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Marion County, Tennessee Genealogy

Goodspeed's Biographies of Marion County
N - P

published 1886

Flowers

JAMES HOUSTON NORTHCUTT, who is connected with the Tennessee Coal. Iron & Railroad Company, at Whitwell, Marion county, was born on the 24th of January, 1857, in Altamont, Grundy county, Tenn., and is a son of Elihu and Mary (Griswold) Northcut. His father went south in 1859 with some stock and the supposition is that he was murdered for his money as he never returned. He had previously served as tax collector of Grundy county. He was a son of Gen. Adrian Northcut, who was a graduate of West Point and a general in the United States army during the war with Mexico. For many years he was a prominent and wealthy farmer and stock dealer of Grundy county, buying stock which he would drive south and sell. He held quite a number of official positions, and so great was his popularity that he was never defeated for any office for which he was a candidate. After the disappearance of her first husband the mother of our subject married Joseph Sweeden, who is now deceased. She now makes her home in Tracy City, Grundy county. She is a most estimable lady and a faithful member of the Christian church. By her first marriage she became the mother of five children, of whom four are still living: Stephen A., a resident of Jasper, Tenn.; Sarah F., wife of Robert Campbell, of Chattanooga; Norman Eudoria Idelia, wife of William Meeks, a farmer of Grundy county; and James H. of this sketch. William E. was crippled in a wreck on the Tennessee Coal & Iron Railroad in 1887, which accident ultimately caused his death.

James H. Northcut acquired his education in the school at Altamont. At the age of sixteen years he began to earn his own livelihood as a coal miner at Earlington, Ky., where he remained for four years, and for the following eighteen months he was employed in the mines at Tracy City, Tenn. He was then with the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Company at that place as a brakeman and fireman, and for a short time ran an engine and was connected with the railroad service there for three years. Subsequently, in connection with Samuel Bennett, he rented the Pryor Tennessee river farm, for which they paid a yearly rent of three thousand dollars cash. The first year they made money, but after that the place proved unprofitable and they gave it up at the end of three years. For two years Mr. Northcut served as deputy sheriff under J. R. Jones, and then began contracting to furnish the Tennessee coal and iron mines at Whitwell with propping timber. He is still extensively and successfully engaged in that business, giving employment to twelve men, and in connection with it he operates a sawmill.

On the 23rd of January, 1881, Mr. Northcut was united in marriage with Miss Sallie Grantham, who was born in Bedford county, Tenn., January 23, 1859, and is a daughter of John Grantham. Though they have no children of their own they have given homes to several, one of whom was Henry, who died recently at the age of seventeen years. His brother William has also been adopted by our subject. Mr. Northcut holds membership in the Christian church, while his wife is a Methodist in religious belief. Wherever known they are held in high regard, and their circle of friends and acquaintances is extensive. Politically he is identified with the Democratic party, and socially is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Royal Arcanum. He is six feet, one inch in height, and is well proportioned physically.

JOHN W. NORWOOD, of Whitwell, Tenn., a son of S. C. And Catherine J. Norwood, of Pikeville, Tenn., was born March 28, 1852, who in addition to the education received in the common schools of his county closed his course of studies at the famous institute, Burritt College, at Spencer, Tenn., under the tutelage of the renowned instructor W. D. Carnes, familiarly known as old “Pop” Carnes.

From his earliest childhood he developed strong and well defined traits of sterling integrity, with a love for business and strong hatred for unfair and crooked dealings. With these strong constitutionally defined characteristics as a boy, it did not take long to mature and develop these traits when manhood and circumstances called for them, and a few years of mercantile experience with his father, brought him to the attention of large corporations, who are always seeking such characters as safe-guards to their business, and for nearly ten years he has managed and controlled for the Tenn. Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., at Whitwell, one of their many large stores, to their entire satisfaction and profit, having at all times his employer’s interest at heart, even to the smallest details of the business he manages.

Fortunately for him, that in the midst of his unceasing energy and love for his business, he has a great lever for balancing power combined with his native ability, by which he gathered much of his wonted physical element in preserving a normal equilibrium - that is his love and devotion for the chase - which is a part of his existence and being, and his pack of thoroughbred fox hounds gives him many hours of recreation after business hours. With his pack of bear and deer dogs he usually spends a vacation from business in some of the wilds of the swamps of Mississippi or Cumberland mountains, and such occasions usually reward him well in restored physical energies, and his many trophies of the chase, consisting of bear and deer rugs, deer antlers and fox skins proclaim him the David Boone of his county. He is a great lover of good horses, deals largely in registered Berkshire hogs, and is perhaps the best posted man in his section on the blood lines of all thorough bred stock.

He married in 1893 Miss Callie Garrett, of Nashville, and a son and daughter to them have been born.

JACOB ROLAND PARTIN, cinder yard engineer at the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad furnaces at South Pittsburg, is one of the pioneers of that thriving city, being located there when it was a mere hamlet. His career has been marked throughout with persistent and faithful effort to advance his own interests and the interests of those by whom he was employed, and he has been rewarded by the acquisition of a good property and a high reputation.

Mr. Partin was born November 25, 1854, a son of Ales and Nancy (Jones) Partin, both natives of Tennessee , the former born either in Marion or Franklin county, and died in 1890, at the age of sixty-four years, and the latter born either in Marion or Sequatchie county, and died in 1888 at the age of fifty-four years. The mother was a member of the Baptist church, The father was a farmer by occupation, and was a son of Thomas Partin. The Partin family were among the pioneers of this section of Tennessee. Our subject is one of a family of seven children, five of whom are living. Of his brothers and sisters we have the following record: Thomas is a carpenter at South Pittsburg; John is a brick mason, also making his home at South Pittsburg; Claiborne is a farmer living in Jackson county, Ala.; Mrs. Mahalla Jane, wife of Wade Goolsby, of Madison county, Ala.

