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Tennessee General Assembly
Greene County

This transcription was done by Mildred Collins Wasser for this project from a printed version by the Tennessee State Library and Archives.


Balch, John Tenant (1760-1849) 

HOUSE: 13th General Assembly, 2nd session only, 1819-21; replaced William Kelley; 14th General Assembly, 2nd session only, 1821-23, replaced Valentine Sevier; 15th and 16th General assemblies, 1823-27; representing Greene County in all sessions; SENATE, 22nd and 23rd General Assemblies, 1837-41; representing Greene and Hawkins counties; Democrat. Born in November 1760 at Deer Creek, Baltimore County, Maryland; son of the Rev. Hezekiah and Hannah (Lewis) Balch. Said to have been well educated; also described as "rough, wild, dissipated, cared neither for God or man." Served in the American Revolution and lived for a time thereafter in North
Carolina; probably removed to Tennessee at the same time as did his father, in 1785. Married to Barbara Patton’ children -- Ann, Rachel (Mrs. William Motes), Betsy, Catherine, James Patton, Barbara T., and John Tenant Balch, Jr. Died on May 27, 1849, near Dandridge, Jefferson County.

 

Sources: D.A.R. Lineage Book, 87, p.45; D.A.R. Rosters and Soldiers, 224;

Balch, Balch Genealogy, 375, 377,383,402-403, Temple, Notable men of

Tennessee, 369-71; Acklen, Tombstone Inscriptions and Manuscripts, 132.


 

 

Bell, Benjamin F. (c. 1822 - ? )

 

SENATE, 30th General Assembly, 1853-55; representing Blount, Cocke, Greene, and Sevier counties; political affiliation not shown. Born c. 1822 in North Carolina, exact date and place names of parents not determined. Occupation: physician at Caney Branch, Greene County. Married to Mary M., her maiden name not given; children -- Ida M.., Clara, Nancy M., James B., and Robert F. Bell. No information of date and place of death and burial.

 

Sources: U.S. Census, 1860, 1870, Greene County.

 


 

Bewley, Jacob M. (1795-1867)

 

HOUSE, 20th and 21st General Assemblies, 1833-37; representing Greene County; SENATE, 30th General Assembly, 1853-55; representing Hancock, Hawkins, and Jefferson counties; Whig. Born in Washington County on February 7, 1795; names of parents not given. Limited education, but described as a man of native ability and known for his unusual memory. Occupation: farmer and politican. He lived in Greene County until after the death of his first wife; then removed to Jefferson County. When Hamblen County was established in 1870, his lands fell within that county. Served in the War of 1812 and in the Mexican War. He was married (1st) to Sarah G. Maroney on August 5, 1817; children -- Phillip, Sam, John Murphy, Will, and Martha, and five others whose names are not known.

 

About 1840 he was married (2nd) to Mrs. Malinda (Moore) Lyle; children -- Robert Lyle, Jesse, Luther B., and Isaac Bewley. Magistrate and chairman of Greene County Court. Political mentor of Andrew Johnson, later President of the United States. In his later life he lived at Springvale, Near Morristown, then Jefferson, now Hamblen County. Died at Morristown on February 16, 1867; buried in Bewley Chapel Graveyard, near Greeneville, Greene County.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Hamblen Countym 1201; Temple,

Notable Men of Tennessee 370-71; History of Morristown, Tennessee,

Census, 1850-1860, 1870, Jefferson County.

 


 

Britton, James (1798-1865)

 

SENATE, 27th and 28th General Assemblies, 1847-51; representing Greene and Hawkins counties; HOUSE, 33rd and 34th General Assemblies, 1859-63; representing Greene County in 33rd Assembly; Greene, Hancock, Hawkins and Jefferson counties in the 34th; Democrat. Born in Greene County on April 9, 1798; son of Daniel Britton. No information on extent of schooling; occupation: farmer at Greenville, Greene County. The maiden name of his wife, Joanne W., a native of Virginia, is not known. Children -- Louisa (Mrs. Blackstone McDaniel), Martha, Hannah E., Nancy A., Mary A., James, and Virginia Britton; there were possibly others. Sheriff of Greene County, 1840-46. Presidential elector, 1860. Died in Greene County on February 18, 1865; buried in Old Greenville Cemetery.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 890, 1252; Acklen,

Tombstone Records, 134; Green County Tombstone Records, 72-73

U. S. Census, 1860, Greene County.

 


 

Bullen, Lloyd (c.1812-1884)

 

HOUSE, 29th, 30th, 31st, and 39th General Assemblies, 1851-57, 1875-77; representing Greene County; SENATE, 32nd General Assembly 1857-59; representing Blount, Cocke, Greene, and Sevier counties; Democrat. Born c.1812 in Vermont, exact date and place not given; son of Joseph Bullen, II, and his wife Jane Ross. Came to Greene County at an early age (where his parents were married before his birth); was a planter, lumberman and slaveholder, at Fairview, Smith’s Ferry Road, Greene County. Married on May 5, 1834, to Elizabeth Ann Gillespie, daughter of George and Ann (Ross) Gellespie. Four children-- George, Martha, Ewa, and Elizabeth Bullen. Sheriff of Greene County, 1846-50. Member Methodist Church. Died at his home, in the 15th civil district of Greene County, on October 12, 1884; buried in Pleasant Vale Cemetery, Greene County.

