1915 & 1922 Overton County News - Contributed by Shirley

The Enterprise
Wednesday, March 10, 1915
$1.00 per year

COOKEVILLE ROUTE 7
We are having some nice weather and the farmers are putting in full time.
There has been far more oats sown than ever before, in this neighborhood.
Miss Ada Moody, E. A. Hassler, and Case Bilbrey are on the sick list this week.
L. F. Myers has installed a telephone in his home; he is on the Hilham Exchange.
A. C. Brown, who has been very sick, is doing nicely and we believe he will recover.
Jim Warden is recovering.
Jo Hide.

LIVINGSTON R-2
Mr. Kelley Brooks of Livingston, has moved here to work at A. T. Lewis, shuttle mill.
"Uncle" Fed Sells has pneumonia fever.
S. G. Flowers visited J. K. Garrett
Saturday and Sunday.
Mack Sidwell, of Allons, was here Saturday on business.
Jim Hill has recently bought a tract of land from J. C. Bilbrey.
Mrs. Ella Garrett, of Maryland, visited relatives here last week.
Several from here attended the County Union at Livingston.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Robbins, on the 3rd a boy.

Twenty Years Ago
In Livingston
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise, dated
Thursday, Feb. 28, 1895

Little Herman Estes has been sick this week.
There is some efforts being made to incorporate the town.
Jas. Hensen is able to be out again after many weeks confinement from a horse kick.
Miss Josie Coward left this morning for Columbia, Ky., where she will take charge of a paper for this year.
J. B. Dale moved into his new cottage last Saturday.
Bob Officer has been appointed Clerk and Master by T. J. Fishe, Chancellor. Mr. Officer is a young man of Judicial cast of Mind and will make an efficient officer.
Several drummers in town this week Wick Cabbon, Lem Robbins, B. S. Minor and last but not least, Gillem Maxwell. Gillem stayed several days and cussed the snow.-Celina Correspondent.
Married on the 13th inst., Isham Richards to Miss Etta Bilbrey.
___________________________

The February groundhog and the March lamb may have been having a joke with us after all.

The Bowers measure to repeal the Capital punishment law has passed first reading in the lower house by a safe majority, and its friends predict for it a safe journey through both branches of the legislature.

_____________________________

Non-Resident
To Charles C. Brooks
First National Bank of Harriman
Vs
G. C. Stockton et al
In Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tenn.
No. 1452
In this cause it appearing from all which is sworn to that Charles C. Brooks is a non-resident of the state. He is therefore hereby required to appear on or before the fourth Monday in March next before the Clerk and Master at his office in Jamestown, and make defense to the bill filed against him by the First National Bank of Harriman or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed and the cause proceeded with exparte as to him. It is further ordered that this notice is published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This 12th day of Feb. 1915.
C. K. McBroom C & M

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
Mary Cooper
Vs
Thomas Cooper
In Chancery at Byrdstown, Tenn.
In appearing in this cause by the return of the Sheriff that Thomas Cooper, the defendant is a non-resident of the state of Tennessee, so that the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon him; he is therefore hereby required to appear before the Clerk & Master at his office in the town of Byrdstown, Tenn., on or before the first Monday in April, 1915, and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court, Jan. 4, 1915, by Mary Cooper, or same will be taken as confessed, it is further ordered that this notice shall be published for four consecutive weeks in The Livingston Enterprise a newspaper published in Livingston, Overton county Tenn.
This Jan. 1st 1915
C. B. Parris C. & M.
White & McDonald sols for complt.

 

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
Walter Newberry
Vs
Arizona Newberry
In Chancery at Byrdstown, Tenn.
In this case, it appearing by the sheriff's returns that the defendant in this case, Arizona Newberry, is a non-resident of the state of Tennessee, so that the ordinary process of law can not be served upon her she is therefore hereby required to appear before the Clerk & Master at his office in the town of Byrdstown, Tenn., on or before the first Monday in April 1915, and make defense to the bill filed against her in said court on
Feb. 9th 1915 by Walter Newberry, or same will be taken as confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice shall be published for four consecutive weeks in the Enterprise, a newspaper published in Livingston, Overton county Tennessee
This January 1st 1915
C. B. Parris C. & M.
White & McDonald Sol for complt.

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
J. L. Garrett
Vs
Eliza Jane Garrett
No. 1453
In Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tenn.,
In this cause it appearing from a bill, which is sworn to, that Eliza Jane Garrett is a non-resident of the State; she is therefore hereby required to appear on or before the 4th Monday in March next, before the Clerk & Master, at his office in Jamestown, and make defense to the bill filed against her by J. L. Garrett or otherwise the bill will be take for confessed. It further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in The Livingston Enterprise.
This 17th day of Feb. 1915
C. K. McBroom C & M

 

Professional Cards

N. C. Sidwell Chas. C. Gore
Celina Livingston
SIDWELL & GORE
Lawyers
Office over Farmer's Bank
Livingston, Tennessee.
__________________

W. J. CHILTON
LAWYER
Will practice in all the courts of
OVERTON, PICKETT AND CLAY
COUNTIES
__________________________

G. A. CULLOM,
Dentist
Office Upstairs in Officer Brick
LIVINGSTON, TENNESSEE
__________________________

Dr. M. B. Capps
OFFICE
Same Old Stand.
Home Phone …….. No. 34
Gainesboro Phone ……No. 34
LIVINGSTON, TENN.
___________________________

Drs. Breeding & Smith
OFFICE
KNIGHT BUILDING
LIVINGSTON, TENN.
________________

O.C. CONATSER
M.M. ROBERTS
Conatser & Roberts
Lawyers
Will practice in all the Courts of this and adjoining counties.
Office in Roberts Building.
_____________________

FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
IF YOU WANT LIFE INSURANCE
You must get it when you are well. If you want FIRE INSURANCE get it before the Fire. I am prepared to give you either and with companies as good as the best, Companies that pay just losses. Call on me before it is too late.
T. B. COPELAND, AGENT
____________________

Tennessee Central Railroad
Excellent Passenger Service to All Points.
If you intend traveling to any point in any direction, call or write our nearest Tennessee Center Railroad Agent, of address.
J. E. SHIPLEY,
Assistant General Passenger Agent,
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
_______________________

RAY BURKS
DRUGGIST
Nothing but the purest of drugs used.
Your business will be appreciated
North-West Corner of Square.
_________________________

No Life is Wasted.
No life is wasted in the great worker's hand. The gem too poor to polish in itself we grind to brighten others. - Philip James Bailey.

LOCAL NEWS
G. W. Dillon S. is real sick.

Atty. J. T. Wheeler, of Jamestown, is here attending Circuit Court.

P. C, Bowman, of Chattanooga, was here Monday.

H. Comer Moore, of Cookeville, passed through Livingston Saturday, on route home from Kentucky.

Mrs. S. B. Harward is real sick this week. She is at the home of parents.

Mrs. A. G. Keisling and niece, Mrs. Jesse Stone, are visiting relatives at Nettle Carrier.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Boswell, of near Monterey, were the week end guests of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Ledbetter.

Miss Esther McGee, formerly of this place, and for three years a designer for D. Loveman & Co., Nashville, will be at Algood this spring we are very sure she will enjoy a nice business.

A. S. Swallows of Algood, R. 1, gave us a call Tuesday.

Chief of Police, Bur Smith, has moved from the residence of Dr. M. J. Qualls, where he had an apartment, to the property recently vacated by Will Chatwell.

K. L. Bilbrey of Crossville, was in town recently on business.

Rev. Kates, wife, and son of Cookeville, spent Saturday and Sunday here. Ray Kates preached the morning and night sermons at the First Baptist Church.

Mrs. B. F. Arneld and Miss Pearl Johnson visited relatives at Willow Grove from Friday till Monday.

Uncle Ben Frank Smith gave us a call Tuesday.

?. P. Myers of Windle, visited Mrs. M. J. Qualls Saturday.

C. B. Arnod was a recent guest of the Maynord House.

Mrs. Dr. McDonald and little son, Morrauson, of Dayton, are visiting relatives here this week.

It is reported a few of the boys were caught smoking but were not expelled from school.

John Roberts, who has been sick for some weeks, went to Nashville Saturday for medical treatment. He was accompanied by Dr. M. B. Capps, who placed him under the care of Dr. Brush of that city. It is to be hoped that John will soon begin to recuperate, and that it will not be long until he has entirely recovered.

Judge C. E. Snodgrass is holding the regular term of Circuit Court here this week.

Mr. & Mrs. H. E. Speyers of Algood visited relatives and friends here this week.

W. A. Garrett of Jamestown was in Livingston several days last week on legal business.

Mr. Daniel Brown, an aged and highly respected citizen of this county, died at his home near Hilham Sunday.

Vince Hargis of Crawford, was in town Monday.

W. C. Crawford of Windle was here this week.

R. F. Jones of Route 4 was in town Monday.

Willie Waits, of Miranda, was here Wednesday on business.

Mr. Sones, President of the Geisser Mfg. Co., of Nashville, is attending court here this week.

Mrs. Johnson, of Byrdstown, is still very sick at the Roberts house.

Dr. and Mrs. A. B. Qualls and son, A. B. Jr., spent Thursday with Dr. Qualls' parents at Bushing.

J. W. B. Stone, is here from Algood.

Misses Lou West and Sallie Bilbrey visited homefolks at Rickman and Oak Hill, over Sunday.

Dock Myers has moved his shoe shop into the Henson property on the north side of the square.

T. L. Breeding, of Spring Creek, transacted business here Wednesday.

Rev. W. M. Lautrip returned from Celina, Saturday and preached to his congregation Sunday.

The meeting at the Christian church is still in progress.

Revising a Maxim.
You can fool all the men all the time - if you are a woman. - Florida Times Union


Livingston Enterprise
Wednesday, March 17, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor and Publisher

Subscription Rates
One Year 1.00
Six Months .50
Three Months .25
Payable in Advance

(Headline)
LIV. ACADEMY VS CASTLEHEIGHTS
BASEBALL FRIDAY MARCH 26

 

OPERATION NECESSARY

John Roberts who went to Nashville about ten days ago and entered a hospital there for medical attention, will undergo an operation today necessitated from an abscess on the stomach. While the operation is a rather serious one, his physicians think he has a good chance to come out from under it safely. The Enterprise shares the hope of all the people of Livingston that the operation may prove entirely successful. Dr. J. Doak Capps and C. A. Roberts left yesterday for Nashville to be with him during the operation.

Dr. J. M. Shelton, a former resident of this county, died at Bushnell, Fla., a few days ago. Dr. Shelton was one of the most widely known and popular men of Overton county for a number of years, and his death will be heard of with people in all ranks of life.

Negroes of the A. M. E. Church at Nashville have gotten up a petition against the abolishment of capital punishment by the present legislature, giving as their reason, that it will tend to increase mob violence against their race. There is undoubted some room for this argument, and it should be weighed carefully before the law is passed. Capital punishment has obtained in all southern states since their inception of abolishing the law just yet, until the race problem is more fully solved.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION
To I. J. Reagan
Korman-Sawyer & Co. et al.
V
Reagan & Robbins, et al.
In the Chancery Court at Brydstown, Tenn.
In this cause it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that I. J. Reagan one of the defendants, is a non-resident of the state, he is, therefore hereby required to appear, on or before the 1st Monday of May next, before the Clerk & Master of said Court, at his office in Byrdstown and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court by Korman-Sawyer & Co., Orr Jackson & Co., et al. otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed and the case proceeded with exparte as to him.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in The Livingston Enterprise, a paper published in Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee.
This 10th day of March 1915.
C. B. Parris C. & M.

 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Korman-Sawyer & Co.
Orr Jackson & Co., et al.
Vs
Reagan & Robbins, et al.

In Chancery Court at Byrdstown, Tenn.
In obedience to a fiat or order of the Honorable A. H. Roberts, Chancellor etc. All creditors of the defendants Reagan & Robbins, et al are hereby notified that a general creditors bill has been filed in this case by Korman-Sawyer & Co, et al and the assignment heretofore made is hereby injoined. Said creditors are required to come in by petition and file and prove their respective claims against defendants on or before the 9th day of October 1915, or they will be excluded from the benefits of this proceeding.
C. B. Parris C. & M & Special Receiver

 

Local News
Eld. Leland Cook is confined to his room with lagrippe.

H. Comer Moore, of the Gainesboro Telephone Co., was in Livingston Tuesday.

The snow put the sporting page out of commission.

Carl Maynord, Turley Knight, Clarance Arnold, and Dixie Smith visited relatives at Windle Sunday.

V. B. Holland spent Saturday and Sunday here.

M. D. Mille is in Byrdstown _____________.

G. W. Carmack of Hilham, made a business trip to Nashville the first of the week.

Sheriff A. J. Carr, is in Nashville this week.

B. M. Stanton has been in and around Cookeville for the past ten days.

Hon. W. J. Matthews, Jr., spent the weekend with home folks at Windle.

Mr. Colvert, of the firm of Waller-Colvert Produce Co. was in Algood Sunday.

Rev. Kates will fill his semi-monthly appointment at the First Baptist Church Sunday.

Mrs. Velma Riley of Algood, was the weekend guest of Mrs. J. W. Henson.

Mrs. H. M. Cornwell of Algood, was the weekend guest of her sister, Mrs. Will K. Draper, and was also a guest of Mrs. Adkin while here.

W. H. Wright, of T. K. & N. R. R. Co, has registered at the Maynord House for the week.

Mrs. Jas. Clark ne Miss Laura Cornwell, of Algood, spent the week end with Mrs. Will K. Draper. Mrs. Clark was at one time one of the most popular girls in school at this place.

Misses Anna Mai and Goldy Lee ___, of Algood, were recent visitors of Mrs Robert Poston.

Rev. B. J. Rochell and sons, Robert and Wilbur, of Celina, spent Sunday here. Rev. Rochell preached at the Methodist church Sunday night.

Miss Beuna Maynord visited home folks Saturday night. She is with the millinery department of Harp & Pointer at Algood.

T. F. Stephens has accepted a position with C. T. Cheek & Sons, and will make the territory that W. T. Goff made.

Robert Oakley and Miss Ellis, W. H. Estes and Miss Bilbrey, spent Sunday afternoon at Windle Yachting.

The Juniors of Livingston Academy will entertain the Seniors Friday evening at the Sarah Preston Home.

B. M. Johnson of Cookeville, was in town this week.

Jas. Clark and daughter, Gladys, of Algood, were in town Sunday.

Mrs. W. C. Williamson of Granville Tenn, is visiting her mother Mrs. Windle, of this place.

J. T. Stonecipher is in Nashville this week, his son, Homer, being in change of the business.

Irvin Eldridge has been confined to his bed with pneumonia for several days, but is reported to be better.

Tom and Gideon Lowe, of Cookeville, were in town first of the week on business.

To the Taxpayers of Overton Co.
The delinquent tax will not go out of my hands until April 15th. I will be in my office in Livingston every Monday and Saturday to receive Taxes.
T. D. Gragg, Trustee.

Mrs. W. D. Roberts, of Des Moines, Iowa, arrived today for a visit to the family Mrs. C. A. Roberts.

Route -2
Walter Brown, and family, of Eagle Creek, visited friends and relatives here last week.

Mrs. John Connor, of Willow Grove, is visiting her father, M. V. Bilbrey.

J. G. Taylor, on of the most esteemed citizens, has moved to Pickett County.

Willie Waits, of Miranda, was here last week on business.

The farmers are utilizing their time during the fine weather.
Vulean


Livingston Enterprise
March 24, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher
Vol XXIII: No 12

Twenty Years Ago
In Livingston
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise dated, Thursday, Jan. 17, 1895

A. L. Dale moved into the Reed House Tuesday.

Dan Frisbie and wife have moved to town.

Robt. E. Bilbrey, County Supt., was married on the 17 to a Miss Miller. May you live long and prosper:, Bob.

Our barber is up to all styles of hair cutting. He is located on the East side of the square.

Cold weather is prevailing.

Mrs. Annie Walker of Manfield, Tex., is visiting her father, J. H. Speck of this place.

Mrs. Rhoda Estes has been sick for the pas few days.

Fed Deck and Sons have bought the livery stable from J. M. Sparkman.

Several Oil men in town this week.

Dr. Story of Travisville was in town yesterday.

____________________________________
News From Neighboring Counties

Jackson County Sentinel
The hand of the five years old son of Nathan Stafford's was nearly severed by his older brother last Friday. They were out playing, and while using a sharp ax the accident happened.

Booz
Dear Editor and Friends:
Here I come for a little chat; the farmers have been busy preparing their soil for the next crop.
The snow looked very discouraging in this part the first of the week.
Sunday School is progressing nicely at Ivy Point under the management of J. R. Hammons.
The singing school closed at Hickory Flat Sunday.
Mrs. Lizzie Hammock, who has been very sick for a few days, is much better. Mrs. Hammons who has also been ill, is considerably better.
There will be a Sunday School organized at Hickory Flat Sunday evening at 2:30 P. M.
Rev. J. R. Hammons will preach at the home of Mr. Mat French on Sunday evening.
I suppose Misses Milda French and Artie Looper were lonesome
Sunday evening.
Rev. Hufflies filled his regular appointment at Hickory Flat with a large attendance.
There are good prospects of your having a Home Phone in our section at once.
Lona Neely visited her sister, Mrs. Looper, Tuesday.
Ernest Ledbetter attended church at Shiloh Sunday afternoon, also at Hickory Flatt Sunday evening.
There will be an all day singing at Ivy Point the first Sunday in ______.
I will come again in the near future.
Happy Girl

Netherland
Mrs. R. T. Carr, who has been ill is improving.
Will and Richard E. Poteet of Dixie College spent the week end with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Poteet.
Miss Esther Henson has returned from a two weeks visit with her sister, Mrs. C. N. Elrod of Cookeville.
J. W. Pickett of Madison was in this vicinity recently.
Robert Little of Livingston was here recently.
J. W. Morgan is drilling a well for Tom R. Poteet.
Newton Poston has moved his family from Rickman to this place.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Williams are the happy parents of a girl.
Mrs. W. F. Judd has been quite sick but is reported better.
Pinkig Prim

Livingston - R 2
J. E. Converse from the State Experimental Station, Nashville, lectured on Farm Work and Improvement Thursday near here.
The Sunday School Convention at Independence which was held Sunday, was opened by Ed Carl Wright, Rev. Neighbors, S. A. D. Smith, and Van Smith made interesting talks.
Eox Metton and Miss Lee Ermie Chowhing were married recently.
A Sunday School will be organized at Taylors X Roads Sunday Mar. 28th.

For the Seniors
Owing to the illness of Miss Cook the Juniors of Livingston Academy entertained the Seniors Friday evening at the home of Miss Mary Price Miller instead of Sarah Preston Home.
The rendering of high grade music and the ices served were the features of the evening. The good spirits of the Juniors went below zero when some one had stolen part of dainty ices that were to be served.
The ices were beautifully monogrammed with the dear old alma mater colors predominating.
On departing the guests expressed the true meaning as to what Alma Mater spirit of the white and blue gives - fellowship, loyalty, and love.

The poultry business season is on. We will begin running cars this week Paying today 13 cents lb. for hens and ducks. You will find us at the same old stand with a price that is always guaranteed to be the top of the market. Our outlet is unlimited, Our paying prices are never beat on this market. We risk nothing but honest, capable hands to handle your business. Satisfaction is absolutely guaranteed. We are here permanently located to stay. Your business could not be more appreciated by any one.
Help us and we will you,
Morgan Produce Co.,
A. J. Mofild, Mgr.

Local News
Mrs. J. A. Barnes is confined to her room with lagrippe.
Little Margaret Miller has been quite sick the past week.
Chas. P. Gray has returned from Nashville.
Miss Lura Maynard is the guest of her sister, Miss Beuna, at Algood.
Miss Ruth Myers, of Windle, is with her sister, Mrs. M. J. Qualls.
Miss Lou West is real sick at the Sarah Preston Home.
Rev, W. M. Lantrip was in Nashville last week on business.
Atty, E. C. Knight is attending Chancery court at Jamestown.
Mrs. Oakley went to Monterey yesterday to visit Mrs. M. A. Copeland, who is very sick.
Robt. Bussell, of Algood, was the guest of his brother, T. A. Bussell, over Sunday.
Robert, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Officer, has been quite sick for the past few days.
Miss Margaret Bilbrey is confined to her room this week with lagrippe.
Col. Robt. Poston is able to be out again after being confined to his room for several days.
Miss Kate Cook, of Hilham, is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. R. L. Mitchell.
Mrs. Will Jernigan, of Algood, visited relatives here first of the week.
Hardy Draper, of Red Boiling Springs, was here last week looking after business interests.
J. Merchison, of Toronto, Canada, who has been at the West Side for several days has returned home.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wright and son, Clark, have returned from a visit with relatives at Nashville.
W. A. Ownsby and Miss Olg Conatser recently attended the funeral of Mr. Ownsby cousin, Mrs. Savage at Flat Creek.
Miss Cook, one of L. A.'s most popular teachers, has been very sick with appendicitis, she's reported improving.

Hens Wanted-Paying today 13 cents er pound.
Morgan Produce Co.
A. J. Mofield, Mgr.

Sunday is "Every" member day at the Methodist church, and this means that every member should be present.
T. F. Stephens, having other business interest that occupied his time, sold his Livery stables to Willard Speck.
The Gainsboro Telephone Co. are installing several new phones in town. Some of those having phones put in are B. & O. Drug Co., Willard Speck Livery, A. J. Mofield, residence, and J. H. Atkins, residence.
We are pleased to report that the operation undergone by John Roberts at Nashville last Wednesday, was a success, and that he is getting on as well as could be expected under the circumstances and has a splendid chance to be out and well again before a great while.
W. L. Guthrie, assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Crossville, spent the week end here with his mother, Mrs. W. S. Guthrie.
Eld. Leland Cook failed to fill his appointment at the Christ Church Sunday, being ill with a bad case of lagrippe.

Prof, X la Rue, hypnotist and mind reader gave two very interesting entertainments at the Livingston Academy auditorium, Monday and Tuesday nights of this week, under the auspicese of the Young Ladies Missionary Society of the M. E. Church South.
The work of the Professor is far above the average, and is undoubtedly a splendid entertainer in his line, as was attested by the apparent appreciation of the people of Livingston in the attendance accorded him.

The Enterprise is having a Gainesboro telephone installed this week, and we hope our patron will help us by keeping same busy transmitting the news of the town and county. We also have a Home phone in our office, and any news we may get over either will be greatly appreciated. If the public will co operate with us in this way, we shall be able to get out a really newsy paper, but without their help, it is an up hill job to glean news from over the county. We are in the business to serve the public, and we want all the news we can gather. Help us to make the Enterprise the newsiest of newspapers and then it will be enjoyed by all the people.

ANNOUNCEMENT!
Beginning the first of April, The Enterprise will furnish its readers with a monthly Magazine sup'lement got up especially for Farmers. This magazine will be edited by experienced and scientific agriculturalists and will be invaluable to farmers.

TEN LIES
Here are ten lies which are often heard, according to the amiable Arthur Hull of La_____.
My wife and I have never exchanged a cross word.
Yes, we're out, but we've just ordered a lot of it.
I never would care to be rich, just comfortably fixed.
I'd just like to have been in his place. I'd have showed them.
If I'd catch a kid of mine at anything like that I'd blister him.
If you don't think it's a good thing for you I don't want you to do it.
If I had that woman for a little while I'd teach her a few things.
If I had just a little money I know here I could go out and make a pile.
I don't care anything for the money. It was the principle of the thing.
I've never seen such weather before.
Kansas City


Livingston Enterprise
Wednesday, March 31, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

Subscription Rates
One Year $1.00
Six Months .50
Three Months .25

Advertising Rates
Display ads on first page 15 cents per inch each insertion column width on all other pages 10 cents per inch.
Reading notices one cent a word each insertion.
Obituaries, resolutions of respect etc. charged for at the rate of one cent a work, in excess of 200 words.
Where no time for display advertisement to run is specified they will be charged for until called out.
All reading notices discontinued after insertions unless by special contract.
All accounts for advertising due when contract closes, or at the end of each month.

 

Movement on Foot
To Revoke Charter of Livingston.
It is reported on good authority that a movement is on foot to hold an informal election next Saturday to ascertain the will of the people of the town in reference to the repeal of the act incorporating the town of Livingston.
If this should be done, the contract with the school would thereby be annulled and pool rooms would take the place of the school. The school could not hope to run with out the protection of an incorporation. Quite a number of the citizens within the corporate limits, especially those on the outskirts of the town favor the repeal of the town charter upon the idea that they would thereby be relieved of the bond issue; but this is a mistake for the county court would levy the tax on the same taxpayers in order to pay interest on the bonds. Besides, these citizens get the benefit of a free school, whereas they would have to send elsewhere or pay tuition, if they were to go out of the corporate limits.
If anything along this line is done, we suggest that the charter of town be amended so as to cut down the corporate limits to a smaller area, and thus leave the contract with the school in full force and permit it to continue.

Livingston R 2
Sunday school was organized last Sunday at Taylors X Roads.
Rev. W. M. Brown filled the pulpit at Taylors X Roads Sunday.
Miss Pearl Wisdom spent Saturday and Sunday with home folks.
W. T. Bilbrey started to Nashville today for a short stay.
Mr. C. E. Davis and Miss May Coleman married last Sunday, Rev. L. P. Reeder officiating.
Rev. S. Flowers is quite sick with grip.
Rev. Curtis Harvey preached at Possomtrot Sunday.
Prof. Oscar Smith had an all day singing at the Hall Sunday.
Oscar _ays spent last week with his uncle John Conner at Willow Grove.
Vulcan.

News From Neighboring Counties
Jackson County Sentinel-

Dr. M. P. Loftis has been critical ill for several days with pneumonia. His condition is somewhat improved.
Mrs. Mary Jane Lock, wife of A. S. Lock; died at her home near Stone Wednesday morning at 4 o'clock from heart failure.
Sheriff J. L. Young carried Tom Brown to Cookeville Thursday where he was given a hearing before Judge Snodgrass for bail. This was fixed at $5,000; which has not been made.
C. T. Huffines, of Dycus, was in Gainesboro Saturday en route to Murfreesboro, where he will attend the Spring term of the State Normal.
Putnam County Herald-
The foundation of the ice plant is being laid this week, and the structure will be put up right away.
Rev. E. A. Cate, pastor of the Baptist church who has been seriously ill for several days is considerably improved.
Mrs. S. A. D. Smith, of Livingston, who has been visiting Miss Laura Copeland and other friends here, also attending the meeting at the Presbyterian church has returned to her home.
The town of Baxter is to have their first city election Saturday and will elect a mayor, four aldermen, recorder, justice of the peace, constable and three school directors.
The town was only recently incorporated by the present legislature

L. A. Nine wins the Game
"Sports"
On Monday afternoon the promising young athletes which Coach Cook expects to whip into a great baseball machine. Took their first game of the season from the old Stars of the town by a score of 9 to 5. The Lads of the Blue and White showed very plainly that they were in mid-season form.
There were a number of errors made by the town, but, had they been in form they would not have been able to stop the lads of the Blue and White.
There was much gloom in the L. A. Camp over the illness of Eubank their Varsity catcher. But the position was ably filled by Stonecipher who is a promising young catcher.
Several candidates were tried out and all showed class both in the field and with the stick. The L. A. lads kept the opposing team busy chasing the ball and at no time did they show signs of weaking.
Gunnels who pitched a splendid game for L. A. allowed one to go straight over the rubber which Fleming hit for three bases.
More than once did Gunnels come out of the hole by the help of the lads behind him when the bases were stacked.
C. Mitchell who twirled for the town pitched a good game, but support was lacking.
L. A. has several hard games scheduled for the coming season, their hardest one being with Castle Heights on April the 17th.
A long road is being arranged with teams in East Tenn., including Milligan College and Carson Newman College.
Coach Cook and Manager Mitchel are very proud of the showing made by their young hopefuls.

Clay County
Bill Fiske's Bugle-
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Vaughn went to Livingston Saturday to spend a few days with friends at that place.
Eb Holman returned first of the week from Granite, Okla. He has been away for about three years and says he will return again soon.
J. D. Bunte, of Fox Springs who accidently mashed his foot with a rock several days ago is able to be out again with the aid of crutches.

NOTICE
A meeting of the citizens and tax payers of the town of Livingston is hereby called at the 7 o'clock next Friday night April 2, 1915 for the purpose of discussing the proposed repeal of the act incorporating the town and the proposed amendment restricting the corporate limits to a much smaller area, and the proposition to test the legality of the $10,000 R. R Bond issue and any other matter of public interest to the town.
Every citizen of the town is urged to be present and participate in these proceedings.
Very Respectfully
W. D. Guthrie, Mayor

TWENTY YEARS AGO
IN LIVINGSTON
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise dated, Thursday,
Jan. 31, 1895.

Mrs. R. L. Burks has been very low but is some better.
The many friends of Dr. M. B. Capps will be glad to know of his return to the city. He has moved his family into the Phillip Myers house.
Brother Hatcher will preach at the Methodist church Saturday night.
The Fair Directors met last Saturday night and accepted the report of the finance committee The committee reports on hand about $700.
The Nashville burner is "cussing" the legislature black and blue.
The contest bill has passed both houses of the legislature. The Hon. Cordell Hull opened the debate in lower house with an able speech.

The State Senate ought to kill the bill abolishing capital punishment recently passed by the House. This bill is the product of sentimentalism run mad and should not be allowed to become a law in Tennessee. The fear of punishment prevents crime and death by hanging or electrocution is now the most effective preventive. Already the murder rate in this state is large as punishment is made lax. With the abolition of capital punishment lynchings will become more frequent and general disregard of the law will increase. The senate should kill this bill. Summer Co. Times.

The legislature proposes to make the man who imports a gallon of booze drink it all himself. That would be capital punishment. Giles County Record

LOCAL BREVITIES
The Livingston Cornet Band have organized once more and are contemplating getting a teacher from Nashville. There are at present 15 signed members, and more are thinking seriously of joining.
Reports say that George Dillon is steadily improving.
John Roberts is still getting on nicely and hopes to get out of the hospital in a few days.

Mr. Eliot Copeland one of our most progressive citizens has been experimenting with citrus fruits in his hot house, and has grown some of the most wonderful lemons that we have ever seen. One tree bore more than twenty lemons this past season, varying in weight from one half to two and one-quarter pounds and measuring something like three and one half inches in diameter. He grew as many as one hundred oranges on one tree. Of course the oranges were not so large as the lemons, but they are fair sized and go to show what a little culture and care will result in.

