Goodspeed's History of Tennessee 

 Houston County

Originally Published 1886

Transcribed by Susan Knight Gore

 

 W. J. Broaddus 

1826-?

Henry H. Buquo 

1844-?

James C. Dickson 

1840-1921

James Wiley Dickson 

1847-1892

Samuel Duncan Dillon 

1849-?

John F. Edwards 

1842-?

William F. Grafried 

1844-1928

Benjamin Franklin Hagler 

1838-1893

Volney Rowe Harris 

1850-1911

James Hoppes

1838-?

James Sanford Lee 
1830-1901

Thomas Mahony 
1852-?

John W. McDonald 
1831-1902

James M. Nesbitt 
1837-1917

George W. Outlaw 
1823-?

Edward Partridge 
1825-1887

A. B. Pope 
1848-?

Robert C. Rushing 
1831-?

George R. Rauscher 
1845-?

William H. Rice 
1844-?

Barton Vial Salisbury 
1848-1913

Willian Coleman Shelton 
1857-1896

George W. N. Shelton 
1844-1904

George W. Simpson 
1833-?

James Morris Skelton 
1834-?

Nathan Orvill Thomas 
1845-1922
       

 

 W. J. Broaddus

Gen. W. J. Broaddus, attorney, and editor of the Houston County News, was born in Trenton, Todd Co., Ky., December 23, 1826. His parents were William and Jane E. T. (Moore) Broaddus. The father was a merchant, and after 1836 lived in Clarksville, Tenn. He was a man of integrity and a highly respected citizen. The mother was a very pious Christian, and died in 1840 when Gen. Broaddus was but fourteen years old. Four of the family of seven children survived the parents, our subject being the eldest. He was educated in the old Male Academy at Clarksville, Tenn., and partly at Lexington, Ky., where he attended one year. In 1847 he returned to Clarksville and began the practice of law, which he continued there till 1851. On June 10, 1850, he married Miss M. E. Carter, daughter of Dr. B. N. Carter, of Aetna Furnace. In 1851 Mr. Broaddus removed to Centerville, Hickman Co., Tenn., and practiced his profession there a year or so. He then purchased an interest in the Mount Aetna Furnace, which he sold in 1853. He then became interested in the Clark Furnace in Stewart County. In 1859 he sold out his interest and returned to Clarksville to resume the practice of law till 1859, when he located at Paris, Tenn., and remained till the breaking out of the war. In 1865 he was appointed clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Stewart County, and practiced law till 1867, when he was elected attorney-general of the Tenth Judicial District. In 1870 he retired from the office, removed to Nashville and entered into a law partnership with Judge John A. Campbell. He was instrumental in securing the passage of the bill creating Houston County. After eight months in Nashville he returned to Houston County, and has ever since practiced law there, except a short time while he edited a paper at Guthrie, Ky. He also now edits the Houston County News. He has been blessed with a family of eight children, four of whom died in infancy and four of whom survive, viz.: John F., Edward N., Sallie Ann and Mary L., all of whom are grown. Before the war Mr. Broaddus was a Whig, but since has been a Democrat. He was licensed as a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1867, and was afterward ordained deacon. He is a very prominent citizen of Houston County.


