming and the milling interest. Our subject has been a successful man, he now owns one mill and over 1,700 acres of land in Hawkins County, 1,000 of which is on the Stony Mountain. Subject’s farm was owned by his father, William C. Kyle, by his grandfather, Absalom Kyle and by the great-grandfather, Robert Kyle, who came from North Carolina, and located, entering or buying the farm at the early settling of Hawkins County. On December 18, 1866, our subject married Miss Annie McNutt, of Knoxville, an excellent lady, and born in 1847 or 1848. They have seven children living, four sons and three daughter. Subject is a Democrat, but takes part in politics. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 

Thomas Lee, farmer, was born near St. Clair, Tenn. April 20, 1824, the son of James and Hannah (Hale) Lee, the former born in Hawkins County about 1786, and deceased in 1866. The ancestors of the Lees came from England, and James, a farmer, was in various battle of the war of 1812 The latter was well educated and held Democratic principles. The grandfather, Thomas, a farmer, also a native of Virginia, died in Hawkins County, in which he was among the earliest pioneers. The mother was born and died at dates corresponding nearly to those of her husband, and in the same county. Our subject, the tenth of fourteen children, was twenty years old when he left the old homestead and began as a farmer on rented land for himself. In 1861, he enlisted in Company B. Thirty-first Tennessee Confederate Infantry as third lieutenant, and remained in service until the close of the war, engaging in the actions at Oak Hill (Miss.) and Big Black River, where he was captured May 17, 1863, and taken to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind., then Fort Delaware, and after six months at these places, to Point Lookout, Md. In September 1864, he rejoined his company then in Virginia. He lost all he had during the war, but now owns 340 acres of land in this county, and has it greatly improved. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is a Democrat who favors prohibition. Lucy, a daughter of Jesse Spears, became his wife in 1843. She was born in Hawkins County, March 23, 1823, and is a Methodist. Their children are Eliza J., John B., Sallie, Thomas D., Edna V., and Samuel; those decease are Jesse J., who was also captured at Big Black River, and died in the war prison at Point Lookout; Joseph N., deceased in this county. Malenota, who died near Springfield, Mo, which State became their home for a while in 1850, and Christopher who died in Salem, Mo., in 1851, while they were en route back to Tennessee. 

WILLIAM W. LEGG, a prominent citizen, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Knox County, December 5, 1841, a son of J. W. and Martha J. (Meek) Legg. They were of English -Irish, and Scotch-Irish descent. Both were natives of East Tennessee, the father of Knox County, and the mother of Jefferson County. The father was born about 1814, and died in 1870, and the mother was born about 1828, and died in Knox county in the fall of 1862. They were married in Jefferson County, and settled after their marriage in Knox County. In 1865 the father went to South Carolina, and remained four years, then went to Georgia. The father was a merchant and a farmer, and for some twelve years he was county surveyor of Knox County. Our subject is one of eight children, he received a common school education in his youth, and at the age of eighteen (in June, 1862) he entered the Confederate States service, enlisting in company D (Cavalry), Second Tennessee Regiment, served the remainder of the war with credit, and was received into Hume's Brigade. Our subject took part in the battles of Fishing Creek, Richmond (Ky.), Murfreesboro, Chickamauga Creek and Missionary Ridge. He surrendered in North Carolina, and after the war he went to Chester, S.C. and remained in that State until 1878, trading in live stock. In 1878, he came to Hawkins County, and settled where he now lives. Since then he has been engaged in farming, trading and raising live stock, in which he has been very successful. June 21, 1882, he married Miss Laura A. Lane, born in Hamblen county November 9, 1859. Three children have been born to this union - two sons and one daughter, one daughter deceased. Our subject is a Democrat. He is not a member of any church, but his wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