Atty. Grover C. Peek of Crossville, visited relatives in this county this week.

The wife of Mr. Thomas Moore, of Rickman, this county, gave him to three baby girls a few days ago and we understand they are all three thriving and are apparently in the pink of condition. One of the trio weighed five pounds, while the other two tipped the scales at three and one-half pounds each.

OPERATION
Mrs. John R. Bullock was operated on last week by Drs. Breeding & Smith, and at present is doing very nicely. This is the fourth operation undergone by Mrs. Bullock and it is believed that she will derive great benefit from this one.
The physicians state that they ex_acted about five quarts of fluid from the abdomen.

E. C. Goodpasture is in Nashville.

W. R. Officer is attending Criminal court at Carthage.
Jesse Coe, of Byrdstown is here visiting his brother Carlyle Coe, who is a Senior in L. A.
John Boyd, of Hilham, was here Tuesday on business.
M. Stanton, traveling salesman of Cookeville, is in town this week.
Miss Margaret Cooper is out of school this week on account of sickness.
Elmo Eubank is real sick this week.
Mrs. H. Atkins, who has been visiting friends in Nashville, returned home Sunday.
Latta Conway Loftis, of this office, is in Nashville this week on business.
Asa Crawford and Miss Auda Moore of Windle, were in town last week.
C. N. Gracy, of Cookeville was in town last week.
Carl Mofield of Castle Heights spent the week end with his parents Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Mofield.

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
E. C. Knight, et al
Vs.
Albert Smith et al
In the Chancery Court at Livingston, Tennessee

To Lockie Taylor, Gladys Smith, William Smith, Albert Smith, Jr., Henry Smith and Emma Smith.
It appering from the bill in this cause, which is sworn to, that Lockie Taylor, Gladys Smith, William Smith, Albert Smith, Jr., Henry Smith and Emma Smith Delina (Smith) Neighbors and her husband ________ Neighbors are justly indebted to E. C. Knight and M. C. Sidwell, the complainants and that they reside our of the State, and an attachment having been issued and levied on the defendants property, it is ordered that publication be made for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise, requiring said defendants to appear before the Clerk and Master of said Court on the 1st Monday in May, next and make their defense to the bill filed against them in this cause otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed, and the cause proceeded with ex parte.
This March 30, 1915
Jno. A. Hargrove, C. and M.
E. C. Knight, Sol.

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
M. H. Weeks
Vs
Smith & Barlow
In Chancery Court at Livingston, Tenn.
In this cause it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that E. F. Marlow, one of the defendants, is a non-resident of the state. He is therefore, hereby, required to appear on or before the first Monday in May, next before the Clerk and Master of said Court at his office in Livingston, and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court, by M. H. Weeks, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This March 30, 1915.
Jno. A. Hargrove, C. & M.
J. T. Wheeler, C. J. Cullom, Sols for complt

LOCAL BREVITIES
J. W. Cash, of Nashville is visiting his mother at this place.
Miss Willie Harris, Private Secretary to Congressman Cordell Hull is at home.
Mrs. Benton M. Johnson and family of Cookeville, passed through town yesterday, enroute to Byrdstown, for a visit to relatives.
Dr. Key, of Kansas City, Mo., is here attending Jess Fleming's mother who has been very low with a peculiar case of rheumatism for some time. She comes highly recommended, and we trust she will be able to give aid to the case.
Dallas Gilliam, formerly of Winchester, has moved his family back to Overton county and is now living on route four.

Resolutions of Respect
Resolved; that whereas, on April 2, 1915, God in his infinite wisdom, removed from our midst our faithful brother and beloved friend, R. W. Boswell; therefore be it resolved:
1st-That we the Knights of Pythias of Monitor Lodge No. 193, Crawford, Tennessee, feel very keenly our loss in the removal of member leaving a vacancy that can never be filled, and a great loss not only to our lodge, but to all who knew him.
2nd-That the faithful attendances and services rendered by him be held in grateful remembrance. His sojourn among us was very uplifting, and may his life and work be an inspiration to us for greater service.
3rd-That while our lodge and community has lost in him one of its most useful members and citizens, we bow in humble submission to Hi who doeth all things well.
4th-That we extend to the bereaved widow and three children our deepest sympathy and assure them that we shall esteem it a privilege to be of service to them in any way within our power.
5th-That these resolutions shall be spread on the minutes of our lodge; a copy be given to the bereaved family; and a copy, each sent to the Ovocomer, Livingston Enterprise, and Monterey News for publication.
O. H. Meyers
W. H. Speck
Peter Klope

Alex VanTrese, Turley Knight, Carlisle Coe, and Frank Deck visited friends at Windle, Sunday.

NEWS FROM NEIGHBORING COUNTIES

Putnam - Putnam County Herald -
B. M. Johnson has sold his interest in the store of Johnson & Landsen to Frank C. Maxwell.
D. Y. Conatster of South Pittsburg has bought the bottling works and will manufacture Coca Cola here. Mr. Conatster has a chain of four bottling works.
Mrs. Matthew Jones died at her home in Double Springs last Saturday at the advanced age of 86 years. She had been an invalid for about 15 years. Her remains were interred at Flynn's Lick.
Monterey News-Eugene Marlow has been very sick, but is convalescent.
A big deal was made last week when R. C. Walker purchased from Hollis Johnson, the building, formerly used as Johnson's office, amount paid by Mr. Walker was $5. Business is booming.
Mr. John Powers was painfully hurt last Saturday while trying to check a car that cut loose from the train, the break beam broke and threw Mr. Powers, bruising him about the head and shoulders and arms. We hope he may be able to be out again soon.
___________________________
Fire Bugs Caught
It is reported that the parties who set fire to the store of B. M. Johnson at Wilder some weeks ago, have been apprehended, and are now or soon will be in the hands of the law. It is said that the act was committed by a man who was refused credit at the store, and that he forced his wife to go with him and set fire to the store. This information reaches us just as we go to press, and so far we have failed to get the name of the parties.
___________________________

Jackson-Jackson County Sentinel - M. L. Dixon has returned from Nashville, where he has been taking special treatment. He is much improved.
The many friends of Dr. H. P. Loftis will be glad to learn that he has passed the crisis and is on the road to recovery. He has been a hard fought case, and much credit is due Drs. Fowler,
Reeves, Macry, Quarls, Baugh, McCoin, Anderson for the victory won.
James Draper was born and raised on Flynn's Creek in Jackson Co. and lived here all his life until three years ago, when he removed to Nashville, where we lived until the time of his death which occurred Tuesday. His faithful wife brought his body to Gainsboro, where his remains were interred.
______________________

Death at Crawford
Rufus Whitney Boswell died at his home at Crawford on April 2nd after an illness of two weeks with diabetis. He was thirty-five years one month and nine days old. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss, besides a host of friends. Mr. Boswell was bookkeeper for the Brier Hill Colleries at Crawford.
The burial took place at Monterey on Sunday, April 4th, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and was conducted jointly be the Knights of Pythias and Masonic orders. A special funeral train was run from Crawford to Monterey and the services which were very impressive, were attended by a large number of people.
__________________

H. Grady Gore, at one time, one of Overton County's most popular school teachers, and for the past few months Assistant Circulation Manager for the Tennessean, is now in Cumberland University completing his course of law.

Clay-Bill Fiske's Bugle- Chr. P. Gray is visiting his parents for a few weeks.
DeWitte Miller of Livingston spent Monday night at Riverside Hotel. While we don't know, we suspect DeWitte has a CHARMER somewhere in Celina.
Atty. M. C. Sidwell has moved into his new law office which he has finished in modern style.
Sam Johnson and son, have bought P. Terry's interest in the Roller Mill at this place.
Mrs. Connie Joe Smith, wife of Sam Smith, died of puerperal fever March 25, at her home in south town, Celina
T. T. Cloyd owner of the Cloyd Hotel at Red Boiling Springs, died March 14. Mr. Cloyd was a native of Monroe Co., Ky., but had lived at Red Boiling Springs for some 30 years.
___________________________

Cumberland-Crossvile Chronicle- Mrs. Mitchell, mother of Dr. E. W. Mitchell and J. R. Mitchell sprained her ankle badly last week and is closely confined to her room. She is doing reasonable well, but will probably be unable to use the foot freely for a few weeks yet.
Mrs. J. S. Cline of Crab Orchid is expected home from Iowa, where she was called by the serious illness of her father a few weeks ago. The old gentleman died and Mrs. Cline is staying for a time pending the settlement of the estate.

The man arrived last week and put the lime pulver to work out at Crab Orchid and the county is now ready to receive orders from the farmers for the crushed rock.
The amount of crushed rock that was turned out for a single hour was weighed and found to be 5,260 pounds which is 760 pounds above the guarantee fixed by the company; two tons being the amount that the Jeffries company guaranteed the pulver would make an hour or 20 tons in ten hours.
_______________________________

John Roberts who has been in Nashville for the past month where he underwent a serious operation, is home again, and his many friends are glad to see him looking so well. With proper care and diligence, he will doubtless soon regain his former strength, and it is to be hoped that the operation has entirely eradicated his trouble.

Mr. Leland Cook, pastor of the Church of Christ will entertain the members of his Sunday School class at the Sarah Preston Home next Friday evening, at seven thirty o'clock.

Floyd Richardson visited his father-in-law, Sim Carr, at Sulphur, Sunday. His son, Simmie, is also visiting his grandfather for a few days.

NOTICE
I am now prepared to sew or nail your soles on satisfactory.
Work guaranteed.
E. T. Kuykendall, Livingston

Mr. Rhodes, the State President of the Farmer's Union and Educational Corporation, spoke at Rickman Saturday. Quite a crowd was in attendance and dinner on the ground was served. Interesting talks were also made by a few of the most prominent farmers of that neighborhood.

Johnnie Livingston and Misses Sallie Bilbrey, Cora Barnes, and Minnie Irwin visited at Rickman the latter part of last week.

J. K. Ferrill of Route 4 was in the city Monday.
J. H. Loftis of Netherland was in town the first of the week.
C. A. Roberts is home again after a month's stay in Nashville.
E. C. Goodpasture has been in Nashville for the past two weeks returned home Tuesday afternoon.
R. L. Mitchell Jr., has been home for several days with his family.
Jess Fleming of Fleming & Myers went to Nashville Tuesday on business. He will be gone for several days.
W. A. Bussell recently cut a Puger gourd and tested the capacity of same, finding it to measure one bushel, one peck and one and one quarter pounds. The gourd was raised by John Wilson, and in point of size is among the record breakers. A number of people have gotten some of the seed to plant for the coming season.

"Pat" Murphy, of Hilham, passed thorough this week enroute home from a business trip to Sparta. He was prevalled on to remain over and participate in the ball game Tuesday afternoon.
JaBea Noris of Algood, RFD is visiting home folks here.
Elmer Murphy of Hilham was in town this week.

The L. A. Baseball nine handed out another defeat to the Town aggregation yesterday afternoon in a rather slow but interesting game. The final score was 10 to 5 in their favor.
Batters: L. A., Cook. Eubank
Town, Little and Mitchell
The town boys had an opportunity to come out winners, but for the numerous errors enacted from time to time, which was the prime cause of their defeat. "Connie" Roberts extinguished himself as the "heavy" hitter for the municipal exponents of the National pastime, while Shirley Wells carried away the honors for stick work for the school nine. Umpire, Peck Wright; Official Reporter and Scorekeeper, Mr. Barker Zachry.
The boys are rounding up into shape for the little fray with the "top o'the mountain" team from Crossville next Friday, and it is only a question of how bad a defeat is it to be for the visitors


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, April 7, 1915

(Established in 1892)
W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

BASEBALL, FRIDAY, APRIL 9TH.
Crossville vs Livingston Academy:
Game Called: 2:30 p.m.

Municipal Mass Meeting
The mass meeting held at the court house Friday evening in response to a call issued by Mayor Guthrie, through the Enterprise, was well attended, and we are glad to report, resulted in the most satisfactory arrangement to all concerned. A plan was agreed to by which the limits of the outskirts of the town, who wants to be on the outside will have their desires fulfilled.
The meeting was called to order by Mayor Guthrie, who made a straightforward and comprehensive speech, setting forth the reasons for having the meeting called. He also went into the town's financial status, and very modestly pointed out the innovations which he has introduced since his incumbency of office of mayor. He then invited discussion of the pending issues, for which the meeting was called, and a number of our most substantial citizens responded, discussing pro and con; the corporation limits, the effect of revoking the charter, as has been proposed, the advisability of cutting down the area; the railroad bonds, their legality, etc. A vote w taken on the question of drawing in the corporate lines with practically a unanimous result in the affirmative, the mayor being appointed as a committee of one to investigate the situation thoroughly, and to act in accordance with his own judgement in re-shaping and re-adjusting the towns domain; he was also instructed to test the legality of the R. R bonds, and not to pay interest on same until the action had been taken.
It was a most representative meeting, being attended by a number of ladies, whose presence plainly showed that they were interested in the outcome of the meeting which might mean so much to the town of Livingston, and we do not doubt that they did no little by their attendance in aiding the citizens to reach an amicable settlement of the matters in question.
There is no question as to the advisability of cutting down the corporate limits of Livingston, as it contains more area than can be handled successfully by the municipal authorities. After the work is done, and the railroad bond question is put to a test, we may expect a great deal of improvement to be made in our streets, several lines of new pavements laid, a lighting system installed, and last but not least a complete sewerage system, all of which the town stands greatly in need. All of these improvements cannot be made at one, but will gradually make their appearance, and we should all strive to bring about these innovations by working together with the one aim in view, viz; to make Livingston the ideal home town of the Upper Cumberland country.
We are indeed fortunate in having the best school of its class in the state, and our citizens verified their appreciation of this fact in not doing anything in the meeting Friday night that could injure the school in any way. The school and town are necessary to each other and their mutual interest will be guarded most zealously by a citizenship, than which there is no higher type in Christendom.

Death at Allons
Mr. Alex Hoover, an aged resident of Allons, died at his home one day last week. He was eighty years of age, and was one of the best citizens of the county. He died very suddenly, it is presumed from heart failure.

Death of Geo. Davis
Mrs. Geo. Davis died at his home near Garrett's Mill last Friday with pneumonia. He was past middle age, and was good citizen. He will be missed by his neighbors and friends.

Livingston R 2
C. H. Holt is on the sick list this week.
S. H. Flowers is no better at this writing.
J. R. Richardson, G. B. Tays, and Oscar Tays returned home from Rickman Saturday where they had been to attend the county Union.
A. T. Lewis was at Wirmingham Saturday on business.
James Robbins returned from Nashville a few days ago.
Leonard Beason died a few days ago from the effect of a cut in his leg. Loss of blood was the cause of his immediate death.
Mai

Ledbetter-Andrews
The marriage of Mr. Overton Ledbetter and Miss Mary Jane Andrews was solemnized at the home of the bride's father, Mr. J. F. Andrews, at Allons, the county last Thursday, the ceremony was performed by Esquire W. A. Cook, and was witnessed by a large number of friends and reltives of both canstracting (sic) parties.
At the wedding a most sumptuous dinner was served, and much enjoyed by all. Both the groom and his fair bride are members of prominent families in that section of the county, and have a host of friends who wish them a happy and prosperous wedded life.

Runaway
Lewis Bilbrey, of California, who is here on a visit to friends and relatives, was the victim of a runaway accident yesterday afternoon just on the outskirts of the town, from which he received some painful though luckily not serious bruises about the face and head. He came back to town and had Dr. A. B. Qualls to dress his wounds.

March Babies
The following is the official list of births in Livingston and the 6th district of Overton County during the month of March 1915, according to the data received from J. H. E. L__, Registrar:

White Children
Abram Vester Ferill to Evert Ferrill and wife;
Sydney Balam Ray to Ridley Ray and wife;
Unnamed, to J. E. McCormack and wife;
William Erebell Ledbetter to Porter Ledbetter and wife;
Albert and Clara Ledbetter to Ray Ledbetter;
Female, unnamed, to H. S. Peek and wife;
Female, unnamed to Ben M. Reagan and wife;
Unnamed, sex not given to T. J. Steward and wife.

Former Citizen Dead
Uncle Pleas Buck, who was born near Hiham, and lived in this county all of his life until some 15 years ago, when he moved to the Lone Star State, died at his home in Bonita, Tex., March 22d, 1915. He was a highly respected citizen and had many friends here who will mourn ______ .

TWENTY YEARS AGO
IN LIVINGSTON
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise dated
Thursday, Feb. 14, 1895

Alice Acre the female prisioner who was brought up from Celina a few days ago and lodged in jail escaped Sunday night by making a hole in the brick wall near the roof. She was captured Monday near Hilham by sheriff Collins.
Chaaley Oakley was severely hurt last Sunday by a hog.
Judge Smith and Atty. Gen. Butler stopped over Sunday on the way to Byrdstown.
The thermometer stood 16 degrees below zero Friday.
Born to A. L. Dale and wife last week, a girl.

 

Whitewright, Texas
To the Enterprise and Many reader: Would you care to see a few jots from here. As winter has not broke yet, I hardly know what to write.
There was a big snow fell here March 22nd. The people here say this is the latest spring they ever saw.
Wheat and Oats are looking fine, and people are busy row planting corn; the crops will look some different. This time last year it was nearly all cotton. This time its corn, wheat and oats.
Some people come to Texas and go back in the sticks, and tell you it don't rain in Texas. I don't guess they come to Grayson county.
It has rained more than half the time since I have been here.
Some of the land here is rich and some is poor. The land my father cultivates produces 30 to 90 bushels of corn to the acre. He will have 30 acres in corn and 50 in cotton. The land here is black wax. About six miles east from here there re red hills. They make me think of Livingston and Flat Creek.
Some people might tell you that this land is level. It lacks some it is a little bumpy, but not as hilly as Overton county Tennessee.
The majority of the people out here came from Tennessee and Kentucky.
Say, girls I am still single, so don't forget me. Goodbye for this time.-
Grover C. Brown


 

LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, April 14, 1915
W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

 

BASEBALL! SAT., APRIL 17TH , 2:30 P M
Castle Heights - Lebanon Vs Livingston Academy

Statement of the ownership, management, etc. required by the act of August 24, 1912
of Livingston Enterprise, published weekly, at Livingston, Tenn. For April, 1915,

Editor, Managing Editor, Business Manager, Publisher - W. Y. Bennett
Owners: Enterprise Publishing Co.
Stockholders:
W. R. Officer, Livingston, TN
T. B. Copeland, Livingston, TN
C. J. Cullom, Livingston, TN
A. J. Mofield, Livingston, TN
J. A. Hargrove, Livingston, TN
G. N. Welsh, Nashville, TN
C. P. Gray, Celina, TN

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT
To The Chancellor Commander officers and members of Liberty Lodge No. 238: Dear Brethren. We your committee to draft resolutions concerning Bro. J. M. Shelton, beg leave to submit the following:
Whereas the death messenger has again entered our midst on March 9th, 1915, and claimed for its victim Brother Jacob M. Shelton M. D.
And whereas he being a member of this Lodge and loved by all his brethren for his fidelity to the truth honor and brotherly love which are foundation stones of Pythianism.
And whereas he was not permitted to be a regular attendant at the meetings of the Lodge yet he loved the order and came as near practicing its teachins as any that attained the rank of knighthood, he was a true Pythian and truly it can be said of him that he lived to bless mankind.
And whereas he had so many virtue and so few faults.
Therefore be it resolved that we commend his life as one that is worthy for us to imitate and we mourn his loss and miss his presence yet his influence will live for years to come.
That we bow in submission to him who doeth all things well.
That to sorrowing family we hereby extend our sympathy and pray God may help them to so live that they met their loved one in the land where parting will be no more.
That copy of these resolutions be spread on the minutes of the Lodge and one sent to the family of the deceased Brother, a copy be sent to the local paper.
G. V. Richardson
T. S. Allred
A. J. Connor
Committee

Netherland
Quitman Reed of Rickman and Miss Annie Cobble of this place were married Apr. 11, at the home of Esquire E. D. Herrick. Mr. Reed is the youngest son of A. J. Reed; the bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Cobble.
Miss Esther Henson spent Easter in Cookeville.
Mrs. B. C. Hood visited her parents at Oak Hill last week.
Miss Alma Speck of Hickman spent Saturday night and Sunday here.
Miss Lou West who is attending school at Livingston, is visiting her parents near here.
Miss Nellie Boatman is very low with consumption.
Oscar Cobble and Miss Edna Deck were married Apr. 8th at Esq. George Cooper.
Jobe Morgan is drilling a well for Frank Gilliland at Oak Hill.
Prim Prim

Crossville Wins Game
Crossville "journied" up to this place last Fridy and beat us 6 to 2. Burnette pitched a good game, it is true, but we got three hits off of him, they got only one off of our pitcher, Hale. Hale pitched a wonderful game and he deserves more credit than he will get. The game was lost by errors that we could have avoided. Estes and Coe did the "2"; Sidwell and Mitchell didn't "diddle any a tall." Dawson did do some "cucklin" worth while.

Death at Byrdstown.
Mrs. Beaty, wife of James Beaty died at her home at Byrdstown last Saturday of rheumatism from which she had been a sufferer for a long while, not having been able to walk for something like two years. Her remains were buried at Byrdstown Sunday.
Mrs. Beaty was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wint Mullinax, and was forty-two years of age, and a consistent member of the Baptist church. She leaves a host of friends to mourn her death.

Livingston R 2
Farmers are getting along with their spring work well.
Bob L. Melton and Miss Eiler Taylor were married Saturday evening at the home of E. E. Smith, J. P., J. W. Wisdom, Esq., officiating.

C. C. Parrot spent several days in Nashville last week.
J. W. Kennedy was here Saturday mixing with his friends.
Wheat is looking well.
Oats is a little off.
Vulcan

Trip to 'Frisco
Mrs. Chas. A. Douglas, of Algood, was in town Monday. Mrs. Douglas came over in the interest of her transcontinental trip to the Panama Exposition, which she is getting up for mid-summer, and which she will conduct personally. All Livingstonians who anticipate going to the exposition, and would like to make one of a "Home-folks" party should communicate with Mrs. Douglas without delay, as he quoto to be carried on the trip is almost made up.

Mrs. Copeland Dead
Mrs. Fannie Copeland died at Monterey on Sunday, April 11th, and her remains were interred at her old home at Bethlehem, about eight miles from Livingston on Monday afternoon. Rev. G. D. Bryne of Monterey conducted the services. The remains were brought over from Algood by special train Monday morning, with quite a number of relatives and intimate friends of the deceased.
Mrs. Copeland was 53 years of age, and was a member of the Methodist Church. Her death was due to tuberculosis, and she had been in bad health for some years. Her maiden name was Turner and she had lived in this county nearly all her life and had many friends and relatives here who deeply regret her demise. She is survived by five children. The burial was attended by a large number.

Roller Mill Changes
P. Terry, Celina, and W. B. Allen, formerly with McClain Lumber Co., Nashville, have purchased an interest in the Livingston Roller Mills Co., purchasing the interest of J. B. C. Armstrong, and also part of the J. W. F. White interest. Mr. Terry has moved his family over, and he is back at the "ole stan" ready to see his friends. He is also, again, owner of the residence above the mill.

The proposed road from Chicago, Illinois to Miami, Florida, to be known as the Dixie Highway is now one of the chief topics of interest and comment, and a number of counties are bidding for its location to be through their domains. There are two proposed routes through this state; one through the blue grass sections of Kentucky and Tennessee, and the other through the mountainous sections. For development of the country through which it passes, the latter route would undoubtedly be the better one, and we trust that this may be the one finally selected. To build an interstate road of such importance as this one undoubtedly will be through Pickett, Fentress, Cumberland, Bledsoe and other counties enroute would be the greatest stride toward progress and development that these counties have ever known, and it will be of lasting benefit to the present and future generations. It is by far the most direct route for the highway and will undoubtedly prove to be the most beneficial. The greatest good to the greatest number should be the aim in deciding this issue, and we trust the newly appointed commission will decide in favor of the Cumberland mountain air line route.

________________________________
TWENTY YEARS AGO IN LIVINGSTON
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise dated,
Thursday, Oct. 24, 1895

Charlie Maddox is still dangerously bad with fever.

Miss Carrie Barnes who has been very sick for a few days, is getting better.

The fair has come and gone, and so far as we have learned the bachelors and old maids failed to avail themselves of the pleasure of getting married.

Hon. Benton McMillion was shaking hands again with the dear people at the fair.

The woman and the bicycle seem to be among the many curiosities of the day.

We understand from Joe D. Coe that there are twenty odd cases of typhoid fever at Byrdstown and the neighboring suburbs.
_______________________________
LOCAL BREVITIES
Hon. W. J. Matthews, of Windle, was in town today.
Miss Lou West is visiting home folks at Rickman this week.
Rev. Cates, of Cookeville, is holding a protracted meeting at the First Baptist Church.
Gene Roberts killed a bird this morning that no one seems to know what it is.
J. B. C. Amstrond, who has been living here for some time, has move to Algood.
H. Grady Gore spent Saturday and Sunday with his grandmother, Mrs. C. C. Gore, Sr., of this place.
C. W. Smart of Cookeville was in town Monday.
Hy Dale planted corn yesterday.
Howard Wright is in Nashville on business.
Porter Taylor of Pickett county passed through town last Friday en route to Nashville, where his wife will be place in care of a physician. Mrs. Taylor has been in bad health for some time.
Lee Johnson came in from O_a_noma Saturday and expects to be in and around Livingston for some time.
Misses Anna Coffman and D__ Masters of Hilham, are in town today.

Bullington - Allison
Mr. L. M. Bullington and Miss Cora Allison both of Cookeville, were married last Monday morning, leaving Cookeville at once for an eastern wedding tour.
Mr. Bullington is a rising young attorney, while his bride is one of Cookeville's most popular young ladies. They have many friends and acquaintances in Livingston, who join the Enterprise is wishing them much happiness.

A dozen young men have subscribed a nice sum each to erect a Tennis Court in Madison Park, between Christ Church and Farmers Bank Bldg. The work will start soon and upon its completion, it is expected to be one of the best courts in this country, if not the best.

NON-RESIDENT NOTICE
Verna Bell Bilbrey
Vs
Grover Bilbrey
In the Chancery Court t Livingston, Tennessee
To Grover Bilbrey
In this cause, it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that Grover Bilbrey, the defendant, is a non-resident of the State he is hereby required to appear, on or before the first Monday in June, next before the Clerk & Master of said court, at his office in Livingston, and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court by Verna Belle Bilbrey, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise,
This April 12, 1915.
Jno. A. Hargrove, Clerk and Master
E. L. Ferrill, Sol.

J. M. Birdwell is installing an Air Dome motion Picture theatre between the Post office and the Fleming and Myers Bldg.

NEWS FROM NEIGHBORING COUNTIES
Putnam-Putnam County Herald-Rev. W. W. Baxter, of Dixon, was among the attendants at the meeting of the Cookeville Presbytery in the 1st Presbyterian church.
Bynam Greenwood has let the contract for a brick store building opposite the new federal building. It will be 26 X 90, J. F. Scott has the contract. Mr. Greenwood thus gives further evidence of his faith in Cookeville.
Jackson-Jackson County Sentinel- Prof. E. J. Allen, who has been very ill, is improving.
Senator John J. Gore returned from Nashville Sunday. He is looking hale and hearty, and the month of hard labor at the State capital has left no lines on his beaming countenance.
S. A. D. Smith, of Livingston was in Gainsboro Monday en route home from Whitleyville, where he spent Sunday. Mr. Smith represents the Presbyterian Sunday School Board, and was at the later place in the interest of the work.
Clay-Bill Fiske's Bugle-The child of John Nevaus of R 1 died last week.
Wiley Sulligau, Ex. Sheriff of Overton county was at this place Saturday.
Last Monday T. L. Gist resigned as Clerk of the County Court and the office was turned back to O. M. Maxey in accordance with the recent decision of the Supreme Court in the case of Malone vs. Gann, a Smith county case.
Cumberland-Re__ville Chronicle-Attorney G. C. Peek returned yesterday from a visit of some days with home folks in Overton county.
Lin Martin arrived in town Monday with the J. Q. Burnett ___ mill and it will soon be at work eating up that big pile of rough staves now on the yard.
Laiten Thurman arrived home from Florida Saturday. He has been passing the winter in the _________ and came through in a Ford car.
(This section is very difficult to read because it is really faded out.)
C. G. Black is getting the lumber on the ground for his new residence that will be erected on the site where his handsome two story residence burned some weeks ago. Carpenters began work this morning on the structure which is to be eight rooms, one story.
________________________________

A. G. Keisling went to Nashville yesterday morning to buy a steam engine, he was accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Sarah Keisling, of Netle Carrier. Mrs. Keisling will visit her brother in that city for a week.

E. B. Gray is opening a repair shop for sick watches in the Farmers Bank Bldg. He is boarding __ Maynard House.

E. C. Goodpasture has returned from Nashville.

E. C. Knight is at Byrdstown attending court this week.

W. Hancock, of Albany, Ky., was here this week.

Robt. Ookley is chinchin in Buffalo Valley, this week.

W. L. Judd of Algood is visiting his son-in-law, Jess Fleming, this week.

E. W. Christian and family, W. B. Ray wife and daughter, D. M. Speck and wife of Monterey, and W. H. Speck, of Crawford attended the burial of Mrs. Fannie Copeland Monday.

Jim Martin, of Oakley is here this week.

M. R. Hargrve of Willow Grove, is visiting his son, J. A. Hargove, of this place.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, April 21, 1915

PRES. WILSON ON WAR
"It would be impossible for men to go through what men are going through on the battlefields of Europe and struggle through the present dark night if it were not that they saw, or thought they saw, the broadening light where the morning should come and believed that they were standing each on his side of the contest for some eternal principle of right.
I fancy I see, I hope that I see, I pray that it may be that I do truly see, great spiritual forces lying awaiting for the outcome to assert themselves even now to enlighten our judgement and steady our spirits. No man is wise enough to pronounce judgement but we can all hold our spirits in readiness to accept the truth when it dawns on us and is revealed to us in the outcome of this titanic struggle.
There is the counsel for all of us ___ us abide by it."

 

Weather Forecast for the week beginning Wednesday, April 21, issued by the U. S. Weather Bureau Washington D.C., for the Ohio Valley and Tenn.

There will be a continuation of generally fair weather, with temperature near or above the seasonal average, in this district until the latter part of the week when local thunder showers are probable.
(First weather forecast that I have seen.)