Our subject spent his boyhood on a farm in Jackson county, Ala., and after farming there on his own responsibility for a few years, moved to South Pittsburg, Tenn., and entered the employ of the company he is still serving, and worked for a time in the stock house. He was next employed for a time in the cinder yard and after that, for about eighteen months, at the carpenter’s trade. Since about 1891 he has been an engineer in the cinder yard.

February 13, 1876, our subject was united in marriage with Miss Annie Lynch, a native of Franklin county, Tenn., and to this union have been born nine children, seven of whom are now living. Their names in the order of their birth are as follows: Amanda, Ada, Maggie, Maude, Lila, Adam Worth and Thaddis May. Amanda, the oldest of the family, is the wife of John McKinzie, who is in the employ of the Eagle Pencil Co., at South Pittsburg, and the rest of those named are all living with their parents. Willie and George W. are dead. Socially Mr. Partin affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in political matters he invariably uses his franchise and influence in support of the candidate who, in his estimation, is the best qualified for the position he seeks regardless of party lines. He is a man of much energy, industrious and is careful and systematic in his work. He has been in the employ of the company he is now serving for many years, has performed the functions of the various positions he has filled for them with rare ability and is recognized as one of the most trustworthy and reliable men in the employ of the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PATTON, whose home is situated in the Fourteenth district, Marion county, near the city of South Pittsburg, is one of the popular and influential citizens of that community. He is operating a farm in the Fourteenth district, and is also interested in coal mining, teaming and contracting. Mr. Patton was born in Sweedens Cove, in Marion county, Tenn., May 29, 1858, a son of Judge William O. and Caroline (Raulston) Patton.

Judge Patton was a son of Robert Patton, who moved to Marion county in an early day, and whose wife bore the maiden name of Miss Raulston. Judge Patton made Marion county his home all his life. When a young man he engaged for a time in teaching school. He was later clerk of one of the courts and was also elected justice of the peace several times. He was chairman of the county court. The first judge was by appointment and W. O. Patton was the first elected judge in the county, and was serving in the capacity of county judge at the time of his death, January 25, 1893, when about fifty-five years of age. He was married in Sweden’s Cove, and later moved to Chitty’s Cove, thence to South Pittsburg, and upon his election to the office of county judge, he moved to Jasper. His wife, who is still making her home in South Pittsburg, has been for twenty-five years a member of the Primitive Baptist church. The Judge was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in politics, affiliated with the Republican party. They were the parents of a family of five children: Benjamin Franklin, the subject of this sketch; R. B., a sketch of whom will appear on another page of this volume; W. M., a justice of the peace, and is a moulder in the stove works of South Pittsburg; Robert O., a moulder at South Pittsburg; and T. L., a bookkeeper at South Pittsburg.

Benjamin Franklin Patton, the subject of this sketch, spent his school days in Chitty’s Cove and in Sweden’s Cove, but principally in Sweden’s Cove. At the age of eighteen he began farming and logging in Chitty’s Cove, being thus engaged for two years. After raising a couple of crops, he again turned his attention to logging and followed that occupation in Chitty’s Cove, on the mountain and on Battle Creek, in Doran’s Cove and in Sweden’s Cove. He then entered the employ of Fletcher Wesenburg & Co., serving in the commissary department of the construction company which was then building the line of railroad known as the Sparta Extension. He then went to Memphis, where he was married, and upon leaving that city he went back to South Pittsburg, and for a time operated a meat market. He then took a contract from R. M. Payne to deliver his coal which had to be hauled from South Pittsburg, for one year. For the following two years he had a contract to mine and deliver coal, and after that he and his brother, R. B. Patton, went into partnership under the firm name of B. F. Patton & Co. Under this name they did an immense amount of contracting, and took some heavy contracts, among them being those of the stove works. In 1891 he opened the Patton Mines at Needmore, and the following year he organized the Battle Creek Coal Co. He was the chief promoter of this company, was it’s first president and presided over it until April, 1897. This company has also done a very extensive business. Since April 1897, he has been interested in the Patton mines, and has also turned his attention to farming. His home is very beautifully situated on the top of one of the Cumberland mountains and overlooks the city of South Pittsburg and the Tennessee and the Sequatchie valleys.

Mrs. Patton, who became the wife of our subject December 9, 1880, bore the maiden name of Miss Clara Zweifel. She was reared and educated in Paris, France, and came to the United States in 1877 or 1878. To this congenial union have been born five children whose names in the order of their birth are as follows: William August, Raulie Scott, Wilhelmena, Lilly and Frank T. Mr. Patton affiliates with the fraternity of the Knights of Pythias, holding his membership in the Mystic Circle. Politically he is a Republican.

REECE BRABSON PATTON, contractor and builder, at Chattanooga, Tenn., since 1895 has made his home at Highland Park. Mr. Patton was born at Sweeden’s Cove, Marion county, December 6, 1859, and is a son of Judge William O. And Millie (Raulston) Patton.