Henry H. Buquo

Hon. Henry H. Buquo, attorney at law, and one of the prominent business men of Houston County, was the third of a family of five children of Jacob and Margaret (Hohenadel) Buquo, natives of Bavaria and France, respectively. They (the parents) each came to Pennsylvania in about 1830, being yet single. In Pennsylvania they married, and Jacob followed farming there until 1868, when he moved with his family to Erin, Tenn., where his son, H. H., had come the year previous. Here the mother of our subject died in 1873. The father yet lives in Erin, a hale old man, whose birth was in 1813. The immediate subject of this sketch was born May 29, 1844, and was reared on a farm in his native State, and secured a good common school education and attended commercial college at Pittsburgh, Penn. At the age of nineteen years he left home and worked by manual labor at mining coal. With money thus earned he attended school. His early business life was in mechanical pursuits and the improvement of his education. In 1867 he came to Erin, where he continued work as a mechanic, and began the study of law, which he continued while pursuing his avocation. For ten years Mr. Buquo practiced law in Erin very successfully. He was actively instrumental in the organization of Houston County, and by his efforts the county seat was secured at Erin. He is the architect for the court house, and helped survey the county lines. He has held several of the county offices, and in 1880 was elected to the State Assembly, in which he served one term. He then engaged with Harris & Buquo Bros. in the manufacture of lime, cooperage material, etc., for some time. In 1884 he purchased a half-interest in the firm of Harris & Buquo, in the manufacture of lime and cooperage, etc., and in the mercantile trade. The firm also conducts the Clifton Cement & Mining Works at Clifton, Tenn., and does an extensive real estate business, now owning about 15,000 acres of land in this county. The firm does an annual business of about $125,000. Mr. Buquo also continues the practice of law. He is one of the few who withstood the yellow fever plague of 1878, and so untiringly cared for the distressed. November 23, 1868, he was married to Mary Jane Brigham, of this county, and daughter of A. W. Brigham. To this union have been born six children, all of whom are now living, as follows: Maggie A., Sallie A., Samuel J., George C., Helen H. and Jennie L. Mr. Buquo, his wife and two oldest children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Buquo is an elder in the church and is regarded as one of the leading lights in the church at this place. He was honored with the appointment as delegate to the General National Assembly of the church, and takes great pride in his religious relations and benevolent and elevating works. He justly sustains the high regard of all good citizens, and is widely known in business circles as an honorable and energetic business man.


James C. Dickson

James C. Dickson, a prominent farmer of Houston County, was born October 19, 1840, near Omega. His father was a native of East Tennessee, and came to Middle Tennessee at a very early day, where he lived and died, having been a farmer. The mother was a native of Robertson County. The father died when James C. Was fifteen years old, and our subject then remained with his mother till eighteen years of age, when he began life for himself. In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in the Eleventh Tennessee Volunteers, C. S. A., and saw considerable service. He was captured and taken as a prisoner to Camp Douglas, Ill. Returning from the war he resumed farming, which he has successfully continued to the present. October 11, 1874, he was married to Miss Fredonia Adams, a native of Dickson County. Six children have blessed this union, two of whom are dead. Their names are as follows: James L., Alvah C., Luther, William, Sophronia M. and Merdolia. Mr. Dickson and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Dickson is a member of the F. & A. M. He is a Democrat, and is one of the respectable, moral and upright citizens of the county. Mr. Dickson's paternal grandfather, who was a soldier of the war of 1812, lived in what is now Houston County, then a part of Dickson County.


James W. Dickson

James W. Dickson, a farmer of Houston County, was born December 12, 1847, in the county. His father, Hugh J. Dickson, was born in 1816; was raised in Houston County, and died October 3, 1873. His mother was raised in Humphreys County; she died in March, 1870. At the age of twenty-one J.W. married Miss Bennetta Edmonson, of Montgomery County, the ceremony being solemnized December 16, 1875. Three children have blessed this marriage, viz.: Benjamin H., Minerva B. and Francis P. Mr. Dickson's wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Dickson's educational advantages were limited. He has been a farmer all his life and has been successful. Politically he has always been a firm Democrat. He is a good and substantial citizen of Houston County and is highly respected as such by all.


Samuel D. Dillon

Samuel D. Dillon, proprietor of the Erin Livery Stable, was the second of a family of five sons and five daughters of William H. And Elizabeth (Cummings) Dillon. The parents are now living in Stewart County, where the father follows farming. They are of Scotch-Irish and Irish parentage. Samuel D. was born June 22, 1849, and was reared on a farm to the age of twenty-two, when, in 1873, he went to Little Rock, Ark., and remained one year. He then returned to Stewart County, Tenn., where he was appointed deputy sheriff, and served four years. He then traveled in the marble trade for three years. Then he engaged in merchandising in Dickson County, where he had established a business before quitting the road. May 1, 1883. He began the livery trade at Erin, in which he has been very successful. He was married, December 28, 1882, to Emma E. Parker, of Stewart County, the result of this union being one son, William G. The wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically Mr. Dillon is a Democrat. He is one of the prominent and well respected citizens of the county.