New Auto in Town
Winningham Bros. have purchased a Ford automobile from the Cookville Motor Co. and it is now making regular runs to Algood. This is Livingstons first automobile, but there are a number of our citizens who are seriously thinking of investing and it would be a safe wager to lay that there will be several before the summer has come and gone.

 

Killed by Automobile
A fatal accident occurred last week in Murfreesboro, when Tom Douglas was killed by an automobile. Douglas was riding a bicycle at the time the accident happened. The auto was being driven by Mrs. C. R. Cawthorn.

Little Boy Shot
The little eight year old son of J. C. Taylor was the victim of a most deplorable and very mysterious accident yesterday afternoon. The little fellow was in the back yard of his father's premises, about six feet from the kitchen door, when he was struck by a bullet which came from no one knows where. The bullet was evidently shot from a 22 caliber rifle. It was buried in his skull, entering in the right temple and penetrating the first plate bone and probably the second. Drs. J. Doak Capps and A. B. Qualls were summoned immediately and did all that was possible to do at the time. The injury will likely prove fatal to the child, although he has a chance of recovery if all goes well. Mrs. Taylor and another child were within a few feet of the boy when he was shot, and they have no idea from which direction the bullet came. The matter is under investigation, and will likely be cleared up in a little while.
Just as we go to press, we learn with deep regret of the death of the little Taylor boy, he died about ten o'clock this is a most _______ tragedy and The Enterprise extends its heart-felt sympathy to the bereaved parents.

Livingston R 2
H. V. Taylor and G. A. Knight are putting up a saw mill at X Roads.
John Richardson is moving from Eastport to his mother's place here.
A. J. Winningham is suffering from the effect of blood poison caused by sticking a splinter in his thumb.
Mr. and Mrs. James Robbine visited Mrs. Emeline Smith at Monroe last week.
Rev. Van Smith preached at Taylors X Roads Sunday.
Miss Minnie Sells of Anthen visited Miss Nan L. Richardson last week.
Mrs. C. H. Holt who has been sick is better.
Miss Maud Taylor is visiting her sister Mrs. Crit Wright at Willow Grove.
Mai.

 

Non-Resident Notice
M. H, Weeks
Vs
Smith & Barlow

In Chancery Court at Livingston, Tenn.

In this cause it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that E. F. Marlow, one of the defendants, is a non-resident of the state. He is therefore, hereby, required to appear on or before the first Monday in May, next, before the Clerk and Master of said Court, at his office in Livingston, and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court, by M. H. Weeks, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This March 30, 1915.
Jno. A. Hargrove, C. & M.
T. J. Wheeler, C. J. Cullom, Sols for complt.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
IN LIVINGSTON
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise dated, Thursday, Oct 24, 1895

Dr. R. Burks is moving to the Turner house.
Mr. A. L. Windle has purchased land in Texas and will move there immediately.
T. E. Goff has purchased the drugs of Moses Miller.
Miss Emma Roberts after a several weeks visit at Nashville has returned to her home at Eagle Creek.
They say that Dr. Capps letters are equal to Bill Arps.
____________________________

Local Brevities
A. G. Keisling has returned from Nashville.
A large crowd were out driving Sunday afternoon.
Robert Oakley has returned from Monterey.
Quite a number of people are enjoying the new tennis court.
V. B. Holland was in town last week.
B. C. Cullom of Henard was in two Monday.
G. A. Pettit of Lebanon was here the latter part of last week.
Miss Kate Cook of Hilham visited Mrs. R. L. Mitchell and the boys.
Miss Rose Gore has returned from California where she has been for the past few months.
A. M. Gibbs and James McCormick of Cookville were here this week.
Chas. Judd visited home folks at Mirandia from Friday till Saturday.
M. D. Miller, with International Law & Collection Co. left for Albany, Burksville, Montecello, and other points in Kentucky, Monday.
Miss Allie Maynord is in Algood this week, visiting.
Homer Brown of Nashville was in town two or three days this week.
Alex Van Trease, Clarence Arnold, and Baalam Spicer, went to Algood Fording, Sunday.
Mrs. Dr. Langford, of Hilham spent Friday here the guest of Mrs. Laura Conatser.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Rosco McGinnis Monday night a girl.
Frank Shirley of Cookville is driving the Ford car recently purchased by Winningham Bros.
Porter Ledbetter of Booz is quite sick with typhoid fever.
Lee A. Copeland of Allons who has been quite sick with pneumonia is still confined to his bed, but is thought to be some better.
Chas. Smith of route 2, came in last night from Mariana Ark., where he has been visiting his uncle, E. L. Conner since the first of the year.
Cash Upchurch has gone back South after an extended visit to Overton county and points of interest in Kentucky.
Mrs. J. Henson Myers and daughter Jean are visiting relatives and friends at Algood and Cookville this week.
Miss Nova Reagan, assistant cashier of the Byrdstown bank, passed through town this morning.
Miss Linnie McCormick was in Algood this week on business.
Tub Loftis was in Neatherland Sunday.
J. H. Loftis of Netherland was in town Monday.
Aaron Lane of the low end of the county was in town recently.
Mr. Davis, the musical director, will arrive with his family some time this week. Quite a crowd have signed up with the band and its to be a success.
Mrs. Bill Cullom and Mrs. Terry were in town Monday, from Henard.
Revs. Lantrip & Cook played a very interesting game of Tennis Monday morning. The game was a tie.
W. J. Chilton is in Nashville on business.
Henry Dies and Bob Townsend of the Cookville Motor Car Co. were here on business Saturday.
Currey Livingston of Oak Hill, stopped over at the Maynord House Saturday night.
Asa Dillion of Cookeville, R. 7, was here Saturday.
Chancellor A. H. Roberts held a special term of Chancery court here the latter part of last week.
T. A. Bussell and little daughter Kathlene, spent Sunday in Algood with Mr. Bussell's parents.

 

News From Neighboring Counties.
Putnam-Putnam County Herald-
Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Cox, Monday, April 12, 1915, a son.
G. W. Alcorn has been reappointed marshall for the supreme court in Middle Tennessee. He has made a good record, and is given a second term strictly on merit.
Congressman Cordell Hull is spending a few days in Cookville with friends. He is much interested in the new federal building now being erected in our city.
Miss Gertrube Whitney returned today from Fellamere, Florida, where she has been for nearly a year. She has been sick for some time but hopes to soon regain her health in this favored section.
William Womack died at the home of is son Haskell Womack, in this city, Thursday, April 15, 1915. He had been in poor health for several years. The funeral services were held at the home, burial being made at the city cemetery.
Mrs. D. L. Landsen and children returned home Monday from southern Texas, where they spent the winter. Judge Landsen will return in about a month. His health is much improved and it is to be hoped he will fully recover. This is good news to his friends over the whole state.
Clay-Bill Fiske's Bugle-
Mrs. Ruby Williams is reported right sick with pneumonia fever.
Rev. Rochell filled his regular appointment at Hilham last Sunday.
Mrs. W. L. Brown has returned from Nashville where she has been with her daughter, Miss Nina, who she reports as some better.
County Physician Dr. W. N. Gray went to Miles X Roads first of the week to quarantine a new case of smallpox at that place, to wit, Mrs. Joe Key.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
April 28, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, editor & publisher

Putnam Jail Delivery
Seven prisoners escaped from the Putnam county jail at Cookville last Friday night, and so far as we have learned six of them are still at large. Four of the number were Federal prisoners and were to be tried at the current term of Federal court.

Last Fight
Fifty years ago next Sunday, May 2nd the last fight between the North and South anywhere in this part of the country was fought at a place called Indian Graves on the road from here to Celina, about four miles from the latter place. The Confederate force, numbering forty-four men was commanded by Capt. J. C. Bennett, while the Federals were lead by Maj. McKee and consisted of cavalry and infantry of possibly a hundred men or more. The Confederates lost one man killed, but managed to inflict a greater loss to the enemy as they killed seven of them; captured fourteen horses and some side arms.
Capt. A. L. Dale participated in the battle, which he states lasted something like two hours, and was hard fought. He feels confident that this was the last fight any where in this part of the country, and would like to know if any other old Confederate or Federal soldier can give one of later date.

Nashville Ladies Will Entertain
Mrs. P. E. Clark, president of the T. K. & N railroad is bringing a party of friends to spend the weekend with Mrs. Harry Atkins.
The ladies of the party have kindly consented to give a complimenttry entertainment on Friday evening, at Fiske-Staggs Chapel. Mrs. Nancy Rise Anderson of the department of public speaking of Vanderbilt University will give several readings, and Mrs. M. F_rill one of Nashville's leading soloists will sing.
The public is cordially invited to attend, and are assured a very pleasant evening's entertainment.

Whether the Dixie Highway is routed through this county, near this county or otherwise, there should be something done before the legislature adjourns to put us in a position to issue bonds, provided the majority of the voters want to issue them between this and the time the next legislature convenes, nearly two years hence. It will cost nothing to get an enabling act through, and if it is not taken advantage of there is no harm done. The Enterprise suggests that our representatives introduce a bill for this purpose and get same passed, and then the county can vote on it at any time within the next two years. County court convenes next Monday, and it would be an ideal day to call a Mass meeting for the purpose instructing Overton County representatives on this or any other matter of local legislative needs.

TWENTY YEARS AGO IN LIVINGSTON
From the files of the Overton County Enterprise, dated Thursday, May 23, 1895

Only 58 person from town attended the Sunday School Union at Oak Hill.
W. W. Goodpasture has returned from an extended visit to Nashville and Chattanooga. Mrs. Goodpasture is in Nashville under medical treatment.
Misses Nellie and Carry Barnes have been sick of measles.
Revs. Joe Nation, Frank Cooper and G. F. Deck will hold services at the barber shop the 1st Sunday in July.
L. L. Mitchell Sr. has been appointed deputy warden at Tracy City.
_______________________________

Local Brevities
Howard Wright spent Sunday in Algood.
Mrs. Ray Burks and Miss Margaret Bilbrey returned from Nashville Sunday.
Mrs. Harry Atkins and Miss Alice Johnson sent Sunday in Algood.
T. K. Mullins, of R-2 was here Saturday.
J. M. Copeland, of Nettle Carrier visited his son Thomas here last week.
Mrs. A. J. Mofield has returned from Granville where she went to attend the burial of her aunt.
Walter Wilson who has been real sick for some time is able to be out again.
E. Y. Gibson of Cookeville was in town last week.
Judge A. H. Roberts and Miss Willie Harris returned from Gainesboro yesterday afternoon via automobile to Algood.

Cookeville Route 7
Farmers in this community are putting in full time planting corn. The acreage will be larger than it has ever been. Wheat is looking fine.
The prospect for a large fruit crop is good.
J. B. Moody is not well this week.
Pat Warden who has been sick for some time is better.
Miss Oma Nelson is improving and hopes to be up soon.
John W. Martin is better. He is able to get about some.
Mr. Ace Johnson was badly hurt on the 21st at his home on Roaring River, having gotten into trouble with one of his renters about the farm work. He was struck on the head with a chestnut fence rail by Rufe Edmonds, and as he is a very old man, the injury may prove fatal. Edmonds was arrested and taken to the county seat. Mr. Johnson is said to be some better at the writing.
Joe Hyde.

Messrs. Willard Maynord, E_nd_ Terry, Cato Taylor, and Tub Loftis went to Celina to attend the commencement exercises at Mt. Va_ Academy.
Ezra Davis of Cookville was here last week.
Baalam Spicer is able to be t his post again after a few days of illness.
Mat Fowler of Celina, came over Saturday to witness the ball game between the Celina Scouts and the local Scouts and others.
Miss Carrie Lee Myers who has been teaching music at Robbins, Tenn., for the last year is at home for the summer.

Hilham R 1
Most everybody is planting corn in this place.
Floyd Greenwood, the little grandson of Mr. and Mrs. George Tally died Sunday night and was buried at Old Union Monday.
Anna May, the 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Carr is very sick.
Sunday school was organized last Sunday at Camp Ground.
There is a singing school going on at Maxwell Chapel.
Frank Ward delivered a number of enlarged pictures last week.
Jay Masters had a working last week.
John Loftis has bought a farm in Robertson County.
H. M. B.
Miss Beula Kirkpatrick of Celina is visiting Mrs. W. A. Bussel.
Paul French came in from Jefferson City yesterday where he has been attending Carson Newman College.
Chas. Rich was in Cookeville last week.

Born to Thomas Garret and wife on Monday, April 26th, a girl, Mother and Baby doing nicely and Father is convalescing.

Carlyle Coe, who has just returned from East Tennessee with the L. A. baseball team, reports the purchase of an oxemeter while away, and states he can vouch for its accuracy.

Mrs. Sue Mitchell has gone to Nashville to visit her daughter Daisy.
Miss Beuna Maynord of Harp & Pointer Millinery department at Algood, visited her parents here over Sunday.
Miss Velia Moredock visited in Algood last week.
Misses Sallie Bilbrey and Minnie Irwin visited friends and relatives at Algood and Cookville the latter part of the week.
Miss Geneva Bohannon has returned from Celina where she went in the interest of her trip to the Panama Exposition.
Dixie Smith was in Algood Sunday.
Miss Hilda Thrasher and Mrs. Horace Keisling were among the Algood visitors Sunday.
Wylie Rochell of Celina is visiting friends here this week.
J. H. Co_e, of Allons, was here on business Saturday.
Hon. Wm. J. Mathews of Windle was in town yesterday shaking hands with his many friends. He predicts a very busy session of the legislature when that body reconvenes next Monday.
J. T. Goodpasture of Route 1 gave us a call Tuesday.
Prof. Ben E. Holroyd has returned from an extended trip to East Tennessee.

_________________________________
LIVINGSTON MERCANTILE CO.
(Picture of a piano)
For each and every $5.00 purchase of $5.00 deposited, of multiples of $5.00, made at one time, from now to the close of the Booster Club, in addition to the regular Booster Coupons, we shall give a certificate for 5,000 Booster Coupons in the Booster Club.
Ten more days until the best Booster will be decided and will be awarded the capital prize also the other premiums will be awarded.
Remember the Date, Saturday,
May 8th
_________________________________

To The Public
We have one of the most complete lines of Coffins and Caskets ever brought to Livingston, and are in a position to give the best of service in this line. Every thing new and neat; Prices moderate, and the best grades of Burial Goods to be had anywhere in this section.
Hargrove & Mofield H'dw. Co.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
May 5, 1915

Highway Meeting
Permanent Organization for
Overton county Perfected,
The mass meeting called at the Court House Monday was fairly well attended, and there was a great deal of interest manifested in the proposed Dixie Highway. In fact the Association was made a permanent organization, with the following officers elected unanimously: G. O. Lea, president, J. B. McDonald and L. H. Carlock, secretaries.
The following resolution was adopted and handed to Hon. A. B. Phillips for he and his colleagues to act on during the last days of the legislature.
RESOLVED: That this mass meeting hereby request of Senator Gore and Representatives Matthews and Phillips, that they prepare and pass an enabling act, modeled after the one recently introduced for Fentress County authorizing the County Court of this County to issue bonds in aid of the Dixie Highway, provided it can be thus located through Overton County. Said bonds to be authorized by the Court with or without a vote of the people, as our Senator and Representatives prefer.
The President was instructed to appoint a committee of citizens to attend the Dixie Highway meeting at Chattanooga May 20th, and look after the interest of Overton county in said meeting. The following gentlemen were named.
J. C. Bilbry, W. J. Matthews, A. B. Phillips, Peary Bowman, W. Y. Kisling, W. S. Windle, B. C. Ramsey, A. H. Roberts, W. R. Officer, W. C. Murphy, George Carmack, J. W. Henson, J. C. Lea, Charles Cooper, J. A. Hargrove and E. C. Knight. Other charter members of the association were as follows:
M. A. Speck, M. L. Boswell, Joe Maxwell, Mack Smith, J. K. Winningham, G. B. McGee, A. J. Mason, J. W. Hall, Casper Bowman, W. M. Lacy, Walter Deck, Jake Kennedy, Tom Garret, W. J. Chilton, Luther McCormack, J. H. Bilbry, E. C. Goodpasture, W. T. Goff, Mac White, E. D. White, W. Y. Bennet, and some others whose names we have failed to get. There will be a meeting of the association on the first Monday in each month.

Death of Asa Johnson
We learn with regret the death of Mr. Asa Johnson of Roaring River, Jackson County, who it will be remembered was injured about two weeks ago by a young man named Edmonds. Mr. Johnson was a very aged man, being over eighty years old.

Netherland
Farmers are very busy planting corn in this section.
J. H. Loftis attended the annual May meeting at Dotsons Branch Sunday. He was accompanied home by his little son Alton, who has been visiting near there for several days.
Will and Richard E. Poteet who are attending school in Cookeville spent Saturday and Sunday with their parents.
Charles E. Greene of Baxter was here last week.
Misses Julia and Effie Speck were in Cookeville Friday shopping.
Tub Loftis of Livingston was here Saturday and Sunday.
J. M. Morgan has been quite ill is better.
A Sunday school was organized at Rickman Sunday.
Pinkie Prim


Theological Debate
There is to be a theological debate beginning July 14th, at Hilham between Elder Winkler of the Christian Church and Rev. M. Pigg, Methodist, of Kentucky.

Tragic Death Of Young Man
At Home Near Wirmingham

A most deplorable tragedy occurred in this county near Wirmingham Monday morning when Fred Wright received a fatal would from a shot gun which he was cleaning, and died from the effects of the shot within an hour later. The load entered his breast just above the heart.
The victim was a young man of about 24 years of age, and was a member of a prominent family. He was well liked by all who knew him and his death will be generally regretted by his many friends and acquaintances.

Accident at Byrdstown
Sheriff Garret of Pickett county was here last Friday. He had started to Nashville, but on receiving a telephone message from home of an accident which occurred there, he returned forthwith. It seems that a young girl, who lives in the home of the sheriff, sustained a painful wound in the leg by the accidental discharge of a revolver. It is presumed to be a serious wound.

 

TWENTY YEARS AGO IN LIVINGSTON From the files of the Overton County Enterprise, dated, Thursday, May 23, 1895.
Eld. Sutton left Tuesday for his home in Sparta.
Miss Maggie Officer, of the Mouth of Wolf is visiting her brother, W. R. Officer.
The funeral of Mrs. B. L. Carlock will be preached at Cave Springs next Sunday by W. R. Carr.
The little four years old son of Mr. Leslie Winton was very badly wounded yesterday by a horse kicking him in the forehead. His recovery is doubtful.
Miss Lou Dillion was baptized last Tuesday.
__________________________

Local Brevities
S. B. Harward went to Nashville Monday to see his wife who is in a sanitarium there.
M. M. Roberts and wife, W. A. Ownsby and Miss Olga M. Conatser enjoyed an automobile outing to Lee's Cave Sunday afternoon.
A. J. Mofield was in Algood Sunday.
W. Woody, of Nashville, is here this week, buying live stock.
Mesdames Anderson and Estill, and Mr. Wm. Haury returned to Nashville Saturday.
Crit Webb, of Nashville, was here first of the week.
James Bohannon, of Cookeville was here Monday.
Mrs. P. E. Clark, who visited Mrs. Harry Atkins several days last week, left Sunday for Knoxville and other eastern points.
Monroe Shoemake, of Cookeville, spent several days here recently.
Sam Huddleston, the Byrdstown druggist passed through town last week enroute to Nashville.
Zaney Robinson, of Algood was here Sunday.
Dixie Smith made another visit to Algood Sunday.
Dr. G. N. Guthrie of Cookeville and Hugh Cornwell of Algood motored over to Livingston Saturday.

Notice
All delinquent taxes were placed in officers hands for collection last Saturday May 1st.
T. D. Gragg, Trustne

Kodaks for rent: Both Box and Folding - Birdwell Studio

Mrs. J. A. Barnes and daughter Miss Madge, were in Cookeville yesterday where Mrs. Barnes went for medical treatment.
W. H. Harrison, who has been with Waller-Colvert Product Co. for some weeks, has returned to his home in Nashville.
C. C. Pitts spent several days in the country district this week.
S. T. Hudson, of Algood has been here this week, mixing with his many friends.
Mrs. L. T. Conatser is on the sick list.
Dr. McDonald of Monroe was in town today.
Burr Speck came in from Nashville Tuesday via automobile, which he has just purchased. It's a Ford.

The Overton County Jail is now housing eight prisoners sent over from Federal court to serve out their time for violating the federal liquor laws.

V. B. Holland went to Nashville Saturday.
Latta Conway Loftis spent Sunday at Netherland.
Judge A. H. Roberts left Sunday for Nashville.
There is another Ford car in town, the property of Wm. Chatwell Carver McCormick. Both of the cars are kept busy on the Algood-Livingston route. It is said there will be two or three more autos in town before the next new moon.
Mrs. Sallie Mayberry of Bennetts Ferry visited Mrs. E. C. Knight last week.
L. D. Bohannon, C. J. Cullom, W. J. Chilton, and E. D. White went to Nashville last week to hear the anti-saloon league speech delivered at the Ryman auditorium by Ex-Gov. M. R. Patterson.
Show at Airdome tonight and tomorrow night May 5 & 6.
Benton M. Stanton has returned from a business trip to Putnam county.
Chas. R. Broyles made a business trip to several Middle Tennessee towns last week.
Paul French is assisting Postmaster Capps at the post office this week.

Non-Resident Notice
To Sarah Buck

Caleb Buck
Vs
Sarah Buck

No. 1427-In Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tenn.

In this cause it appearing from a bill which is sworn to, that Sarah Buck is a non resident of the State; she is therefore hereby required to appear on or before the 1st Monday in June next, before the Clerk and Master, at his office in Jamestown, and made defense to the bill filed against her by Caleb Buck or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed. It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in The Livingston Enterprise.
This 1st day of May 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C & M

 

Non-Resident Notice
Roxie Warren
Vs
Ben Warren

No. 613-In Chancery Court at Livingston, Tenn.

In this case, it appearing by the sheriff's returns that Ben Warren the defendant is not to be found, he is therefore hereby required to appear on or before the first Monday in June, next, before the Clerk & Master at his office in Livingston Tenn. And make defense to the bill filed against him in said court by Roxie Warren or otherwise the bill be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This May 5, 1915.
Jno. A. Hargrove, C & M
C. J. Cullom Sol. For Complt.

Order of Publication
To the unknown heirs of E. E. Clark
Decd. 1434
Nancy Williams
Vs
J. C. Mills et al
In the Chancery Court at Jamestown Tenn.
In this cause it appearing from an affidavits which is sworn to that the unknown heirs of E. E. Clark Deceased are non-residents of the State, they are therefore hereby required to appear on or before the 1st Monday in June next, before the Clerk and Master; at his office in Jamestown, and make defense to the bill filed against them by Nancy Williams or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This 1st day of May, 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C. M.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
May 12, 1915

Moved to Overton
Large Lumber Mill to be
Operated Near Livingston

The large band lumber mill belonging to Ferguson, Smith & Whitson is now being moved from Algood to the old McDonald mill site at Nettle Carrier, about eight miles above Livingston, and the owners hope to be able to start operation about June 1st. There is said to be something like 4,000,000 feet of good timber to be sawed in that vicinity, and of course this will mean a long siege of cutting, sawing, hauling and shipping of lumber, and the whole community will no doubt be benefited by same. The natural outlet for this timber is via Livingston and the T. K. & N. railroad; and we believe this will be the ultimate route decided on, however, there is some talk of the lumber being moved out in the other direction, that is carried to the Tennessee Central's Wilder branch, by the aid of an incline tramway, or of the extension of a tramway already in operation on the Davidson Hicks & Green property. We do not believe this will be feasible however, as the rough roads leading in that direction will more than overbalance the distance in its favor. The road from here to the mill site is one of the very best in the county for regular heavy traffic of this character, especially during the winter months, when a great deal of this hauling would be done.
Of course the mill operators will get their lumber out via the cheapest route; and it behooves the citizens of Livingston to be up and doing, and put this route's many advantages before them, that all parties concerned may be mutually benefited. The T. K. & N. railroad will doubtless make a fair, competitive rate for this large amount of lumber to go over their line, and offer any legitimate inducement with that end in view. Every business man in Livingston will be more or less benefited, so let each and every one use his influence in behalf of the Livingston route.

Lusitania Sunk
By German Submarines.
Many Parish in the Deep.

The British steamship Lusitania, one of the greatest passenger vessels afloat was torpedoed and sunk by German submarines off the coast of Ireland last Friday. About 1,500 lives were lost in the disaster, and among them a number of prominent Americans. Out of 188 Americans on board, only about 54 survive. All the survivors of the ship number around 700. The ship's passengers had no warning of pending danger, and were evidently drowned like so many rats as the vessel sunk within twenty minutes after she was struck with the torpedoes. The survivors were carried to Queenstown, Ireland, where they are being cared for. It is stated that the population of Germany are celebrating the sinking of the Lusitania, and consider it one of the greatest feats of the war.
The people in this country are naturally very much wrought up over the affair, and some are clammering for war, and are urging the president to take steps in this direction; however the masses of the people have every confidence in the President and believe that he will do the wisest thing to be done in this crisis. He has steered clear of trouble so far, and it is generally believed that this incident, although admittedly a serious one, will not be the cause of any trouble between the United States and Germany. Gov. Rye in answer to an enquiry from one of the New York papers, stated that Tennesseans have every confidence in President Wilson and the administration and are willing that the Lusitania affair be left with him. The General Assembly now in session at Nashville passed resolutions Monday in support of the President's policy in regard to the matter.
Germany has already sent messages of regret at the loss of so many American lives, and no doubt will make all the formal apologies possible in due course.
British ships are still making their regular passages across the Atlantic as if nothing had occurred. People are still going back and forth by the thousands on these ships, and doubtless will continue to do so as long as they are allowed to. England's merchant marine is the very essence of her existence as a nation, and if it were to be permanently blocked her population would be starved to death, for it is a well known fact that at normal times, she never has more than six week's food supply within her own domain to draw from.

Killing in Clay County
A moonshiner by the name of Bill Burks was fatally shot by Deputy Collector W. H. Tyler in Clay county last Monday, and died yesterday as result of the wound. A still was being raided by Tyler and his assistants, and while they were destroying the utensils, the man Burks attacked Tyler with an ax, and in order to save his own life the officer shot. The still was located on Mill Creek, Clay county, near the Jackson county line.

TWENTY YEARS AGO IN LIVINGSTON
From the filed of the Overton County Enterprise dated, Thursday, May 23, 1895

Prof. Ed. Jared of Buffalo Valley was in town yesterday.
O. C. Conatser of Jamestown was in Livingston yesterday.
The "Old Guard" is nearly all ober this week-Granis
Prof. E. D. White of Hilham has been licensed to practice law.
Judge Smith is making the blind tiger and whiskey men quake and tremble.
W. T. Goff has purchased half interest in T. E. Goffs drug store and will be located in Livingston for a while.
_________________________________

Local Brevities
Ernest Terry spent Sunday at Windle.

Joy Smith entertained the Seniors at the Sarah Preston Home Friday evening, ice cream and cake was served at a late hour.
Howard Wright was in Algood Sunday.
Miss Lena Reagan entertained the Juniors at the home of Mrs. H. Adkins Friday night, a three course menu was served.
Cato Taylor, Carl Maynord, Baalam Spicer, Clarence Arnold, Kelley Peek, and Carlisle Coe motored to Fellowship Sunday.
Rev. W. M. Lantrip left Saturday for Gainesboro, where he will hold a series of meetings for Rev. J. O. Crawford.
Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Howard of Algood visited relatives here Saturday and Sunday.
Roscoe McGinnis returned Saturday from a trip to Nashville and Carthage.
Oscar Clark of Algood was here on business Monday.
Mr. Colvert of the Waller Colvert Produce Co. was here Monday.

Mrs. Josh Kirk died last Thursday at her home at Butler's Landing after a week's illness. She had been in poor health for several years.

Mrs. T. Gillentine of Moodyville, passed through Tuesday en route to Nashville where she will undergo a surgical operation.

Mrs. Derthick Dead
Mrs. Alicia Derthick died at the home of her son, H. J. Derthick, Indianapolis, May 1st. She was the mother of ten children, two of whom, Prof. H. J. Derthick, of Indianapolis and Paul Derthick of Stanton, KY, survive her, besides these there are several grand children, a brother and sister who will sadly miss her. She had been in delicate health for some time. Mrs. Derthick was much loved by all who knew her and hew presence in any home was a benediction.

Local Companies in Civil War
We are reliably informed that fifty -four years ago today, Capt. C. E. Myers left Livingston with a company of Confederate soldiers. They marched from here to Celina where they were joined by another company in command of Capt. Tim McHenry, and both companies then proceeded to Nashville via flat boats on the Cumberland river; joined the 8th Tennessee regiment at Nashville, and went to war. These were the first two companies to be sent out of Overton County to the Civil war, and each gave a good account of itself in the four years of hard fighting that followed. The gallant leader of the first named company is one of Livingston's most highly respected citizens today, and is a Mexican war veteran as well.

Livingston R 2
Ell Cana Booker fell dead Saturday and was buried at old Bethel Sunday.
Dave West of Oak Hill was here last week looking after sheep.
J. L. Robbins was in Livingston Saturday.
In an affray last Friday, Este Coffee shot Tom Holman in the arm.
There has been some old-time log rolling here this spring.
Rev. S. H. Flower who has been sick for some time is getting better.
The hardest hail storm in some years fell here last week.
Oats are looking better since the rains.
Vulcan.

Card of Thanks.
I desire through the columns of your valuable paper to announce to our many friends expressions of our thankfulness for their loyal support rendered me in the late piano contest at the Booster Store closing 8th inst. I shall never cease to be grateful. At the same time, I feel no ill will toward those who saw fit to vote for my opponents, they were merely exercising their rights. Again thanking you all. I am your true friend.
Price Deck

Camp Fire Girls
The Camp Fire girls, twelve in number, with Miss Nell Cook as leader; gave a picnic Saturday afternoon at Drapers spring.
All indulged in pleasures of out-door life, and an interesting game of ball was also much enjoyed. A five the guest were entertained with an interesting programme by the Camp Fire Girls, then a table was spread, where an abundance of good eatables were served.
The Camp Fire Girls had as their invited guest on this outing. Rev. Leland Cook, Prof. Ben E. Holroyd, Mesdames Eastland and Carlock, Misses Lizzie Dave, Olga Conatser Hayes, Mary Officer and Carrie Myers.

Rifle Association
The Livingston Rifle Association meets regularly on Tuesday evening of each week, and the interest among the members is growing rapidly.
They are doing some splendid shooting, and the association average promises to be very satisfactory. The following officers have been elected for the current year: Harry Adkins, president, Morris Roberts, vice-president, Philip Wheat, Sec. & Treas.