Judge William O. Patton was born in Marion county, Tenn., the date of his birth being 1836, and was reared in Sweeden’s Cove. His wife was born in Sweeden’s Cove in 1842, and they were married there. They then removed to Chitty’s Cove, Marion county, and lived on a farm there until 1876, at which time they removed to what is now known as Patton’s Addition to South Pittsburg. During a part of the Civil war Mr. Patton held a position as detective in the Federal employ at Nashville. After the close of the war he was circuit clerk for eight years, and was chairman of the county court until the office of county judge was instituted, at which time he was elected to that office. After his installation in this position, he moved to Jasper, where he died while yet in office, in 1894. His wife is still living, making her home in South Pittsburg. They were both members of the Primitive Baptist church, and he was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he was a Republican. To him and his wife were born five children, all of whom are living, and of whom we have the following record: B. F., of South Pittsburg, was the real promoter in the development of the Battle Creek Coal Company; Reece Brabson, the subject of this sketch; William M., a machine moulder at the stove foundry at South Pittsburg, and a member of the Marion county court; Robert O., a moulder at Shuster Foundry; and Thomas L., a traveling salesman for the last-named institution.

Our subject attended the public school in South Pittsburg, and in 1876-77 was a student at the Hiwassee College, in Monroe county, Tenn. After leaving the latter he entered the railroad office at South Pittsburg, but a short time after found employment in the Southern States Coal, Iron & Land Co.’s store for one year. At the expiration of that time he was employed by Mr. John F. Fletcher as paymaster in the construction company of the Cincinnati Southern Railroad Co. The Duck River Valley railroad was the next scene of his labors, and later on the Sparta extension of the same line engaged his attention. He next worked on the bridge across Lake Pontchartrain for the Northeastern or Queen & Crescent Company. In 1884 he quit railroad construction work and turned his attention to general contracting, which has since been his vocation. He has put up many of the best buildings in South Pittsburg, Bridgeport and other places.

December 9, 1979, Mr. Patton was united in marriage with Miss Sallie Bradshaw, daughter of William Bradshaw. She was born in Dade county, Ga., but grew to womanhood in Jasper, Tenn. This union has been blessed by the advent of a family of seven children, six of whom are now living, as follows: Hal T., William H., Ruth, Mary, Sarah and Reece R. Gus died when a child. Mrs. Patton is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and our subject is a member of the Knights of Pythias, being one of the charter members of the lodges at South Pittsburg, Tenn., and Bridgeport. Politically, he is a Republican.

ROBERT A. PATTON, the present popular postmaster of South Pittsburg, Marion county, has been identified with the interests of that place since its origin, and has contributed to its material progress and prosperity to an extent equaled by but few of his fellow citizens. He early had the sagacity and prescience to discern the eminence which the future had in store for the thriving little city, and acting in accordance with the dictates of his faith and judgment, he reaped, in the fulness of time, the generous benefits, which are the just recompense of indomitable industry, spotless integrity and marvelous enterprise.

A native of Marion county, Mr. Patton was born in Sweeden’s Cove, April 10, 1848, and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Roulston) Patton. During boyhood the father located in Sweeden’s Cove, his parents John and Elizabeth Patton, with their family, being its first settlers. Robert Patton, Sr., was a farmer by occupation, but also taught school for a time, served as justice of the peace many years, and filled the office of deputy tax collector of Marion county. He was an ardent Republican in politics, was a strong Union sympathizer, and had two sons, James R. And Samuel B., in the Federal service, both members of the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, and the former, James R., died in the hospital at Murfreesboro, in 1863. The parents were consistent members of the Primitive Baptist church and died in that faith, the father February 24, 1886, at the age of seventy-nine years, and the mother in October, 1876.

Their family consisted of twelve children, of whom eight are still living: Jane, the eldest daughter, married L. J. Beene, a prominent citizen of Sweeden’s Cove; William O. married Caroline Roulston, and died in Jasper, Marion county, January 25, 1893, after having been elected judge of the county the previous August; James, previously mentioned, is the next of the family; John, died in Mississippi some years ago; Samuel B., married Mary A. Roulston and resides in Jasper; Martha Ann married Sampson W. Roulston, an old resident of South Pittsburg, who died at that place August 2, 1896; Sallie L., married L. R. Lucas; Rhoda C. is the wife of R. C. Powell, of Knoxville, Tenn.; Tennessee is the wife of William R. Bible, of Battle Creek, Marion county; Laura T., married Dr. J. G. Lowber, of Philadelphia, Penn., and died in South Pittsburg, August 28, 1897; and Maggie is the wife of A. H. Blacklock, bookkeeper for the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., at Whitwell, Tenn.

Robert A. Patton, until he attained his majority, remained under the parental roof receiving a good practical education in the school’s of Sweeden’s Cove. On leaving home he first engaged in farming on his own account in Marion county, and then removed to Arkansas, locating near the line of the Choctaw nation. Later he lived in the Boston mountains of northwestern Arkansas, but after three years spent in that state he came to what is now South Pittsburg, Tenn. This was in 1875, and here he erected a little three-room cottage on the mountain side, becoming one of the first residents of the place. He took a contract to lay the railroad to the furnace and has since successfully engaged in contracting, not only in South Pittsburg but also in Whitwell, Tracy City and Cowan.

On the 25th of March, 1869, near Jasper, Mr. Patton led to the marriage altar Miss Pemmie C. White, a most excellent lady who has been to her husband a true helpmeet, and to her he attributes much of his success in life. She was born July 16, 1849, in Dadeville, Tallapoosa county, Ala., and is the daughter of Josephus H. And L. A. F. (Hearne) White. By her marriage she has become the mother of eight children, namely: James J., who married Annie Bowler, of Knoxville, Tenn., and resides in that city, being in the employ of the Louisville & Nashville railroad; Mary Elgin, wife of C. M. Hash, a native of Rock Island, White county, Tenn., and a resident of South Pittsburg, who is in the employ of the Nashville & Chattanooga railroad; Bessie, wife of L. K. Downing, a native of Ohio, who is interested in the South Pittsburg Pipe Works; Robert M., who is with his father in the post office; Angus, the youngest daughter, who is now serving as assistant postmaster; and Maurice V., Harry White and Jean Sloan, who are all at home. The wife and mother is a worthy member of the Primitive Baptist church.