William F. Lyons, a prominent citizen of Hawkins County, was born eleven miles east of Rogersville, May 22, 1818, a son of William and Matilda G. (Maxwell) Lyons. Both were of Irish descent. The father was born in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia, March 11, 1776, and died in Hawkins County, at Lyon’s store, July 3, 1886, at the advanced age of ninety years. The mother was born in Hawkins County, January 19, 1787, and died at Lyon’s store August 21, 1867, aged eighty years. They were married in Hawkins County about 1806 or 1807, and spend the remainder of their days in Hawkins County. the father was engaged in the mercantile business in connection with farming, and made a success of life; he sold goods nearly sixty years and near Lyon’s store. He was a Democrat, and he and wife were worthy members of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject is the fifth of nine children. He secured a good academical education in Hawkins County, began life as a farmer, and farming has been his occupation ever since. About 1840, he settled on a farm in the Eighth District, where he resided some ten years. In 1850, he purchased and settled where he now lives, having at the same time sold his other place. He has been successful in the farming interest, now owning upward of 800 acres of land in Hawkins County. Our subject is a stanch Democrat. He is not a member of any church, but is of the Presbyterian faith. He has been married twice; first on November 3, 1842, to Miss Julia A. Hale, born in Sullivan County, but raised in Hawkins County. She was born March 24, 1823. She died at Knoxville while under treatment of a physician. She was a worthy member of the Presbyterian Church. One son was the result of the first marriage, James C., born December 13, 1843 and died May 29, 1884. Our subject is a very stanch Democrat, and desires the world to know it. He is a great admirer of Jefferson Davis. 

Capt. Clinton G. Lyons, a prominent citizen and stock raiser, was born where he now lives, February 10, 1829, son of William and Matilda G. (Maxwell) Lyons. The father was of Irish descent, and the mother of Scotch-Irish descent. The former was born in Pennsylvania, nine mile from Philadelphia in Haverford Township. The mother’s father, George Maxwell, was among the first settlers of Hawkins County. Our subject’s father was among the first settlers of the same county, having settled here as early as the year 1800. Our subject is the youngest of nine children. He secured a good education which was commenced at the county schools, and finished at the University of Knoxville, He remained with his father until his death, and assisted him in his mercantile and farming interests. At the death of his father (1866), he came in possession of the old homestead, and since that time he has given his attention exclusively to the farming interests, making the raising of live stock a great specialty. In May, 1862, he entered the Confederate States service, enlisting in Company A, Twelfth Tennessee Battalion of Calvary as first Lieutenant, and in a short while he was elected captain of the company, and served his country in this capacity the remainder of the war. His company was gallant, and was finally received into Gen.,. Pegram’s division, and operated both in the western and eastern armies; took part in the battles of Perryville, Ky., Murfreesboro, Chickamuga, and then led the advance of Gen. Longstreet to Knoxville. At Loudon, one night, he was selected by Gen. Morrison to drive into the enemy’s pickets and ascertain the position of the enemy. This he did very successfully, and to the satisfaction of the commanding general. He received a wound at Chicamuga, but never quit the field. After leaving East Tennessee he went to Virginia, and took part in the battles of Cedar Hill and Port Republic, and at Port Republic he received a sever wound, and was never able to enter the service again, and is still suffering from its effects. On October 7, 1857, he married Livie M. Cocke, daughter of Col. William M. Cocke, of Grainger County, who represented before the war that district in Congress. To the subject of this sketch belong six children - four sons and two daughters - one son, James S., died in February, 1880. Our subject is a stanch Democrat, and he and wife and four children are members of the Presbyterian Church. Five children are living, and all reside with him, and one son, William C., is a practicing physician. William C. commenced the study of medicine in 1884, and read two years under Dr. James Hoffman of Stony Point, and in the winter of 1886-7 he attended lectures at the Louisville Medical College, receiving an honorary diploma. He is a young physician of much promise, and will go soon the Bellevue College, New York City. He returned from college in January, 1887, and since that time he has been engaged in the practice of medicine.