 

Sources: Reynolds, Greene County Cemeteries, 326; Goodspeed,

History of Greene County, 890; Gosmold,Joseph Bullen, 108;

Greenville Democrat-Sun, April 13, 1927; Hamer, Tennessee, A History,

III, 222; information supplied by Mrs. E. T. Gosmold, Hickory, North Carolina.

 


 

Campbell, David (1750-1812)

 

North Carolina HOUSE OF COMMONS, 1787; representing Greene County, then North Carolina, now Tennessee. Born in Augusta County, Virginia in 1750; son of David and Mary (Hamilton) Campbell. Educated for the law. Joined the Continental Army during the American Revolution and rose to the rank of major. About 1783 he removed to Greene County. Lawyer and jurist. Married in 1779 to Elizabeth Outlaw, daughter of Alexander and Penelope (Smith) Outlaw. Thirteen children, eleven of who were Alexander, Polly, Betsy, Penelope Smith,Dolly, Thomas Jefferson, Victor Moreau, Carolina, Letitia, Harriet, and Margaret Campbell. Member of First Franklin Convention, 1784, and Third convention, 1785. Judge of the Supreme Court of Franklin and member of the Council. One of Franklin commissioners to North Carolina to magistrate separation, 1786. Judge of the superior Court of North Carolina, Washington District, 1787-90. Judge of the territory of the United States, south of the River Ohio, 1790-96. U.S. Boundary Commissioner, 1792. Appointed a charter member of Blount College, 1794. Judge of the Superior Court of Tennessee, 1797-1807. Charter trustee of Tennessee Academy, Rhea County. Lived for a time at the site of Lenoir City, Loudon County. Appointed for a judgeship in the Mississippi Territory, 1811, but did not serve. Member of Presbyterian Church. Died at Washington, Rhea County, in 1812. father of Thomas Jefferson Campbell, sometime member of the Tennessee General Assembly and of the U. S. Congress.

 

Sources: Williams, Lost State of Franklin, 291; Tennessee

Reports, Vol. 176, p.864; Pilcher, Campbell, Pilcher, and Kindred

Families, 33, 114-18; D.A.R.,Rosters and Soldiers, 398.

 


 

Conway, Joseph (1763-1830)

 

HOUSE, 1st and 2nd General Assemblies, 1796-99; representing Greene County; no party designation. Born on December 14, 1763, in what is now Greenbriar County, West Virginia; son of John and elizabeth (Bridgewater) Conway. Served as a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War; as a captain in the War of 1812. Declined appointment by President Thomas Jefferson to be in charge of what is known as The Lewis andClark Expedition to explore the Louisiana Purchase. entered land in Greene County in 1783. Sometime foreman of grand jury, road overseer, member of county court, and clerk of the Senate of the State of Franklin. Married in Bourbon County, Kentucky on February 22, 1792, to Elizabeth Caldwell, daughter of Samuel Caldwell. Children’’Elizabeth, Walter, John, Samuel, Presley, Ann, James, Joseph, Fountain, Polly, and Lucinda Conway. Member Presbyterian Church; donated land and materials for a church in Greene County. Following his legislative service he removed to Missouri, taking up 400 acres of land in what is now Metropolitan St. Louis. Died in St. Louis on December 27, 1830; buried in graveyard near his home. Brother of Henry Conway, speaker of the Senate of the State of Franklin, 1786.

 

Sources: Ansearchin’ News, X, 99-160; Williams,Lost State of Franklin,

110; D.A.R. Rosters and Soldiers, 484; Madden, Sevier Family History,

513; Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Common Sessions, 1783-1796,

Greene County, pp. 135-36.

 


 

Earnest, Henry (1772-1851)

 

HOUSE, 9th General Assembly, 1811-13; representing Greene County; no party affiliation indicated. Born on December 13, 1772, place not shown; son of Henry Earnest, a soldier of the american Revolution, and his wife Mary Stephens. No information on extent of schooling. Settled with his parents c.1778 on the Nolichucky River, Greene County. Farmer and merchant; trustee of Tusculum College. Married to Kittie D. Reeves; children--Jesse R., Henry H., Mary H., Isaac N., Felix, Kittie E., Marjorie, Joseph E.P., and Jacob P. Earnest. Commissioned lieutenant-colonel of militia in 1808; colonel of mounted infantry in War of 1812. Member Methodist Church; one of the founders of the first Methodist Church in the state. Died in Greene County on November 24, 1851; buried in churchyard of Ebenezer Methodist Church, Greene County. Father of Felix W. Earnest, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Moore, Commissions of officers in the Tennessee Militia, 56;

D.A.R. Rosters and Soldiers, 607; Green County Wills and Inventories,

1802-10, pp.260-65; Goodspeed, History of Washington County, 882,

887, 1268; Greene County Tombstone Records, 66.