Fraternally Mr. Patton is a member of the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, and the Heptasophs. Since attaining his majority he has taken an active part in promoting the interests of the Republican party, which he always supports by his ballot, and recently, through the recommendation of his friends, among them the Hon. H. Clay Evans, now commissioner of pensions, he was appointed postmaster of South Pittsburg. The prompt and able discharge of his official duties has won the commendation of the many patrons of the office, and if possible has increased the circle of his friends, which is extensive.

ALTON TERREL PEAY, M. D. - This gentleman has a high standing as a physician and surgeon, not only among the people but among his medical brethren, and, although he has not yet completed the ascent of the sunny side of life, he has become well known throughout the county as a skillful operator and an honest and painstaking medical practitioner.

In tracing the life of our subject, we find that he was born in Warren county, Tenn., April 20, 1863, a son of Thomas Terrel and Sarah E. (Winfrey) Peay, the father born in Rutherford county, Tenn., February 29, 1812, and died in August, 1896, and the mother born in Virginia and died in Warren county, Tenn., in 1867, and is buried in Nashville. Thomas Terrel Peay, our subject’s father, was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools of Rutherford county. He was married five times. He first married Miss Nancy Kelton, and two children were born to them: Mattie and Nancy, deceased. Mrs. Nancy Peay died, and Mr. Peay subsequently married her sister, Margret, and two children, Emma and Tommie, were born to them, the younger of which is now dead. After the death of his second wife, Mr. Peay was united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah E. King, who was in her girlhood, Miss Sarah E. Winfrey. Her first husband was a Mr. Cobb, and to this union was born one child, William who died at the age of thirty-five years. Mr. Cobb died and his widow married Mr. King, and three children were born to them: Alonzo, John and Sarah E. Mr. King died, and she then married Thomas Terrel Peay, the father of our subject, and two children were born to this union: Maggie, wife of James Sanders, and Alton Terrel, the subject of our sketch. After the death of Dr. Peay’s mother, the father married his fourth wife, Mrs. Nancy D. Jarrett, and, after her death, he married Mrs. Mary Guinn. By occupation he was first a merchant at Readerville, Tenn., following that business for ten years in connection with the work of controlling a large farm. He then sold out everything on account of ill health and moved to Warren county, bought a farm there which he operated and engaged in merchandising at the same time. Later he built a grist mill, which he controlled for twenty years. About one year before he died he discontinued all the lines of business in which he was engaged, except farming. He died in Warren county, Tenn., and is buried at Vervila cemetery.

Dr. Peay, the subject of this sketch, received his primary training in the public schools of the district in which his boyhood was spent. He then entered the Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tenn., and completed the medical course in that institution in 1889 and began practice at once. For one year he practiced in the vicinity of his home, and then went to Jasper, Marion county, and practiced there one year. He then served one term as physician at the Inman branch prison under Gov. Bob Taylor. After making his home at Inman for six years he moved in 1895 to Whitwell, where he still makes his home and base of operations. On September 11, 1897, he formed a partnership with Dr. David Carah Shelton, a sketch of whom will appear on another page of this volume, and the firm now enjoys an extensive and profitable patronage.

On December 7, 1886, our subject was united in marriage to Miss Lillie G. Johnson, daughter of C. M. and Catharine (Davis) Johnson. Mrs. Peay was educated at Burksville, Ky. To this union have been born six children, five of whom are now living and make their home with their parents. Their names in the order of their birth are as follows: Mattie, Alton M., Fred J., Robert, Catharine, deceased, and Myrtle. Dr. Peay is a Master Mason, holding his membership at Altine lodge, Sulpher Springs, Tenn., and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Politically he is a Democrat but has never aspired a public office.

Dr. Peay is one of the members of the brass band at Whitwell, Tenn., it being the only brass band now in Sequatchie valley.

DUDLEY C. PECK, deceased, was for many years connected with the business interests of Marion county, and his well-spent life won him high regard. He was born in Jefferson county, Tenn., on the 24th of December, 1827, a son of Henry Peck, who resided on Mossy creek, in that county. The father was a farmer by occupation, and in addition to agricultural pursuits operated a carding machine and cotton gin. At his death Jefferson county lost one of its worthy citizens. Dudley C. Peck was reared in his parents’ home and after attaining his majority went to Knoxville, Tenn., where he secured a situation as bookkeeper in a warehouse. He occupied that position for several years and then became clerk on a steamer in the Tennessee river. While thus engaged he formed the acquaintance of Miss Nancy Mayo Kelly, a daughter of Alexander Kelly, and a representative of one of the most prominent and honored families of Marion county. On the 27th of January 1853, was celebrated the marriage which united the destinies of these young people, and they began their domestic life on the old Oates homestead. Mrs. Peck was born May 20, 1830 in Marion county, and to her husband she proved a faithful companion and helpmeet.