 

Luther B. Lyons, a prominent citizen and well-to-do farmer of the Eighth district, was born in Hawkins County, January 7, 1854, son of David and Julia (Armstrong) Lyons. They were of Irish and Scotch-Irish descent. Both were natives of Hawkins County. the father was born September 27, 1809 and died in Hawkins County, September 27, 1864, just fifty-five years of age to a day. The mother was born in 1811, and is still living in Hawkins County. they were married in Hawkins county, and never lived anywhere else. The father was a merchant and farmer. He was an old line Whig, and a Presbyterian in faith, though he never connected himself with the church. The mother is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Luther B., the youngest of five children, received a good education , commenced in a country school and finished in King’s College, Bristol. He took a select course and received a certificate for the same. Upon leaving college, he commenced farming and this has been his calling ever since. At the age of twenty-one he came in possession of the homestead. He has been successful, and now owns 325 acres of land. On December 21, 1879, he married Miss Kate Phipps of Hawkins County, a cultivated lady, born in 1859. Three children, two sons and one daughter have been born. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and his wife are worthy member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Richard P. Mitchell, M.D., of Rogersville, was born, at Rogersville, April 30, 1827, the son of Stokely D. and Alice (Rogers) Mitchell. They were of Scotch-Irish and Irish descent. Both were born at Rogersville; the father on March 25, 1795, and the mother on November 4, 1800. Both died at Rogersville, the father on June 19, 1866, and the mother in 1873. They were married at Rogersville, December 11, 1823. The father received a collegiate education, and graduated from the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, in 1815. He was a man of considerable prominence, and was cashier of the old State Bank at Rogersville from 1818 to 1830. He was clerk of the House of Representatives four terms - 1835, 1836, 1841 and 1843. He published the Calvanistic Magazine during 1828-29-30 and in 1830 published also the Railroad Advocate. The mother was the daughter of Joseph Rogers, who was the founder of Rogersville, Our subject is the third of nine children. He received a liberal education in his youth at McMinn Academy, at Rogersville, and went in 1853 to the Jefferson Medical College, in Philadelphia, where he graduated as an M.D. in 1854. After his graduation he went to Florida, and when he had practiced over one year near Gainesville, he returned to Rogersville and with the exception of the two years he spent in the war, he has been a practicing physician here ever since. In the fall of 1863, he joined the United States Army, and was made surgeon of the first Tennessee Regiment of Light Artillery. He was stationed at Nashville, where he remained the remainder of the war. He was on the medical examining board of the State and county. July 7, 1861,he married Miss Mary J. Shields, daughter of Dr. Samuel and Eliza Shields of Grainger County. She was born July 4, 1835. They have four children, three sons and one daughter. Our subject is a Republican. His father was old line Whig, and a great admirer of Henry Clay. Subject, father, mother and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

 

John R Moore, farmer, was [born] on his present farm in the Fourteenth district, Hawkins County, August 18, 1843, the son of James (Sr.) and Ann (Beckman) Moore, the former born in Botetourt County, Va., in 1800, and deceased in this county, December 9, 1871. James was brought to Tennessee, when but a year old, by his father, who afterward died there. James became a wealthy farmer, and in politics was a Whig and a Republican, successively. The date of birth, birth-place, and residence of the mother, are nearly the same as those of her husband, but she died July 27, 1883, a member of the German Baptist Church. Our subject, the youngest and only living child of eight born to them, was educated in Washington and Hawkins Counties. He lived with his father, until he married, and then took care of his parents in their old age, from whom he received part of his land, which he has so improved and increased since. From 1881 to 1886 he was selling agricultural implements at Rogersville Junction. He is a Republican and a member of the German Baptist Church. In June, 1864, he enlisted in the Third Tennessee Mounted Infantry, for 100 days, and was on guard duty as corporal along the line of the East Tennessee, Virginia & George Railway. November 23, 1871, he married Emily, a daughter of Alexander and Eliza (Davis) McCullough, the former of whom died at the action at Bull’s Gap, and the latter is still living. She was born in Hawkins County, August 22, 1849, and is well educated. Their children are Maggie A., Minnie B., Dorsey J., and Mary E.  