 


 

Ellison, John (? - ?)

 

North Carolina HOUSE OF COMMONS, 1789; representing Greene County (then North Carolina, now Tennessee). The only other information located on subject is that he was a member of the North Carolina convention ratifying the U.S. Constitution in 1789; a justice of the peace in Greene County, 1790; and appointed to survey a road in Greene County, 1791.

 

Sources: East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications,

XIV, 110; Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions,

1783-1796, Greene County, pp. 159, 215.

 


 

Feazel, Samuel (? - 1841)

 

HOUSE, 23rd General Assembly, 1839-41; representing Greene County; party affiliation not shown. No information found on place and date of birth, names of parents, extent of schooling, or occupation. The maiden name of his wife, Lucinda, not given; he had children but their names not located. The inventory of his estate shows that he was a man of some substance. Died in Greene County sometime in 1841.

 

Source: Greene County Inventories and Sales, pp. 688, 692.

 


 

Frazier, Samuel (1749-1839)

 

SENATE, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd General Assemblies, 1796-1801; representing Green County; Whig in later life. Born in France of Huguenot ancestory on April 10, 1749; names of parents not given. In Revolutionary War, participating in the Battle of King’s Mountain. Pioneer, soldier, and lawyer. Married on March 17, 1771 to Rebecca Julian. Children--Abner, Beriah, Thomas, Julian Frazier, Barbara, and Samuel Frazier, Jr. Member of Tennessee Constitutional Convention, 1796; attorney-general, 11th district, 1831-36. Died in Greene county on April 10, 1839; buried in Bearden Cemetery, Greene County. Father of Julian Frazier, grandfather of Constantine Frazier and of Beriah Frazier, all sometime members Tennessee General Assembly; great-grandfather of James Beriah Frazier, sometime Governor of Tennessee and United States Senator

 

Sources: Tennessee State History of the D. A. R., 171; D.A.R.

Rosters and Soldiers, 679; Hale and Merritt, Tennessee and Tennesseans,

559, 722; Miller’s Official Manual, 189; White, Messages of the Governors

of Tennessee, VIII, 178.

 


 

Gass, John (1758-1840)

 

HOUSE, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd General Assemblies, 1796-1801; representing Greene county; SENATE, 4th, 5th, 6th, 11th, 13th, and 16th General Assemblies; 1801-07, 1815-17, 1819-21, 1825-27; representing Greene County in all assemblies except the 16th in which he represented Greene and Jefferson counties; no party affiliation shown. Born in County Down, Ireland, on March 25, 1758; names of parents unknown. He came to America with three or four brothers and settled in Orange County, North Carolina. He was in the Revolutionary War and participated in the Battle of King’s Mountain. He removed to Greene County, (then North Carolina, now Tennessee) by 1783. By 1789 he had established a mill and a distillery in addition to farming operations. The maiden name of his first wife, Margaret, is unknown; they had ten children--William, Alice Rankin, George, Jane, Mary Young, Margaret, Nancy Anne, Martha A., John, Jr., and Hezekiah Balch Goss. He was married (2nd) on August 26, 1830 to Elizabeth Rankin, daughter of David and Anne (Campbell) Rankin; no children by second marriage. Member of Greene County Court, 1790; several times justice of the peace; commissioner of Greeneville, 1794, 1809. Said to have been "staunchly calvinistic"; member Masonic Order; helped establish Lodge #3 in Greenville. Appointed a charter trustee of East Tennessee College, 1807. Died in Greene County on June 14, 1840; buried in the churchyard of Gass Meeting House in Greene County. Grandfather of William T. Gass, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: University of Tennessee Record, I, 242; information

supplied by Mrs. C. P. Kelley, Chattanooga.

 


 

Gist Joshua (c.1740 - ?)

 

North Carolina HOUSE OF COMMONS, 1784; representing Greene County (then North Carolina, now Tennessee). Born c.1740 in Baltimore, Maryland; son of Nathaniel and Mary (Howard) Gist. Removed as a young boy with his parents to Cumberland County, North Carolina. In 1772 he was operating a tavern in Cumberland County; captain in Cumberland County militia. About 1783 he removed to Greene County and settled on the north side of the French Broad River. Justice of the Peace in Greene County, 1784. Assistant judge of Superior Court of the State of Franklin, 1785. When Jefferson County was formed his land fell into that county; and later in Sevier County when that county was established. Justice of the peace in Sevier County, 1794. Closely identified with the affairs of the State of Franklin. The maiden name of his wife, Elizabeth, is unknown. Children--Richard, Sarah (Mrs. John Brown), Mordecai, Nathaniel, and William Gist. One of the witnesses of the Treaty of Dumplin’s Creek, 1785. No further record, except that he was living in Henderson County, Kentucky, in 1810.