In addition to agricultural pursuits, Mr. Peck devoted his energies to selling goods, and also conducted the warehouse at Oates Landing. Industry and enterprise were numbered among his chief characteristics and his well directed efforts brought him a very comfortable competence. In addition to the labors of private life he acceptably discharged the duties of a member of the county court, and did all in his power to promote the welfare and advance the best interests of the community in which he lived. He gave his political support to the Democracy, socially was connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in religious faith was identified with the Cumberland Presbyterians, holding membership in the church of that denomination in Ebenezer. He passed away December 13, 1861, when in the prime of life, and his loss was deeply mourned by many friends as well as his immediate family, for he was a man of sterling worth, whose fidelity to every trust reposed in him gained him the confidence and good will of all.

Mr. And Mrs. Peck had a family of four children: Nancy E., wife of John C. Turner, a farmer residing with Mrs. Peck; Henry A., a representative agriculturist living in the same neighborhood, who served as tax assessor of Marion county for four years, and married Eugenie Hicks, a native of Virginia; Sallie A., at home; and Dudley C., who also resides with his mother and is a member of the county court. Mrs. Peck and all her children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and the family is one of prominence in the community, enjoying the hospitality of the best homes in this section of Marion county.

EPHRAIM WILLIAM PRIGMORE, a leading and representative agriculturist of Marion county, Tenn., has spent all his life there, his birth occurring January 25, 1850. His father, Joseph K. Prigmore, was born March 20, 1815, a son of Ephraim and Margaret (Kelly) Prigmore, who were of French descent. Before the war the father engaged in merchandising near Whitwell, Marion county, but later removed to Oats Landing and turned his attention to farming. From early boyhood, he made his home in Marion county, and was here married, February 20, 1840, to Miss Mary Pryor, who was born March 21, 1818, of Irish descent. They became the parents of eight children, namely: Margaret and Melinda J., both deceased; Louisa A., wife of J. S. Richmond; Ephraim W., of this sketch; James G., who married Laura Stafford and is engaged in merchandising at South Pittsburg, Tenn.; John A., who married Florence Heiskell and lives on a farm adjoining our subject’s; Mary, wife of Robert Richards, who lives near our subject; and Ruth, wife of John Ely, of Moore county, Tenn. Their parents were both sincere and faithful members of the Presbyterian church and died in that faith, the father November 12, 1889, the mother November 6, 1865, being laid to rest in Gotts cemetery, where the remains of their parents were also interred.

Mr. Prigmore, whose name introduces this sketch, obtained his education in the Sam Houston Academy, and when his school days were over he returned to the old homestead, where throughout life he has successfully followed agricultural pursuits. On the 7th of January, 1886, he led to the marriage altar Miss Lizzie Mitchell, who was born December 25, 1853, in Marion county, and is a daughter of Preston and Mary A. (Deakins) Mitchell. Her father was a native of the same county, born November 18, 1819, but the birth of her mother occurred near Dunlap, Sequatchie county, Tenn., September 26, 1826. They were the parents of six children: James A., Lizzie, John F., Mary A., Mattie and Laura E. The mother, who was a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal church, died August 19, 1873, and was buried at Shiloh. Mr. Mitchell was again married, July 15, 1877, his second wife being Mary J. Hudson. He is a prominent farmer of the Fifth district of Marion county, where he has lived for many years.

To Mr. And Mrs. Prigmore have been born three children, namely: Joe M., who was born March 13, 1890, and died October 23, 1895; Mary A., born June 21, 1892; and Victor E., born March 2, 1894. The parents hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and socially Mr. Prigmore is an active and prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. As a Democrat he has been prominently identified with local political affairs, and in 1886 he was triumphantly elected trustee of the county by a large majority, though the county is usually strongly Republican. The fact that he was elected plainly indicates his personal popularity and the confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow citizens.

GEN. JACKSON PRYOR is an honored and well-known citizen of Jasper. He was formerly one of its leading merchants and is one of the men to whom that city owes much of its present state of growth and prosperity. He is now living on a beautiful farm of three hundred acres situated scarcely outside the limits on the north side of the city.

Mr. Pryor was born in Morgan county, Tenn., January 15, 1816, a son of Green H. And Biddy (Halloway) Pryor, and the father was a son of Matthew Pryor. Matthew Pryor was a native of Virginia and moved from there to North Carolina, but soon after settled in Marion county, Tenn., where he spent the remaining years of his life on a farm. Green H. Pryor, the father of our subject, was born in North Carolina about the year 1787, and moved from thence to Marion county, Tenn., with his parents when a child. He served in the Creek Indian war under General Jackson, was a farmer by occupation, and died June 4, 1862, four years after the death of his wife. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom we have the following record: Jackson, the subject of this sketch; Polly A., deceased; Sampson, deceased; William, a farmer near Whitwell, Tenn.; Preston, who died in infancy; John, deceased; Washington, a farmer living on the old homestead; Anderson M., deceased; Jeremiah, deceased; Benjamin F., deceased; Eliza J., widow of Isham P. Alexander, and is now living with her brother, Jackson, the subject of this sketch; and Caroline Z. died in Arkansas.

Jackson Pryor was educated in the public schools of Marion county, and for a time was engaged in farming. He began selling goods in Jasper in the year 1838, and a few years later formed a partnership with W. S. Griffith. About two years later Mr. Pryor bought out his partner and carried on an extensive mercantile business alone until 1857. He then sold out to W. S. Griffith, his former partner, and L. P. Alexander, and returned to his farm, which is situated just north of the city, and has made that his home since 1861. He is a man of the very best character and of good business qualifications and as such is well respected throughout the county, and, as a token of the respect in which he is held, his fellow citizens have bestowed upon him the title of “General,” although he took no part in the war. Politically he is a Democrat, and, although he has never sought public honor, he once accepted the office of entry taker. In business matters and all matters tending to the welfare and improvement of Jasper and vicinity he has always proved a valuable factor. He has always sanctioned and given material aid in the development of all financial matters which tended to the better establishment of the business interests in jasper. The Pryor Institute was established here in 1889 by General Pryor, Col. A. L. Spears and Washington Pryor, and the institution was named “Pryor Institute” in honor of the subject of his sketch.