_________________________________
Automobile For Hire
I have recently purchased
An Automobile, and will run
Same in connection with my
Livery business. Moderate
Rates and good Service.
Give me a trial.
A. W. Speck
_________________________________

Mrs. Davidson, of Celina is the guest of her sister, Mrs. B. M. Stanton.
Miss Floretta M. South, of The Elk Creek Training School, Elk Creek, Va., is in Livingston for the commencement exercises, Miss South taught music for several years at L. A. and her many friends are glad to have her visit them.
Mrs. John Goulsby and children are visiting Mrs. Will Journaging at Algood.
Pack French and wife of Nashville are here visiting Mr. French's parents.
Mrs. Green of Hilham is the guest of Mrs. John Bullock.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Deck, who left their home in California for Livingston some few days ago are snow bound in Arizona.
Lester Deck, who has been attending Carson-Newman college at Jefferson City is at home.
Mawrus Groce, of Byrdstown, was here last week shaking hands with his many friends.
Miss Carrie Quall who has been teaching school at Crawford for the past eight months is at home for her vacation.
G. A. Petitt, of Lebanon, was here last week.
_________________________________
KEEP KOOL
Come to my Fount. I serve the best ICE CREAM AND SODA IN TOWN, "The FOUNT with running water"
(SANITARY.)
RAY BURKS, Druggist
_________________________________

Mrs. Charlie Parris and children of Byrdstown, were guests of Mrs. W. J. Chilton last week.
Miss Dora Myers who has been visitng home folks at this place for some time has returned to her home at Cookeville, she was accompanied by her sister, Miss Julia.
Prof. R. E. Sims and Houston Roberts spent Saturday at Windle fishing.
Miss Melia Pierce has returned from a few months stay in Algood.
Miss Addieville Huddleston, of Cookeville, is the guest of her cousin, Miss Myrtle Kinnaird.

_________________________________
Urged to give Another Day for
LIVINGSTON
Dr. D. Garfinkle,
The Eye Specialist, of Nashville, is urged by many people to give at least one more day for our town. He consented to be all day Saturday, May 15, 1915 at the Parlor of the Commercial hotel,
EYE EXAMINATION AND CONSULTATION FREE TO ALL. APPOINTMENTS SOLICITED.
If your eyes are weak, near-sighted, farsighted, if you suffer with Neuralgia, Headache, or Astigmatism; call on him. He is an expert in fitting glasses to all defective eyes, and his prices are reasonable for first-class work. Dr. Garfinkle refers you to his late patrons whom you can see every day in the week.
Ask Them About His Work
Mr. Thomas B. Copeland, Mr. A. L. Dale, Mr. W. M. Hunter, Mr. Daniel Phillips, Mrs. Emma Gilpatrick, Mrs. E. T. Kuykendall, Mrs. J. C. Thomas, Mrs. J. G. Webb, Mrs. E. Gore, Mrs. Maggie Pettie, Mrs. B. Eubank, Mrs. A. A. Qualls, Mrs. P. Terry, Miss Belle Maddux, and dozens of pleased patrons all over Overton Co. Dr. Garfinkle can be seen Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Parlors of the Commercial Hotel
Livingston, Tennessee.
________________________________

J. M. Birdwell has secured the assistance of Mr. Jack Boust of LaFayette, Tennessee in the operation of the Air dome, Mr. Foust is expected to arrive Saturday.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
May 19, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

______________________________
RIDE IN A FORD
(Picture of Car)
A FORD Car will go anywhere a horse and buggy will go and at less than horse and buggy expense.
Goes over any and all of your roads, - Hills, Creeks, Rocks, Mudholes, - Anything that comes along - The FORD goes right on.
The FORD will pull five men up that rough, rocky, steep crooked Tower hill on the Livingston and Celina road.
The reason you don't already own one is because you don't know what it will do.
Ask Us To Show You
Prices on New Model Fords, F. O. B.
Touring Car (Five Passenger)
New Model ….. $490
Roadster (Two Passenger)
New Model …..$440
Write or Telephone B. C. Hix,
LaFayette, Tenn.
Macon, Jackson, Clay and Overton Counties.
_____________________________

Livingston R 2
Farmers are getting ready to plow over corn.
Henry Robbins and family visited Bill Smith at Monroe Sunday.
Misses Mattie and Julie Swnat was the week end guests of their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Richardson.
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Melton, of Willow Grove visited Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Smith last week.
Rev. Van Smith failed to meet his appointment at Taylors X Roads Sunday.
A small child of Jobie Martin who has been sick for some time is better.
Mai.

The Dixie Highway route is to be decided on at Chattanooga tomorrow, when the delegates from the several states interested meet in the mountain city. We hope the route decided on will be through this part of the country, but feel sure that which ever way it goes or comes that it will prove a boon not only to the section through which it traverses, but the whole country in general, as it will doubtless be a great impetus to good road building from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

_________________________________
Livingston Academy Programme
Fiske-Staggs Chapel
Tuesday Evening, May 18th, 1915, At 7:30 o'clock
A Country Law Suit
Justice of the Peace … Jesse Lee Dillon
Plaintiff-Spludge……. John Bilbrey
Defendant-Fudge …… Willie Reagan
Attorney for Plaintiff .. John Harvey Lea
Attorney for Defendant…..Clarence
Hankins
Witnesses…Buldge-Herchel Ferginson
Jinks-Creed Arnold
Smith-Hulbert Lynn
Jury: Allen Freeman- Foreman, Robert Mitchell, Pleas Huddleston, O'Dell Speck, Dittro Lollar, Spurgeon Guthrie, Gradis Winningham, Elbert Cole, Hillard Phillips, Edgar Yound, Herchel Smith, Lee Armitage Breeding.
Sludge accuses Fudge of borrowing a sugar kettle from him during "sugar season", and of failing to return the kettle because of its cracked condition. Mr. Spludge brings action to recover damage of $1.50.
Jury decides Fudge must have the kettle fixed; Buldge and Jinks pay for the cost of fixing; and Spludge pay for the cost of the lawsuit.
Miss Williams

Flower Drill
Pauline Mofield …. Maloa Gibson
Zoe May ………… Ruby Dale
Mildred Chilton….. Mabel Bilbrey
Verta Winningham.. Jessie Officer
Thelma Wright ….. Odie Speck
Maggie Webb……. Roxie Ledbetter
Velma Ramsey….. Ethel Reneau
Maude Bilbrey …. May Smith
Miss Legg

In The Union Depot
Mrs. Brown and Johnnie…..
Etta Gunnels
Hilard Phillips
Ticket Agent ……. Curtis Stonecipher
Depot Agent ……. Bruce Estes
Man at Lunch and Candy Stand..
… Herchel Furgerson
Bootblack……… Creed Arnold
Mrs. Snyder and daughter, Miranda……
……………… Artie Winningham
Lilly Bowden
Mrs. Larkin …… Veo Hogue
Miss Sophia Piper.. Nora Bowden
Mr. Jones ………. Earl May
Woman and Baby.. Edith Kenly
Uncle John …….. Wm. Reagan
Josiah Potter and wife, Nancy..
………… James Ferrill
Ollie Keeton
Mr. Armstrong …Booze Garrett
Five Small children..
Clarence Hankins
Willie Bowden
Creed Arnold
Ruby Reneau
Three School Girls Lilly May Hankins
Etta Gunnels
Mamie Stockton
Dude …………………. Harry Mofield
Mrs. A. Hummer … Artie Winningham
Mr. & Mrs. Martindale.. Wm. Reagan
Edith Kinly
Bride and Groom ….. Edison Smith
Stella Webb
Two Young Ladies … Ova Copeland
Rebecca Lee
Two Young Men ….. Harry Mofild
McClure Stephens
Cassy, Jupiter, and Father..
Mabel Chilton
Clarence Hankins
James Ferrill
College Quartett…. Chas. Wells
Jesse Mitchel
Frank Deck
Sherlie Gunnel
Lilly, Eliza, George and Mr. White.
Clarence Deck
Beulah Webb
Earl May
McClure Stephens
Harold and Flossie .. Joseph Mitchell
Margaret Tinsly
Mr. Linton and wife.. Wm. Reagan
Burnice Ledbetter
Miss Officer

Sulphur
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. C. Underwood, of New Middleton, visited relatives and friends last week at this place & Oak Hill.
J. B. Ledford and son, Willis, of Blackmans Fork visited relatives at this place and Windle, latter part of the week.
Cash Poston, of Livingston visited his mother one night last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Ray spent one night last week with Mr. Ray's parents.
Addison Hodge was on the sick list a few days last week but is reported some better.
F_ee
Dr. and Mrs. Morgan, Mrs. Peyton Robertson, Mrs. Lamb, Mr. Allan, all of Nashville, are guest at the Sarah Preston Hall.

The following marriage licenses were issued from the County Court Clerk's office during last week:
L. E. Eerrill to Nettie Davis
A. B. Copeland to Ana Ledbdter (sic)
Ernest Ashburn to Ada Vaughn
W. A. Needman to Bertha Peterman.

Miss Reta Clark of Clarksville, Ind., is the guest of Miss Nene Cook.

Local Brevities
Judge A. H. Roberts is in Wartburg, Morgan County this week holding chancery court.
Miss Gertrude Officer who has been attending Ward-Belmont College at Nashville, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. Shirley Keisling and daughter, Christine, of Henard, are the guest of Mrs. A. G. Keisling.
Miss Katie Cook, of Hilham is the guest of her aunt Mrs. R. L. Mitchell.
Miss Anne D. Neil, of Nashville, is the guest of Mrs. A. B. Qualls this week.
Mrs. Denton Bilbrey of Algood is visiting Mrs. Burr Smith.
Mrs. Frank Turner of Algood is visiting her sister Mrs. R. H. Hankins.
Wm Guthrie of Crossville came over with the Crossville Base ball team, and is attending the commencement exercises at Livingston Academy.
A. J. Mofield went to Nashville Sunday, and returned yesterday in a new ford automobile, which he purchased while away. He was accompanied by W. H. Winningham, who drove the car from Nashville yesterday.
The passenger traffic of rail and motor has been exceedingly heavy for the past ten days.
Haskell Womack of Cookeville was in town Friday night.
Carl Maynord was in Cookeville Sunday.
Frank Sutton, of Granville, is at the Commercial Hotel this week.
Misses Anna and Mable Copeland and Lora Speck, of Monterey are visiting Mrs. J. A. Oakley.
B. C. Hix of LaFayette is here bustling among the automobile prospects, and threatens to place a few more Fords here before the season is over.
Mr. Upchurch of Mangum Okla. Who has been visiting his mother for the past few months, returned Wednesday: Mr. Upchurch is at present working for the Case Machine Company.
Robert Oakley returned Friday from a business trip to Nashville.
J. H. Loftis and son "Tub" have returned from Celina where they have been for several days.
M. H. Gunter of Gunter was in town the latter part of last week.
Mrs. Philip Wheat and daughters Melba and Winnie visited relatives at Oakley.
Mr. and Mrs. Newman, of Fayetteville, are the guests of Mrs. Floyd McCormack.
Mrs. Loyd Speck, of Bushing, is spending a few days in Livingston with relatives.
Miss Effie Speck of Algood is visiting friends here this week.
"Pat" Murphy, of Hilham is here this week.
Miss Anna Minot, of Cookeville is the guest of Mrs. J. Henson Myers.
Misses Minnie Draper and Lola Young, of Gainesboro are guest of the Misses Dale at the Commercial Hotel.
Carson Hampton of Algood, is here this week.
Atty-Gen. W. R. Officer is in Cookeville this week attending Criminal court.
Dixie Smith didn't go to Algood Sunday.
Clarence Arnold, Ernest Terry, Hassel Oakley, Carson Guthrie and Lee Johnson motored to Windle Sunday.
Miss Leila Moore, of Algood is the guest of Miss Margaret Bilbrey.
Willard Maynord was in Cookeville Saturday.
Frank Speck, of Watertown, is spending a few days with home folks.

Dr. W. M. Breeding officiated at two very important events last Sunday:-Born to Harvey Gore and wife, a boy; Dock Carmack and wife, a boy.

Letter From Esterline, Texas
Dear Editor: I'm writing you from my Texas home, hoping this will be read by some of the young people 'mid the purple tinted hills of Tennessee.
It is a very beautiful place here, with the prairie covered with wild flowers, and the sweet green grass. But to me there is nothing half so dear, as those creeks, meadows, hills and trees of my native state. I know it is quiet impossible to mix with the great outside world there, but read, read good books. I want to say I know very little myself, but I would not exchange even that little, and be compelled to drag out my life without some knowledge of the world. I live in Ophir's land of gold by reading and exercising my mind to some extent, I get bright glimpses of the outside world in my imagination; I travel through many climes; I visit bright eastern lands; I talk with men and women of every race and creed; I hear the old world fables from their lips; I become acquainted with their lives, their very thoughts, I can picture their faces, their clothes, then my fancy carries me northward to the mysterious regions of ice and snow. I can travel over those wide and rock bound plains where night reigns for months. I can watch the short arc__ summer begin; I see the rare flowers and the tiny mosses of that far off land expand and bloom under the sun that shines for two months long. My body is here confined within the limits of a small town, but through the blessed influence of books, my mind can break its narrow confines and roam the wide, wide world. I can hear the gentle lapping of the banks of the Bosphorous, and watch the vulture flight through the amber sky, far above the river's restless waters. I can stand on the deck of a ship when the sun has gone down, beneath the broad expanse of water and look into the star-studded arch above me and dream of a land where the years of eternity roll and where there is no tomorrow. Channing expresses my sentiments exactly when he says: "It is chiefly through books that we enjoy intercourse with superior minds and their invaluable means of communication are in reach of all."
I am so glad of books. They are voiced of the distant, and the dead books give to all who will faithfully use them, the society, the spiritual presence of the best and greatest of our race. So my dear young friend, wisely improve the present. Is it thine. Read, and read good books.
Milton will cross your threshold and sing to you of Paradise. Shakespere (sic) will open to you the works of imagination and the working of the human heart. It is Douglas Jerrold who said, "A Book filthy (sic) chosen is a lise (sic) long friend.
Vera L. Cook Wright



LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
May 26, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

Honors Earned By Large Number of Pupils at Livingston Academy
On last Thursday evening the commencement exercises of Livingston Academy were conducted in the large Fiske-Staggs chapel, which was filled with patrons and friends of the school.
Diplomas were awarded to the graduating class and medals to thirty of the pupils.
The graduating class was composed of the following: Miss Minnie Irwin, valedictorian, who aquitted herself with high honors in the delivery of her oration "Barrabus Released." Miss Sallie Bilbrey made a very pleasing delivery of :The Task of Tennessee;" while Carlisle Coe and Roy J. Smith proved their oratorical powers by delivering "Modern Monitor and the " Other Me."
The following pupils of Livingston Academy were recipients of gold medals for perfect records during the term just completed. Deportment, attendance at school and Sunday school, and all other things that go to make up the perfect pupil were considered, and it was indeed a fine showing for the student body that so many earned this much coveted award;-
Iva Smith, Nil_rod Estes, Albert Brown, Loma Young, Ova Smith; Era Reragan, Ethel Speakman, Maloa Gibson, Clarence Hankins, Lillie May Hankins, Lillie Speakman, Bonzie Reagan, Leila Bell Dale, Edith Kaykendall, Myrtle Gillentine, Grayden Kuykendall, Edgar Young, Zoe May, Hester Moredock, Mamie Stockton, Rhior McGee, Willie Reagan, Allie White, Anne Carlock, Lula Young, Bessie Johnson, Arvin Thrasher, Gladstone White, Audie Bilbrey, Mary Price Miller, Lena Reagan, Minnie Irwin.

Practically every newspaper in the United States applauded President Wilson's note to Germany except a few German papers. Hadn't they better go slow? There is no such animal now as a German-American-Giles County Record.

Netherland
Jeff Bilbrey died the 16th after a lingering illness. The remains were intered in the Webb grave yard on the 17th.
Will and Richard Poteet, who have been attending school in Cookeville are at home on vacation.
Miss Va_lie Morgan, of Cookeville is visiting her brother, J. M. Morgan.
Miss Esther Henson has returned from a weeks visit in Cookeville.
Mrs. J. A. Webb, of New Orleans La is visiting relatives here.
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Eldridge, are the parents of a new girl.
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Hood were in Cookeville last week.
"Pinkie Prim"

Livingston R 2
R. L. Windle and Alfred, were here last week buying hogs.
Mrs. Bob Melton is quite sick.
Misses Ava and Colva Allred visited Mrs. Joe Allred Sunday.
Miss Nettie Lewis visited Mrs. Willie Judd Sunday.
Rev. Everet Eaton filled M. E. C. S: Pulpit a X roads Sunday.
Vulcan

Dr. D. Garfinkle, of Nashville, was here Monday.
J. H. Myers is in Clay county this week.
On account of the rain, the big four-reel play was not produced at the Air dome last night as advertised. If the weather conditions are favorable, the show will e put on tonight and should be greeted by a large crowd.
Mrs. Oscar Clark was here from Algood last week.
Miss Nellie Cook left Tuesday for her home at Topeka, Kans. To spend the vacation months.
Byrd Bohannon is home from Castle Heights to spend his vacation.
Messrs E. Cash Estes and W. Lee Johnson, were bicycle riding Monday afternoon for their health.
Messr "Peck" Taylor and Alex Van Trease spent Saturday and Sunday in Celina.
Dr. W. M. Breeding is in Nashville this week.
Thurston Sewell who has been attending school at L. A. has returned to his home at Willow Grove.
Benton Fleming returned Monday from Spencer where he attended the closing exercises at Burris College.
Miss Floretta South has returned to her home at Jett, Ky., after a short visit with friends here.
Miss Pearl Johnson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Nade Hul, at Carthage.

Local Brevities
Herman Estes of Harriman is here visiting relatives and friends.
Mrs. Lewis Poston is visiting her son Bob Poston this week.
Jas. Shirley of Cookeville is here on business.
Eld. Leland Cook accompanied his sister as far as Nashville on her way home.
Mrs. Dr. Moore, of Algood, was the guest of the Misses Maynord last week.
Mrs. Dr. Sidwell, of Fox Springs passed through Saturday enroute .
(I think the rest of this entry was down the page, so I will include it here.)
Home from Spenser where she had been to attend the closing exercises at Burrit College.
Miss Nell Hampton, of Algood visited friends here the latter part of last week.
Miss Sadie Dean Roberts, who has been attending Sullens College for Young Ladies, at Bristol, Va., is home for her vacation.
Herchel Maynord is spending a few days in Algood this week.
Rev. Lantrip will fill the pulpit at the Methodist Church Sunday morning and evening.
Miss Lona Looper, of Ft. Collins, Colo., is visiting her mother, and sisters here.
P. L. Mitchell, of Nashville is spending a few days with his family.
Mrs. W. C. Officer and daughter Elise, of Monterey, are visiting Mrs. Officer's mother, Mrs. M. D. Miller.
Miss Beuna Maynord came up from Algood last week and spent the night with her patents at the Maynord house.
Mrs. Edna Ashenhurst sons Joe and Hall, left Sunday for a visit with relatives at Burkesville and other places in Kentucky.
Misses Ruth and Lucile Myers, of Windle, visited their sister, Mrs. M. J. Qualls last week.
Miss Effie Windle has returned to her home at Monroe after a few days visit with relatives.
Tom and Gideon Low, of Cookeville, passed through town Tuesday enroute to the upper counties.
Dave Conatser, of Cookeville, was here last week with relatives.
Judge A. H. Roberts is at home for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Mofield and family left Sunday for Chestnut Mound, Granville, Lebanon, Nashville, and other points. They motored through the country in Mr. Mofield's new automobile.
M. C. Sidwell, of Celina was here Sturday en route home from Nashville.
Miss Ina Myers is visiting Mrs. H. M. Cornwell at Algood this week.
Mrs. W. M. Lamtrip and children left last week for Gainesboro, to be with her husband who is holding a meeting at that place.
Gapt. G. W. Stephens, of Vernon, Ky., is here with his daughter, Mrs. E. C. Knight.

 

The recent rains have done much good toward starting crops of all kinds to growing, and livening up generally. The local automobile traffic has been considerably flustrated on account of the roads being muddy and slick, however they have been making trips at intervals and endeavoring to take care of the travels as best they could. The train which has been stopped since Saturday resumed its regular run this morning, after having had the engine thoroughly everhauled, and ___ first-class order.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
June 2, 1915

 

Letter From Putnam County on Dixie Highway Route
Editor Livingston Enterprise,
Livingston, Tennessee
Dear Sir:
Your article on the Dixie Highway is timely and to the point. The route along the Cumberland Mountains through Sequatchie, Bledsoe, Cumberland, across the eastern section of Putnam county and through Overton and Pickett or Fentress and Pickett is the logical route from the north to the south, and in the opinion of those who are more anxious to see a great direct highway from the Great Lakes through our Dixie land than they are to wind it around and cross both ends of the State in order to reach certain interests, is the one that will ultimately be built and be known in reality, if not in name as the direct route through Dixie.
Some two years ago, when the agitation for the Memphis to Bristol highway was at its heights, this county made a proposition in good faith, and had the route through this section been adopted, it would have now been a reality instead of a failure as now happens to be the case. The two routes selected through Tennessee, each of which is claimed to be known as the Dixie Highway, will end about the same way. It occurs to me that the decision, as rendered at Chattanooga, whereby the routes were divided and extended east and west, adding to the distance anywhere from 75 to 100 miles from the direct route across the Cumberland Mountains, has taken away from the enterprise the force and energy that would have been exerted, had one direct, or even one indirect route, been selected. Now the thing for us to do who are interested in this matter and are proposing to do the part that will bring about results is to begin meeting some time in the near future and call together at some convenient point men from these various counties and agree to build our route with the help of that wonderful road enthusiast in Chattanooga, Mr. C. E. James, who is the originator and promoter of the Dixie Highway project and who has been so badly treated in this selection, and there is no doubt in my mind but that we will ultimately get the route and the travel between the north and south, which is the result hoped for. Putnam county stands ready to do her part. What say you for Overton?
Yours very truly,
Jas. N. Cox

Killed in Storm
Mrs. Pearl Western and baby were killed by falling timbers when the house in which they were living, in Jackson county near Whitleyville was undermined by a heavy down pour of rain, one day last week. Two other children escaped unhurt.

Painfull Accident-Ex-Sheriff Collins Gets Bullet in Leg
Ex-Sherriff J. O. Collins was the victim of a most painful accident last Saturday night, when he accidentally shot himself with a 38 revolver. Mr. Collins, who is acting in the capacity of deputy sheriff, was preparing to go out in search of some law breakers, and had borrowed a revolver for another party who was going with him; he was just entering the front gate of Elliot Copeland, and in reaching to open the gate with the same hand in which he held the scabboted revolver, the fire arm in some way slipped out and fell to the stone steps and discharged. The ball went through the leg of Mr. Collins just below the knee, it struck the edge of the bond, breaking off several pieces. Dr. M. B. Capps was called at once. He dressed the wound after which Mr. Collins was removed to his home. Late reports state that he is getting on as well as could be expected and that he hopes to be out before long. The accident will be deeply regretted by the people of Overton county, there is no better known or more popular man within its borders than "Jude" Collins.

Deck-Butt
Miss Mattie Burks Deck and Mr. Buford Thompson Butt were quietly married on Monday afternoon May 24th, at 1:30 P.M. at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Snoddy of Cook Place, a number of close friends being present. Rev. B. L. Lyle of Lebanon, performed the ceremony. The bride was attractively dressed in white satin messalin trimmed with oriental lace and carried a very beautiful boquet of brides roses and lilies of the valley.
The room was decorated with ferns, roses and other cut flowers.
After the ceremony the bride and groom left for the home of the groom near Franklin, Tenn., where they will spend a few days and will return to their home at Cook Place where the groom is connected with the Davidson Hicks & Green Co. at their lumber operation.

Kadell-Kritchfield
The Kadell-Kritchfield show now in progress is one of the best popular priced attractions that Livingston people have had the opportunity to enjoy in a long while. The show is under canvas, and the large seating capacity will undoubtedly be taxed to its utmost, if the weather clears up for the remainder of the week. It is a really good show, and well worth seeing.

After considering the situation for nearly a year, Italy has come to the conclusion that she has been driven to war.
The June brides are beginning to bud out, and the Frisco hotels are expecting their bridal suites to be in great demand this season.
The wet days and damp nights of the past week put the automobile brigade out of action temporarly, however, as Abe Martin would say, it gave the owners a chance to put their Fords in tune.

Local Brevities
Dr. J. Doak Capps was in Byrdstown Saturday on professional business.
Benton M. Stanton has been in Pickett County for the past week.
Misses King, Stoy, and Asbell of Livingston Academy, left Monday for their respective homes.
J. H. Loftis of Netherland was in town first of the week.
Latta Conway "Tub" Loftis left Monday for a visit to relatives and friends in Jackson county.
Lester and Frank Deck left Monday for Wichita Falls, Texas, where they expect to work in the harvest fields.
Fletcher White has sold his remaining interest in the Livingston Roller Mills to Terry & Allen, who are now the sold proprietors of this establishment.
W. R. Officer spent Sunday with his family here.
Mrs. Philip Wheat Sr and family of Cookeville, visited the family of Philip Wheat Jr. last week.
Benton M. Johnson of Cookeville was here last week.
Talking pictures at the big tent show Wednesday and Thursday.
Prof. Ely Story from near Monterey, attended the Teachers Examination here this week.
A. J. Mofield and family returned yesterday afternoon from an extended trip to Lebanon and Nashville.
The little son of J. F. Bledsoe who has been quite sick for the past week is better.
Carl Mofield, who has been attending school at Castle Heights, is home for the vacation.
Misses Lillie and Pauline Dale will return from Murfreesboro today where they have been attending the State Normal for the past five months.
Change of program every night at the big tent show.
Don't fail to see re production of the Titanic disaster at the Kadell-Critchfield show Friday night. Also Willard-Johnson prize fight and other good features.
S. D. Bilyeu of Hilham gave us a call yesterday afternoon.
J. W. Cash of Nashville, is spending a few days here with is mother and other relatives.
M. V. Bilbrey, of Eagle Creek, was here Friday of last week on business.
Mr. and Mrs. Brinkley Hogan of Willow Grove passed through here last week on their way to Oklahoma.
Miss Myrtle Kinnard of this office is visiting her mother in Cookeville this week.
"Peck" Taylor has accepted a position with Fleming & Myers.
"Rube" Mitchell happened to a painful accident one evening last week.
C. C. Cannon and family of Iowa spent several days here last week visiting Mrs. Harry Atkins.
The sinking of the Lusitania by German submarine will be realistically produced at the Kadell-Critchfield show Saturday night. Also scenes from the European war.
J. Russell of Chinute passed through town Sunday.
C. J. & J. E. Cullom returned from Nashville Tuesday.
Miss Buena Maynord came over from Algood Sunday to visit home folks.
Carl Maynord was in Algood Sunday.

Fletcher and J. A. M. White, Bob Poston, Charles Mitchell, and Dr. J. Doak Capps left Sunday for Richmond, Norfolk, Washington and other eastern cities. The party expects to be gone about a week; they will attend the United Confederate Veterans re union at Richmond which is now in progress.
"Bishop" McCulley left Monday for Chattanooga, having accepted a position in a manufacturing establishment in that city. His many friends wish him much success in his new field.

Cookeville Route 7
We have had two months drouth which was broken on the 22nd, wheat and oats will make almost a failure, garden and truck patches has been suffering for rain.
Cas Bilbrey died on the 4th and John Dickens died on the 5th.
Miss A. C. Brown is on the sick list this week.
Miss Oma Oelson is no better at this writing.
Preaching at Hardy's Chapel last Sunday a large crowd in attendance.
T. J. Morton lost a fine mare last week.
S. H. Bowers and Alex Hull visited in Jackson county last week.
J. J. Dickerson was at this place on the 23.
Henry Warden and Oscar Stone, of Sulphur, was here on the 23rd.
W. D. Letner is visiting in Putnam county last five days.
Jo Hide

Prohibition Lecture
Hon. Peter Turney Hiett of Nashville is here this week, making arrangements to deliver a lecture on national prohibition. The lecture will likely be delivered at the court house Saturday afternoon.

Howard Bohanon who has been attending C. & N. College is home for the vacation


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
June 9, 1915

W. Y. Bennett, Editor & Publisher

Corn Club Prizes
To be Awarded to the Winning Contestants of Boys Club in 1915

1st Prize-Free trip to State Fair for one week. Given by Mrs. P. E. Clark, Pres. T. K. & N. R. R.
2nd Prize-$25.00 in Gold. Given by Mrs. P. E. Clark, Pres. T. K. & N. RR.
3rd Prize-$25.00 Gold Watch. Given by the following Livingston Lawyers: A. H. Roberts, W. R. Officer, C. J. Cullom.
4th Prize-$20.00 in Cash. Given by County Official.
5th Prize-One pair of thoroughbred pigs. Given by T. B. Copeland, Cashier Citizens Band, and Walter Wilson.
6th Prize-$10.00 in Cash. Given by Livingston Merchants: Bilbrey & Landen Hwd. Co., J. A. Young, Hargrove & Mofield Hwd. Co. and Fleming & Myers.
7th Prize-One Boy's Saddle
8th Prize-One Waterman of Parker's $5.00 Fountain Pen. Given by B. & O. Drug Company
Last a prize of not less than $3.00 for every boy falling below prize No. 8, who submits his reports, exhibits his 10 ears of corn at the court house on the date set for the exhibit and complies with the rules and regulations provided for the boys corn club.
Chas. C. Gore, County Chairman
Boys Corn Club.
Walter Wilson, County Secty.
Farmers Union

 

Killed His Father
Richard Cleghorn, of Dry Valley, Putnam county was killed by his son Ike Cleghorn last Sunday. Reports say that the young man's mother was remonstrating with him about his conduct, and that he used some very abusive language for which his father corrected him, thereupon he turned on the old man with a hoe, striking him on the head. The skull was crushed, and he died the following day. A warrant has been sworn out for young Cleghorn who disappeared after the tragedy.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Dow Waller on Monday night, June 7th a 12 pound boy.

Willie Coleson of Willowgrove was in town the first of the week on business.

 

BRYAN RESIGNS
Sec. of State Wm. J. Bryan has resigned from the Cabinet, according to late dispatches from Washington. Reason given for his action is that he does not agree with President Wilson's Note to Germany, believing that it is too strong an indictment against the German government, and is of the opinion that same may embroil the United States in the present war.