Thomas J. Parrott, trustee of Hawkins County, was born there January 23, 1857, and finished his education at the high schools of Macedonia and Sabina (Ohio). He began on the farm of John Simpson, at the age of twelve years, and labored two years; then went to Joseph A. Bassett’s, in the same neighborhood, and worked five years, regularly, except four months, during which time he was in school. In the meantime while he worked for J. A. Bassett, he recited lessons every night to Miss Addie Johnson, who was governess in the house of Mr. Bassett. Miss Johnson gave him his first lessons in grammar and arithmetic, and we would study his lessons during the day and recite at night. He learned to repeat all of the multiplication tables, while hauling rails with an ox team, in the winter of 1871. He began on the farms of John Simpson and Joseph A. Bassett, and when nineteen, worked on the farms of W. McKibben and Andrew M. Hunter, in Ohio. He taught school one year in Ohio, and in 1881 returned to East Tennessee, and then engaged in teaching in Greene County, a short time. He was then a salesman for Jones & Gray, at Choptack, for about twenty months, and then bought out the store, but two years later quit that business,. In August 1886, he was elected to his present position, as a Republican, over L. H. Charles, the Democratic nominee by 354 votes. December 10, 1884, Sarah E. Davis became his wife. She is a cultured lady of this county. Cora N., their only daughter was born October 8, 1885. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. 

P. L. Pearson, a prominent citizen, merchant and farmer of the Ninth Civil District, of Hawkins County, was born in Hawkins County, in the Third District, thirteen miles northwest of Rogersville, October 23, 1837, the son of Lawrence and Elizabeth (Davault) Pearson. They were of German and Irish descent. The father was born in Pennsylvania, and brought to Hawkins County when a child where he was reared and lived ever afterward. He died February 19, 1872, at about eighty-five or eighty-six years of age. The mother was born in Claiborne County, about 1800, and died in Hawkins County, January 7, 1884. The father’s parents were among the first settlers of Hawkins County. His father was a farmer, and made life a good success. He was a Republican. Our subject is the eighth of nine children. He secured a liberal education in his youth, which was commenced in the country schools, and finished at Sneedville, Hancock County, and Mossy Creek, Jefferson County. He was reared on his father’s farm. After completing his education he taught school one year in Hawkins County, and then entered business at Rogersville as a clerk in William White’s general merchandise store. He remained about one year, and then engaged in farming a short time. He then entered the Confederate States Army, enlisting in Company E battalion. At the reorganization of the company it was put into the Second Tennessee Regiment of Cavalry, under Gen. Ashby. The first captain was Robert Simpson, and the second was William Smith, when it was placed under Ashby. Our subject enlisted, July 8, 1861. He took part in numerous battles - Murfreesboro, Chichamauga and Missionary Ridge. He was captured in Bedford County, on one of Wheeler’s raids. In October, 1863, he was carried to Indianapolis, Ind., and kept as a prisoner of war until March, 1865, at which time he was paroled and after remaining in Virginia awhile, he reached his father’s home in Hawkins County, April 30, 1865. He immediately commenced to engage in farming. In August, 1866, he purchased and settled where he now lives, and up to 1876, he gave his attention exclusively to farming. In the year 1876, in partnership with James G. Looney, he dealt in livestock, a business which was continued about four years and the last three years they were also engaged in the mercantile business. The store at Vogel Postoffice, near our subject’s residence, and on his farm, was opened up in November, 1877. Our subject bought out Mr. Looney in 1881, and still continues the business. All along our subject has been engaged in farming, and has made stock raising a specialty. On August 19, 1866, he married Miss Sallie J. Looney, of Hawkins County, born March 25, 1835, daughter of A. D. Looney and Sallie Looney. They were the parents of eight children - five sons and three daughter - one daughter deceased. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