John F. Edwards

John F. Edwards was born in Virginia, May 15, 1842. He was one of the children born to the marriage of Jackson Edwards and Rebecca Mountcastle, natives of Virginia. The parents remained in their native State till 1850, when they moved to Kentucky, where the father died in 1854, and where the mother still lives. The father was a cabinet-maker, and our subject was reared at that trade. He remained with his parents to the age of fifteen, when he engaged at his trade in Kentucky till 1875, at which time he came to Houston County and engaged in saw-milling. In 1882 he came to Erin and engaged in the undertaking business, and is still interested in that trade. In the spring of 1884 he, with James Hoppes, established their present business, that of general blacksmithing, wagon-making, carpentering, etc. They run a set of machinery, including lathes, planers and saws. He was in army service for about two years in Company I, Thirtieth Tennessee Volunteers, Confederate States Army, and was in battle of Fort Donelson, as was his partner in the Federal Army. His wife, Mary F. Edwards, is a native of Todd County, Ky., and his marriage to her was celebrated November 16, 1869. Five living children now bless this union, viz.: Lula, Patterson, Eddie, Herschel and Bessie. Politically Mr. Edwards is a Democrat. He is a member of the F. & A. M. Order. He is one of the well respected and enterprising citizens of Erin and of Houston County.


William F. Grafried

William F. Grafried, one of the prominent farmers of Houston County was born in 1844, to the marriage of George and Mary (Wenz) Grafried. His parents were natives of Baden, Germany, where they raised a family of four children--two boys and two girls. By occupation the father is a farmer, wine being the chief product. He is one of the leading citizens of his village, having held the positions of treasurer and surveyor. Both are zealous workers in the Lutheran Church. The parents still live in their native land, the father being eighty-six, and his wife eighty. William's ancestors as far back as they can be traced are Germans. Having received a common school education he left home in 1866 to try his fortune in the New World. After working on the farm and getting some use of our language, he attended the English schools. In 1874 he married Mary Bower, by whom he had three children, two of whom are still living. He and his wife also hold to the teachings of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Grafried owns a large tract of land and a good saw-mill, and is recognized as one of Houston County's enterprising citizens.


B. F. Hagler

B. F. Hagler, a merchant of Erin, was one of a family born to the union of William Hagler and Delilah Pegrim. His father died when he was but about three years old, and his mother, when he was about twelve years old. He then lived with an uncle to the age of fifteen, when he began his own support, having had very limited educational advantages, his schooling being only what he earned himself. After attending a two-years' term of school he began teaching and continued till the war, when he enlisted in Company B, Fourteenth Tennessee Volunteers, C.S.A., where he served till the fall of 1862, when he became physically disabled. In the winter of 1862 he entered the cavalry service and continued therein till the surrender. He received a gun-shot wound in the left elbow, at Franklin, Tenn. After the war he engaged at general carpenter's work for two years, and then at railroad bridging for about eight years. Since then he has pursued his trade, farmed, and sold merchandise. He established his present business in 1883. September 2, 1872, Callie Rauscher became his wife, who lived to be the mother of two children: Guy L. and Blanche C., and died October 29, 1876. He chose and wedded his present wife, Bettie (Pollard) Hagler, February 12, 1878, the result of this union being three children: Rooke, Daisy and Grover C. Mrs. Hagler is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Hagler is a firm Democrat, and he is a good citizen of Houston and a self-made man.