Orley Bilbrey, of Sesser, Ill, is here on a visit to relatives and friends.
Lee Johnson is in Carthage visiting relatives.
Misses Lillie and Maggie Bilbrey are visiting friends in Nashville.
Prof. Kittrell of Algood was in town this week.

 

I have recently purchased a new Edison Moving Picture machine and will install same in the Air Dome theater this week, and hope to be ready for operation by the latter part of the week.
J. M. Birdwell, Mgr.

Mr. and Mrs. Shockney, of Lebanon, are here the guests of friends.
C. C. Pitts spent Sunday in Watertown.

'Tis said that the bootleggers have again budded out in Livingston, but the officers of the law are nipping them and the crop will not be a large one.

President Wilson's note to Germany is a strong document and to the point. Its tone is friendly but firm and gives the Tuetons a chance to be good, but good they must be, or take the natural consequences.

Local Brevities
A Meeting of the Mayor and Board of Alderman was held Monday, June 7th, and the following business transacted:
School Directors for the ensuing year: J. C. Bilbrey, W. R. Officer, W. R. Smith, J. A. Hargrove, W. T. Goff and Frank Smith.
Milton Mordock was elected Alderman in lieu of B. O. Smith, who is now outside the corporation.
The Board of Alderman authorized Mayor Guthrie to pay interest on the $10,000 bond debt.
A number of tax releases were issued.

Judge Roberts left Sunday for Cookeville, where he will hold chancery court during the whole month of June.
B. C. Hex of LaFayette, the hustling Ford dealer was in Livingston Thursday of last week.
B. M. Fleming, who went to Murfreesboro last week to work on the Grading Committee came home this week.
He stated that all papers from Overton county were graded when he got there.
He didn't seem to know if there were any failures from this county; but state a large number failed from other counties. He thinks all teachers will get their grade this week as they were done grading when he left.

Geo. Lea and Benton Fleming returned from Nashville Sunday.
Mrs. Bob Poston returned Sunday from a visit to relatives in Putnam County.
Mrs. C. E. Freeman and children visited friends at Algood last week.
Rev. Cates held the regular services at the Baptist church Sunday.
"Uncle" Josua Chilton returned Sunday from a visit to friends near Rickman.
Paul Capps spent several days in Nashville last week.
The Livingston party of gentlemen who attended the United Confederate reunion at Richmond, Va., returned Sunday. All report a large time.
Dixie Smith and Ernest Terry were in Algood Sunday.
Dr. Thomas Moore of Algood was in Livingston the latter part of last week.
County Attorney E. L. Ferrill of Nettle Carrier gave us a pleasant call Monday.
J. W. Crabtree of Windle was in town first of the week.
Miss Myrtle Kinnaird has returned after a week's visit to relatives at Cookeville.
Miss Willis Harris left Monday for Peoria, Illinois, where she will join a party of friends, with whom she will go to San Francisco, to the Panama-Pacific exposition.
Delinquent Tax Sale
On the first Monday in July next, at the Court House door in Livingston, Overton County Tennessee, I will offer for sale at public outcry, to the highest and best bidder for cash in hand, all the Relal Estate belonging to the delinquent taxpayers for the year 1914. Said sale will begin at one o'clock p.m., and if not completed on said date, will be continued from day to day until completed. The following is a list of such delinquents, the district in which the property is situated, and the number of acres in each tract:
1st District
W. C. Ashborn 3 tract, No. 1 bounded as follows, on the north by Bilbrey, south by county line, east by Reed, west by Ashborn; containing 100 acres, assessed at $500. Tract No. 2, bounded on the north by Wightman, south by Daniels, east by Bilbrey, west by Matthews, containing 80 acres, assessed at $400. Tract No. 3; bounded on the north by Ashburn, south by Bilbrey, east Ashburn; west Ferguson, containing 125 acres, assessed a $500. Total $100, Tax $25.80.
Andy Fifer (Colored) 1 tract, bounded as follows-North, by Poteet, south by Smith, east by Bohannon, west by Williford, containing 23 acres, assessed at $100. Tax $25.80
C. P. Miller 1 tract, bounded as follows: North by Breeding, south by Cobble, east by Breeding, west by Miller, containing 35 acres, valued at $100; tax $1.70.
C. T. Miller, one tract, bounded as follows:- North by Cannon, south by Young, east by Young, West by Moore. Containing 9 acres, assessed at $20, tax 34 cents.
2nd District
W. H. Matthews, one tract, bounded as follows:-North by Matthews; South by Matthews, east by Matthews, west by Matthews. Containing 2 acres, assessed at $10., tax 17 cents.
Keeton Webb - 3 town lots in Windle, Tennessee. Assessed at $60, tax $1.02.
3rd District
G. W. Garrett 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Murphy, south be Christian; east by Bullock, west by Bullock, containing 2 acres, valued at $70, tax $1.19.
W. C. Gore - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Maxwell, south by Neeley, east by Ogletree, west by Brown, containing 55 acres, valued at $250, tax $4.55.
Heirs of A. J. Reed - 1 tract bounded as follows: on the north by Howard, south by Neely, east by Holman, west by Brown, containing 50 acres, value $400, tax $1.70.
Heirs of H. J. Staggs 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Langford, south by Stover, east by Eldridge, west by Hembree, containing 100 acres, value at $150, tax $2.55
Perry Swan 1 tract bounded as follows North be Carmack, south by Brady, east by Ward, west by Carmack, containing ___ acres valued at $20, tax 34 cents.
Lee Catley 3 tracts. Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by Rich, south be Dailey, east by Dailey, west by Dailey, containing 25 acres, value $50. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Dale, south be Warden, east by Warden, west by Warden containing 3 acres valued at $10. Tract No. 3 bounded as follows: north by Rich, south by Dailey, east by Dailey, west by Dailey, containing 10 acres, valued at $30. Total value $90, tax $1.53
James Wilson Sr. 1 tract- bounded as follows: North be Wilson, south be Cook, east by Thompson, west by Cook, containing 20 acres valued at $60, tax $1.02
4th District
H. Y. Bilbrey, 1 tract, bounded as follows, north by Garrett, south be Burchett, east by Maynord, west by Burchett. Containing 100 acres, assessed at $150, tax $2.55.
Mrs. M. C. Bilbrey 1 tract, bounded as follows: North by Garrett, south by Maxwell, east by Garrett, west by Moore. Containing 60 acres, assessed at $150, tax $2.55.
A. S. Burges, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Bilbrey, south be Maynord, east by Maynord, west by Hatcher. Containing 75 acres, valued at $300, tax $5.10.
W. C. Smith, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Davis, south by Peterman, east by Davis, west by County Line, 30 acres, valued at $80, tax $1.36.
A. C. Smith, 2 tracts: bounded as follows: No. 1, on the north by Sullivan on the south by Upton, on the east Davis, west by Smith containing 50 acres, valued at $100, tax $1.70. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Chilton, south by Mxwell, east by Bilbrey, west by Peterman, containing 50 acres, valued at $125, tax $2.12-1/2
Mrs. L. O. Staggs, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Sullivan, south by Garrett, east by Burges, west by Garrett, containing 70 acres valued at $100 tax $1.70.
5th District
E. C. Poston and sister, 2 tracts. Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by Poston, south by Poston, east by Poston, west by Poston, containing 45 acres, valued at $150. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: north by Poston, south by Poston, east by Poston, west by Poston, containing 50 acres, valued at $200. total $350. Tax $5.95.
S. G. Ramsey, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Ramsey, south by Speck, east by Speck, west by Speck, containing 1-3/4 acres, valued at $20. Tax 34 cents.
J. P. Romines - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Dillon, south William, east Eldridge, West Williams, Containing 40 acres valued at $400. Tax $6.80.
George Testameut, 1 tract, bounded as follows: North by Finley, south be Speck, each by Shelton, west by Speck, containing 15 acres, valued at $25. Tax 43 cents.
A. E. Lovesay, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Allrod, south be Pointer, east by Deck, west by Allred, containing 29 acres, valued at $100, tax $1.70.
6th District
J. F. Copeland - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Peek, south by Bilbrey, east by Christian, west by Bilbrey containing 50 acres, valued at $100. Taxes $1.70.
H. E. Carr - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Carlock south be Reed, east by Day, west by Carr, containing 125 acres valued at $300, tax $5.10.
Cumberland Stave & Heading Co. 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Frisby south by street, east by Bohannon, west by street, containing 1 lot, value $850. Tax $12.75.
C. C. Cullom - 1 tract bounded as follows North by Copeland, south by Simpson, east by Harding, west by Bowden - 1 lot valued at $50, tax 75 cents.
Heirs of Joe Cole - 1 lot bounded as follows: North be street, south be street, east by alley, west by Smith, valued at $125, taxes $1.88.
W. L. Gillentine - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Chilton, south by street, east by street, west by alley, 1 lot valued $175, tax $2.63.
D. M. Gillem - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by road, south by Cullom, east by road, west by road containing one-fourth acre valued at $50. tax 75 cents.
Howard & Hatcher - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Howard, south by C. W. B. M., east by Breeding, west by Breeding, containing 10 acres, valued at $400 tax $6.00
J. D. H. Hatcher - 1 tract bounded as follows. North by Howard, south by C. W. B. M., east by Howard, west by Howard, containing 7-1/2 acres valued at $100 tax $1.50.
Mrs. Mattie Hatcher (colored) - 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Speck, south by road, east by alley, west by road, 1 lot valued at $25, tax 38 cents.
John T. Maynord ( colored) 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Ereeman, south by road, east by road, west by Freeman, containing 1 acre valued at $50. tax 75 cents.
Mrs. M. E. Richardson 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Lea, south by Sells, east by Bilbrey, west by Almonroad, containing 50 acres valued at $100, tax $1.70.
P. M. Smith - 2 tracts. Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by Smith, south by Realty Company, east by Taylor, west by Ward, containing ½ acre, valued at $100. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows, North by Smith, south by Street, east by Street, west by Street - 1 lot valued at $50 - total value $150, total tax $2.25.
L. H. Sells - 2 tracts. Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: north by Bilbrey, south by Vaughn, east by Bilbrey, west by Beaty containing 10 acres valued at $100. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Gunnels, south by Cravens, easty by Stover, west by Bilbrey, containing 50 acres, valued at $100, total value $200. Balance taxes $1.70.
7th District
Haggard Beason, one tract bounded as follows: North by Smith, South by Smith, East by Spicer, West by Garrett, containing 70 acres, value $200.00, tax $3.40.
A. B. Conner, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Sells, South by Smith, East by Dennis, West by Sells, containing 50 acres, value $100.00, tax $1.70.
Edgar Garrett, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Conner, South by Creek, East by Wright, West by Garrett, containing 26 acres, value $50.00. tax 85 cents.
Mrs. Nancy Garrett, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Conner, South by Vaughn, East by Garrett, West by Smith containing 80 acres, value $120.00; tax $2.04.
Hayes Green, 1 tract, bounded as follows: North by Dennis, South by Spicer, East by Sells, West by Markham containing 50 acres, value $250.00, tax $4.25.
D. E. Mullins, 1 tract, bounded as follows: North by County Line, South by Dennis, East by Harvey, West by Carnell, containing 30 acres, value $60, tax $1.02.
8th District
A. M. Hampton, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Phillips, South by Officer, East by Milder, West by Gracy, containing 300 acres, value $600. tax $10.20.
9th District
R. M. Ashborn, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., South by B. H. C., East by B. H. C., West by B. H. C., containing 50 acres, value $175, tax, $2.98
A. F. Ashborn, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Speck, South by Baldwin, East by Reed, West by Key containing 150 acres, value $100, balance taxes, 85 cents.
J. S. Bowman, 2 tracts - Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by Street, South by Bowman, East by Alley, West by Street. 1 lot value $450. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Norrod, South by Street East by Alley, West by Street, 1 lot value $250. Total value $700, taxes $11.90.
G. M. Bowman, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by R.R., South by B. H. C., East by B. H. C., West by B H. C., containing 6 acres, value $100, tax $1.70.
E. A. Bowman, 1 tract bounded as follows, North by Windle, South be Fuque, East by Vaughn, West by Windle, containing 88 acres, value $200, tax $5.10.
J. H. Bowman, 4 tracts Tract No. 1, bounded as follows: North by Collins, South be Ford, East by Ford, West by Wilmouth, containing 20 acres, value $125, Tract No. 2, bounded as follows: North by Miller, South by Collins, East by Welch, West by R. R. containing 20 acres, value $75, Tract No. 3 bounded as follows: North by Miller, South by Collins, East by Welch, West by R. R., containing 392 acres, value $320. Tract No. 4 bounded as follows: North be Speck, South be Baldwin, East by Reed, West by Key, containing 75 acres, value $100. Total value $620. Total tax $10.54
S. A. Booher, 2 tracts - Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North be Rosenbaum, South by Street, East by Morgan, West by Baldwin, containing 3 acres, value $125. - Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by B. H. O. , South by Little, East by Wiseman, West by Street, 1 lot value $310. Total value $435, Tax $7.40.
W. H. Collins, 4 tracts - Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., South by Pittman, East by Ford, West by B. H. C., containing 25 acres, value $225. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Welch, South by Bowman, East by E. Fork, West by Bowman, containing 20 acres, value $25. Tract No. 3 bounded as follows: North by Pierce, South by E. Fork, East by Smith, West by Welch, containing 50 acres, value $50. Tract No. 4 bounded as follows: North by Bowman, South by R. R. East by Welch, West by R. R. containing 4 acres - value $40. Total value $340. Total tax balance $1.28.
Enos Copeland, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Bowman, South by Wiseman, East by Gherit, West by Little containing 5 acres value $50. tax 85 cents.
C. C. Coleman, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Duffield, South by B. H. C., East by B. H. C., West by Reed, containing 6-2/3 acres, value $85, tax $1.45.
J. S. Cooper, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Windle, south by Street, West by Street, containing 7 acres, value $325, tax $5.53.
J. M. Cravens, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Allred, south by Richter, east by Smith, west by Nash, containing 5 acres, valued $75, tax $1.28.
Brad England, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Welch, south by Welch, east by B. H. C., west by Welch, containing 40 acres, value $240, tax $4.08.
R. S. England, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., south by McCormick, east by Wilson, west by Welch, containing 25 acres, value $75, tax $4.68.
W. J. & S. A. Ford, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by road, south by Padget, east by Melton, west by E. Fork containing 80 acres, value $350, tax $5.95.
Pat Gibson, 1 lot in Windle town, value $60.00, tax $1.02.
Bruno Ghernt, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., south by B. H. C. east by County line, west by B. H. C. containing 2 acres, value $10, tax 17 cents.
W. T. Howard, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Phillips, south by McCowan, east by Phillips, west by Phillips, containing 75 acres, value $325., tax $5.53
M. Harris, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Bilbrey, south by Windle, east by Eilbrey, west by Windle, containing 3 acres, value $110, tax $1.87.
Ike Hargis, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Duffield, south by Ashborn, east by B. H. C., west by Reed, containing 1 lot value $70, tax $1.19.
Leonard Howard, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., south by Phillips, east by Phillips, west by Phillips, value $500, tax $8.50.
J. S. Kirby, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Ford, south by McCook, east by Padgett, west by E. Fork, containing 66 acres, value $20, tax 34 cents.
Allen Looper, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Hargis, south be Qualls, east by Stout, west by Walker, containing 75 acres value $100, tax $1.70.
T. V. Miller, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Padgett, south by Miller, east by Matthews, west by Melton, containing 414 acres value $120, tax $2.04.
T. H. Norrod, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Hargis, south by B. H. C., each by R. R., west by B. H. C. containing 30 acres, value $120, tax $2.04.
T. H. Norrod, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Hargis, south by B. H. C., east by R. R., west by B. H. C. containing 30 acres, value $120, tax $2.04.
V. A Norrod, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Welch, south be B. H. C., east by B. H. C., west by Phillips, containing 100 acres, value $180, tax $.06.
J. L. Newberry, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Welch, south by Suttle, east by Hall, west by Ray, containing 5 acres, value $300, tax $5.10.
M. J. Phillips, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Phillips, south be B. H. C., east by Phillips, west by B. H. C., containing 73 acres, value $225, tax $3.83.
A. C. Phillips, Jr. 2 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., south by Wilson, east by Weeks, west by Phillips, containing 50 acre value $75, tax $1.28.
R. M. Pitcock, 1 tract as follows: North by Gragg, south by Street, east by Little, west by Robbins, 1 town lot value $25, tax 43.
Garfield Robbins, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by B. H. C., south be Street, east by Street, west by Little, containing 1 lot, value $100, tax $1.70.
W. B. Swallows, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Tuder, south by Ashborn, east by Miller, west by Wilson, containing 80 acres, value $350, tax $5.95.
S. V. Suttle, bounded as follows: North by Hall, south by Melten, east by Miller, west by Shaver, containing 75 acres, value $900, tax $15.30.
G. W. Smith, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Young, south by Wilson, east by Wilson, west by Wilson, containing 1 lot, value $90, tax $1.53.
Stout and Bowman heirs, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Neely, south by Walker, east by Bowman, west by Stout, containing 50 acres assessed $90, Balance taxes $1.02.
Southern & Saylors, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Phillips, south by Phillips, east by County line, west by Phillips, containing 800 acres value $2400, tax $40.80.
L. B. Tinch, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Walker, south by Stout, east by Walker, west by Johnson, containing 10 acres value $20, tax .34.
Shirley Tinge, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Stout, south by Tinch, east by Stout, west by Tinch, containing 45 acres, value $90, tax $.1.53.
A. D. Tinch, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Tinch, south by Stout, east by Stout, west by Stout, containing 45 acres, value $105, tax $1.79.
A. C. Tinch, 2 tracts, Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North by Tinch, south by Tinch, east by Bowman, west by Johnson, containing 15 acres value $30. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: North by Stout, south by Walker, east by Walker, west by Stout, containing 1 acre. Total value $35. Total tax .60
C. J. and Noah Wilson, 1 tract bounded as follows: North be Melton, south be Bilbrey, east by Phillips, west by Tuder, containing 80 acres, value $375, tax $4.68.
W. W. Wilson, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Wilson, south by Phillips, east by County line, west by Phillips, containing 20 acres, value $60, ax $1.02.
M. H. Wicks, 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Phillips, south by Phillips, east by Phillips, west by Wilson containing 120 acres value $400, tax $6.80.
10th District
Paicey Allred 1 tract bounded as follows: North by Conk, south by Cole, east by Cook, west by Duffield, containing 1 acre valued at $25, tax 43 cents.
Big Five Lumber Co., 1 tract bounded as follows: north by Vaughn, south be Lee, east by Vaughn, west by Bilbrey, containing 1117 acres, valued at $2,000 tax $34.00
W. M. Cooper, 1 tract bounded as follows: north be Cook, south by Crawford, east by county line, west by D. H. & G containing 40 acres, valued at $60, tax $1.03.
J. L. Cravens, one tract bounded as follows: north by Winningham, south by Newberry, east by street, west by Linder containing 1-1/2 acres valued at $50, tax 85.
S. S. Davis, one tract bounded as follows: north by Kimes, south by Vaughn, east by Robbins, west by Kimes, containing 50 acres valued at $50, tax 85 cents.
Joe Gunnels, one tract bounded as follows: north D. H. & G, south by Cravens, east by street, west by Cravens, containing ¾ acre value $150, tax $2.55.
John M. Lee, one tract bounded as follows: north by Lee, south E. & N., east by Gore, west by Lee containing 40 acres, value $50, tax $1.02.
McDonal Heirs, 1 tract bounded as follows: north by Crawford, south be Crawford, east by Sells, west by Allred, containing 50 acres, value $100, tax $1.70.
Joel Pullins, 1 tract bounded as follows: north by Threet, south by Gaw, east by Stafford, west by Cole containing 1 acre $25, tax 43 cents.
N. G. Robbins, 1 tract bounded as follows: north by Allred, south by Allred, east by Allred, west by Allred, containing 50 acres, value $110, tax $1.87.
W. C. Threet, 2 tracts, Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: north Forgey, south Duffield, east D. H. & G, west Cravens ½ acre value $100, Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: north Gunnels south Wright, east D. H. & G, west D. H. & G., ½ acre value $200 total value $300, total tax $5.10.
Sam Wilson 2 tracts, Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: north Copeland, south Forgey, east Copeland, west Forgey, containing ¾ acre value $50. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows, north Copeland, south Sells, east Copeland, west R. R., 1-3/4 acres $15, total value $65, total tax $1.11.
M. B. Smith, 1 tract bounded as follows: north Duffield, south Sells, east C & C, west Cravens, containing 100 acres value $250, tax $5.42.
11th District
J. F. Allred, 1 tract bounded as follows: north Stover, south Gunnels, east Stover, west White, containing 140 acres, value $400 tax $6.80
Grover Bilbrey, 1 tract containing 50 acres value $50, tax 55 cents.
C. E. Brumit, 1 tract bounded as follows: north county line, south Flowers, east Smith, west Flowers containing 14 value $40, taxes 68 cents.
J. C. Garrett, 1 tract bounded as follows, north Wright, south Smith, east Wright, west Garrett, containing 30 acres value $30, tax 51 cents
M. F. Garrett 1 tract bounded as follows: north Boswell, south Lynn, east Little, west Little, containing 115 acres, value $375, tax $6.38.
W. H. Carrett 1 tract bounded as follows: north Dennis, south Mosley, east Smith, west Reagan, containing 160 acres value $200 tax $3.40.
N. H. Hull 1 tract bounded as follows: north Cooper, south Davis, east Padgett, west Smith, containing 50 acres value $160 tax $2.72.
J. W. Kennedy 1 tract bounded as follows: north Stover, south Stover, east Stover, west Kennedy containing 16 acres, value $30, tax 51 cents.
Mrs. Ferril B. Parrott, 1 tract bounded as follows: north White, south Sevier, east Stover, west Barrett containing 100 acres value $400 tax $6.80.
J. M. Reagan 2 tracts. Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: North Keisling, south Daniels, east Richardson, west Shoemake, containing 50 acres value $250. Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: north Sells, south Smith, east Brumit, west Phillips, 20 acres value $100, Total value $350, total tax $5.95.
Porter Stephens 1 tract, 100 acres value $20, tax $3.40.
Mrs. Diana Shoemake, 1 tract bounded as follows: north Bilbrey, south Dennis, east Daniels, west Bilbrey, containing 85 acres, value $300 tax $5.10.
Mrs. Martha Smith 1 tract bounded as follows: north Ringley, south Ringley, east Ringley, west O'Brien & Co., containing 45 acres value $110, tax $1.87.
Wofford King 2 tracts, Tract No. 1 bounded as follows: north Jones, south Ferrill, east Hill, west Garrett containing 2 acres value $40, Tract No. 2 bounded as follows: north Smith, south Crouch, east Smith, west Brown, containing 13 acres value $60 total value $100 tax 1.70
12th District
Andy Brown 1 tract bounded as follows: north Lee, south Ogletree, east Mitchell, west Abbot, containing 25 acres, value $25 tax 43 cents.
T. D. Gragg, Trustee.

Insolvency Notice
On this the first day of June, 1915, came Sam H. Jones, J. C. Ketchersid & Company, and Carson Bros., and suggested to me the insolvency of said estate of C. B. Smith. It is therefore ordered by me that notice, by advertisement in the Livingston Enterprise , a newspaper published in Livingston, Tennessee, for all persons having claims against the estate of C. B. Smith, to appear and file the same in this Court authenticated in the manner prescribed by law on or before the first Monday in July, 1915, and warning them that any claims not filed within said date will be barred in the law and equity.
This June 1st 1915
W. J. Blevins, Clerk of County Court of Fentress County Tenn.

Sam H. Jones et al
Vs
A. G. Green et al

In the County Court of Fentress county Tennessee
In this cause it appearing from the petition which is sworn to, that Harrison Bledsoe and his wife, Nettie Bledsoe, two of the defendants are non residents of the State. They are therefore, hereby, required to appear on or before the first Monday in July 1915, before the clerk of the county court of said county, at his office in Jamestown, Tennessee, and make defense of the petition filed against them in said court by Sam H. Jones and others. Otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise, a newspaper published in Livingston, Tennessee.
This the 1st day of June, 1915.
W. J. Blevins, Clerk of County Court.

Insolvency Notice
To the Creditors of the Estate of Joe France, Decd.
The insolvency of the estate of Joe France, deceased, having been suggested to the Clerk of the County Court of Overton County, Tenn. Notice is hereby given, as required by the order of said clerk, to all persons having claims against the estate to present and file the same with the clerk of said Court at his office in Livingston, Tennessee, authenticated as required by law, on or against Monday, the 4th day of October, 1915, or be forever barred.
This June 7, 1915.
Lee Ann France, Administratrix of Joe France, dec'd.

Accidental Shooting
Little Leila Belle, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jake Dale was accidentally shot in the arm last Saturday, and we are glad to report that she is doing nicely, and no serious results are anticipated


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
June 16, 1915

 

Notice to Business Men
This is the last time that I am going to warn you to keep your business houses closed on Sundays. So do not be surprised if you have to pay a fine some Monday morning. If the law is not good have your aldermen to repeal it. Until it is repealed I intend to enforce it without fear or favor.
W. D. Guthrie, Mayor

Mrs. T. Gillentine, who has been in Nashville for several weeks, where she underwent an operation, returned home Saturday. We are glad to report that she is greatly improved.

The secret is out, like all other truths, it has risen above all things else, and now the world at large knows the Louisville, Nashville, Indianapolis, and other towns along the western route of the Dixie Highway that-is-to be, are indebted to Tullahoma near the capital of Coffee county, for having placed them on the map of this projected thoroughfare. The little left our villages will have to make the best of it, for the present, but maybe some of these long come shorts, the Highland Rim metropolis, will agree for them to have a byeway if not a highway.

Local Brevities
Carl Maynord was in Nashville and Watertown first of the week.
Miss Madge Barnes is moving her millinery establishment to the store house formerly occupied by J. H. Loftis in the Roberts building.
Robt. Hamlet of Algood has been here for several days looking after his lumber interests.
Buck Ferguson of Buffalo Valley was in town yesterday.
G. A. Pettit of Lebanon was here Saturday.
"Ted" Clrak of Nashville, is spending a few days with H. Atkins this week.
Blanchard Duke and family of Nashville are here on a visit to the family of S. A. D. Smith.
A. G. Keisling and family, B. B. Ledbetter and family spent Sunday at Nettle Carrier with relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Stanton and children, Robert and Katherine, have returned from a visit with Mr. Stanton's mother at Cookeville.
D. W. Phillips and family are spending several days at Red Boiling Springs.
Hon. Cordell Hull passed through town Sunday, enroute to the upper counties.
Judge J. M. Gardenhire passed through here Sunday, enroute to Byrdstown, where he will hold criminal court this week.

Route 2
Curtis Franklin started to Ovoca today where he will attend the Grand Lodge of K. of P. June the 16 and 17.
James Clark of Heard died Friday night and was buried at the family grave yard Sunday.
Mrs. E. Sells spent Saturday and Sunday at Geo. Richardson's
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kennedy visited the family of T. S. Allred Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Wright, of Wirmingham visited at S. H. Flowers Sunday.
Rev. Jessie Franklin preached at the Eagle Creek Hall Sunday.
Mai

Mrs. Heath of Nashville is here on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Lantrip.
S. A. D. Smith returned last week from an extended trip to New York and other eastern cities.
Jno. A. Hargrove, B. H. Hunt, W. H. Estes, E. C. Knight, W. R. Officer, and Miss Jessie Shaw attended chancery court at Cookeville the latter part of last week.
Rev. Lantrip returned Friday from a business trip to Nashville.
Mrs. Edna Thrasher and sons Hall and Joe, returned last week from an extended visit to relatives in Kentucky.
Mrs. Andrew Fiveash and sons Larry and Leo Doak, of Carthage are visiting the family of A. J. Mofield.
Mrs. James Myers and little daughter, Jean, left today for Dallas, Texas for a visit to relatives.

Netherland
Robert Warren and Miss Hazel Willett were recently married, the bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sid Willett while the groom is the youngest son of Wiley Warren a prosperous farmer.
Mrs. W. C. Poteet is visiting in Livingston.
Latta Conway Loftis is visiting his parents here.
Jim Lan Cannon, of Cookeville, spent Saturday and Sunday here with his grandparents.
Miss Roxie Poteet is visiting in Nashville.
Miss Mamie Stockton has returned to Livingston.
Miss Bell Maddux has returned to Livingston after a visit with her sister Mrs. Caruthers.
Willie Davis who has been ill with pneumonia, fever is convelescent.
Miss Nellie Boatman died May 31 after a lingering illness of consumption at the age of 14 years. She is survived by three younger sisters, her parents having died a few years past, the remains were intered in the Paron cemetery.
Pinkie Prim

Who is going to offer prizes to the Girl's Canning club?
Miss Lillie Bilbrey and Miss Reba Lee Yeatman of Nashville are enjoying an excursion up the Cumberland river this week.
The very attractive prizes offered in the Boys' Corn Club contest should be interesting to every boy in the county who has a chance to compete. The prizes are valuable and well worth working for, but the experience is worth far more to the boy who goes into the contest with a determination to win.

Mrs. W. Y. Bennett and children of Cookeville are at the Maynord House.
The Elmgrove Sunday school had a picnic last Thursday, which was much enjoyed by all who attended.
Mrs. Finnie of Nashville, who has accepted a position as stenographer for Chancellor A. H. Roberts, spent the week end here with her aunt, Mrs. Harris.
E. C. Knight is attending court at Byrdstown.
Atty. W. J. Chilton is at Byrdstown attending Criminal court.
Mrs. W. C. Poteet of Netherland is visiting friends here.
An automobile party arrived here Sunday afternoon from far away Houston, Texas.
C. J. Cullom and Judge Hull returned from Byrdstown yesterday, bringing with them some pretty good specimens of the public highway soil which they gathered enroute.

Gracey-Allcorn
Chas. N. Gracey and Miss Leila Alcorn both of Cookeville, were married at Nashville last Wednesday.
Both of the contracting parties are members of prominent families in Cookeville, and they are well known in Livingston, where they have many friends, who wish them a long and happy married life.

Mrs. W. M. Lantrip and children left today for a visit to friends in Nashville.
G. B. McGee went to Algood today.