William S. Phipps was born in Hawkins County, July 17, 1848, son of Wesley A. and Eliza (Hale) Phipps. Both were of Scotch-Irish descent, and natives of Hawkins County. the father was born September 16, 1816, in the Eighth Civil District at the place where he died, October 16, 1882, aged sixty-six years. The other was born about 1820 and died in 1865. They were married in Hawkins County, and lived and died where the father was born. The father was engaged in agricultural pursuits, and was very successful. His father, William Phipps, was a native of Botetourt County, Va., and was among the early settlers of Hawkins County. Our subject’s father was a stanch Democrat, and he and his wife were worthy members of the Presbyterian Church. The father served the church as an elder over thirty-five years. Our subject is the third of ten children. He secured a liberal education in his youth, which was commenced in the country schools of Hawkins County, and finished at King College, Bristol. His first industrial employment was in agricultural pursuits on his father’s plantation, and farming has been his chief calling ever since. In 1870,and for the next few years up to 1873, he was engaged in the mercantile business with his father at Stony Point. Since that time he has given his attention exclusively to the farming interest. March 26, 1873, he married Miss Sallie Carmack, of Hawkins County, born in November, 1852, daughter of Dr. John and Matilda Carmack. On marrying, in 1873, he settled where he now lives as a renter, and continued as such up to 1883, at which time he moved to the old homestead and lived three years. In the meantime he wound up his father’s estate as administrator. In 1885 he purchased the farm he now lives on, and moved to it in the spring of 1886. Our subject has been a live, active man, all of his life. He began life rather poor, but now owns upward of 600 acres of land on the Holston river, in the Eighth District. Our subject is a decided Democrat, and he and his wife are worthy members of the Presbyterian Church. The subject of this sketch is the father of six intelligent children - four sons and two daughters. The father was also engaged in the mercantile business from 1866 to 1873, first at Lyons Store, then at Stony Point. 

J. M. Phipps, an enterprising planter, of Hawkins County, was born where he now lived, thirty-four years ago, February 25, 1853, son of Joshua and Ann P. (Bachman) Phipps. The father was of English and Scotch descent; the other of Scotch-Irish descent. The father was born in Hawkins County in 1801, and died in Hawkins County in 1861. The mother, born in Sullivan County in 1827, is still living, and makes her home with the subject of this sketch. The parents were married in Sullivan County, and settled permanently in Hawkins County. The father was engaged in agricultural pursuits, and was known as the most extensive and successful planter in upper East Tennessee. At one time he owned over 11,000 acres of land in Hawkins County. He was an old line Whig before the war, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. The mother is a member of this church. Our subject is the only child. He received a liberal education, which was commenced in the country schools of Hawkins County, and finished at Hamilton College, New York, though, before entering college, he attended some preparatory schools at Lookout Mountain and at Leroy and Clinton, New York. He left college in 1872, and since that date he has given his attention to farming. In due time he came in possession of the homestead. On June 4, 1873, he married Miss Mollie McKinney, a cultured Lady, and educated at the Rogersville Female College. She is the daughter of Maj. C. J. McKinney, deceased. There were born to this union seven children - four sons and three daughters; three are dead, one son and two daughters. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

 

William H. Price, merchant and planter, was born near Lynchburg, Va., March 10, 1825, the son of Joseph H. and Lucy (Stone) Price, the former born in England in 1795, and died at Kingsport Tenn., about 1857. And the latter, of about the same age, born in Virginia, and died about 1868. The parents lived about sixteen years in Virginia after their marriage, and then settled in Kingsport, Tenn. He was a painter, who had learned his trade in London. Our subject, the eldest of four children, was educated in Kingsport, and began as a farmer, but afterward traveled for the cotton factory of Wall & Simpson, Kingsport. He was a salesman there and at New Canton also, and in 1865 he and Daniel Rogan established a general store, continuing for eighteen months, when the firm became W. P. Price & Co. instead of D. Rogan & Co. Mr. Price conducted it alone for about thirteen years. in December, 1881, he moved his store to Church Hill, his present location, where he has also been engaged in farming. He has acquired now over 600 acres of land, and controls a trade of from $12,000 to $15,000 annually. In 1862 he married Lou Smith, who died in 1866, and in 1867 Mary Shaver, of Sullivan County, became his wife. They have one son, John W., born in 1868. Our subject is a Democrat, and in religion a Methodist, while his wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

 

William T. Robertson, proprietor of the Rogersville Review, established that paper July 23, 1885, and after a struggle through the consumptive years of a new paper, he has, through all obstacles, placed it on a sure footing. The Review is a supporter of the Democratic party, and is largely circulated throughout the East Tennessee region and vicinity, and among the Hawkins County people who have immigrated to the West. The Review has advocated the development of the marble and mineral resources of this region, and favored railroad extension, and a line from one end of the State to the other, for the completion of which there are well-founded hopes, and that in the near future. Mr. Robertson was reared in Greene County, and when a boy entered and served in Lynch’s Confederate Battery three years, being captured at Vicksburg. After his exchange he served in the army of southwestern Virginia and East Tennessee. Since the war he has lived in the Carolinas until he established the Review at Rogersville. The Review, in July last, closed its second volume, and entered upon its third year with brighter prospects than at any time since it was established.