Volney R. Harris

Volney R. Harris, one of the most prominent and leading business men of Houston County, was born in Logan County, Ky., January 17, 1850, being the third of a family of twelve children of Y. F. E. and Mary Anne (Rowe) Harris. The father was reared in Simpson County, Ky., and was a farmer by occupation, but also carried on a very extensive saddlery. He lived and died in Kentucky, his death occurring in 1870. The mother was reared in Tennessee, and is now living at the age of sixty-five years, making her abode with her different children. The paternal grandfather of V. R. was a very zealous and prominent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and was instrumental in the founding of that church. He educated many young men for the ministry. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared on a farm at his Kentucky home to the age of fourteen years. At this age he began life for himself. Leaving the parental roof with only $2.65 in money he engaged as clerk in a store in Robertson County, Tenn., for three and a half years. At the end of this time he engaged with a Nashville wholesale dry goods jobbing house at a salary of $720 per year for the first year. He worked for this firm for six years at increased salary, and the last two years commanded $3,000 per year. On January 1, 1875, he opened a general merchandising trade at Erin, where he has ever since remained. Being very successful, he has gradually increased his business affairs, and now the firm of Harris & Buquo is engaged extensively in manufacturing lime and cooperage material. The firm has recently started an enterprise at Clifton, Tenn., as the Clifton Cement & Mining Company in the manufacture of cement, sewer-pipe, etc. Mr. Harris was the prime mover in the opening of that enterprise. In 1878, when yellow fever was imported by means of hospital cars being sidetracked here, Mr. Harris, with a few other faithful citizens, fearlessly stood between life and death and with untiring energy cared for the sick and dying. The firm of Harris & Buquo transacts a yearly business of $125,000, and owns about 15,000 acres of land in Houston County. On January 18, 1871, the marriage of Mr. Harris to Lizzie Garner was solemnized. She is the second daughter of Judge John E. Garner, of Springfield, Tenn. This union has been blessed in the birth of six children as follows: Johnnie, who died at ten years of age; Lizzie R., who died at four years of age; Edgar R.; Ewing G.; Henry D. and Mabel. The last four are living. Both Mr. Harris and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Harris is a firm Democrat but conservative. He enjoys the high esteem of the people of Houston County, and is too extensively known and highly respected to have us speak otherwise then in his praise. Those who know him will remember that he was a poor boy, and is now a successful business man.


James Hoppes

James Hoppes was born February 14, 1838, In Scioto County, Ohio, of which State his parents, Michael and Rachael (Reynolds) Hoppes, were natives. The mother died about 1858, and the father now lives in Arkansas, where he follows farming, having formerly been a carpenter and steam-boat pilot. James was reared on a farm with his parents to the age of eighteen, when he enlisted in Company B, Thirteenth Missouri Volunteers, Federal Army, and was in service three years and seven months. He was in the battle of Fort Donelson, and his partner was in the same battle on the Confederate side. After the war he settled at the La Grange Iron Works of Stewart County, Tenn., where he followed the wagon-maker's trade until 1879, when he came to Erin and engaged in the wagon-maker's trade, and in the spring of 1884 he formed a partnership with Mr. Edwards, with whom he now continues. He was married, December 18, 1871, to Mary Arnold, a native of Indiana. This union has been blessed in the birth of seven children, all of whom are living: Annie, Fannie, Elizabeth, George, Sarah E., James and Thomas W. The wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Hoppes is a Republican in politics and always has been. As a citizen of the county he is highly valued and respected.


James S. Lee

James S. Lee, clerk of the County Court of Houston County, was born May 26, 1830, within the present limits of Houston County. He was the youngest, but one, of eight children born to the marriage of John W. Lee and Elizabeth Hawkins, natives of North Carolina. The father was born about 1790. He married the mother in that State, and soon after came to Tennessee, where he followed farming. He was one of the prominent pioneers, and bore the high esteem of the people. His death occurred in 1849, and his mother in 1884, she being in her eighty-sixth year. Our subject was reared on a farm, and had the common school educational advantages, and has acquired his education mainly by his personal application outside of school. He remained with his parents till he married at the age of twenty-five, after which his mother lived with him till her death. He taught school in this county two and a half years, and then engaged in mercantile business at Ashley, Ill., for one year. He then returned to Tennessee. In 1861 he enlisted in Company I, Fiftieth Tennessee Volunteers, Confederate States Army, in which he served three months at Fort Donelson, and was discharged because of sickness. He was then a mercantile clerk till 1871, when he was elected to the office he now holds, the only incumbent ever in the office. In 1873-74 he read law, which he now practices. October 13, 1856, he was married to Sarah C. Richardson, a native of this county. Eight children have been born to this union, viz.: Ella, the wife of William Wilson, of Stewart County; Minnie, the wife of E. W. Rauscher, of Erin; James S., Alma, Robert E., Harry, Sallie, and Harrison C., who died at sixteen years of age. The wife died October 1, 1885. She was a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Lee is a member of the Knight Templar Degree, F. & A.M. Politically he is a firm Democrat, and stands high in his party and as a citizen.