 

Sources: Williams, Lost State of Franklin, 307; Muir and Dorsey,

Christopher Gist and Some of his Descendants, 3, 55-57, 61-63;

East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications,, V, 54.

 


 

Gregg (Gragg), John (1767-1847)

 

HOUSE, 11th General Assembly, 1815-17; representing Greene County; party affiliation not indicated. Born in Mossy Creek Community, Augusta County, Virginia in 1767; son of Robert and -----(Harrison) Gregg. Extent of schooling unknown. Early settler in Meadow Creek Community, Greene County, in 1788. Occupation: farmer. Married in Augusta County, Virginia on November 13, 1792, to Hannah Piercy, daughter of John and Hannah Piercy. Children--Lydia, Rebecca (Mrs. Nathaniel Chambers), Anna (Mrs. Jacob Kelly), Elijah, John, William, Marshall, Robert, Samuel, and George A. Gregg. Sometime justice of the peace of Greene County; elder in Meadow Creek Presbyterian Church. Died at Meadow Creek, Greene County in June 1847; buried in Caney Branch Cemetery, Greene County.

 

Source: Information supplied by great-great-grandson, LeGrande

D. Kelley, Jr., Lookout Mountain.

 


 

Guin, Daniel McDonald (? - c. 1827)

 

HOUSE, 10th General Assembly, 1813-15; representing Greene County; party affiliation not indicated. Date and place of birth unknown; son of Robert and Ursula Guin, who died in Greene County in 1813. No information on extent of schooling or occupation. Served as a private in the War of 1812. Married in Greene County on May 28, 1816, to Mary Broyles; children, if any, not identified. Sheriff of Greene County, 1810-12, 1814-18. Died about 1827, exact date and place not shown. Son of robert Guin, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Creekmore, Tennessee Marriage Records, Greene County, I,

1783-1818, p. 67; War of 1812 Records, State Library; Goodspeed,

History of Greene County, 890; Ray, Tennessee Cousins, 73.

 


 

Guin, Robert (? - 1813)

 

HOUSE, 7th and 8th General Assemblies, 1807-11; representing Greene County; party affiliation not designated. Date and place of birth and names of parents unknown. No information on education or occupation; was living in Greene County before 1807. The maiden name of his wife, Ursula, has not been found. One son of record -- Daniel McDonald Guin. Sometime justice of the peace and member of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Greene County; member Masonic Lodge #3, Greeneville. Died in Greene County on November 19, 1813. Father of Daniel McDonald Guin, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Nashville Whig, November 24, 1813; Snodgrass

History of Freemasonry in Tennessee, 1789-1945, p. 36; Greene

County Inventories and Sales, 1828-43, Part I, p. 158; Greene

County Will Book, 1802-10, p. 43.

 


 

Hale, Hugh Douglass (1787-1876)

 

HOUSE, 12th General Assembly, 1817-19; representing Greene County; party affiliation not indicated. Born in Fauquier County, Virginia, on August 12, 1787; son of Phillip and Catherine (Douglass) Hale. No information on education or date of removal to Greene County; served in the War of 1812; large landowner and slaveholder. Married to Sara Hundley Sevier, daughter of Major James and Nancy (Conway) Sevier. Children--James W., Dr. Phillip Perry, Eliza Jane (Mrs. Charles T. P. Jarnagan), William Dickson, Lemuel, Johnson, Sarah Amanda ( Mrs. Charles Wendel Meek), Hugh Douglass, Jr., Laura Evelyn (Mrs. Thomas E. Gosnell), and Franklin Sevier Hale. Sometime justice of the peace of Greene County. In later life removed to Washington County and died there, at Jonesboro, on November 30, 1876. Father-in-law of Charles T. P. Jarnagan, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Whitley, Hale Family, 29, 31, 36; D.A.R.

Rosters and Soldiers, 586; Madden Sevier Family History,

274, 513-14.

 


 

Hardin, Joseph 1734-1801

 