 

Andrew D. Simpson, an enterprising merchant of Rogersville, of the firm of A. D. Simpson & Co., was born at Rogersville, August 26, 1854, the son of William and Mary T. (Davidson) Simpson. The father was of Irish descent and was born at Rogersville in 1822, where he died January 23, 1886. The mother was born at Abingdon, Va., in 1833, and died at Rogersville in the fall of 1854. The parents were married at Rogersville about 1852. The father remarried about 1857 to Miss Lou Potter, of Manchester, Ky. The father was engaged in the mercantile business all of his life at Rogersville, and was very successful. He was a Democrat. Subject is the only child. He secured a good education in his youth at Rogersville, and began life (1870) by clerking in his father’s store, and he has been engaged in the mercantile business ever since. He is now, in connection with his step-mother and a half brother, R. E. Simpson, engaged in an extensive mercantile interest - one store at Rogersville and one at New Canton, eighteen miles northeast of Rogersville. Both houses do a business of between $75,000 and $100,000 a year. Subject is not a member of any church, but his in sympathy with the Presbyterian Church. He is a Democrat.

 

Alexander Smith, farmer, was born in Hawkins County, April 28, 1843, the son of Campbell and Maria J. (Alexander) Smith, the former of Scotch-Irish stock, and the latter of German, and both natives of this county. they lived to past middle age. Our subject, the youngest of five children, secured an ordinary education and worked on his grandfather’s farm until he entered the Confederate service in 1861, joining Company E, Second Tennessee Cavalry, operating in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina and South Carolina. He participated in the actions at Fishing Creek, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and others in Georgia. In 1865, after an absence of four years, he returned to the farm. He lived on the farm until he fall of 1866, then clerked in a store until the summer of 1867, then traded in grain and stock until 1868, after which he farmed in Mecklenburg County, N.C., until 1870, then again traded in stock until 1875, when he bought the farm where he now lives and has farmed and traded in stock ever since. He has acquired about 1,000 acres of land, 700 of which is on the Holston River. Besides this he owns over 500 acres of Bay’s Mountain land. October 19, 1871, Ollie M. Hamilton became his wife. She was born January 24, 1851 in Hawkins County. they have five sons and two daughters. Our subject is a Democrat, and favors prohibition. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. 

 

Christopher C. Spears, coroner and ex-sheriff of Hawkins County, was born four miles east of Rogersville August 17, 1840, son of D. A. and Mary (Parks). The father was born in Hawkins County about 1811, and died in Hawkins County in 1860. The mother was born in Maryland in 1814, and died in Hawkins County in March, 1887. They were married in Hawkins County and settled permanently in the county. the father was a farmer, and was an old line Whig. The father and mother were worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. South. Subject is the third of eight children. He received a good education in his youth, which was finished at McMinn Academy, and located at Rogersville, His education was interrupted by the breaking out of the civil war between the States, and in the spring of 1861, he entered the Confederate States service, enlisted in company K, Nineteenth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and was received into the western army. Subject took part in the battles of Shiloh Church, Murfreesboro, Baton Rouge, La., and from Dalton to Atlanta, etc. He returned home in May, 1865, after an absence of four years. Upon reaching home he commenced to engage in the farming interest, and continued up to 1870, at which time he was duly elected high sheriff of Hawkins County, and was successively elected to the same office in 1872 and 1874. In 1872 he was an independent candidate, and defeated the nominee of both political parties. He was also an independent candidate in 1874. It seems about this time there was a change in his politics, for in 1878, he was the nominee of the Republican party for circuit court clerk, and was elected. He served one term of four years, and was re-elected to the same office in 1882. January 1, 1887, he was elected coroner by the county court, and still holds this office. September 27, 1870 he married Miss Sideria M. Bean, born at Abingdon, Miss., in 1849. They had no children. Both are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

 