________________________________
CITY GARAGE
COOKEVILLE, TENN.
HENRY DIES, MGR.

We have the Agency for the International Harvester Company automobile Truck; also DODGE BROS. automobile. The Dodge is between the Ford and the higher priced cars, in comfort and in price. We feel that if you are not looking for a Ford, you will not pass up the Dodge Bros. car.
We also handle Ford cars in Putnam and White counties.
We have a complete line of tires, tubes and all other accessories for automobiles of the very best grades at the least prices obtainable. There are some cheaper parts but none better. Give us a trial.
Henry Dies, Mgr.
_________________________________
PERMANENTLY LOCATED
WE ARE HERE TO STAY

We came here and opened up a Produce business, with the determination to become permanently identified with the business interest of Livingston and surrounding territory. We will play no favorites when it come to business, but will treat each and every man the same. We appreciate THE LIBERAL PATRONAGE accorded us thus far, and trust that we may deserve a continuation of same. We will always pay the highest market prices for produce, and being strictly in the Produce business, we are in a position to give the best possible service. We handle Salt Flour and Bran of excellent quality and moderate prices. Give us a trial.
Waller-Colvert Produce Co.
_________________________________
Livingston R 2
The hardest rain of the season fell here Sunday.
Jas. S. Robbons, G. W. Smith and others have gone to Nashville with logs and ties.
Wheat harvest is near at hand. There will be a light crop here; oats are looking better.
Rev. Curtis Harvey preached at Possum Trot Sunday.
Rev. L. P. Reeder preacher to a large crowd at Old Bethel last Sunday.
Vulcan.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
June 23, 1915

 

(This is torn)
W. M. Pryor is getting up an old time singing at Ozone.
Rev. Van. N. Smith filled the pulpit at the Presbyterian church Sunday.
James Robbins and others have gone to Nashville with logs, there has been two tides in June.
Good road talk is heard often but it takes the cash to make the roads, But $160,000,00 bonds would bankrupt the county with over $5,000,000,00 worth of real estate besides personal property, "They say"
Vulcan.

Cookeville Route 7
Editor Enterprise;
I received stationery sent out by the Enterprise and was very glad to get it, and to learn that it is the intention of the editor …torn

Hilham R 7
Bro. Setser filled his regular appointment on the Ridge Sunday.
The blind singing master, Mr. Roberts, sang at Oakgrove yesterday.
Mape Brown and wife, who have been sick for some time are no better.
People are getting behind with their crops, owing to so much rain.
Dr. Will Brown has gone to Knoxville.
Hardy Murphy lost a milch cow a few days ago.
Wheat is almost a failure in this part of the County.
Several people went to Livingston Monday. H. M. B.

 

Fishing Party
Quite a party of young people chaperoned by Mrs. Harry Atkins left this morning for Butler's Landing, Clay County for a ten days fishing trip. The party with baggage and provisions filled two wagons, and it has been suggested that two more wagons will have to be commandeered for the return they sould bring the supply of the ____ tribe that is looked for.

Prominent Citizen
And Popular County Official
Died Suddenly This Morning

Marshall Robert, one of Livingston's most highly respected citizens died at his home at an early hour this morning from the effects of a severe hemorrhage of the lung. The news of his death will come as a great shock to his many friends thoughout the county. His death was very sudden and unexpected by all, as he had been attending to duties regularly, and was in his office in the court house all day yesterday, although he was not feeling very well, and had remarked to some of his friends that he had pains in his chest.
Mr. Roberts was serving his third term as Register of Overton County and was known by all as a genial, painstaking official, and a man of exceptional personality. He leaves a wife and seven sons to mourn his demise, besides a host of friends and relatives. He was 52 years of age, having been born in January 1864.
The remains will be interred at the Okalona cemetery tomorrow.

Algood Route 1
Albert Eckle visited his brother Norman of Smith county part of last week.
Cash Poston of Livingston visited his mother a few days last week.
Arlis Hodges of Livingston spent last week with his brother, Addison.
Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Poston and baby also Miss Mai Brown visited Mr. Poston's mother over Saturday night.
Miss Anice Hodges of Livingston spent part of last week here visiting relatives and friends.
Mr. Bill McCormick and son Jno. Were at this place one day last week.
Mrs. Armandy Lednew of Nashville is visiting her daughter Mrs. Henry Warden.
Mrs. S. A. Hodges went to Livingston one day last week to have some dental work done.
Mattie Copeland

Criminal Court
Convened Monday, Large Crowd Here in Attendance.

Criminal court convened here Monday morning with Judge J. M. Gardenhire presiding. There was a large number of people in town, and the court house was filled with citizens from all parts of the country to hear the Judge's charges to the Grand Jury. The docket is not a large one, and it is expected that the work of the court will be finished before the week's end.
The Grand Jury is composed of the following:
Emmett Copeland, Foreman, Jno H. Lea, Bob Fletcher, Elbert McCormick, J. L. Cannon, Jay Masters, G. B. Ramsey, Winter Wilmoth, Wheeler Bilbrey, F. W. Winningham, E. H. Forgy, Hardy Ferrell and V. J. McCoamick.
The following citizens compose the Trial Jury,
Jno. W. Kennedy, I. T. Nolen, Hilary Langford, J. R. Copeland, L. S. Poston, D. J. Copeland, J. H. Phipps, Calvin Cape, L. T. Davis, John Anderson, Jaces C. Tayse, Floyd Allred.

Special Election
We will open and hold an election at all of the voting places in Overton County, Tennessee, between lawful hours on Thursday, the 5th day of August, 1915, for the purpose of having the qualified voters of said County to determine by affirmative vote, whether or not Overton County, shall issue $160,000,00 (as written) road bonds as provided by an Act of the General Assembly of 1915, as a special law for said county being house bill No. 1507 Chapter No. 544 passed May 14th, 1915, and Approved May 17th, 1914.
This June 8, 1915.
W. S. Swallows
B. L. Speck
C. J. Cullom
Commissioners.

Local Brevities
Mrs. John A. Hargrove and little daughter left Thursday for a visit to friends and relatives in Okla.
K. L. Bilbrey of Crossville was in town this week.
Miss Hilda Thrasher left Saturday for Red Boiling Springs where she will be for a few days.
M. B. Smith of Cravens was in town Monday. Mr. Smith is of the opinion that the road bonds will carry in this part of the county and is very optimistic as to the result thoughout the county.
Hon. Wm. J. Matthews of Windle Overton County's genial and popular legislator was in town Monday, mixing and mingling with his constituency.
M. Hearn of Lebanon is here today for the purpose of buying mules.
B. H. Harris of Oakley is in town today.
C. C. Gore returned Saturday from a trip to Nashville and intermediate points.
Thurman Whitson of Cookeville passed through town today enroute to Nettle Carrier to look after his lumber interest.
Prof. Taylor who has been right sick for some days is reported better today.
A. W. Speck and family left this morning for a visit to relatives at Glasgow, Ky. They went through in an automobile, and expect to make the trip today; they were accompanied by Willard Maynord.
Good roads always lead to the highest and best civilization; vote for good road bonds for Overton county and get in the band wagon of progress.
Boost good roads first, last and all the time.
Dr. McDonald of Monroe was in town yesterday.
E. L. Ferrill of Nettle Carrier is attending court this week.
J. W. Creasy of Monroe is here visiting friends.
E. N. Henry of Sulpher was in town yesterday.
J. H. Ewton of Nashville was here on business first of the week.
S. J. Hudson of Algood was here first of the week.
Judge Cordell Hull of Carthage was here this week shaking hands with his many friends.
John A. Hargrove was in Nashville the latter part of last week.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Bussell spent Sunday at Algood visiting relatives.
James Fleming and family of Montague, Texas arrived Sunday for a visit to relatives and friends in this county.
Mrs. Lansden, the mother of J. M. Lansden left Sunday for Nashville for a visit to her daughter. She was accompanied to Algood by Mr. and Mrs. Lansden and S. J. Bilbrey.
Misses Lou West and Etta Bilbrey of Rickman were in town yesterday.
E. Tomphson and son John, of Cookeville Route 7 were in town yesterday.
Dr. W. A. Howard of Algood, motored over to Livingston Sunday returning home in the afternoon.

Ex sheriff J. O. Collins, who has been confined to his home for two or three weeks as a result of the accidental would received in the leg, was on the streets Monday, and was navigating by the aid of a pair of crutches. He is very much improved and hopes to be entirely well in a short time.

Resolution of Respect
Whereas, on the 15th day of June 1915, the grim reaper of death has taken from our midst our walk and our lodge, brother J. L. Hargis who was a consistent, faithful and worthy member of our believed Lodge of Rebekahs of Cravens, Tennessee, and whereas the friendly Rebekah of I. O. O. F. No. 128 realize deeply the loss of its member and our brother.
Be it resolved that it is with profound and deep sorrow that we are called to make a record of his death and to know that his chair in this Hall will hereafter be vacant.
Resolved, that as a mark of repect to his memory we do ay here in our Lodge assembly a tribute to the earnest efforts of his life, and that we express our deepest treiling of regret and sympathy to his dear ones who will miss him even more than we do.
Resolved; that upon the adoption of this resolution it be spread on the minutes of our Lodge, and that a copy be furnished to his beloved wife and family.
M. B. Smith
Mrs. Gusta Cravens
Mrs. Rose Toys,
Committee


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
June 30, 1915

 

Joined Banner Party
Miss Dorothy Coe of Byrdstown, passed through here last Wednesday enroute to Nashville to join the Nashville Banner Panama Exposition party. Miss Coe has many friends and admirers in Livingston who congratulate her on winning in the contest just closed, and all join in wishing her a pleasant and most enjoyable trip to the far west.

Moved to Grant
Mrs. Elmo Smith and little daughter left Thursday for Grant, Smith county, to join her husband, Dr. Smith, who has located in that place and is practicing his profession there. The many friends of the Doctor and his family in Livingston wish for them much success in their new home.

Local Happenings
Fletcher White has returned from a visit to relatives in Rhea county.
E. C. Knight is attending court at Celina this week.
Balaam Spicer is back in town after a two week's sojourn in the rural districts for his health.
Mrs. Hilary Vaughn of Nashville is here visiting her sister, Mrs. Walter Mitchell.
Prof. Ben E. Holroyd was in Chattanooga last week on business.
Dudley White and Jesse Mitchell were in Hilham Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Benton M. Stanton visited relatives at Hilham this week.
Geo. Cooper of Burksville, Ky. Was here this week.
Mrs. A. G. Keisling and miss Myrtle Kinnard have been visiting friends in Celina for the past few days.
Dixie Smith was in Nashville first of the week.
Sheriff Alvin Carr left Monday with three prisoners, for the state penitentiary.

Mr. Isaac Masters one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of the county was in town Saturday, and for his advanced age, which we understand in ninety-one years, he is one of the most active of men. Everyone likes to see Mr. Masters come to town, and are always glad to give him the glad hand of welcome.

Whitewright, Texas
To the Enterprise and many Readers..
We take the Enterprise and like to read all the letters from Livingston, as my home is close there. I live in Grayson county now, I would like to see the old hills of Tennessee.
Crops are looking fine at this place. Corn and cotton are fine; wheat and oats are good.
People are having their thrashing done at this place.
If the waste basket don't get this I will write again some time.
Mrs. Laura B. Brown.

Livingston, Route 2
Mrs. Thomas of Livingston is spending a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wisdom at Eagle Creek.
Earnest and Curtis Franklin of Wirminghan were here Saturday.
Halton Billings of Oakley was here last week on business.
Harrison and Leo Nelson are here visiting relatives.
Miss Sarah Sells has fever.
Misses Brook and Maud Wright attended Sunday School and preaching at Taylors X Roads Sunday.
Miss Nova Holman went to Livingston last week for medical treatment.
Mai.

Booz
Editor and Friends-
I will drop a few lines from this place.
The wet weather still continuing and crops and weeds growing very fast.
Mrs. George Hammock is very ill with typhoid fever.
Mrs. Bettie who has been sick for some time died 25th and was buried 26th.
Sunday School has closed at Ivy Point for awhile.
There will be all day singing at Hickory Flat 3rd Sunday in July.
Rev. J. R. Hammons will preach at Ivy Point the first Sunday in July. Also Rev. C. M. Bilbrey in the evening at 3 o'clock.
Miss Kellie Cantrell visited Mrs. Julia Ledbetter Sunday.
Rev. J. R. Hammons preached a very interesting sermon at Hickory Flat Sunday evening.
Mrs. Cassie Looper visited at her mother's Saturday night.
Mrs. A. S. Ledford fell the other day and hurt her arm very badly.
The writer attended preaching at H. F. Sunday evening.
I will ring off. - The Happy Girl.

The Germans now seem to be undoing all the real work done by the Allies during the past eleven months by driving the Russians back from the Galician towns.

England's conservatism no doubt gets monotonous to the allies, who are doing the bulk of the fighting, while the British Lion shakes his mighty main and roars unceasingly.
England, whose "Sun never sets: has innumerable "Sons" who prefer to sit idle, rather than work in the factories which are turning out munitions of war. It must be "Bally hard work, dontcher know".

Local Brevities
Dr. Thomas Moore of Algood attended the Algood Livingston ball game Thursday afternoon.
Victory and Clifford Holland of Willette were in town Saturday.
Perry Dale of Nashville spent the week end here with home folks.
C. J. Cullom was in Nashville the latter part of last week.
Judge C. E. Snodgrass of Crossville spent Sunday night in town. He was enroute to Celina where he is holding court this week.
Dr. Brown of Hilham passed through here Sunday enroute home.
Mrs. R. L. Mitchell visited relatives in Hilham over Sunday night.
Dr. W. C. Groce of Byrdstown was in town this week.
Dr. Hawk of Monterey is here this week.
A. B. Vantrease has returned from his vacation.
C. C. Pitts spent the week end in Watertown.
Miss Arta Winningham is up again after a few days illness.
A. J. Mofield and family and Miss Ruth Officer and Mrs. C. A. Roberts joined the camping party at Butler's Landing, Clay county, Sunday.
Miss Lily Bilbrey has returned from a visit to Miss Reba Yeatman of Nashville.
Miss Willie Ealman of Celina passed through Sunday enroute home.
Don't forget the big base ball game between the Nashville Tennessee Centrals and the Livingston team, Saturday July, 3rd.

Non-Resident Notice
To William Smith

John Smith Jr.
Vs.
Sam Smith, et al
No. 1475, In the Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tennessee
In this cause it appearing from the bill, which is sworn to, that William Smith is a non resident of the State: he is therefore required to appear on or before the fourth Monday in July next, before the Clerk and Master, at his office in Jamestown, and make defence to the bill filed against them by John Smith Jr. et al or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed, and the cause proceeded with exparte as to him. It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This 22 day of June 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C. and M.
L. T. Smith Sol. For Complainant

Non Resident Notice
Missouri Coal and Land Company, Mercer C. Smith, George Webb, Bessie Stanley, Mary Stanley, George M. Stanley, Dora Stanley, Alsyon McClennon, The Central Land and Coal Co., Ayer and Lord Tie Co.
Minnie Houston et al
Vs
Missouri Land and Coal Co, et al
No. 1476, In the Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tennessee.
In this cause it appearing from the bill, which is sworn to, that foregoing named parties as defendants therein are non-residents of the State of Tennessee. They are therefore hereby required to appear on or before the fourth Monday in July next before the Clerk and Master, at his office in Jamestown, and make defense to the bill filed against them by Minnie Houston and others or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed and the cause proceeded with exparte as to them. It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This 26th day of June 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C and M

Non-Resident Notice
To William A. Whited, Amanda E. Walker, Abe Walker, George Whited, John Whited, Hays Whited, Martha Whited, Myrtie Whited, Gertie Whited, Anna J. Brown, nee Whited, John Gibson, William R. Gibson, Mahala Magaline McGill, nee Gibson. Amanda Gibson, Nora Barber, Edna Whited, Etter Whited, Ader Whited, William Whited, Esben Lee Whited, Emma Whited, Alice Whited, Amanda Whited, Belle Whited, Nettie Whited, Barlow Whited, Ader Whited. The only heirs at law of John W. Whited, deceased, being the brothers and sisters of said John W. Whited, deceased, and the children and heirs at law of the deceased brothers and sisters of said John W. Whited, deceased, Viz. George Whited, Polly A. Gibson, nee Whited; Robert Whited, James Whited and Jefferson Whited.
W. P. Little, Admr. Of the estate of John W. Whited, dec'd.
Against
William A. Whited and others.
No. 1474 In the Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tennessee.
In this cause it appearing from the bill, which is sworn to, that the forgoing named parties, as defendants therein, are non-residents of the state of Tennessee, they are therefore hereby required to appear on or before the Fourth Monday in July next before the Clerk and Master, at his office in Jamestown, and make defence to the bill filed against them by W. P. Little, Admr. Or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed, and the cause proceeded with exparte. It is further ordered that this notice be published at Livingston, Tennessee, there being no newspaper published in Fentress County.
This 22 day of June, 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C & M
J. T. Wheeler, Sol. For Complts.

Non-Resident Attachment Notice
W. T. Dearman and his wife Eva Dearman
Vs
G. E. Harrison et al
No. 1473. In the Chancery Court at Jamestown, Tennessee.
It appearing from the bill in this cause which is sworn to that John Whited at the time of his death, was the owner of a certain tract of land fully described in a deed from G. E. Harrison to John Whited dated the 2nd day of January, 1914, and registered in the Register's office of Fentress County, Tennessee, in Book "L2" Page 112 containing 500 acres; which is referred to for description that while he owned said land he made a parol trust agreement with the complainants that if they would pay off certain purchase money notes against said tract of land, and against another tract of land amounting to $337.50 that he would deed to Eva Dearman the above described tract of land, that he died before said money was paid and said trust specifically performed; and the bill in the case is filed to enforce the parol trust agreement above mentioned.
The said bill alleges that the following named persons are heirs at low of John Whited and that they are non-residents of the State of Tennessee, and are claiming said land in violation of said trust agreement and are seeking to sell said tract of land; and complainants ask for an attachment to attach said land and empound it and hold it subject to the orders of the Chancery Court of Fentress county until said parol trust can be declared, which attachment has bee issued and levied on said land, and they further ask that in the event the said parol trust agreement can not be performed that they have decree in favor of Eva Dearmad for work and labor done.
The names of the said non-residents and heirs at law of John Whited, deceased are as follows: Pernetta Whited, Rell Whited, Armanda Whited, Alice Whited, Erman Whited, Esburn Whited, Annie Jane Whited, John Whited, Jr., Myrele Whited, Martha Whited, George Whited, Gertie Whited, John T. Whited Jr., Bertha Whited, and the unknown heirs of Robert Whited, deceased whose names and residences can not be given, after diligent inquiry. William Whited, Sarah Jane, Gibson, Magdelean Gibson, William R. Gibson, Nancy Gibson, Pernetta Gibson, John Henry Gibson, Amanda Walker and her husband, Abe Walker.
It is therefore ordered that publication be made for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise, a newspaper published in Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee, requiring said non-residents to appear before the Chancery Court of Fentress County, Tennessee, at its special term to be held at the Court House in Jamestown, Tennessee on the 4th Monday in July, 1915, and make their defense to the bill filed against them in this cause; otherwise said bill will be taken for confessed, and the cause proceeded with ex parte.
This the 22nd day of June, 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C. & M.
L. T. Smith, Solicitor


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
July 7, 1915

Algood Route 1
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Stewart are visiting relatives in Smith county this week.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jess Gilliam on the 23rd of June, a girl.
Mr. and Mrs. Quitman Morgan of Livingston are visiting friends and relatives at this place for a few days.
Born to Syd Norris and wife on the 4th, a boy.
The little son of Rev. Elisha Henry has been quite sick but is better at time of writing. M.C.

Cookeville R 7
Miss Oma Nelson died on the 23rd and was buried on the 24th at the Williams graveyard.
T. O. Smith went to Livingston on the 27th.
James Hall of Jackson County was in this neighborhood last week.
Bill Smith who has been sick for quite a while is reported some better.
Walter McCormick and Joe Wileford were here last week on business.

Livingston R 2
I will drop a few lines from this place.
We take the Enterprise and like to read all the letters.
The wet weather still continues Crops and weeds are growing fast.
The Sunday School at Howard's Chapel is progressing nicely.
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Judd of Monroe visited Mr. and Mrs. Ledbetter Sunday.
Mrs. G. W. Ledbetter who has been quite ill with rheumatism for some time is no better.
Rev. J. M. Brown of Allons will preach at Howard's chapel Sunday.
Rutledge Nicholas of Monroe visited here the first Sunday in July.
Happy Girl.

Nettle Carrier
After a long delay I will give a few items from this community.
Health is pretty good at this writing.
Corn looks well considering the amount of work it has had on account of the protracted wet weather.
Wheat is better in this vicinity than was expected before the harvest, but it is feared that it may damage in the shock on account of so much rain.
The fruit crop so far as apples are concerned is light on an average, but there is a good prospect for peaches.
J. M. Copeland Sr. has just returned from a trip to Kingston with his daughter Mrs. Orion Himes, where he went to consult the Negro doctor. He also took treatment himself for Catarrh.
Children's day at Brown's on the fourth, with a large crowd, good order, an interesting program, and nice talks by E. L. Ferrell, Wash Lea, E. M. Smith and T. E. Ferrell; two nice solos sung by Miss Conway Lea.
A. J. Copeland

Allons Route 1
Having received stationery will send a few items from this section.
Revs Wilson and Burrough preached here Sunday.
Sunday School is progressing nicely.
J. S. Reed of Crossville is visiting friends and relatives here.
J. S. Ferrell and wife of Livingston visited home folks here last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Needham of Clay Co. visited here over Sunday.
Mrs. Sib Maynord and son of Livingston R 2 were here Sunday.
Born recently to Noah Maynord & wife a boy. Also to W. F. Davis a boy.
A. K. Lee of Livingston was here last week.
Mesdames S. A. Gunnels and H. E. Carr who have been sick are able to be out again.
F. L. N.

Election Officers
The following is a list of officers who have been selected to hold the Road Bond election, called for Thursday Aug. 5th, 1915:
1st District-Officer; Dave Stewart, Judges: Lee Cobble, W. A. Williford and T. D. Swallows. Clerks: W. F. Waits and Frank Swallows.
2nd District- Officer; Sid Norris. Judges: P. H. Myers, W. D. Hyder and Lee Curtis. Clerks: E. Thompson and Caloin Crawford.
3rd District- Officer: T. B. Ogletree, Judges: Abe Hawkins, Sid Ward and Sam Myers.
4th District-Officer: W. A. Burgess. Judges: Bedford Langford; T. N Chilton and J. K. Hunter. Clerks: T. L. Chilton and B. Stinson.
5th District- Officer: B. W. Eldridge. Judges: C. A. Williams, H. L. Little and L. L. Bilbrey. Clerks: J. T. Gilliland and G. V. Cooper.
6th District- Officer: C. E. Freeman. Judges: S. V. Bowman, J. M. Dillon and M. F. Ogletress. Clerks M. M. Roberts and Jno. Hart, Jr.
7th District-Officer: G. V. Ramsey. Judges: Joe Holman, Geo. Chowning and Jack Sells. Clerks: P. L. Carlock and J. W. Vann.
8th District-Officer: A. C. Copeland Jr., Judges: Halis Johnson, S. T. Qualls and Tom Ramine. Clerks: Luther Speck and Lee Hooper
9th District-Officer: M. H. Weeks, Judges: T. Qualls, L. A. Key, and J. C. Lush, Clerks: E L. Hoover and Tom Norrod.
10th District, Cook Place-Officer P. M. Allred. Judges M. C. Cravins, E. H. Forgey and Pete Cravens. Clerks: Alvin Vaughn and William Tays.
Poteet-Officer: I. E. Handy, Judges: John Vaughn, J. M. Copeland, Sr and Bates Stamp. Clerks: Cas Stout and Sol Norris.
11th District-Officer, J. McDonald. Judges: J. M. Garrett, J. C. McDonald and J. R. Cole. Clerk J. A. Coleman and J. R. Mullins.
12th District-Officer: W. F. Hoover. Judges: S. R. Peterman, H. L. Swift and John Seber. Clerks T. D. Cole and W. W. Buck.
W. S. Swallows,
B. L. Speck,
C. J. Cullom,
Election Commissioners

England with her enormous fleet of fighting vessels cannot or does not prevent the German submarines from sinking vessels within a few miles of her own shores. One of the latest causalities occurred just off the shore of Cornwall, the southern part of England. In this disaster a number of Americans and Missourians lost their lives.

Local Happenings.
Tom and Gideon Lowe of Cookeville passed town yesterday enroute to the upper counties.
W. A. Mason of McMinnville spent Sunday at the Roberts House.
Dr. McDonald of Monroe was in town first part of the week.
Judge E. L. Ferrill of Nettle Carrier, attended quarterly court Monday, and paid us a very pleasant and much appreciated call.
A J. Copeland of Nettle Carrier was in town Monday.
W. C. Crawford of Windle was here first of the week.
LOST-Sunday, June 27th a Misses white, wool coat, between Livingston and Frank Fleming's store. If found return to A. J. Mofield and receive reward.
Thurston Sewell of Willow Grove spent the week end in Livingston.
Mesdames G. E. Carlisle and J. R. Bryum of Nashville are here on a visit to their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wright.
Mr. Shell Read, a former Livingstonian but now of Crossville, was here last week, shaking hands with his many friends.
Miss Margaret Bilbrey returned last week from a visit to friends in Alabama.
W. K. Draper returned last week from Smith county where he and his family have been visiting.
Mayor W. D. Guthrie is at Red Boiling Springs.
W. H. Parregin of Route 3 was in town Monday.
Squire L. F. Myers of Cookeville, route 7 attended court here Monday.
Miss Lena Reagan is in Nashville this week visiting friends.
Miss Annie Beatrice Myers of Hilham is here attending the teachers institute.
Alex Van Trease and Dewi_ Miller spent Sunday in Hull.
O. L. Garrett of Monterey was in town Monday.
A. J. Mason was in Nashville this week.
Judge Roberts lift Monday for Woodbury, Cannon county where he will hold chancery court this week.
Miss Myrtle Kinnaird returned from an extended visit to friends in Celina. She will go to Cookeville this week to visit home folks.
Miss Hilda Thrasher will return from Red Boiling Springs today.

Boone Trail
Perhaps the most striking projects yet undertaken by Southern women originated with the D A R of North Carolina. It is the marking of the famous Boone Trail from the intrepid explorer's home on the Yadkin River to the site of the Indian fort at Boonesboro, Ky., where the old road ended. The D A R of the states of North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky, through which the trail passed, undertook the work of marking its course through their respected territories.
On the morning of June 30, at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, there was held a great celebration by the Daughters of the four states, the purpose of the occasion being the unveiling of a handsome monument to Daniel Boone. The event was one of the most unique that has taken place in the South for many years. Thousands of visitors from many states attended the ceremonies in which speakers of national prominence participated. Music and various striking features were arranged to make the occasion one long to be remembered by patriotic Southerns.- Anna Bland in Southern Woman's Magazine.

Teachers Institute
The Overton County Teacher's Institute convened at the Fiske Staggs Chapel on Monday morning with 110 teachers in attendance, and a great deal of interest is being manifested in the work Supt. C. C. Gore is conducting the institute. Next week will be devoted to examination work, and the teachers who failed to pass in the last examination will be given another trial.

Prof. Ben E. Holroyd left Monday for Indianapolis, Ind. He will not be at the Livingston Academy next term, but we understand will teach in one of the larger schools in the North. Prof. Holroyd has made many friends during his stay in Livingston, all of whom wish him much success in his new field.

The many friends of Miss Daisy Mitchell will regret to learn that she recently had an attack of appendicitis for which she had to undergo an operation in Nashville last week.

The many friends of Prof. Roy E. Simms will be pleased to learn that he has accepted a position as principle of the Gainesboro High School for the ensuing year.

Note: Several issues past, the paper started publishing a FARMERS MAGAZINE Section. In this magazine are articles by:
T. F. Peck,
Ada Cooke Settle - WOMAN
AND THE HOME
Patterns for clothing
Eli Haggard- DOWN ON THE FARM
John A. Murkin - POULTRY DEPARTMENT
Geo. R. White, M.D., D. V. S-LIVE STOCK DEPARTMENT
H. H. Shoulders, M. D. - TYPHOID VACCINE
D. T. Hardin, University of Tennessee- THE DAIRY


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
July 14, 1915

Death of Mrs. Boswell
Mrs. Obedience Boswell died at her home in Livingston last Friday. Her remains were laid to rest the following afternoon at Bethlehem cemetery, with appropriate services conducted by Rev. W. M. Lantrip. Mrs. Boswell was 72 years of age, and was much beloved by her many friends and relatives. She was the widow of the late A. C. Boswell, and is survived by five sons and daughters, two of whom live in the West. She is also survived by her aged mother, Mrs. Lea, who is now about 92 years of age, and is in splendid health for one of her years.

Livingston Route 2
Most of the farmers are about through working in their corn drop.
R. L. Clark spend Saturday and Sunday at Heard.
Rev. Jesse Franklin preached at the Eagle Creek Hall Sunday.
Martin Flowers has gone to Algood for a few days.
Smith & Grogan began threshing wheat last week.
H. F. Keisling is buying the Benton Johnson stock of goods at Eagle Creek, we are told.
Some pike bond talk among the voters, who seem to be about equally divided on the question.
Vulcan

For Sale
One Moving Picture Machine, complete, gas making outfit and 6 reels of good pictures. A good chance for some man to make some quick money. If interested call or write, J. M. Birdwell, Livingston, Tenn.
Uncle "Hi" Dale has recently purchased a canning outfit, and is going to take advantage of the goodly supply of vegetables and fruit by canning a large quantity of each.

The German Note is evidently a fair presentation of the situation from the German viewpoint, and to the unprejudiced Americans who choose to travel on belligerent ships take their lives in their own hands, and if they are destroyed the United States should not become embroiled in the present was as a consequence.

Dixie Smith and Howard Wright were in Monterey Sunday.
Carl Mofield and Clarence Arnold spent Sunday in Celina.
J. M. Fleming and family of Bonita, Texas, who have been here for two or three weeks visiting relatives and friends, returned home last week.
D. W. Phillips and family returned last week from Red Boiling Springs. Dan is looking very much better that when he went to the springs, and says he feels a whole lot better.