North Carolina HOUSE OF COMMONS, 1778-79; representing Tryon County; 1782, representing Washington County (then North Carolina, now Tennessee); 1788, representing Greene County (then North Carolina, now Tennessee); Tennessee Territorial Assembly, 1794-95, being Speaker of the Assembly in 1795. Born in Richmond, Virginia, on April 18, 1734, names of parents not shown. Married in 1762 to Jane Gibson McAfee; children--Joseph, John, Jane, James, Benjamin, Robert, Elender, Mary E., Margaret (Mrs. Minor Steele), Benjamin, Amos, Rebecca, and Gibson Hardin. Justice of the pece for Tryon County, 1772-78; member of Committee of Safety, 1775; member Provincial congress at Hillsborough, 1775. Captain of 2nd North Carolina Minute Men, Salisbury District, 1775; captain Tryon County Light Horse, 1775; in Cherokee Expedition, 1776. participated in battles of Ramsour’s Mill and King’s Mountain. Removed to what is now Greene County, Tennessee in 1781; settling on Lick Creek. One of the organizers of the State of Franklin, 1784-85. Justice of the peace for Greene County, called "Hardin’s Valley," and lived there for the remainder of his life. Received military grant of land in West Tennessee, where Hardin County was named for him; he never occupied the land but his sons settled on it. Member of Presbyterian Church. Died at "Hardin Valley", Knox County, on July 4, 1901; buried in Hickory Creek Cemetery, near Concord, Knox County. Father of James and Benjamin Hardin, sometime members Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Commission Book of Governor John Sevier, 16;

Griffin, Old Tryon and Rutherford Counties, 22; Patterson,

Joseph Hardin, 1,4,5,7,23,24-40; Williams, Lost State of

Franklin, 297.

 


 

Harmon, John (? - 1838)

 

HOUSE, 4th, 5th, and 6th General Assemblies, 1801-07; SENATE, 8th General Assembly, 1809-11; representing Greene County in all sessons; no party affiliation indicated. Date and place of birth, names of parents, extent of education, and when and to whom married unknown. one so--John Harmon, Jr., and his family, Isaace and Hacob Harmon. Living in Greene County at least by 1796 when he was commissioned a captain of militia and member of county court and justice of the peace there the following year. Landowner and farmer. Died in greene County on December 29, 1838; place of burial unknown.

 

Sources: Commission Book of Governor John Sevier, 17; Moore,

Record of Commissions of Officers of the Tennessee Militia, 15;

Greene County Inventories and Sales, 1828-1843; p.p. 504-06, 459.

 


 

Johnson, Andrew (2808-1875)

 

HOUSE, 21st and 22nd General Assemblies, 1835-39; representing Greene and Washington counties; SENATE, 24th General Assembly, 1841-43; representing Greene and Hawkins counties; Democrat, Unionist. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, on December 29, 1808; son of Jacob and Mary (McDonough) Johnson. Never attended school; apprenticed to a tailor at the age of ten; was taught to read and write by his wife. Removed to Greenville, Greene County, about 1825; took up trade of tailoring; later public official, politican, and statesman. Married on May 17, 1827, to Eliza McCardle. Children--Martha (Mrs. David T. Patterson), Charles, Mary (Mrs. W. R. Bacon), Robert, and Andrew Johnson, Jr. Greenville alderman, 1828; mayor of Greenville, 1830-34; elected to the House of Representatives of the 28th through the 32nd Congress, serving from March 4, 1843 to March 3, 1853; governor of Tennessee, 1853-57. Elected to U.S. Senate and served from October 8, 1857 to March 4, 1862. Military governor of Tennessee with the rank of Brigadier General from March 4, 1862 until 1865. Elected vice-president of the United States and served from March 4, 1865, until the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1865; President of the United States, April 15, 1865 to March 3, 1869. Again elected to the U. S. Senate and served from March 4, 1875, until his death. Other affiliations: organized Working Man’s Party in Greeneville, 1828; Mason in Greenevill, Lodge #119; Knight Templar. Died in Elizabethton, Carter County, on July 31, 1875; buried in Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville. His Greeneville home, his tailor shop, and his burial place constitute the Andrew Johnson National Monument. Father of Robert Johnson, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Biographical Directory of the American Congress,

1774-1927, p.1151; Henry Geneology of the Families of the

Presidents, 239; Temple, Notable Men of Tennessee, 357-61;

Morristown Gazette, January 26, 1876; Andrew Johnson Genealogical

File, Tennessee State Library.

 


 

Johnson, David R. (1808 - ?)

 

HOUSE, 32nd General Assembly, 1857-59; representing Greene County; political affiliation not shown. Born in Greene County in 1808; farmer and school teacher, Rheatown, Greene County. The maiden name of his wife, Mary Jane, not found; children-- Benjamin G., Louise C., Hannah J., Milpha A., Julia M., James Barton, Sarah E., and Kitty Johnson. Constable of Greene County, 1831; sheriff, 1850-54. No information on subject after legislative service.

 

Sources: Greene County, Minutes of the Court of Pleas and

Quarter Sessions, 1829-32, p. 290; Goodspeed, History of

Greene County, 890; U.S. Census, 1850, Greene County.

 


 

Johnson, Robert 1834-1869)

 

HOUSE, 33rd General Assembly, 1859-61; representing counties of Greene, Hancock, Hawkins, and Jefferson; Southern Unionist. Born in Greeneville, Greene County, on February 27, 1834; son of andrew and Eliza (McCardle) Johnson. Lawyer at Greeneville. Never married. colonel in 1st Tennessee Cavalry, U.S.A.; resigned May 31, 1864, to become private secretary to his father. Died in Greeneville on April 22, 1869; buried in National Cemetery, Greeneville. Son of Andrew Johnson, sometime membr Tennessee General Assembly and President of the United States.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 885; Greene

County Tombstone Records, p. 132; Nashville Republican Banner

April 24, 1869.