John E. Starnes, farmer, was born in Hawkins County, August 2, 1837, the son of John Starnes, Sr. and Elizabeth Starnes, formerly Elizabeth Pearson, both born in that county, the former born on March 8, 1807, and still living with his son, and the latter was born on May 1, 1817, and died February 10, 1882. Both were members of the Methodist Church South, and had been for several years; they had a large family of children, eleven in number, six boys and five girls, two sons and two daughters dead. John E. Starnes followed school teaching for some six years. He has since turned his attention to trading and farming exclusively. In 1875 he was elected in a Republican county by a majority to twenty-six votes for representative in serve in the Lower House of the General Assembly for two years. On Mary 18, 1876, he married Willie Denny, of Sullivan County. She was born May 27, 1857. She is a member of the Methodist Church South. They have had four children, one son and three daughters; the eldest daughter is dead. John E. Starnes is not a member of any church but is a sympathizer with the Methodist Church South, of which his wife is a member.

 

David C. Tunnel, farmer and lumber manufacturer, was born near Van Hill postoffice in this county, October 29, 1847, the son of Wesley and Rebecca (Ball) Tunnel, the former born about 1807, and died in February, 1872. The father was a successful and wealthy farmer, and for several years was magistrate and deputy sheriff. He was well educated, and was a Republican and a Baptist. The mother was born in Russell County, Va., March 10, 1810, and now lives at Van Hill, also a member of the Baptist Church. Our subject, the ninth of eleven children, worked at home, and went to school at Fall Branch until twenty-two years of age, since when he has been at this present location, excepting three years in the Eighteenth District where he owned 300 acres. He now owns 400 acres and a flour and saw mill at Slide post-office. He succeeded in establishing the post-office in 1883, and was made Postmaster. He has been a magistrate, and in politics is a Republican. He has been in the mercantile trade the last four years. Mary E., a daughter of Edward and Mahala Ball, became his wife in August, 1869. She was born in this county march 31, 1850, and educated at Goldshill, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Ella C., Joseph O., Charles E. and Maggie are their children. 

Edward Watterson, farmer, was born at his present home July 25, 1824, the son of James and Sarah (Galbraith) Watterson, who lived their whole lives in Hawkins County, and were of Irish and English stock. The father, born about 1800, was a farmer, and in politics a Democrat. He died in 1853, while the mother was born about 1802, and died about in 1877. Both were members of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject, one of eight children, was educated in the common schools, and grew to be a farmer and settled since 1845 on his present farm - the old homestead. About 1838 his father moved to another place near by, where he still lives, and at the division of the land our subject drew his present home, to which he has since added until he now owns about 1,200 acres in Hawkins County. In 1846 he married Minerva E. Carmack. Of their four sons and six daughters, one of each sex are deceased. Our subject is a Democrat. 

William H. Watterson, clerk and master of the chancery court of Hawkins County, was born in the county in what is now the Ninth Civil District, November 19, 1836. He is the son of Henry and Lydia (Hutchison) Watterson. His father was of Irish descent, and was born in Ireland. His mother came from Tennessee to North Caroling, and was of Scotch and German descent. Her ancestors came from Maryland to Tennessee at an early date. The father was born in Hawkins County before it became one of the United States, in 1795, and died in Hawkins County February 12, 1877. The mother was born in Hawkins County, July 22, 1799, and died in the same county February 28, 1876. They were married in this county about 1833. The father was a farmer, though he was engaged in teaching school in his early life. He was educated at Greeneville College. He was third or fourth cousin to Henry Watterson, of the Louisville Ky. Courier - Journal. Our subject is the second of four children. He secured a collegiate education in his youth, which was commenced in the common schools of the county, and completed at Emory and Henry College, Virginia, which college he entered in August, 1833, and continued his studies until June, 1859, at which time he received his diploma. He then read law two years under Hon. L. C. Haynes, of Knoxville. In May, 1861, he entered the Confederate States service, enlisting in Company K, which was the first company from Hawkins County, and served until July, 1862, at which time he received a discharge, on account of ill health, and, after an absence of two months, he reentered the service at Knoxville, Tenn., and afterward was with the Cavalry in Virginia. He surrendered in North Carolina in 1865, lacking only two days of being out four years. One year after the war he commenced the practice of law at Rogersville, and was thus engaged up to 1884, when, on account of ill health, he retired. In October, 1885, he was appointed by Chancellor C. J. St. John, and now holds his present office. On September 15, 1870, he married Miss Minerva B. Riley, daughter of John D. and Alice M. (Kyle) Riley. She was born April 5, 1849. This union has resulted in eight children. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and his wife and two daughters are members of the Presbyterian Church.