Local Happenings
Atty. Wynne Clouse of Cookeville is here attending Circuit court.
County Trustee, T. D. Gragg was here yesterday.
J. H. Bowling of Russellville, Ky. is here on business.
James N. Cox of Cookeville, General Mgr. of the Gainesboro Telephone Co. was in town today.
The Young Ladies Missionary society of the Methodist church were entertained Wednesday evening at the home of Mrs. A. H. Roberts.
Miss Lena Regan has returned from a visit to friends in Nashville.
Mrs. P. E. Clark, president of the T. K. & N. R. R., is in town for a few days.
T. C. McCampbell and wife are registered at the Roberts house.
J. A. Young is selling out his stock of dry goods, clothing, shoes and hats at cost, and will handle hardware and groceries exclusively, after his present stock has been sold out.
Maurice Groce of Byrdstown was in town this week, mixing with is many friends.
Thomas Bowman died at his home in Dry Hollow, this county, last Monday afternoon. He had been in had health for some time; having been a victim of that dread malady consumption.
Hon. A. B. Phillips of Monroe was in town Monday.
Hon. W. J. Matthews of Windle returned home last Saturday from a business trip to Oklahoma, where he has farm interest.
Chas. Reeves of Watertown was here first of the week, buying sheep.
Judge A. H. Roberts is holding Chancery court at Hartsville this week.
Chas. Judd and his sister, Miss Clara, of Miranda were in the city Monday.
M. M. Roberts is acting in the capacity of mayor during the absence of Mayor Guthrie, who is at Red Boiling Springs recuperating.
Miss Lyda Klope of Crawford attended the Institute last week.

LOST: An opportunity to vote "For Good Roads," if you don't go to the polls and cast your ballot on August 5th.

Byrd Bohanan has accepted a position in the local post office, formerly held by Dallas Stephens.
Messrs. Smith and Cope of Hanging Limb were in town on business this week.
Good Roads are lasting monuments to the memory of the progressive men who build them.

Judge C. E. Snodgrass of Crossville is here this week hold the regular term of circuit court. There is said to be a very light docket this time, and will be finished in a few days.
Hon. S. M. Turner of the Byrdstown bar was in Livingston this week.

FOUND: An opportunity to help Overton county get in line with the other progressive counties of the state, by voting "For Good Roads" on August 5th.

Black Graves of Nashville was here this week.
Carson Malone, the hardware man was in town this week.

J. M. Birdwell, the local theatre Mgr., gave a show at Hilham one night last week, and reports a large crowd out to see the movies.

The Irish potato crop is said to be a bumper one this year, while the Sweet potatoes are expected to be not quite so bountiful as usual.

Addison Bilbrey and Shirley Bohanan returned home Sunday from a trip to Rockwood and Harriman where they went with the Algood base ball team, the latter part of last week. The Algood team won the game easily from Rockwood Friday with Bohanan in the box, but lost the game to Harriman on Saturday.
Mrs. E. C. Knight and son, George left Sunday morning for Nashville.
E. C. Knight is home again after a two weeks' stay in Celina where he attended Criminal and Circuit courts.

Paul Capps was on the sick list for several days last week, but we are glad to report that he is much better now, and is able to attend to his duties at the post office.
M., F. Heron of Nashville was in town last week.

The man who refuses to vote for good roads because he does not believe in voting a tax on his children does not stop to consider that more than half of the posterity of the present generation will move to communities that have good roads and help to pay the tax that was levied to build them; and do it cheerfully, too, if something is not done to better conditions that now exist. The County will never have good roads without a bond issue, the carrying of which will never be a burden to the present or future generations, but would prove the greatest boon to the County that its citizens have ever experienced.

The apparently bountiful corn crop that is in the making in Overton county would be worth at least one fourth more to the farmers who make it, if they had good roads on which to haul it to the market when it demands the best price. Then they could afford to hold for the price, now they have to take the prices prevalent when the roads are fit to haul over.

Good roads bring the farmers nearer to town, and the town people nearer the farms, and create a fellow felling among the people that nothing but closer association can possibly bring about. We could do with fewer school buildings in the county and at the same time have a larger percentage of school attendance, if we had pike roads.

The Bible or Equal Suffrage
Which Will You Take

Do we believe in the teaching of the Bible, if so can we advocate Woman Suffrage and equal participation in public speaking and politics; equal with men at the ballot box, in office, engaged in scheming, hoodwinking the people, using all sorts of demagoguery in order to rule, if not rule, ruin, as the first woman did in the Garden of Eden. See the first attempt to run things. She brought mankind to everlasting ruin and sin. The Lord said unto the woman in the Garden of Eden, "Thy husband shall over thee and he said unto Adam, "Because thou has harkened unto the voice of thy wife, cursed is the ground for thy sake". So it will be when the time comes, if it ever does, when woman is made by the change in our constitution, equal with man at the ballot box. Then will be the darkest hour for the South she has ever seen, throwing the balance of power in the hands of the Negro race, and the South's enemys. Will we uphold the law as given by the Creator. "Thy husband shall rule over thee". Again see First Peter chapter three; "Ye wives be in subjection to your own husbands, 1st Corinthains, Chapter X1, verse 3, "And the head of the woman is the man, "For a man indeed ought not to cover his head for inasmuch as he is the image and glory of God, but the woman is the glory of man, verse 8, "For the man is not of the woman, but the woman of the man" verse 9, "For nether was the man created for the woman, but the woman for the man."
This Equal Suffrage movement is contrary to the teachings of the Bible, and of the servants of the Bible and all of the wise men from the creation down to the present day. During all ages the churches and most of the Christians have been submissive to the Lord's decree, and now if Woman Suffrage be right, what a mistake the religious world and the founders and builders of this republic have made, when they left Woman Suffrage out of the constitution. Now if the people should ratify the amendment to the constitution, and women be allowed political freedom, would the system of the states and the federal government be changed? The only change would be from a republican or democratic government to an anarchy and a hobble skirt government, and the Negro would hold the balance of power. Then a race war which would run rivers of blood from Mason's line to the Gulf of Mexico. Stand by the old constitution it will do for all classes.
Joe Hide.

A very interesting ball game was played last Wednesday afternoon between the "Outlaws" and the Normal, the score being 6 to 5 in favor of the Normal.

Order of Publication
To Lizzie Atterson:
John L. Atterson,
Vs.
Lizzie Atterson
No. 632. In the Chancery court at Livingston, Tennessee
In this cause it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that Lizzie Atterson, the defendant, is a non-resident of the State she is, therefore, hereby required to appear on or before the 2nd Monday of August next, before the Chancery Court, in Livingston, Tennessee, and make defense to the bill filed against her in said Court, by John L. Atterson, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise. This 13th day of July, 1915.
Jno. A. Hargrove, C. & M.
C. J. Cullom;
J. H. Bowman, Sols


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
July 21, 1915

President Wilson's
Proposes Peace Policy For The
European Nations

President Wilson, actuated solely by a desire to promote an early peace between the nations now engaged in war in Europe, submits the following representations to the representatives of the several nations of Europe and America not engaged in the war, to be submitted to their respective governments and to become the joint action of all governments agreeing thereto, when a majority have agreed:
1. That the nations now engaged in war in Europe cease hostilities for a period of 100 days.
2. That the status of the armies remain intact under the rules guaranteeing that neither of the warring nations shall seek or take advantage of any other during the armistice.
3. That the soldiers of all the armies be furloughed home indefinitely and until resummoned to the colors, and no nation shall strike another until the agreed time fixed in the armistice shall have come; provided that sufficient numbers of soldiers may remain under arms to police and protect their respective camps under such regulations as may be agreed.
4. That the foregoing proposals when modified or amplified and finally formulated by the agreement of a majority of the governments to which they are submitted shall become a binding agreement between such governments, and the proposals so finally formulated by submitted and proposed to the governments at war as the preliminary basis for neuatiatious for peace.
5. That the nations at war be invited to consider the proposals and to respond thereto in definite statements expressing their respective views upon the various items of the proposals and to submit counter proposals modifying, changing, amplifying or extending, as each may desire; and when the issue is finally thus made up in preliminary form then.
6. That the representatives of all the nations be called into council by the President of the United States, at Washington, who will proceed to adjust and reconcile all matters in dispute, as nearly as possible in conformity with the wishes of the warring nations, and envolve a plan for peace, provided that representatives of the warring nations may be present and heard to participate in the deliberations of the council and to consult their respective governments during the sicting, upon any difference or difficulty that may arise, and no action shall be taken until all are heard.
7. That when all are herd fully if mutual agreement has not been reached, the council shall go into executive session and itself determine and propose a just and final solution of all questions involved and fix the terms for peace.
8. If the warring nations shall disagree and determine to resume hostilities, then the council shall take such united action as it may determine looking to enforced peace upon the basis fixed.

While the general direction of each of the roads to be built by the Good Roads Commissioners is fixed by the Act calling the election, still the exact location is yet to be determined, and a few men who ought to favor the building of these roads are opposing them - some secretly and some openly - thus making it clear to the Commissioners that these men do not want the pikes to cross their farms or come near them. After the bonds are voted these men will be in a very poor attitude to ask favors of the Commissioners and especially to ask for pikes to come through their land or near to their farms. On the other hand, those men and those neighborhoods who favor the pikes and want them will be in a much better attitude to ask the Commissioners to locate the roads where they want them. The strongest argument any man or neighborhood can make to the Commissioners against the roads coming over their lands or through their communities, is to open up a fight against the bond issue. We are not authorized to speak for the Commissioners, but we know they are men who would be inclined not to force pikes on men who do not want them, provided they could give them to men who do want them, while at the same time serving the public at large as well as to put pikes where they are not wanted.

C. J. Cullom, A. L. Maxwell and W. S. Swallows are the three election commissioners recently named by the Board. These three gentlemen are well and favorable known throughout the county, and will see that the elections are held according to law.

 

 

Cookeville R-2
Floyd Warden and Miss Emma Webb were married on the 4th.
Parson Moore and Miss Annie Peak were married on the 13th.
Miss Elvin Harris who has been sick for some time is reported no better.
Don Brown's wife is no better.
A protracted meeting is in progress at Hardy's Chapel this week with James Brady and other preachers in attendance.
Joe Hide

WANTED - To buy several thousand eighteen inch white oak boards. Write, phone, or call at the Enterprise Office, Livingston, Tenn.

Local Happenings
John Roberts is in Clay county this week.
Judge A. H Roberts of Livingston and Hon. M. C. Sidwell of Celina will address the citizens of Oakley and vicinity, on the subject of Good Roads next Saturday, July 24th, at 2 p.m.
Shirley Ledbetter, son of E. Ledbetter of Copeland Cove, was thrown from a mule Saturday, sustaining a very painful and perhaps serious wound in the back of the head. His head was cut to the skull, and it necessitated several stitches to be taken. He was doing well at last report. Dr. A. B. Qualls dressed the wound.
If you want to see a Willow Grove Fair catalogue, write to W. T. Sewell, Sec. Willow Grove Tenn.
A. S. Frisbie is preparing to build a large ten-room residence on the lot just opposite the Livingston Academy Dormitory. This is an ideal building side, and the location is one of the best in town.
On last Friday evening quite a number of young people, chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. H. Atkins, spent a most enjoyable time at the Sarah Preston Home.
John R. Bullock is installing an acetylene lights in his home.
J. W. Wilson was in Algood Sunday.
Messrs. Clark and Colvert of Algood were here Monday on business.
J. R. Copeland of Crawford, was in town last week.
Herman May of Harriman spent the week-end here visiting home folks.
The new Clay County Fair at Willow Grove will be held August 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th.
Mrs. O. N. Massa of Cookeville is here visiting the family of her brother, B. M. Stanton.
James Henson and wife spent the week-end at Rickman.
Judge Roberts left Sunday for Wartpurg, Morgan county to hold the regular term of Chancery court this week.
A. J. Mofield was in Nashville the latter of last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard Duke of Nashville are here visiting the family of S. A. D. Smith.
Miss Certie Guthrie is visiting her sister Mrs. A. J. Cook at Black's Ferry, Ky.
Charlie Rich was in Algood first of the week.
Fred Cornwell of Algood was here first of the week.
W. K. Draper left today for Macon county.
Joe Johnson of Byrdstown was here the latter part of last week.
S. T. Hudson of Algood was here last week.
W. A. Ownsby motored to Cookeville Sundry to see and return home with Miss Olga Conatser, who was the week-end guest of Mrs. W. C. Davis.
Miss Ilean Bishop of Nashville was here visiting friends last week.
Miss Dorothy Coe of Byrdstown returned Saturday from a trip to the Panama-Pacific exposition at San Francisco, spending a few days here as the guest of Miss Margaret Cooper.
Mrs. A. J. Mofield, Pauline and Harry have returned from a visit in Algood.
Dr. I. H. Bilbrey has been confined to his home on account of sickness this week, however we are glad to report that he is better today, and hopes to be out in a few days.
T. C. McCampbell of Nashville, vice president of the T. K. & N. railroad has been in Livingston for the past week, looking after the road's interest.
W. C. Murphy of Hilham was in town today.
J. G. Eastland has purchased the Goodpastuer lot on West Main ST. and will erect a modern residence on same. This is one of the choicest building lots in Livingston, and it goes without saying that Mr. Eastland will build an up-to-date residence, and one that will be a credit to the town.
Bob Poteet is preparing to open up a new barber shop in the E. C. Knight office building on the Southwest corner of the square. He has ordered new furniture throughout for the shop, and will have same fitted up in first-class style.
Mrs. Clark Myers of Gordonsville is here visiting friends and relatives.
Mrs. S. A. D. Smith left Thursday of last week for Lake Charles, La., after receiving the sad news of the death of her father, Mr. Bowman.
G. V. Richardson, of Route 2 was in town Monday.

Livingston R 2
Mrs. Henery Robbins and Children spent the week-end with Mrs. Robbin's father, Mr. Stover near Monroe.
Walter Garrett of Wirmingham was here Friday on business.
H. C. Savage has bought the Nancy Williams tract of land from the Mullins heirs, paying $250 for it.
S. K. Garrett visited S. H. Flowers Friday and Saturday.
James Rubel and G. V. Richardson went to Livingston today.
Aunt Malinda Taylor is on the sick list this week.
W. F.

Misses Reba May and Nettie Morris are visiting friends at R b rson Crossing.
DeWitt Miller went to Monterey this morning.
J. W. Dalton of Winchester is here this week.

To John Allen Reagan
H. C. Beaty et al
Vs
John Allen Reagan et al
No. 1477 In the Chancery Court in Jamestown, Tennessee.
In this cause it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that John Allen Reagan is a non-resident of the State; he is herefore hereby required to appear on or before the first Monday in August next, before the Clerk and Master, at his office in Jamestown, and make defense to the b ill filed against him by H. C. Beaty et al or otherwise the will be taken for confessed. It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This day of July 1915.
C. K. McBroom, C. M.
L. T. Smith, Sol. For Com.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
July 28, 1915

 

GRAND RALLY.
GOOD ROADS MEETING.

The U. S. government, through its special agent, Hon. L. E. Boykin, Engineer in office of the Public roads, Washington, D. C. The State government through Hon. Chas. E. Ferris Dean of Engineering Dept., University of Tennessee, and other prominent speakers, will address the people of Overton county, at LIVINGSTON, MONDAY AUG. 2, 1915.
On the subject of good roads, improvement of schools, social conditions, and the economic benefits to be derived from Internal Improvement.
EVERYBODY INVITED.
Come, bring your wives and children.

One of out Correspondents tells
Why He is for Good Roads.
WHY I AM FOR GOOD ROADS.
Because I am a Farmer. Because I do not want to see Overton county left in a mud hole. Because we cannot travel our roads during the winter and spring, only drag through them. Because we need a way opened up to the North, that is to Clay and Picket counties, and the blue grass regions of Kentucky. Because Good Roads will open up trade relations with the upper Cumberland region as well as to the South and East Giving to the farmers a way to get their produce to a market in either direction; also give us a way to get to Crawford to the East. Because Good Roads will cause farmers to improve their methods of farming; to keep up with the eneral improvements of the country, and show to the world that we want to better our conditions, and ask them to co-operate with us in the work by giving them a way to mingle with us and see what we need and want, and show to them that we are not afraid to improve our conditions by using our capital in improving our homes, school houses, and roads. That we are willing to aid in the betterment of mankind; that we re not living for self alone.
We have a chance to better one of these conditions, so let us use it by voting for Good Roads. Bond issue is the way such improvements are usually made by our government, railroads, manufacturing, bridges are built, and canals are dug, all for the betterment of conditions that exist. So if we can better our conditions by building Roads now is the time to consider same, by voting in accord with them.
Vulcan.

GRAY-GORE
e. b. Gray and Miss Eria Gore were quietly married at the home of the bride's father. Mr. Overton Gore in East Livingston last Sunday evening at 7:30 o'clock, with Elder Leland Cook, officiating. There were only a few intimate friends present, besides the immediate family. The Enterprise extends the best of good wishes for their future happiness and success.

 

Booz
I will jot down a few items from this place.
We are having some fine weather here now.
Revs. Burris and Copeland are conducting a series of meetings at the new schoolhouse.
Mr. Winson Ledbetter conducted an all-day singing at Hickory
Flatt last Sunday. There was a large crowd in attendance and everyone seemed to enjoy the occasion.
Lester Neely and his sister Lona attended meeting at the new schoolhouse Wednesday.
Our school at Ivy Point began last Monday with Mr. Italy Bilbrey for instructor.
Preaching at Ivy Point the Fourth Sunday be Revs. Robert Hammons and Troy Cantrell, and they expect to protract the meeting for a few days.
Our merchant M. C. Brown has finished his new house, and has moved in it.
M. E. N.

Miss Reba Lee Yeatman of Nashville is the guest of Miss Lily Bilbrey for a few days.
Messrs. Cato Taylor and Willard Maynord were in Celina First of the week.
Chas. Brown who has been attending the summer school at Knoxville passed through last week enroute to his home at Fox Springs.
W. C. Cooper of Oak Hill was in town last week on business.
Miss Ova Allison of Monroe is visiting Mr. & Mrs. Carlock.
C. C. Pitts left Friday for Canie Fork to join a party on a Camping trip.
Jesse Mitchell went to Hilham Saturday.
Mrs. E. B. Cosby, matron at the Livingston Academy Dormitory, who has been in Chattanooga for the past two months, returned Monday.
W. S. Swallows was in town Monday.
Mrs. Allison of Algood has been visiting the family of her brother, W. A. Bussell, here for several days.
Squire J. W. Key of Bushing was in town this week.
Earl May of Harriman is visiting his mother, Mrs. Minnie May.
Quite a number of people from here attended the Winkler-Pague debate at Hilham Sunday. There was a large crowd in attendance, and a great deal of interests is being manifested in the debate which will continue until Thursday.
R. S. Oakley and John Roberts were in Algood Sunday.
DeWitt Miller has returned from a visit to friends in Cookeville and Monterey.
Miss Ilean Bishop who has been the guest of the Roberts House for a few days has returned to her home in Nashville.
R. M. Johnson of Cookeville passed through town Monday enroute to Byrdstown.
_______________________________
TO THE PUBLIC
After August 1st, I will reduce the price of shaving from fifteen cents to ten cents. This price means strictly cash to all.
Tom Garrett Barber
_________________________________

Mrs. J. F. Turner, of Algood was a guest in the home of her sister, Mrs. R. H. Hankins, a day or two last week.
Grover Deck of Albany, Kentucky, was in town this week on business.
Postmaster of Celina was in town last week.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Floyd McCormack recently a girl.

B. M. Stanton has returned from a week's business trip to East Tennessee.
W. A. Ownsby and Miss Olga M. Conatser spent Sunday at Hilham, attending the Debate.
Miss Nettie Norris will return this week from a two weeks visit in Algood.
E. C. Goodpasture went to Nashville the later part of last week.
E. Y. Gibson of Cookeville was here last week.
Capt. James Davis and Hon. John McMillin of Celina were in town yesterday on business.
Eld. Leland Cook, pastor of the Church of Christ, preached two very interesting sermons Sunday. Large and appreciative congregations greeted him at both morning and evening service.
Miss Ada Coulson, a former popular Livingston girl, but later of Algood, and then Chipley, Fla., is a guest this week of her sister, Mrs. R. H. Hankins, much to the pleasure of her many friends here. The family have recently returned from Florida and after a few weeks visit with realtives in Algood and Livingston will be t home in their former residence in Algood. We are glad to welcome them back.
Miss Cleo Draper is spending the week with her sister, Mrs. W. Y. Keisling, at Nettle Carrier.
Master Forest May spent last week with his brothers and other relatives at Harriman.
Miss Reba May has returned from a visit of several days with relatives and friends on Spring Creek.
Marvin Bennett and wife visited the family of W. A. Bussell Sunday.
Mrs. W. K. Draper and family are home again after an extended visit to friends in Macon and Jackson counties.
C. J. Cullom was in Nashville this week.
"Uncle" Shell Read of Crossville was here this week.
Miss Ruth Farley is visiting relatives in Cookeville. Mrs. J. H. Keisling accompanied her to Algood.
Carl Maynord and sisters, Misses Buna, Lura, and Allie returned home Sunday from a visit to friends at Willette and Red Boiling Springs.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION
To Hays Phillips
Eleana Phillips
Vs.
Hays Phillips
Albert Phillips
And Floyd Winningham
In the Chancery court at Byrdstown, Tenn.
In this cause, it appearing from the bill which is sworn to, that Hays Phillips, one of the defendants, is a non resident of the state, he is, therefore, hereby required to appear, on or before the 1st Monday of September, next, before the Clerk & Master of said court, at his office in Byrdstown and make defense to the bill filed against him in said court by Ellean Phillips, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for Four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This July, the 22nd, 1915.
C. B. Parris, C. & M.
White and McDonald, Sols.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
August 4, 1915

VOTE FOR GOOD ROADS

Local Happenings
E. D. Marcom and wife of Willow Grove visited relatives and friends here this week.
Mrs. Stanton of Cookeville is here visiting the family of her son, Benton M. Stanton.
W. Heard returned Sunday from a visit to relatives in Texas and Oklahoma.
T. E. Goff a former Livingstonian, but now of Monterey, was in town Monday, mixing and mingling with his many friends.
Mrs. M. C. Sidwell who has been visiting relatives in Crossville passed through last week enroute to her home in Celina.
C. M. Smart of Cookeville was in town last week.
The Misses Ogletree of Hilham were the guests of Miss Willie Mordock last week.
Mrs. E. C. Knight is visiting her parents in Vernon, Ky.
Mrs. S. E. Cunningham of Gallatin is visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. G. O. Knight.
Flower Staggs and family of Crossville passed through last week en-route to Celina.
The Campfire girls chaperoned by Miss Gertrude Officer spent a most enjoyable outing last Wednesday at Hilham.
Miss Ninnie Swift of Algood visited Miss Willie Mordock last week.
See that your ticket reads "For Good Roads."
E. C. Goodparture returned from Nashville Saturday.
Eld. Robert Kirby of Kentucky will begin a meeting at Walnut Grove next Sunday.
Mrs. Lamb, and daughter, Miss Ruth of Nashville, are the guest of Mrs. Cosby at the Sarah Preston Home.
Rev. Leland Cook is holding a series of meetings at Tinsley Bottom this week.
Rev. W. M. Lantrip has returned from Elmwood, Smith county, where he has been conducting a protracted meeting.
Eld. Thos. Rose was in town Monday enroute to Flatt Creek where he will hold a series of meetings this week.
Mrs. D. D. Thomas of Livingston was the guest of Miss Dora L. Masters last week.
Rev. H. E. Winkler of Nashville is holding a protracted meeting at Hilham this week.
Mrs. J. G. Eastland left yesterday for a visit to relatives at White Bluff, Tenn.

DEBATE AT HILHAM
As to the religious debate held at Hilham last week, I had the pleasure of attending from beginning to end, and would say that I never witnessed such nice order by an outdoor audience. I attribute this mainly to the parliamentarian, J. W. Sheppard, who was one of the moderators.
While the rules governing a debate of this kind were very abruptly ignored, I leave it to the 1500 people who were present to decide who were the guilty parties.
Mr. Pigue is 57 years old; has been a minister for 30 years, and has been in about 75 debates. Mr. Winkler is 26 years old; is a contractor and builder; has been preaching about six years, and this is the first debate he has engaged in.
Each of the contestants made strong and interesting arguments.
B. F. Smith
Chas. Hatcher and wife of Texas are here on a visit to Mrs. Hatcher's mother, Mrs. A. Deck.

Baxter
Bro. Will K. Hunter has just closed a very successful two weeks meeting at the Christian Church.
The Kadell-Kritchfield big tent show has been here a week, a large crowd was out each night.
Mrs. H. J. Farley is at Kingston for medical treatment.
Oliver Greene of Algood was here several days last week.
W. C. Wade of Cookeville was here last week talking insurance.
Prof. C. E. Austin was in Cookeville Monday.
Brownlow Oliver has returned from Cookeville.
Miss Lillian Lee and Grove Anderson were married Thursday at the home of the brides sister Mrs. J. C. Oliver, Reb. Harris performing the ceremony. Miss Lee wore a beautiful gown of white satin and carried brides roses Miss Clara Miller of Nashville rendered the wedding music. Mr. Anderson is cashier of the Baxter Bank and Trust Co. They will be at home to their many friends in Baxter after Sept. 1st.
Pinkie Prim

Allons
Mrs. Belle Upton died recently after a short illness, she leaves a husband and other relatives to mourn her loss.
Mrs. Coreilia Webb of Nashville is visiting her sister Mrs. J. D. Holman.
Rev. E. Little of Cookeville was here last week enroute home from Smyrna, where he had been conducting a meeting.
One of the most unique Wedding's that was ever solemnized in this section was that of Thos. Garett aged 84, and Miss Amanda Mullins 63, Rev. Brown officiated.
K. W. Maynord and family visited relatives at Nettle Carrier last week.
Uncle Joe Spicer of Oakley, was here Sunday enroute home from Hilham.
A. B. Stinson and family of R. 1 visited at Livingston last week.
Born to Benton Hall and wife a Boy.
Prof. Porter Carlock, opened school at Unity Monday.
Uncle Bob Cole and Mrs. Andrew Sidwell are on the sick list this week.
F. L. N.

Livingston R. 2
Mr. James Wright of Oakley was here Saturday.
M. R. and Edd Hargrove of Willow Grove were here last week on business.
John M. Connor of Willow Grove, was here Friday and Saturday looking after a land deal.
Wirt Eubanks and John Jackson of Livingston were here Friday.
The school at Lone Maple is getting along nicely with Miss Pearl Wisdom as teacher.
The school com, are building a school house at Independence.
Mr. Alvin Richardson and Miss Daisy Taylor were married Sunday.
J. D. Martin of Winniewood, Okla. Visited here last week.
Vulcan.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
August 11, 1915

ELECTION ECHOES LISTEN GOOD
Judge A. H. Roberts, when asked his opinion as to the effect of the recent election, said; Advocates of good roads and other internal improvements are not discouraged, many taxpayers who voted against the bond issue favor good roads. These men have some other plan, most of them favoring the levy of a direct tax and paying for the roads as they are built. Such a plan is entitled to consideration. Let those who voted for the bond issue give these men credit for honesty of purpose and join with them in an application to the county court at its next quarterly session to take a stand for good roads by the direct tax plan. If the county court will ten take steps in that direction and five the people of the county an assurance that it is in earnest in desiring to improve our roads, every advocate of the bond plan will join heartily in the direct tax movement and give it a fair test. No man ought to be so selfish as not to be willing to try the other mans plan. If the majority prefer to build pikes in that way, we should not hesitate to give their plan our hearty, and loyal support. The plan is not so important to the sincere advocate of good roads, what he wants is a better system of roads in the county, with the development of our resources along all lines which must follow. Business in the county must stagnate for five or six months out of the year because the roads cannot be profitably used. This business stagnation has already made itself felt, and will necessarily produce even more striking results as time goes on, for our roads grow worse every year. The burden of maintaining our present road system falls largely upon labor rather than upon capital; this is wrong in theory, and is unjust to the laboring man. The road levy this year is 15 cents on each $100 which will produce about $2200 in road taxes. The 1600 road hands working 5 days each, (8000 days) and worth $8000, must bear a burden over three and half times as heavy as the wealth of the county several hundred of these men who thus pay in work a road tax of $5 a year each, do not own a horse or a vehicle to put on the roads. They are required to build the roads for other men to use. If they refuse to work when warned they are indicted and fined or jailed. The capitalist is not jailed or fined if he refuses to pay his road tax.
Let us call on the county court at the October term to give us some relief from our present ills and let every voter who wants to see his county built up and improved keep up the fight for good road. There is no doubt but that a majority favor better roads than we now have, we have differed only as to the means of securing them. Let us adopt any other reasonable plan, if every other plan fails let us organize turnpike companies and build pikes and let those who use them pay for it. However this should be done after all other plans fail.
Dr. W. M. Breeding says:
I feel that with another election the proposition will carry by a substantial majority. The questions should not be called to hurriedly, but the issue should not be allowed by any means. I rather favor the calling of another election some time in November.

To The Enterprise:
I congratulate you upon the splendid work you have done for the cause of good roads in the campaign just closed, or I should say, rather, the campaign just begun. There is everything to encourage good roads advocates in Overton County, and nothing to discourage us in the result. No proposition ever put before the people, grew so rapidly, or took root so deeply in the minds of the voters, in so short a time. The campaign has done permanent good. A weeks more time for mature consideration of the part of the people, and a thoro understanding of the proposition, and it would have carried. And there were votes enough, who were deprived of voting on account of the new poll tax law that was not understood by any of us until it was too late, probably to have carried the proposition now, when the people are ready for another election let it be called and held, and in the meantime let good roads advocates keep up the fight every day as if the election was tomorrow. The wealth and capital of the Country should be taxed to build and maintain the roads and this burden taken off the labor.
When the laboring man fully understands the proposition, the fight is over. Let us keep up the fight because we are right. On the first Monday in September which is labor day, let us have a great meeting of all friends of the good roads and friends of the laboring man in Livingston, in order that we may from one another, revive inspiration, and take new courage for the fight, in which I believe we have just begun.
Very respectfully,
W. R. Officer.

Dr. M. B. Capps Says:
"What do I think of the result of the Good Roads Election?"
The result is not just what I desired or anticipated but the gain over our first vote was so immense, being 94 to 1053, I feel the people are rapidly awakening to their own interests, and that one more vote by the people is all tat is needed to carry prosperity all over our county. Give us an early election and labor will come into her own; we will be free and happy people."

Judge J. R. Hogue said:
The returns were very satisfactory to me, as they show that the people are fast waking up to their own interests; it shows that the bond issue is not such a bugaboo as it once was, and with one more election pitched on a high plane as this one was will win the fight for good roads. The increased wealth of the county will more than over balance the increase in taxes.

J. C. Bilbrey says:
I feel much encouraged over the result. It shows conclusively that the Good Roads sentiment is growing. We will win next time.