Thomas Mahony

Thomas Mahony, proprietor of the Central Hotel, was born in Petersburg, Va., August 14, 1852. His parents were Jeremiah and Mary (Reardon) Mahony, natives of Ireland. They came to America in 1850 and lived about four years in Virginia, and then removed to Ohio. From there they came to Tennessee in 1870, where the father died in 1878, having been a manual laborer in mines, on railroads, etc. The mother now lives in Erin and superintends the hotel. Thomas spent his early life, to the age of fifteen years, with his parents. He then, being a poor boy, began his own support by manual labor. He was brakesman on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad for three years, and in that service lost an arm in coupling cars. Since then he had been attending watertanks for the same company. In 1877 he established the Erin Wagon Works, which he now runs. In 1880 he began keeping hotel in the building where the Partridge House now is, and for two years kept that place. Since then he has had his present stand. May 9, 1883, matrimonial rites were celebrated, uniting him to Ella Dawson, of Paris, Tenn., the result of this union being two children: Mary and Emma. Mr. Mahony is a member of the Catholic Church. Politically he is a Democrat and always has been. He is one of Erin's good and enterprising citizens.


John W. McDonald

J. W. McDonald, clerk of the Circuit Court of Houston County, was the eldest child of a family of five children born to the marriage of Daniel McDonald and Elizabeth Wilson. The father was born in North Carolina December 30, 1802, and when but eight years old came to what is now Houston County, where he followed farming, and died May 11, 1864. He was an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The mother was born August 19, 1810, and died in October, 1880. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. John W. was born October 30, 1831, near Erin, and spent his early life on a farm securing a very limited early education. At the age of twenty-three years he married, and farmed on a part of the home farm until 1878, when he was elected to this office, having held the office a term of two years before this. He was married October 29, 1854, to Nancy A. McAuley, of this county, the result of this union being two sons, William A., a druggist in Erin, and Daniel W., now attending school. Mr. McDonald, his wife and eldest son are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Previous to 1860 he was a Whig, but since then has been a conservative Democrat. He has filled his office since 1878, and is held in the high esteem of his constituents.


James M. Nesbitt

Capt. James M. Nesbitt, clerk of the Chancery Court of Houston County, was born Oct. 8, 1837, in Dickson County, Tenn., being the youngest of a family of five children of Thomas and Dorcas (McAdoo) Nesbitt, natives of South Carolina and North Carolina, respectively. The parents lived and died in Dickson County. The father was a blacksmith and farmer, and an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He was in the war of 1812. He died in 1867. The mother was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and died in 1853. Our subject was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. In 1865 he enlisted in Company D, Forty-Ninth Tennessee Volunteers, Confederate States Army, as third sergeant, from which he was afterward promoted to captain. He was in several severe battles and was wounded in the right arm by a gun shot. He was twice a prisoner of war and was in prison at the time of the surrender. Coming from the war he engaged in farming at Yellow Creek which he followed till 1873, when he began merchandising in Houston County and continued for five years. He then sold out, came to Erin and engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, which he now continues successfully. In 1882 he was elected justice of the peace and still holds that office. He was appointed to his present trust by Judge Seay April 25, 1885, and has filled the office efficiently. In politics Mr. Nesbitt is a Democrat. He is one of the well respected citizens of Houston County.


George W. Outlaw

G.W. Outlaw, a very prominent citizen of Houston County, is a native of Montgomery County, Tenn. His parents were George and Frances (Belotte) Outlaw, both natives of North Carolina. They were raised in their native State and came to Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1804. The father was in the war of 1812. He died in 1843, his birth having occurred in 1780. The mother was reared an orphan and died in 1869. Of the family of twelve children of this parentage George W. is the only one now living. He was born March 20, 1823, and was reared on a pioneer farm, receiving a very limited early education. He remained with his parents till he married and then took his mother to live with him where he began farming in Montgomery County, and where he resided till March, 1880, when he moved to Danville, where he built a large brick house and runs a hotel. He is a member of the firm of S. W. Kelly & Co., also in merchandising. He owns about 2,000 acres of land and carries on farming extensively. He became the husband of Elizabeth Outlaw in 1849, and by her the father of three children, one of whom is now living, viz.: Elmira T., the wife of J. S. West, of Houston County. Mrs. Outlaw died in 1854. Our subject then chose and wedded Mrs. Anne (Tomlinson) Kelley in 1858. Several children have been the fruits of this marriage, namely: Mattie D., Eddie, Johnnie L. And Rosa D. Mr. Outlaw and all his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Politically he was an old line Whig, formerly, but is now a Democrat and a very prominent citizen of the county.