 


 

Jones, John (c.1804 - ?)

 

HOUSE, 24th General Assembly, 1841-43; representing Greene County; Democrat. Born c. 1804 in Tennessee; exact date and place of birth, names of parents not found. Studied law, but did not follow that profession, farmer. Intimate friend and counselor of Andrew Johnson; said to been Johnson’s speechwriter. Maiden name of his wife, Martha, not given; children--Sarah, Luther, Simpson, and Lidia Jones. Trustee of Tuculum College, Greene County. No additional information located on Representative Jones.

 

Sources: Temple, Notable Men of Tennessee, 456-57,

Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 887, U.S. Census

1850, 1870, Greene County.

 


 

Kelly, William (? - 1819)

 

HOUSE, 13th General Assembly, 1819-21 (1st Session only; died during assembly and replaced by John Balch); representing Greene County; no party affiliation indicated. Date and place of birth unknown; son of Anthony Kelley, who died in Greene County about 1812. Commissioned an ensign in state militia, 1799; Lieutenant, 1800; captain, 1809. Lawyer. Attorney-general for 2nd District, 1809-13. Married on December 6, 1796 in Greene County to Margaret Johnson; children--Elizabeth (Mrs. John Houston), James, Peggy, William, Samuel, Ann, and Anthony Kelly. Died in Rutherford County on December 22, 1819; place of interment not found.

 

Sources: House Journal, 1819, p. 27; Miller, Official Manual,

187; Moore, Record of commissions of Officers in the Tennessee

Militia, 15, 74; Greene County, Inventories and Sales, 1828-1843,

pp.17, 147-48; Nashville Whig, January 5, 1820.

 


 

Kenney, George (1804-1884)

 

HOUSE, 28th, 31st, and 36th General Assemblies, 1849-51, 1855-57, 1869-71; representing Greene County in 28th Assembly; counties of Greene, Hancock, Hawkins and Jefferson in others; Unionist. Born September 29, 1804, in Greene County; names of parents not found. Farmer at Romeo, Greene County. Maiden name of wife, Melissa, not found; children, if any, unidentified. Died at an undetermined date in 1884; buried near Romeo, Greene County.

 

Sources: Reynolds, Greene county Cemeteries; U. S.

Census, 1870, Greene County.

 


 

McDaniel, William (c.1826 - ?)

 

HOUSE, 27th General Assembly, 1847-49; representing Greene County; party affiliation not shown. born in Tennessee c. 1826, exact date and place, and names of parents unknown. No information on extent of education. Farmer at Clear Creek, 17th Civil district of Greene County. The maiden name of his wife, Mary, not found; children-- Martha, Sarah M., James,, Andrew, Mary L., Nancy, and Caroline McDaniel. No other information found on Representative McDaniel.

 

Source: U. S. Census, 1870, 1800, Greene County.

 


 

McGaughey, John 1792-1874)

 

HOUSE, 17th, 18th, and 19th General Assemblies, 1827-33; representing Greene County; SENATE, 21st General Assembly, 1835-37 (1st session only; replaced by Orville Bradley); representing Greene and Hawkins counties; Unionist. Born in Sevier County on July 12, 1792; son of Major Samuel and Jane (Laughlin) McGaughey. Farmer, near Greenville, Greene County; trustee of Tusculum Academy, Greene County, 1818; orator, politician; one of the original directors and active in construction of the East, Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad. Married in Greene County on February 12, 1812, to Hannah Robinson; children--Richard W., Margaret (Mrs. Robert Rankin), Nancy L., and (apparently) William S. McGaughey. Member of Constitutional Convention of 1834; ensign in Blount County militia, 1811. Member Presbyterian Church. Died at his home near Greeneville on May 20, 1874; buried at Mt. Bethel Presbyterian Churchyard, Greeneville. Father of William S. McGaughey, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Athens Post, May 29, 1874; Moore, Record of

Commissions of Officers of the Tennessee Militia, 107; Laughlin

Dairy, Roll 40, p. 38; White, Messages of the Governors of

Tennessee, II, 468; Temple, Notable Men of Tennessee, 52;

Wilson, East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad, passim;

Reynolds, Greene County Cemeteries, 188; Creekmore, Greene

County Marriage Records, Vol. III, p. 111; Burns and McCoun,

Soldiers of the War of 1812, 80; D.A.R. Rosters and Soldiers, 1181.