General Pryor has been twice married. He first met at the hymeneal altar Miss Beersheba L. Perkins who became his wife June 28, 1841. She was a daughter of Isam Perkins who moved, during the early part of his life, to Dade county, Ga., and sent his daughter to the Sam Houston Academy, in Marion county, Tenn., and it was while there that she formed the acquaintance with and was united in marriage to Mr. Pryor. She was born in Warren county, Tenn., in the year 1822, and died in Jasper, January 17, 1881. She was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. To this union were born four children: the first died in infancy; John; William G. And Elizabeth, all of whom died when young. July 18, 1882, our subject was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Hornbeck, who was born in Marion county, in 1839, the daughter of James H. Hornbeck. Mr. And Mrs. Pryor are both members in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal church, South.

JOHN H. PRYOR, a well-known general blacksmith and highly respected citizen of Whitwell, Marion county, was born at Jasper, November 4, 1867. After attending the common schools of his native city for some time he became a student in the Sam Houston Academy and later in Forest Hill College. During his boyhood and youth he became quite familiar with blacksmithing in his father’s shop, and in 1887 went to Chattanooga, where he accepted a position in the blacksmith and carriage shop of A. Fachtnech, remaining there three years and becoming thoroughly proficient in his chosen calling. On leaving Chattanooga he went to Harriman, Tenn., but shortly afterward came to Whitwell and entered the employ of the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., working in their blacksmith shop for two years. He then established a shop of his own at that place, and so successful has he been that he now gives employment to two hands and enjoys an excellent trade. He carries on both general blacksmithing and wagon making and the work turned out of his shop is first class in every particular.

Mr. Pryor was married on the 26th of August, 1888, the lady of his choice being Miss Fannie Miller, a daughter of Jacob Miller, of Dayton, Tennessee. They have two children living, Gracie and Lillie, and have lost one, Edley, who died at the age of three years. The parents are both worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, while politically Mr. Pryor is identified with the Democratic party, and socially is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Woodmen of the World, having held office in both.

WASHINGTON PRYOR, one of Marion county’s most extensive land owners, and a very prominent farmer and stock raiser, living in the Seventh district, near the city of Jasper, was born nine miles north of that city, November 14, 1824, a son of Green H. And Obedience (Holloway) Pryor, and Green H. was a son of Matthew Pryor.

Matthew Pryor, the grandfather of our subject, and his wife were both born in North Carolina, and he was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He moved with his family to Tennessee in an early day and settled on a farm in Roane county, and later moved to the Sequatchie valley, settled on a farm and died near Whitwell. Green H. Pryor, our subject’s father, was a farmer and stock trader by occupation, and died June 2, 1862, and his wife died a few years before. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. They were the parents of a family of twelve children, viz: Jackson, who is living in Jasper, Tenn.; Sampson, deceased; Mary, deceased; William, a farmer living near Whitwell; John, deceased; Washington, the subject of this sketch; Preston, who died while young; Anderson, deceased; Jeremiah, deceased; Benjamin F., deceased; Eliza, widow of I. P. Alexander, is living with her brother Jackson, in Jasper; and Caroline, deceased.

Washington Pryor, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the valley, in the public schools of the district in which his boyhood was spent, and after completing his course of study engaged in farming. At the breaking out of the war with Mexico, he enlisted as a private at Chattanooga, and went with the command to Memphis on flatboats, and from thence to Brazos Island, Camargo, Tampico, and to Vera Cruz in sailing vessels. He participated in the battle at the last named place, and then moved toward the city of Mexico, taking part in the battle of Cerro Gordo. He was discharged and returned to his home in the year 1847, having served in Haskal’s regiment, under Capt. William J. Standefer.

After the close of the was Mr. Pryor returned to his home and began farming and selling goods at Oates Landing. In 1850 he formed a partnership with Mr. Prigmore, and engaged in business for a time under the firm name of Pryor, Prigmore & Co. Our subject then bought out his partner and continued the store alone for several years, and also sold goods in Jasper until the breaking out of the Civil war. During this time he continued his farming operations in connection with his mercantile interests. He lost very heavily by the war, as the soldiers on both sides took his horses, mules, cattle, sheep, hogs and grain, and also robbed his store, burned his fences and plundered his house, and he also lost twenty-four slaves, and was left with nothing but his land. In 1866 he moved to Jasper and stayed one year, and then moved back to his farm near Oates Landing. In 1875 he continued his selling goods at that place, but after a few years he sold out and since has devoted his attention to farming and dealing in stock.