 

James White, a prominent lawyer and planter of Hawkins County, was born in Rogersville, June 12, 1828, being the son of Rev. George and Sarah (Snodgrass) White. They were of Scotch and Welsh descent. The father was born in Botetourt County, Va., in 1781, and died in Hawkins County, January 1, 1849, and the mother was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., being four years younger than the father and died in Hawkins County in April, 1867. The father was a tanner by trade. He was among the first settlers of Rogersville, and established the first tannery in the county - at Rogersville, He afterward entered the Methodist ministry, and was a local preacher in that church for over thirty years. The mother was the daughter of Col. William Snodgrass, who distinguished himself at the battle of King’s Mountain. Our subject is one of a large family of children. He secured a good education in his youth at Rogersville, and began life as a tanner and farmer. In 1853 he was elected as a Whig to represent Hawkins County in the House of Representatives. In 1868 he was appointed special agent of the postoffice department of Tennessee, and in the latter part of the same year he was appointed United States consul to the post of Matamar, Mexico. He resigned on account of change of administration, and returned to Tennessee in 1869. In the same year he was again elected to the House of Representatives to represent Hawkins County, and in 1872 he was elected to the State Senate from what was then the First Senatorial, but now the Second, District, and was composed of the Counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Hancock, Hamblen and Claiborne. He was twice (1876 and 1886) nominated for Congress and, though his party was defeated, he beat its ticket several hundred votes, the Republican party having the majority. In October, 1852 , he married Miss Margaret McClure, of Hawkins County. This union resulted in seven children, five sons and two daughters. He is not a member of any church, but is a Methodist in faith. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1865 our subject secured a license to practice law, and since that date his name has been on the list of Tennessee attorneys. 

James Wright, of Mooresburg, was born at Waltham Abbey, Essex County, England, November 5, 1813, and is the son of James Sr., and Lucy (Campbell) Wright. The father was also born at that place, and died at Gravesend, England, in 1853, at the age of eighty-one. James, the father, was store-keeper of the Royal Gunpowder Works at the above place, a position also held by the grandfather. Both father and mother were Episcopalians, and the mother, born in Epping, near Epping Forest (made famous by Thomas Hood) about 1777, died at Waltham Abbey in 1855. Our subject, the seventh and only living one of nine children, was educated in Hartfordshire, England, and when twenty-two went to South Australia, exploring and surveying in that then savage county for five years. He had also traveled extensively in South America, and after a short sojourn in England, came, in 1837 to Baltimore County, Md., and engaged in the mercantile trade. In 1858 the Dougherty Marble Quarry Company, of Hawkins County, Tenn., gave his charge of their works, which he has successfully managed up to the present time. From after the war, and until 1883, he was engaged in merchandising, with an annual trade of from $20,000 to $35.000. On coming to America, he borrowed money of his brother to go into business, but during the war lost all, but, since, has succeeded well. He is in belief an Episcopalian, and politically a Democrat. Caroline, a daughter of Jesse Ritter (now living with our subject, at the age of eighty-four), became his wife in 1838. She was born in Baltimore County, Md., 1822, and is a Methodist. Alice is the only living child, and those deceased are W. F., Emily M., Laura J., James C., and Robert. 


Return to Main Page

Return to Tennessee Genealogy Page

Return to USGenWeb Page



You are the 26356visitor to this page since May 11, 1998.

The design of this page is copyrighted © 1998 by Jackie Robinson All Rights Reserved. This information may be used by libraries and genealogical societies, however, commercial use of this information is strictly prohibited without prior permission. If copied, this copyright notice must appear with the information.

Server space for the Hawkins County project is provided through the generosity of Rootsweb Genealogical Data Cooperative.

This page was last updated Thursday, 31-May-2012 12:53:37 MDT