Edward Partridge

Edward Partridge, proprietor of the Partridge Hotel, of Erin, was born in Worcester County, Mass., December 20, 1825. His parents were Edward and Editha (Bullard) Partridge, natives of Massachusetts, but both died in New Hampshire. They reared a family of nine children, eight of whom are now living, and one of whom died but a few months ago. Our subject was the fifth of the family and was reared on a farm to the age of thirteen when he engaged at making shoe-pegs till nineteen years old, at which time he engaged at driving an ox team on a railroad construction. From this he became foreman. From this time till 1880 he continued railroading and held various positions. He was roadmaster on different eastern roads, and on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad was roadmaster for fourteen years. He has made Erin his home since 1866. In 1880 he bought the property he now owns and has ever since run the hotel. He was married July 19, 1866, to Mattie H.E. Zell. Five children have blessed this marriage, viz.: Stella E., Hattie L., Edward R., Jennie C. and Fannie F. The wife and eldest daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Partridge is one of the upright citizens of Erin and a Republican in politics.


A. B. Pope

A. B. Pope, a leading business man of the county, was born November 26, 1848, in St. Lawrence County, N.Y. H. G. and Eleanor (Pohlman) Pope, his parents, were natives of New York, where the father followed farming. The mother died about 1851, when our subject was quite young. The father is still living in Nebraska. A. G. was reared on a farm in Wisconsin and secured but a limited education. He remained with his parents until fifteen years of age, when he enlisted in Company B of the Twenty-second Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers and remained in the service until 1865. He received a wound in the ankle at Robertsville, S.C. He then engaged in vending drugs in Wisconsin for one year and in Iowa for three years. He was then engaged on railroads and filled the different positions of brakeman, baggage master, freight conductor and passenger conductor, being on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from 1870 to 1879. He then engaged in the stave trade at Stewart for two years. He then began general merchandising and has very successfully continued that trade ever since. He is postmaster, railroad agent and express agent at Stewart. He chose and wedded, June 8, 1876, Jennie R. Salisbury, the result of this union being two children: George A. And Henry B. Mr. Pope is a Republican in politics and a very prominent citizen of Houston County.


R. C. Rushing

R. C. Rushing, trustee of Houston County, was born July 4, 1831, within four miles of Erin. He was the third of a family of seven children of Mark and Margaret (McDonald) Rushing. The father was born in Anson, N.C., and the mother in Moore County, N.C. They came to Tennessee at a very early day and settled within the present limits of Houston County, where they lived and died. The father was a farmer and died in 1859; the mother, who was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, having preceded him to her long home about two years. R. C. was reared on a farm and secured a limited education. At the age of twenty-four years he married and began farming on rented ground. In two years he bought land where he now lives, and ever since has successfully continued agriculture. He has been identified with public interests several times, having been an officer in Stewart County and was the first sheriff of Houston County. In 1878 he was elected to his present trust, having filled the same office one term before. He also owns an interest in a saw-mill. He was married, march 15, 1858, to M.J. Lockhart, a native of Houston County. Both Mr. Rushing and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is an elder in the church. He is one of the prominent and self-made citizens of Houston County.