Mr. Pryor has been married three times, first to Miss Ruth Kelly, July 14, 1848, and to this union two children were born, viz: Sarah G., wife of Samuel Bennett, a farmer near Oates Landing; and William A., deceased. Mrs. Pryor died December 25, 1855, and in February, 1858, our subject was united in marriage to Miss Jane Reed. She died in 1871, and Mr. Pryor was married February 22, 1872, to Miss Mary A. Beene, who was born in Marion county, Tenn., August 16, 1838, daughter of O. R. and Martha (Roulston) Beene. Her grandparents were pioneers of Tennessee. Her grandfather Col. Joseph Roulston, and his father published the first newspaper published in Tennessee. She is the second child in the order of birth in a family of ten children, and attended school at the Sam Houston Academy at Jasper, and afterward attended the Robert Donnels Institute at Winchester. She was a member of the Primitive Baptist church. To this union have been born two children: Frances K., born February 12, 1873, and educated at the Nashville College for Young Ladies. She is still unmarried and is living with her parents, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. The younger child, Andrew W., married Miss Mollie E. Kelly. He is a miller by occupation, and lives but a few rods from his father’s home. Politically, our subject is a Democrat. He is a Master Mason, holding his membership at Jasper. As a farmer he is thorough and systematic, enterprising and progressive, and has become one of the wealthy and popular men of Marion county. His lands comprise more than five thousand acres.

HON. WILLIAM PRYOR, an honored resident and a wealthy and prominent farmer of Marion county, whose home is situated in the Fifteenth district, near Whitwell, was born in Marion county, February 27, 1821, a son of Green H. And Obedience (Halloway) Pryor. Green H. Was a son of Matthew and (Miss Neely) Pryor.

Matthew Pryor, the grandfather of our subject, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and drew a pension while he lived for his services. He moved with his family to Tennessee in an early day and settled on a farm in Roane county, and later moved to Marion county, settled on a farm in the valley, and died near Whitwell. Green H. Pryor, our subject’s father, was a farmer and stock trader by occupation, and died June 2, 1862, and his wife died a few years before. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. They were the parents of twelve children, viz: Jackson, who is living in Jasper, Tenn.; Sampson, deceased; Mary, deceased; William, the subject of this sketch; John, deceased; Washington, a farmer and stock raiser living in the Seventh district, Marion county; Preston, who died while young; Anderson, deceased; Jeremiah, deceased; Benjamin F., deceased; Eliza, widow of I. P. Alexander, is living with her brother Jackson in Jasper; and Caroline, deceased.

William Pryor, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of the Sequatchie valley, and afterward taught school for a few terms. He was married February 27, 1845 to Miss Amanda Prigmore, who was born June 22, 1822, in Marion county Tenn., a daughter of Ephraim and Margaret (Kelly) Prigmore. Her father was born in Pennsylvania, and went to Tennessee when a young man and died there about the year 1844. His wife died in 1864. They were the parents of a family of ten children, all of whom are now dead except Mrs. Pryor, and whose names in the order of their birth were as follows: James O., Anna, Joseph K., Eliza, Malinda, Amanda, Keziah M., Nancy K., Margaret D. And Ephraim L.

After his marriage our subject settled near the location of his present home, in the Fifteenth district, in a little cabin. In the fall of the same year he moved to Battle Creek, in the Tenth district, bought a farm there and made that his home two years. He then sold out and moved to Little Sequatchie Valley, in the Fourth district, bought a farm and lived there six years. This farm he traded to his father for the one he now owns and occupies, at once moved to it and has since made that his home. The farm originally comprised about one thousand acres, but Mr. Pryor has divided with his children and has also sold a part, and he now has scarcely five hundred acres. He deals extensively in cattle and hogs, and both in his agricultural and stock raising business he has been eminently successful. A few years ago he erected a saw and planing mill, and for several years did a large and profitable business. Later he added to it a cabinet factory, and he and his sons control the entire plant.

Mr. Pryor is also an old soldier, having joined the Union army in 1864, enlisting in Company C., Sixth Regiment of Tennessee Mounted infantry, and was mustered in at Hamilton county, Tenn. He was stationed in Hamilton county for some time, and was then made provost marshal. He also acted as a scout, and was in a great many skirmishes, but participated in none of the regular battles. He was at Dalton, Ga., Resaca, Ga., and at Nashville, Tenn., and was there mustered out June 30, 1865. Politically he is a Republican, and by that party has three times been elected justice of the peace and once a member of the legislature.

Our subject and Mrs. Pryor are the parents of a family of three children, of whom we have the following record: Mary A., born February 27, 1846, is the wife of William B. Hilliard, living on a part of Mr. Pryor’s original farm. To them have been born seven children, five of whom are living, viz: Carry A., Alexander W., James G. (deceased), Edgar L., Luther W. (deceased), Anna and Myrtle. The second child, Ephraim G. H., who was born August 29, 1849, lives not far from his father’s home, married Miss Icy Foster, and four children - Hallie, William, Dora A. And Samuel L. - have been born to them. The third child, Samuel L., was born October 26, 1852, and is also living in this district. He married Miss Lucy Williamson, and six children have been born to them, five of whom are still living: Maude E., Mary A., Milton, William (deceased), John and Eva.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PRYOR, JR. The motto “merit always commands its reward” is well exemplified in the career of him whose name introduces this sketch. This is a progressive age, and he who does not advance is soon left far behind. Mr. Pryor, by the improvement of opportunities by which all are surrounded, has steadily and honorably worked his way upward and has attained a fair degree of prosperity, being the present superintendent of coke ovens at Whitwell for the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co.

