Coal Mines

The map below was created in 1863 and shows some of the mine locations before the Civil War: Etna, Battle Creek, Whitwell, Victoria, Needmore, Orme, Inman, Whiteside, Tracy City, Dorans, Kelly's Ferry, Vulcan, Sweeden's Cove, Sequatchie, and Summit, with Castle Rock and Russell Gordon Mines below the State line, in Georgia. (Two very old coal mines near Mt. Eagle are not identified.)

Below the map you will find excerpts from the book: "OLD MINES and MINERS of MARION CO., TN" by Nonie Webb

"STORY of MINING in MARION,"

by Capt. John Frater
"The man who set up the mines in 1859."
(Capt Frater died in 1910, story was written in 1909)

Told in a most interesting and very informative manner, Capt. Frater takes you through the process of setting up each mine, one by one, from the crude methods of 1859 to the then "present day" modern methods.(1909). Mrs. Webb then added in the appropriate places old precious photographs of each mine to enhance his story and give the reader a more vivid picture of what Capt. Frater was relating to. (pages 10-37)

Excerpt:

The FIRST COAL MINES IN TENNESSEE were:

1831Rockwood MinesThe first coal shipped was by Capt. William Jackson.
1841Roane CountyLocation- One mile from the Rockwood Mines.
Allisson Howard, blacksmith
Using Charcoal to shod horses at Post Springs,TN
1843Sale CreekLocated in Northern part of Hamilton Co., TN.
1852Etna MinesLocated in MARION Co, TN (on top of Etna Mtn)
1853 Rhea County 
1854Battle Creek Mineslocated in Marion Co., TN. (Southwest end)
1854White Co., TNBon Air
1877James Bowron and Assoc. brought into the Marion Co. valley sufficient capital to develop the Iron and Coal Industries. Coal Mines were opened in Whitwell, Coke Ovens built in Victoria, Iron oar was obtained from Inman, and Smelter erected in South Pittsburg. Coal was worked in Georgia and Alabama and Shipped to Shellmound in Marion Co.,TN. Marion Co. had claim on it as Coal development.


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