 


 

McNutt, Benjamin (? - post 1853)

 

SENATE, 9th General Assembly, 1811-13; representing Greene County; no party affiliation indicated. No information found on date or pace of birth, names of parents, or extent of schooling. Living in Greene County as early as 1793. Married in Washington County on February 13, 1796, to Amy Alexander; children, if any, unidentified. Commissioned justice of the peace for Greene Count, 1796; member of county court, 1802-12, being chairman, 1810-12. Indian fighter during early settlement of area. No information on subject after legislative service. Died at some undetermined date after 1853.

 

Sources: Commission Book of Governor john Sevier, 1896-1801,

16; Washington County Marriage Records, 1787-1859, p. 123;

Greene County Court Minutes, 1807-1809, Pt. I, p. 457;1812-14,

pp. 70, 111; Greene County Minutes of the Court of Pleas and

Quarter Sessions, 1783-96, pp. 322,324, 1810-12, Pt. II,p.p. 2,

158, 338; Greene County Will Book, 1802-10, p. 42; Ramsey,

Annals of Tennessee. 586-87.

 


 

Milligan, Sam (1814-1874)

 

HOUSE, 24th, 25th, and 26th General Assemblies, 1841-47; representing Greene and Washington Counties in 24th Assembly; Greene alone in 25th and 26th; Democrat. Born in Greene county on November 16, 1814; son of Sam and Sarah (Reynolds) Milligan. Attended common schools, Greeneville College; graduated from Tusculum College, Greene County, in 1843; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1844 and began practice at Greeneville. Major, Quartermaster Department, Mexican War. Married in 1849 to Elizabeth Howard; children--Howard, Sallie and Alice R. Milligan. Taught school in early life; editor of The Spy. Delegate to Democratic National Convention of Charleston and Baltimore, 1860; member of Peace Conference at Washington; offered associate judgeship of Nebraska Supreme Court by Abraham Lincoln, but declined. Appointed to Tennessee Supreme Court in 1864 and served until 1868 when he resigned to accept judgeship of the Court of claims in Washington, D. C. Member of Presbyterian Church; Mason Order, Greeneville Lodge #20. Died in Washington, D. C. , on April 7, 1874; buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, Greene County.

 

Sources: Athens Post, April 24, 1874; Acklen, Tombstone

Inscriptions, 133; Goodspeed, History of Green County, 281;

Snodgrass, History of Freemasonry in Tennessee, 281; Moore,

Tennessee, The Volunteer State, 192-93; Greene, Lives of the

Judges of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, 137; Tennessee

Reports, Vol. 176, p. 868.

 


 

Park, Joseph (c. 1768-1834)

 

HOUSE, 4th General Assembly, 1801-03; representing Greene County; no party affiliation indicated. Born c. 1768 in County Donegal, Ireland; son of rober and Nancy (Aiken) Park. Came to America in his youth; was living in Greene County as early as 1793. Bought land at Rogersville, Hawkins county, in 1806; sold it in 1826, and removed to Nashville, Davidson County. Never married. Justice of the peace in Greene County; sheriff of Hawkins county, 1802-05. Died in Nashville on March 20, 1834; place of burial not stated.

 

Sources: Armstrong, Notable Southern Families, III, 87-89;

Nashville Banner and Nashville Daily Advertiser,, March 22, 1834;

Goodspeed, History of Hawkins County, 880; Greene County Court

Minutes, 1802-04, pp. 107, 113; 1807-09, p. 86. Hawkins County

Court Minutes, 1810-21, pp. 456, 488; Greene County Minutes of

the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1783-1796, pp. 285, 450.

 


 

Rawlings, Ashakel (1742-1813)

 

North Carolina Constitutional Conventon, 1788; representing Greene Count, (then North Carolina, now Tennessee). Born in Virginia on March 19, 1742; names of parents not given. Served in the American Revolution from North Carolina; active in the organization of the western county afterwards. Sometime justice of the peace of Greene County. Married to Margaret Rezin; children--Daniel, Michael, Aaron, Rezin, Ashakel, Jr., Elizabeth, John, and James Rawlings. Died, place not given, on December 3, 1813.

 

Sources: Ramsey, Annals of Tennessee, 277; D.A. R.

Rosters and Soldiers, 1331-32.

 


 

Russell, John (? - 1817)

 

HOUSE, 5th and 6th General Assemblies, 1803-07; SENATE, 7th, 10th, and 12th General Assemblies, 1807-09, 1813-15, 1817-19; representing Greene County in all sessions; no polical affiliation shown. Date and place of birth not found; son of Thomas Russell, who died in Greene County in 1818. Commissioned a cornet in Tennessee militia, 1798; birgadier major in Creek War, 1814. sometime Justice of the peace of Greene County. Occupation: merchant. the maiden name of his wife, Jane, and the names of his four surviving children not found. Died in Knoxville, Knox County, three days after the adjournment of the 12th General Assembly, on November 28, 1817. Buried in churchyard of First Presbyterian Church, Knoxville.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Green County, 885; East

Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications, XII, 37, 40; Moore,

Records of commissions of Officers of the Tennessee Militia, 16;

Greene County Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions,

1817-19, pp. 198, 202, 209, 353.