George E. Rauscher

George E. Rauscher, one of Houston County's most prominent business men, was born December 23, 1845, in Beaver County, Penn., being the third in a family of eleven children born to the marriage of George Rauscher and Caroline Goehring, natives of France and Pennsylvania, respectively. The father was a merchant and farmer. He came to America about 1820, and married the mother in Pennsylvania, where he lived and died. The mother is now living in Erin. Our subject was reared on a farm and secured a fair business education. He remained with his parents till attaining his majority, and then he came to Erin, Tenn., where he engaged in saw-milling for one year successfully. He then began general merchandising in 1869, and has ever since continued in that business very successfully. In 1883 he connected himself with other parties in organizing the Arlington Lime Company, the manufacture of lime. He is the secretary of that company. He is also a member of the Stewart Manufacturing Company, at Stewart, in this county, in the manufacture of staves, heading, lumber and barrels,and in merchandising also at Stewart. October 1, 1872, he was married to Lizzie Campbell, a native of Pennsylvania. Five children have been born to this union, all of whom are now living. Their names are as follows: Ira W., Arthur C., Callie E., George and Bertha. Mr. Rauscher, his wife and eldest child are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Rauscher is a firm Republican. He was the first mayor of Erin, and held the office several terms. He is one of the prominent men of the community, and as a citizen of Houston County he is very highly respected as a moral, honorable and very successful business man.


William H. Rice

William H. Rice, a prominent farmer of Houston County, was born February 29, 1844, at Gallatin, Sumner Co., Tenn. His father and mother were natives of Memphis and Clarksville, Tenn., respectively. They moved to Gallatin in about 1838. While in Montgomery County the father vended merchandise and was sheriff of the county. He died in 1848; the mother died in 1849. William H. followed farming till 1861, when he enlisted in Company A, Second Tennessee Cavalry, and was in the service till May 25, 1865. Returning from the army he again resumed farming, which he has ever since continued. He was married, December 12, 1867, to Anna Parrish, the result of this union being five children, two of whom are dead. Their names are Walter J., James (deceased), Callie, Grace (deceased) and George E. Mr. Rice is a member in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church, his wife being a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Rice is a firm Democrat, and takes active interest in public affairs. Ever since the organization of the county he has been a justice of the peace, and has twice been chairman of the county court. He bears the reputationof an honorable, upright and enterprising citizen.


Barton V. Salisbury

Barton V. Salisbury is a native of New York State. He was of a family born to the marriage of Russell Salisbury and Mary Downer. The parents lived in New York till B. V. was about five years old, when they moved to Wisconsin, where the father died in 1867. In 1868 our subject came to Houston County, and in about 1872 the mother and her youngest daughter came to the same county. The father was a cabinetmaker. The immediate subject of this sketch was born September 14, 1848. He received but a common school education. Upon coming to Houston County he worked for his brother in the manufacture of lime. After four years he engaged on a railroad, and was conductor of a freight train for about nine years. In 1883 he engaged as a partner in the Stewart Manufacturing Company in the manufacture of cooperage, lumber, lime, etc. His marriage ceremony was solemnized in 1878, uniting him in matrimonial bonds to Miss Martha Rauscher. A family of two children has blessed this union. Their names are Frank and Ethel. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically Mr. Salisbury has always been a Republican. He is one of the prominent and highly respected citizens of Stewart and of Houston County.


W. C. Shelton

W. C. Shelton, one of the prominent attorneys of Houston County, was born August 28, 1857, and is one of M. F. and W. F. (Pope) Shelton's family, who was born in Dickson County. The father is now retired from active business life, but was formerly a merchant and trader, being very prosperous in his business enterprises before the war. Both parents are now residing in Erin. Up to fifteen years of age our subject's days were spent on a farm. He worked in a blacksmith shop six months, and then became salesman in general merchandising stores in New Providence, and also clerked in other stores in Montgomery County for three years. His early educational advantages were limited, but by application at night he secured a very good education. After his eighteenth birthday he was for three years with D. G. Beers as surveyor for county maps and atlases. He read law at different times, and read "Blackstone" in the office of H. H. Buquo, and was admitted to the bar in March, 1881. October 10, 1883, he wedded Alice Amos, of Warren County, Ky. One daughter, Lillie A., has blessed their union. Mr. Shelton is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the most highly respected and popular young men in this section of Tennessee. He is thoroughly self-made, and has been eminently successful in the practice of his profession. He is candidate for the office of attorney-general of his district, and, owing to his ability, his many excellent qualities and hosts of friends, bids fair to be elected.