A native of Marion county, Mr. Pryor was born in Jasper, July 9, 1865, a son of Philip G. and Temperance (Prigmore) Pryor. The father was born one mile south of Whitwell, in the same county, September 9, 1832, and is a son of John H. And Harriet (Williams) Pryor, natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively, who on coming to Tennessee located in Roane county, whence they came to Marion county. Subsequently they lived for two years in Illinois and then returned to Marion county, Tenn., but in 1838 removed to Walker county, Ga., where they made their home for four years. Their next place of residence was in Hamilton county, Tenn., where the grandfather died in 1844, his wife surviving him several years and dying in Jasper. Both were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. She was a direct descendant of Roger Williams, who in early colonial days was banished from Massachusetts on account of his religious belief, and with his followers founded the colony of Rhode Island. Twelve children were born to John H. and Harriet Pryor, namely: Hayden, Matthew, Mary N., Nancy, Julia, Elizabeth A., Sarah A. And John, all now deceased: Phillip G., the father of our subject; Paul N., deceased; William A., who lives near Jasper; and Harriet, deceased.

In October, 1862, Philip G. Pryor joined the Confederate army as a private, but was soon promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in Captain League’s company, Colonel Smith’s regiment. After participating in the battle of Richmond, Ky., and other engagements, he resigned in January 1862, and returned home. In October of that year he married Temperance Prigmore, a daughter of J. O. Prigmore, and the children born to them are J. R., now a merchant of Whitwell; William A., of this review; J. H., a blacksmith, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Ollie, wife of William Richards of Texas; Annie, wife of James Grayson, who lives near Red Hill, Marion county; and Elizabeth, Ella and David, who are still with their parents. Since a young man the father has engaged in blacksmithing, but is also a millwright by trade, and is now following farming in connection with the former occupation. For six years he capably filled the office of justice of the peace, and for two years served as tax assessor of the Third district of Marion county. In 1870 he removed to Independence county, Ark., and after a residence there of two years located in Boone county, that state, but in 1875, returned to Marion county, and now makes his home at Ketner’s Cove. With the Methodist Episcopal church, South, he and his wife hold membership and their sterling worth and many excellencies of character have gained for them a host of warm friends.

The free schools of Marion county afforded our subject his early educational privileges, but later he was a student in the Looney Creek school and at the Hall in Sequatchie county. Under his father’s direction he learned the carpenter’s trade during his youth, and then commenced working at that occupation for the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Company, serving them in that capacity for two years. For the following two years he was in the mines, later was a timberman, and for four years was a weigher of coal. Since then he has most efficiently served as superintendent of the coke ovens, and has the confidence and esteem of his employers to a marked degree.

Mr. Pryor was married November 28, 1886 to Miss Maggie Gott, who was born near Inman, Marion county, a daughter of Rafael Gott, and they now have two children: Alton L. And Eugene A. The parents are both identified with the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Oak Grove, in which Mr. Pryor is now serving as ruling elder. He belongs to the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World fraternities, and as a Democrat has always taken an active part on local politics, doing all in his power to insure the success of his party. He is the present chairman of the executive committee of Marion county and ranks among the most honored counselors of his party, while his opinions and advice are often sought on questions of importance to his city and county. He is well informed on the leading questions and issues of the day, and is a most progressive and public-spirited citizen.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PRYOR, one of Marion county’s popular and well-to-do citizens, is carrying on an agricultural and horticultural business near the city of Jasper, in the Seventh district. He was born in Marion county, Tenn., September 16, 1837, a son of John H. and Harriet (Williams) Pryor. John Pryor is supposed to have been born in North Carolina, and was a son of William Pryor. Harriet (Williams) Pryor was a native of Virginia. Her father was a direct descendant of Roger Williams, of Rhode Island.

Our subject’s parents were married in the Sequatchie valley, and settled on a farm there. In 1838 they moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., where the father followed the cooper’s trade until his death, which occurred January 19, 1844. His wife then returned to jasper and spent the remaining years of her life in that city. She died in may, 1868. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics the father was a Whig. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom we have the following record: Hayden, deceased; Matthew, deceased; Mary N., deceased; Nancy J; Juda S., deceased; Betsey A., deceased; Sarah, deceased; Philip G., a farmer living on Looney creek, Marion county; Paul M., deceased; William A., the subject of this sketch; Harriet, deceased; and one who died in infancy.

William Alexander Pryor, the subject of this sketch, was educated in Chattanooga after which he followed the carpenter trade for a number of years. In 1863 he went to Kentucky to evade the war, but later enlisted in the Union army at Louisville. He was first sent to Nashville, and from thence to Lookout Mountain, where he served on detached duty until the close of the war. He was discharged in August, 1865, and returned to Lookout Mountain, where he had previously lived. In the beginning of the war he was arrested on account of his sympathy with the Union cause, and was taken to Bridgeport, Ala., and confined for about three weeks. A Confederate soldier then assisted him in making is escape about eleven o’clock one night in May, while the guard was asleep.

April 19, 1866, Mr. Pryor was united in marriage to Miss Louise Cox, who was born near Jasper, Marion county, Tenn., a daughter of George W. and Tabitha (Pearson) Cox, and their wedded life has been blessed by the advent of a family of four children: Hattie, deceased, was the wife of M. A. Wall; May, wife of R, B, Patton, a moulder living in South Pittsburg; Frederick died in childhood while his parents were living in Texas; and one who died in infancy. Mr. Pryor lived at Lookout Mountain about two years after his marriage, and then moved to Jasper and engaged for a time in the meat market business, but most of his time has been devoted to farming. In 1871 he moved to Grayson county, Texas, and, after making that his home about one year, returned to Marion county, Tenn., and began farming there. In 1892 he bought a tract of land three miles east of Jasper, in the Seventh district, and began farming on a scientific plan, making a specialty of small fruit. In this line of work he has been quite successful, and has become one of the substantial and well-to-do citizens of the district, and has accumulated considerable means. He and his wife are both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and he is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Politically he is a Republican, but has never aspired to office.

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September 21, 2003