 

 


Sevier, Valentine (1780-1854)

 

HOUSE, 14th General
Assembly, 1821-23; representing Greene County; Whig. Born in Tennessee on July 8, 1780; son of Captain robert and Keziah (Robertson) Sevier. Began career as a clerk in astore in Greenville, Greene County; later a yawyer. Married (1st) to Nancy Dinwiddie, daughter of James and Isabella (Galbreath) Dinwiddie; children--Isabel (Mrs. Francis A. McCorkle), Kesiah (Mrs. George Jones), Robert, Elizabeth (Mrs. John W. Cunningham), Susan, james, Charles, Jane (Mrs. James H. Vance), David Deaderick, William Robertson, Mary, Edward, and Joseph Sevier. By his second wife, Vinerah Cannon, Valentine Sevier had two children -- Charles Lyman and Henry Valentine Sevier. Greene County Court Clerk, 1802-10; circuit court clerk, 1810-54; mayor of Greeneville, 1818. Trustee of Greeneville College; also trustee of Rhea academy, 1806. Membr Presbyterian Church. Director of Hiwassee Railroad, 1836. died on April 24, 1854, presumably in Greene County; buried in old cemetery at Mt. Bethel Church, Greeneville. Father of William Robertson Sevier, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly; nephew of John Sevier, first governor of Tennessee.

 

Sources: Armstrong, "The Sevier Family," (Vol. III of

Notable Souther Families); Madden, Sevier Family History,

416, 435-41; Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 885,

890; Greene County Tombstone Records, 80.


 

Temple, Major S. (c. 1818 - ?)

 

HOUSE, 30th General Assembly, 1853-55; representing Greene, Hancock, Hawkins, and Jefferson Counties; Republican. Born in Tennessee c. 1818, exact date and place not given; son of James and Mary (Craig) Temple. Occupations: trader, goverment surveyor, superintendent of East Tennessee and virginia Railroad. The maiden name of his wife, Margaret, not found; seven children-- Nancy, Oliver, David, Major J., Charles, Margaret, and Ellen Temple (Mrs. James H. Robinson). Elder in Presbyterian Church. Died at some undetermined date after 1880; place of burial not given. Brother of Chancellor Oliver Perry Temple.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 888, 1257;

Temple, Some Temple Pedigrees, 262,264, 268; Speer,

Prominent Tennesseans, 540-46; Greenville Herald, March 24,

1881; U. S. Census, 1870, 1880, Greene County; Greene County

Cemetery Records, 140, 192.

 


 

White, Frederick Tillman 1783-1844)

 

HOUSE, 22nd General Assembly, 1837-39; representing Greene County, Republican. Born on January 8, 1783 (or 1795), place unknown; son of Bloomer White. No information on schooling; farmer near Baileyton, Greene County. Married in Greene County on July 25, 1810, to Deborah McNeese; children--John Blair, Rachael, and Frederick White. captain in state militia, 1809; in War of 1812; captain of militia, 1817-26. Constable of Greene County, 1818-20. Member Baptist Church. Died, presumably in Greene County, on July 20, 1844; buried in Union Temple Cemetery, Greene County. Father of John Blair White, sometime member Tennessee General Assembly.

 

Sources: Moore, Records of Commissions of Officers of the

Tennessee Militia, 74; East Tennessee Historical Society’s

Publications, II, 112; Creekmore, Tennessee Marriage Records,

Greene County, 178-1818, I, 178’ Greene County Minutes of the Court

of Pleas and Quarterly Sessions, 1817-19, pp. 29, 186, 195; 1828-29,

p. 202; U. S. Census, 1850, Greene County; information supplied by

Mrs. Alma E. White, Hillsboro, Oregon.

 


 

Wilson, James (? - ?)

 

North Carolina constitutional Conventions of 1788 and 1789; representing Greene County (then North Carolina, now Tennessee). Unknown are date and place of birth, names of parents, wife, and children (if any). Active in Greene County public affairs 1783-1796, being justice and magistrate. In 1796 he was commissioned justice of the peace of Jefferson County. No other information located.

 

Sources: Governor Sevier’s Commission Book, 1796-1801.

p. 26; Ramsey, Annals of Tennessee, 277, 669; Greene County

Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1783-1796

pt. 1, pp. 1, 3, 89, 117.

 


 

Wyly, James W. (? - ?)

 

SENATE, 19th and 20th General Assemblies, 1831-35; representing counties of Cocke, Greene, Sevier, and Washington; Democrat. Date and place of birth not found; son of Robert wyly. In 1817 he was licensed to practice law in Greene County, where he lived during his legislative tenure. He removed to Missouri in 1835; no later record of Senator Wyly.

 

Sources: Goodspeed, History of Greene County, 884;

Tennessee Historical Magazine, I, 212; Greene County

Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1815-17,

p.276.



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