G. W. N. Shelton

G. W. N. Shelton, proprietor of a grocery store in Erin, was the oldest of ten children of J. W. and Martha (Lewis) Shelton, who were born in raised in Dickson County. The father was a merchant and stock dealer, and was successful till the war, when he became somewhat involved. He died in August, 1875, and the mother died in the same month, 1881. Our subject was raised in Dickson County, on a farm and in his father's store. He remained with his parents to the age of twenty-nine, having, however, been engaged away from home three years at mercantile clerking. At the age of twenty-nine he married and engaged in farming. He has continued farming to the present time. He came to Erin and followed farming and butchering two years, and then engaged in his present business on a borrowed capital of $150, and has been successful. He was married October 2, 1873, to Miss E. A. Links, a native of Montgomery County. Five children have been born to them, viz.: Marshal M., Annie T., Landy H., Lillian M. and an infant. The wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Politically Mr. Shelton is a firm Democrat.


George W. Simpson

George W. Simpson was born in 1833, in Southbridge, Mass., being one of the family of Pearley and Hannah (Harwood) Simpson. The father was a merchant, and died in 1867. The mother still lives at the old homestead at the age of eighty-seven years. Our subject was reared at home and received a common school education, and attended an academy one term. He left his parents at the age of twenty-two and went to Warren County, Ill., and engaged at merchandising there till August, 1862, when he came to Fort Donelson and sold goods under military permit. He then pursued merchandising at Clarksville two years. From 1866 till 1876 he served in the internal revenue department. Thence he went to Benton County and sold merchandise till 1884, when he came to Erin and was connected with the Arlington Lime Company. He also held an interest in the Stewart Manufacturing Company from February, 1883, till March 1, 1886. He was married in 1867 to Gertie Bradley, who bore him a daughter, Carrie H., and died in 1868. In June, 1876, he was united in marriage to Margaretha Rauscher. This marriage was blessed in the birth of a son, George M. In November, 1878, this wife died of yellow fever. His last marriage, in January, 1883, was to Miss E. F. Thompson, of Wilson County, Tenn., the result of this union being two children, one of whom is living, Lillian G. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal and Presbyterian Churches, respectively. He is a firm Republican in politics, and a valued man of Houston County.


James M. Skelton

James M. Skelton, merchant, was born in Dickson County, Tenn., December 23, 1834. His father was born in South Carolina, in 1806, and when two years old was brought to Dickson County by his parents. J. M. was the second of a family of ten children, of whom seven are living. He was reared on a farm with his parents to the age of twenty, when he engaged as a dry goods clerk till May, 1861, when he entered the Confederate Army in Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Volunteers, and remained in the service till the spring of 1864, when he resigned his position as third lieutenant on account of bad health. In 1865-66 he worked on the farm and then engaged in general merchandising at Omega, and continued the business four years there. In the fall of 1870 he went to Howell County, Mo., and vended merchandise till the fall of 1872, when he returned to Tennessee. In January, 1884, he again opened a general merchandise trade which has ever since successfully continued. He was married, February 15, 1865, to Miss Lenora Shelton, of Houston County. Six children have been born to this union, viz.: William A., Joseph J., James L., Morris T., Mary S. and Bettie Lou. Politically he is a firm Democrat. He is one of the prominent and highly respected citizens of Houston County.


Nathan O. Thomas

Nathan O. Thomas, a very prominent merchant of Erin, was born August 20, 1845, near Erin. He was the second of a family of ten children of John H. And Nancy (Allen) Thomas, both natives of Houston County. Both grandfathers were among the very first settlers. The father was a farmer and one of the prominent men of the community. He died in 1855. The mother survived him for about ten years. Both parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. He remained with his mother till she died, and he then carried on farming for three years. In 1869 he came to Erin and engaged in general merchandising, which he continues very successfully with a full line of mercantile articles. In 1870 he was appointed postmaster at Erin and held it till 1881, when on account of political caste he was deprived of it, but has been reinstated under the present administration. From 1880 till 1885 he was engaged in the lumber trade and saw-milling. He was married in 1872 to Jennie M. McAuley, the result of this union being six children, three of whom are living, viz.: Flora, Vida and Clatie; and three have died, viz.: Helen, Clara and Willie. Mr. Thomas is a member of the F. & A. M. organization. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a Democrat in politics and always has been. He is one the prominent men of the county and has been officially interested in town affairs. 


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