John A. Hargrove says:
The opposition mustered more votes than we expected, while our vote was materially lessened by the fact that a goodly number of Good Roads advocates had not paid their Poll tax. They are gradually but surely coming around to the bond issue as the only way to get Good Roads at any time in the near future, and the next election will settle the question, and I feel confident that it will mean a victory for our cause.

 

Death of Mrs. Bradford
Beloved Woman Passes Away
Favorably known in Livingston

It is with deep regret that Overton county people will learn of the death of Mrs. Lula Bradford at her home in Nashville last Friday afternoon. Mrs. Bradford was one of the original promoters and builders of the Livingston Academy, and has given the school much of her personal attention since its organization. The people of Livingston who knew her had learned to love her for her many personal charms, as well as the work she has helped to accomplish in giving us the best preparatory school in the upper Cumberland country. The Tennessean and American of last Saturday gave the following account of her death:
Following an illness extending over six months, Mrs. Lula Bradford, wife of D. E. Bradford, vice-president of the Bradford Furniture Company died at 5:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at her home, 129 Sixth avenue, north.
Death was due to a complication of diseases. She was born near Butler's Landing, Tenn., and had lived in |Nashville twenty years. Mrs. Bradford was 44 years of age. She is survived by her husband, and three sisters, Misses Sallie and Gladys Staggs, and Mrs. T. B. Baker; two brothers, Hammond and Fowler Staggs, and her mother, Mrs. K. D. Staggs.
Mrs. Bradford was a very active member of the Vine Street Christian church and was an interested worker in the Boys club and Y. M. C. A. She was also greatly interested in the work of reform carried on by the W. C. T. U. of this count y and was one of its most active workers in temperance campaigns. A member of several missionary societies and civic organizations, Mrs. Bradford devoted much of her time to carrying out their methods of beautifying and upbuilding the city.

 

Local Happenings
Miss Fannie Dale of Celina is the guest of the Misses Terry's this week.
R. L. Mitchell is spending a few days with his family.

Don't miss the mighty Haag Shows, Everything that other shows have and them some new feathers that will be interesting to all.

Crit Willis of Willow Grove was in town Tuesday on business.
Miss Jessie Lee Dale entertained a number of her friends with an Informal reception on Monday evening, there were about twenty guests present, and all report a good time.
Stanton says the reason he sells so many policies: He's got the Company that's GOT the STUFF that the PEOPLE WANT. Your time will be well spent in looking over his policy.
J. H. Loftis of Netherland was in town the first of the week on business.
W. T. Sewell of Willow Grove was in town Monday.
A long program with lots of variation and cheap admission is wht you will find at the great Haag Shows on Friday Aug. 20th. Don't forget the date.

Dr. W. M. Breeding officiated at the following births recently:
To Whit Crabtree and wife on last Saturday, a girl; to Sam Upchurch and wife on Thursday, Aug. 5th, a boy; to Luther Qualls and wife, on Aug. 1st, a boy.

Mrs. A. B. Qualls and son A. B. Jr. left Friday afternoon for an extended visit to relatives at Bell fountain, Ohio.
Mayor W. D. Guthrie who returned from Red Boiling Springs some days ago, is able to be out on the streets for a little exercise each day, and it is to be hoped that he may entirely regain his former strength in a little while.
Miss Margaret Bilbrey is spending a few days at Red Boiling Springs.
Dr. M. E. Jones, Veterinary, of Cookeville, was here last week on professional business.
Prof. A. J. Taylar was able to get down town to vote for Good Roads on the day of the election.
Chas. Hatcher and wife are visiting relatives in Sparta this week.
Miss Alice Johnson is spending a few days at her home in Franklin, Ky.
Miss Mary Price Miller is visiting her sister Mrs. W. C. Officer at Monterey.

NOTICE
I have opened a finishing department in connection with my KODAK business. All work finished the day received. Experienced Finisher, prices as cheap as elsewhere, first class work and quick delivery.
Give me trial and be convinced. Enlargements from negative 25 cents.
Ray Burks Druggist
Livingston, Tennessee

Frank Speck of Watertown has been in Livingston for the past few days.
Granville Simms of Watertown has been in Livingston for the past few days.

 

GOOD ROADS ELECTION
Following is the official canvass of the vote by districts held Aug. 5th.
For Against
1st 60 90
2nd 39 170
3rd 87 245
4th 6 34
5th 34 105
6th 345 160
7th 99 66
8th 63 43
9th 47 181
10th 30 128
11th 169 81
12th 65 25
Totals 1044 1329
Note: I did not calculate these to see if they are correct.

A. B. Vantrease the Ass't cashier of the Farmer's bank who has not been well for sometime is at his home in Alexandria recuperating.
Miss Henrietta Stoy has returned from her vacation which was spent at her home in New Albany, Indiana.

Livingston Route 2
The long dry spell was broken by a light rain Sunday.
Rev. Charlie Cook will begin a protracted meeting at Eagle Creek Hall next Sunday.
Rev. L. P. Reader will hold a protracted meeting at Old Bethel in the near future.
Keen Smith who has been sick for some time is reported better.
Miss Linda Adkins of Oakley is visiting her sister Miss Lucie Adkins this week.
G. V. Richardson attended the County Union at Ivy Point last week.
Mai.
MARRIED AT HILHAM
Miss Ethel Carmack and Mr. Albert Lee were joined in holy matrimony Sunday, Aug. 8th, at 2:30 p.m., at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Carmack, in the presence of a number of relatives and friends, Rev. Bronstetter officiating. The bride was dressed for the occasion, in a gown of crepe de chine. Immediately after the ceremony they left for the home of the groom.

Booz, Tenn.
I will write again as my letters have escaped the waste Basket so far, maybe this one will.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Brown and family of Pleasant Hill are on their way home from an extended visit with friends and relatives of Booz.
The Singing school has just closed at Hickory Flat and another will begin Tuesday night.
The protracted meeting has begun at Shiloh.
School is progressing nicely under the management of Prof. Bilbrey.
There will be Box supper at Hickory Flat Tuesday night the 10th everybody is cordially invited we will guarantee a good time, you know that is where we have good times.
Happy Girl.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
August 18, 1915

 

Direct Tax Plan Figured Out
The Highest Possible Direct Tax Levy
Would Not Build any Roads
To Speak of in Overton County
If the county court should levy a direct tax with which to build roads in Overton County, and should venture to go the limit as it were, the amount of roads that they could have built in each district would be so ridiculously small that we are sure the people would not stand for it. When figured out some of the districts would get only a few yards, as the tax from each district would have to be applied in that district only. A tax of that kind would be a veritable burden on the property owners, and they would receive no direct or indirect benefit from it, nor would anyone else, for it would be literally throwing money away. The only way we can ever expect to get good roads is by the bond issue, or by private corporations, and if the latter method is adopted the toll on the roads will be a heavier tax than any man would have to pay for a bond issue, and in order to get ride of the toll gates the county would have to buy over the roads at a reasonable figure.
Something must be done in the near future, and it is high time that the citizenship of Overton county were waking up to the situation.

Sulphur
As I have not written for some time, will send a few itms.
Mr. and Mrs. Addison Hodges arevisiting near New Middleton, for a few days.
Will Matthews who has been very sick is improving.
Mrs. Elisha Henry is visiting her brother, Will Clark near Waterloo.
F. B. Ledford and his aunt, Miss
Sarah Ledford are spending a few days with relatives at Nettle Carrier.
Misses Anice Hodges and Myrtle Spurrier of Livingston were here a few days ago.
Jess Gillam, Albert Eckles, B. Swallows and Sid Norris returned recently from a business trip to Smith county.
Floyd Richardson of Livingston spent Sunday at this place, visiting Sim Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Copeland returned last Friday from a visit to relatives in Smith County.
M. A. C.

Clinton County Kentucky voted on a bond issue of $50,000 for building good roads last Saturday, and the issue carried by a majority of nearly six to one. This is another link added to the highway which is to be built through Tennessee and Kentucky on the central route, and unless there is some method devised by which Overton County can get connection with the system, the trade which rightfully belongs to us will be routed the other way, and we will lose thousands of dollars a year.

Livingston, Route 2
Local showers last week. Farmers are plowing for wheat.
Mrs. Nora Knight is very sick.
Rev. Van N. Smith preached at the Presbyterian church here Sunday.
Rev. Chas Coop is preaching at Eagle Creek this week.
Misses Wilie and Ethel Flowers are visiting relatives and friends at Oakhill this week.
Mr. and Mrs. John Martin spent Sunday with friends at Eagle Creek.
Several attended the fair at Willow Grove and report a good time.
Henry Robbins was over at Monroe last week on business.
The contractors are digging a well at Taylor's X roads for the public.
Vulcan.

Pardoned by Gov. Rye
Alfred Smith of Cookeville who was recently tried for the killing of Hilary Masters, and given a sentence and fine for carrying concealed weapons, was pardoned last week by Gov. Rye on condition that he abstains from alcoholic drinks in the future.

NOTICE
My husband died leaving several hundred deeds in the Registers' office with the fees unpaid. I have given notice to come and pay me. Now unless you pay these charges at once I will hand them to an officer for collection. You can save cost by acting at once.
Respct. Mrs. J. M. Roberts. Executrix

DEATH AT COOKEVILLE
Mr. David L. Dow one of Putnam county's oldest and most prominent citizens died at his home in Cookeville last Thursday. Mr. Dow had been identified with the business interests of Cookeville for more than half a century, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. He was the father of postmaster John B. Dow of Cookeville, who is well known in Livingston and Overton county.

REVENUES ACTIVE
The U. S. revenue officers have been quite active in these parts for the past week or two, having destroyed two or three stills, and captured about four alleged operators.
Labor Day will be observed every where this year, and for the first time, there will be a large gathering in Livingston on that date, which is Monday, Sept. 6th. Don't fail to come to town on that day and we will guarantee that you will have good time.

The Allies gained another inch and a half on the Germans last week. This makes almost a foot gained in thirteen months of war, against some few thousand miles gained and held by the Tuetons.

If England had a few more Canadas and Australias she would be in a position to give a good account of herself in the war.

Petrograd, formerly known as St. Petersburg, Russia, is now said to be the goal the German army is making for. It might be well for the Kaiser to remember that one Napoleon
Bonaparte made an unparelelled retreat from this point some hundred years ago.

Overton county has untold resources that will continue to lie dormant so long as the people refuse to turn a hand toward progression.

Local Happenings
John Mitchell is on the sick list.
Miss Lena Reagan is visiting friends and relatives in Byrdstown.
Miss Willie Harris went to Jamestown Sunday.
A. J. Mofield and family attended the fair at Rome, Smith County last week. The trip was made in an automobile.
Judge A. H. Roberts is in Jamestown this week, holding a term of Chancery court.
E. C. Knight is attending Chancery Court at Jamestown this week.
Mayor W. D. Guthrie went to Nashville last week for medical treatment, and it is expected that he will undergo an operation while there.
Mrs. Alice Reagan of Cookeville spent the week end here visiting relatives.
Mrs. J. H. Myers has returned from an extended visit to friends and relatives in Texas.
Rev. Cates of Cookeville held services at the Baptist church Sunday and Sunday night.
M. A. Wydick, the tobacco man is in town this week.
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. McCampbell of Nashville, are at the Roberts House.
S. B. Harward has purchased the business of the Gentry Produce Co., and will take charge of same in a short time.
Thomas B. Copeland and family left Sunday for a visit of several days to friends and relatives in Morgan county.
Dr. A. B. Qualls recently officiated at the following important events: To Leslie Carmack and wife, a boy; to Murphy Bilbrey and wife, a girl.
E. B. Gray, the jeweler, is now occupying a part of the B. & O. Drug Co.'s large store, having recently moved from the rooms occupied over the Farmers Bank, and will be glad to have his friends call on him at all times.
Jas. McCormack of Cookeville was here the latter part of last week.
_________________________________
To The Public
I have recently opened up a first-class meat market, next door to Bay Burk's drug store, and am in a position to serve the public, by giving them good, fresh meat. Give me a trial.
J. G. Webb.
_________________________________

Frank Capps of Arlington, Texas returned home last week after a few days visit to relatives and friends here.
Mrs. Gill visited the family of Philip Myers last week.
Carl Maynord, Dick Arnold, Perry Mordock and Lee Johnson were in Cookeville Sunday.
Wheeler Boles, contractor of Hilham is here erecting a barn for Burr Speck.
Mrs. M. H. Hankins and sons, Robert and Hugh of Harriman are here on a visit to the family of R. H. Hankins.
Luke Shanks and wife of Cookeville are at the Roberts House for a few days.
Addison Bilbrey left yesterday for Nashville. He will stop over at Carthage on his return to attend the fair.
Friday is circus day in Livingston, and a large crowd of people are expected to be here.
_________________________________
I PAY
12cts. Per doz. for eggs.
15 cts per lb. for meat.
15 cts per lb. for lard.
75 cts per bu. for shelled corn.
I SELL
14 lbs Granulated sugar $1.00
All calico 5 cts. per yard
1 yd. wide domestic 6 cts.
1 gal. Coal oil 15 cts.
2 gal. Coal oil 25 cts.
5 gal. Coal oil 60 cts.
½ gal Fruit cans 80 cts.
1 qt. Fruit cans 65 cts.
W. T. Lee
_________________________________

RECITAL
Miss Ruth Lamb of Nashville, a pupil of the Vanderbilt School of Expression, will give a recital at Fiske-Staggs Chapel on Tuesday evening, August 24th, at 8 o'clock for the benefit of the Livingston Academy Athletic Association. The admission will be fifteen cents this will be a splendid entertainment and should be attended by all Livingstonians. The programme will be one of the best of the kind ever rendered here.

LAND SALE
T. J. Stewart
Vs
M. H. Hankins, et als
No. 580 In Chancery at Livingston.
In obedience to an order of sale from the Chancery court of Overton county, Tenn., issued by J. A. Hargrove, Clerk & Master of the said court, in the case of T. J. Stewart Vs. M. H. Hankins et als, I will on the 18th day Sept. 1915, at noon in front of the courthouse door in Livingston, Tenn., sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the tract of land levied on in this case as the property of the Cumberland Stave & Heading Company, and described an said levy and said order of sale, being the tract of land on which the old plant of the Cumberland Stave & Heading Company was located, and described as follows; On the north by Frisbie, south by Street; east by Bohanon, west by Street. Containing 3 acres more or less, located in the 6th Civil district, Town of Livingston. Said sale will be made subject to the right of redemption, to satisfy a judgment of ($629.96) Six hundred Twenty nine and 96.100 dollars, together with interest and costs, recovered in Chancery court by T. J. Stewart and against the Cumberland Stave & Heading
Company.
This Aug. 16, 1915
J. O. Collins, Dept. Sheriff

Messrs. Leonard & Shipley of Albany, Ky., passed through town Sunday enroute to Nashville.
Atty. Benj. Ramsey of Monroe was in the city Monday.
G. B. McGee spent several days in Fentress county recently.
J. G. Eastland went to Dickson a few days ago, and will return with his family this week.
Atty. E. D. White is in Jamestown on legal business.
J. T. Stonecipher has gone to the bedside of his father, who lives at Robbins, East Tennessee, and is dangerously sick.

SECRET OF SUCCESS.
Early to bed and early to rise,
Work like h__l, and advertise.

The Blacksmith Preacher
Rev. Mr. Sexton, generally known as the "Blacksmith Preacher" will begin a series of meetings here on Saturday Aug. 21st. Services will be held at the Baptist church Saturday and at the Methodist church Sunday. Mr. Sexton has a wide reputation as an evangelist and it is hoped and believed that much good will result from the meetings.

LEO FRANKS FATE.
Yesterdays papers carried a most startling news story to the effect that a Georgia mob had forcibly removed Leo Frank, the alleged murderer of May Phagan, from the prison at Milledgeville, Ga. Where he had been sent for a life term, and had carried him away in an automobile, presumably to be put to death. However guilty Frank may have been, this was a most inexcusable act on the part of the men who engaged in it, and the matter should be investigated thoroughly.

ENJOYABLE AFFAIR
On last Tuesday evening Mrs. E. B. Cosby entertained at the Sarah Preston Home in honor of Miss Ruth Lamb of Nashville, about twenty guests were invited. Games were played until a late hour when the young people assembled in the large dining room where delightful refreshments were served


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
August 25, 1915

 

Letters of Interest
From Correspondents from different Sections of the County

Livingston Route 2
The wind last Thursday and Friday damaged corn considerably.
S. G. Flowers has bought a lot from M. C. Talley at Taylor's X Roads and will erect a mill on it.
Revs. Reedes, Reece and Garrett begun a protracted meeting at Old Bethel Sunday.
A. J. Conner got badly hurt last week, by spraining his foot.
Miss Sarah Sells is still very low.
Revs. Coop, Smith, Clark and others are still protracting their meeting at Eagle Creek.
Vulcan.

Cookeville Route 7
We have been having some wet weather for the last few days, which is a setback for early foddering.

Mrs. Donly Brown is no better at this writing. She is gradually growing weaker.

Mrs. A. C. Brown is still down with rheumatism.

Mrs. Robert Phillips is some better at last report.
John W. Maston is some better being able to walk around now.
Mrs. Martha Warden is still very sick.
Arkly Crawford and Marvin Carr have moved to Spring Creek to the heading mills run by Will Allen of Livingston.
Mrs. Maggie Newberry is some better.
Road working is the order of the day. There is some good work being done on the public roads this time.
Joe Hide

Windle Tenn.
Rev. Marion Harris has begun his protracted meeting at this place and is having a successful meeting and large crowds.
Messrs. Jesse Crawford and Lonnie Allen were persuaded to go west but we suppose they got round trip tickets we see them back in Windle.
Mrs. M. M. Allen how has been quite sick is improving.
Miss Bess Poston visited home folks Saturday and Sunday.
A number of young folks from this place attended the show at Livingston the 20th.
Miss Lockie Gore got seriously injured at the show Friday.
School at this place is progressing nicely.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Walter Qualls twin babies, both babies and father are getting along nicely.
Bill W.

Oak Hill
E. C. Poston is some better.
The Great Hagg Shows have come and gone, and everybody was well pleased with the performances.
Mrs. Reece Eldridge of Monterey, formerly of this place, attempted suicide one day last week by cutting her throat with a razor. She was taken to a hospital where she has the attention of Montereys best physicians, who entertain some hope of her recovery. Ill health was the cause of the rash deed.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Tim Stewart, a girl.
John Eldridge has purchased an automobile.
Jack Hampton of Algood is here taking up lumber.
W. C. Cooper has purchased a rock crusher, and will put it in operation in a few days.
J. N. S.

Death of Little Child
The little three months old baby of Dr. and Mrs. L. H. Byrne died at the home of Mrs. Byrne's father S. A. D. Smith, last Thursday afternoon with acute indigestion, and was buried on Saturday at Cookeville. Dr. Byrne was in Maryville at the time of the child's death, but came on to Cookeville in time for the burial. The Enterprise extends the sincerest sympathy to the parents in their sorrow.

Death of J. P. Wood
Mr. J. P. Wood, an old and highly respected citizen of this county died at his home near Rickman Monday night, and was buried at Okalona cemetery Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Wood was nearly eighty years of age and was well known throughout the county having been in the merchandise business for a number of years, and his many friends will regret to learn of his death.
The funeral was conducted by the local lodge of Masons, and was a very impressive service.

Jail Delivery
Three prisoners escaped from the local jail yesterday afternoon, by sawing their way out, and up to an early hour this morning had not been apprehended. All three of the prisoners were white men. They were Bedford Hill, Shelby Studeville and Oscar Hargis.
Sheriff Carr and his deputies are scouring the country in search of the fugitives, and expect to have them caught by night. The three men were in jail awaiting trial at the next term of criminal court. It is not known how they secured the utensils with which they sawed themselves to liberty. The neighboring county officials have been notified and the chances for their getting clear away are slim.

Death in Pickett
Mrs. Matheney, wife of Edward Matheney, died at her home in Pickett county, near Boom, one day last week. She leaves a husband and one child. Mrs. Matheney was a member of one of the best families of Pickett county, and leaves many friends and relatives to mourn her death.

Policy of President
The United States government will not shape its policy on the sinking of the steamer Arabic until full details of the disaster has been obtained and carefully gone into. There were two American lives lost in the wreck of the Arabic.
The newspapers all over the country are advocating that the President break off diplomatic relations with Germany.
The United States has clearly expressed its opposition to the destruction of merchant ships without warning and had pointedly warned Germany against repetition of such tragedies in which Americans are involved.
It is assumed that unless Germany wishes to make an outright issue with the United States some explanation will be volunteered. Acting with that thought Ambassador Gerard was instructed today to report whether he had received a report from the German government. He was not, however, instructed to ask for one.
It is said the state department will not necessarily wait indefinitely on Germany before taking whatever action is decided on, neither does it intend to invite or encourage argument. All it wants now are the facts.
When these are assembled and officials are convinced their evidence is properly substantiated President Wilson will lay the case before the cabinet.

U. S. to Loan Money
To Southern Banks to Help The Cotton Planters.

Secretary of the treasury, McAdoo has made the announcement that if it becomes necessary he will deposit $30,000,000 or more in gold in three Southern regional banks to help the cotton sections, inasmuch as the British government has declared cotton to be a contraband of war. This money would be deposited temporarily without interest in order to enable the banks to rediscount outstanding warehouse receipt, and would help the cotton states tide over the stringent times that is sure to follow the recent mandate of the European allies.
The secretary said that one of his chief objects was to create a basis for such enlarged credit in the south that the banks will have ample resources to extend to producers such accommodations that they will be able to carry cotton in warehouses for a reasonable length of time until it can be marketed advantageously. In order to accomplish this, he said that the national and state banks which are members of the federal reserve system should make loans on warehouse receipts for insured cotton at low rates of interest: that the banks can well afford to carry cotton for producers at six per cent, especially if they are able to rediscount cotton paper at the federal reserve banks at the much lower rate than six per cent; that the credit resources of the banks of the country are greater than ever before in our history and that there is no reason why the banks should not, in co-operation with the merchants of the south, help the cotton producers with loans at low rates in the present peculiar situation.

Another storm on the Texas coast has snuffed out 200 lives.

The Northern press will now proceed to wallop the whole South for the lynching of Lea Frank.

King cotton, the staple necessity of the world, has been declared by Fret Britain to be a contraband of war.

Local Happenings
Turley Knight left yesterday for Nashville.
Mrs. Lamb and daughter, Miss Ruth, who have been here visiting friends left today for their home in Nashville.
Allen Maynord and Frank Johnson of Granite Okla., arrived here Monday for a visit to friends and relatives.
Burch Wilcox of Cookeville was in town this week.
R. S. Oakley was at Beaver Hill first of the week.
Chas. Hatcher and wife who have been here visiting relatives and friends returned to their home in Texas this week.
Alfred Gibbs of Cookeville was here first of the week.
Miss Reba Lee Yateman of Nashville who has been here visiting Miss Lillie Bilbry, returned home the latter part of last week.
Zina Robertson of Algood was in town Sunday.
Robert Mitchell, son of R. L. Mitchell, fell from a stable loft Sunday morning and sustained a broken arm just below the elbow.
John Hart was in Algood last week.
M. H. Hankins of Harriman was here first of the week.
B. M. Stanton has gone to East Tennessee on a business trip.
Miss Margaret Cooper is visiting friends in Nashville.
C. J. Cullom was in Crossville this week.
W. J. Chilton went to Celina today.
We are pleased to report that Mayor W. D. Guthrie who went to Nashville some few days ago for an operation, is getting along nicely, and hopes to be back home again real soon.
H. Atkins and wife have been in Nashville for the past few days. T. C. McCampbell has been running the train during the absence of Mr. Atkins.
James Carson Guthrie and sister, Miss Gertie returned yesterday from a visit to relatives at Black's Ferry, Ky.
The recital which was to have been given last evening at the Fiske-Staggs chapel by Miss Ruth Lamb, was called off on account of the meeting now in progress.
Rev. Mr. Cates of Cookeville I here this week helping in the series of meetings.
Dawson McCormack returned last week from Nashville with his little son who he took there for Medical treatment.
Dan Philips and Wm. Goff left Monday morning for Pickett county on business.
Miss Isabella Williams of the Livingston Academy came in Monday from Knoxville where she has been attending the summer school.
T. B. Copeland and family returned yesterday from Morgan county where they have been visiting for the past ten days.
Jesse Fleming of Fleming & Myers was in Nashville this week on business.
S. J. Bilbrey returned yesterday from a trip to Crossville.
J. M. Birdwell has moved his family from the Knight place on the square to his house opposite _. M. Robert's residence.
Miss Beula Kirkpatrick of Crossville passed through town this week, enroute to Celina.

Cutting Affray
A man by the name of Hoover was seriously cut in an affray at Crawford a few days ago. The man who did the cutting was named Stephens. It was at first thought that the wounded man would die, but later reports give him a chance for recovery.

J. T. Stonecipher has returned from a visit to relatives at Robbins, Tenn.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, September 1, 1915

Hotel Burned
The Donoho hotel at Red Boiling Springs was destroyed by fire one night last week, and some of the guests had narrow escapes. This was one of the most popular hotels at the Springs, being patronized by a great many people. The loss was considerable and we understand there was little or no insurance carried on the building.

Sulphur
J. T. Hodges and wife spent Sunday visiting relatives at this place.
Norman Eckle of Smith county came Saturday to visit relatives and transact business here.
B. Swallows has bought what is known as the Bundy Eckle property.
Sam Matthews has typhoid fever. His father who has been sick is better.
F. B. Ledford spent part of last week in Smith county.
Prof. Hardy has suspended school one week for fodder pulling.
Miss Willie Qualls of Livingston visited here last week.
M. A. C.

William J. Bryan
On The War. Giving Reasons Why We should Stay Out

Twenty-one million of soldiers are engaged in the unparalleled war now raging in Europe: what will be our quota if we are foolish enough to enter into it?
More than two million men have been killed thus far. What will be our toll if we take part?
Over five millions wounded. What will be our share if we become a participant?
The nations at war are now spending four hundred million dollars per week - more than twenty billions per year - what will our expenditures by?
Before we decide to "go in" at any cost" let some of the advocates of war give us an estimate.
We are a great nation and can't be stingy with blood or money if we cast in our lot with the belligerents.
And what is to be gained by war? Protection of American rights? No, that can be secured without loss of life, money, or honor; it can be secured without arousing hatreds which would last a century.
And what would we lose by entering the war men? Yes, no one knows haw many. Money? Yes, no one knows how much. But more than that we would loose our place as the leader of the neutral nations and the opportunity to mediate when the time for meditation comes; we would loose the priceless privilege of using our good offices as a friend to assist in laying the foundations of permanent peace.
There is no excuse for war. Our grievances - we have them against both sides - do not justify war; and the treaty plan furnishes the machinery for maintaining an honorable peace. Those who talk war misrepresent the wishes of the people. You can no more measure the sentiment of the masses by the froth of the jingo press than you can measure the oceans silent depths by the foam upon its waves.
W. J. Bryan

Tried to Cash Heap Big Check.
A young man, giving his name as Albert Clayton appeared at the Cashier's window of the Citizens Bank last Friday morning and presented a check for $4,000,00 on the bank of Monterey, with the signature of J. H. Ray affixed thereto and asked that he be given the cash. On being interrogated the young man stated that the check was given to his brother who in turn gave it to him, and he had come to cash same, but did not care to deposit the money. On investigation it was ascertained that Mr. Ray disclaimed any knowledge of the check, so the young man was place under arrest. After his arrest he stated that his name was Enoch Wilson, and that he lived near Monterey. The latter story was verified by some parties here who knew him. He was tried before Squire Phelix Bilbrey on Friday afternoon, and bound over to court on a $500.00 bond, which he has failed to make up to this time. Wilson gave his age as eighteen years.

Local Happenings.
Atty. J. T. Wheeler of Jamestown is here this week attending Chancery court.
Ed Hargrove of Willow Grove was in this city this week.
Atty. O. C. Conatser of Huntsville is here this week on legal business.
K. L. Bilbrey of Crossville was here this week.
Alex Qualls has returned from Cumberland county where he has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. Spencer.
M. R. Hargrove of Willow Grove was here yesterday on business.
Atty. L. M. Bullington of Cookeville, attended Chancery court here this week.
Robt. Nunnelly of Cookeville was here first of the week.
Dr. J. M. Billings of Oakley was in town last week.
Bedford Arnold and wife, and son, Creed, spent the week-end at Willow Grove, visiting relatives.
Mr. Hamp Maxey of Celina was in town first of the week.
Miss Myrtle Asbell has returned to this city to take up her work in Livingston Academy.
Miss Katherine Cooper has returned after an extended trip to Monterey and Cookeville.
Mrs. George Hale of Cookeville passed through town Monday enroute home from the Celina fair.
J. C. Bilbrey was in Cookeville Sunday.
Miss Margaret Bilbrey returned last week from a visit to friends in Alabama.
Miss Gertrude Officer is in Monterey visiting relatives and friends.
Bruce Estes received a rather painful wound in the head one day last week, while he and some more boys were doing circus "stunts". We are glad to report that he is getting on nicely.

TO THE PUBLIC
We have decided not to sell our store house, stock of goods etc., as advertised last week's Enterprise, but will continue business as heretofore at the same old stand. Come and see us. Qualls & Bilyeu, Hilham, Tenn.

HENRY D. GRANNIS.
Henry D. Grannis died at the County House last Friday evening and was buried the following afternoon. Mr. Grannis who was a New Englander by birth, had been in Overton County for about twenty-five years and worked at the carpenters trade here for a number of years. He was a man of splendid education, and was a member of a fine family. He was about 72 years of age, and had not been able to do any work for some time previous to his death. He was highly respected by all who knew him, and many will regret to hear of his demise.

Alex Vantrease, assistant cashier of the Farmers bank, who has been away for some weeks recuperating his health, returned yesterday, and we are glad to report he is much improved.
Horace Anderson of Celina was in Livingston yesterday.
W. T. Sewell of Willow Grove was in town this week on business.
Mayor W. D. Guthrie is home again from a trip to Nashville where he had an operation for a goiter. He is much improved, and is able to be out some.
Worth Bryant of Cookeville is here today attending Chancery court.
Ray Burks and family left this morning for Nashville.
J. H. Loftis of Netherland was here Monday.
Miss Beula Kirkpatrick returned to her home in Crossville this week, after attending the fair at Celina.
Rev. Mr. Rochelle of Celina was here Sunday.
Balaam Spicer left Sunday for Oklahoma where he expects to be for some time.
J. H. Myers of Fleming & Myers has been in Knoxville for the past few days.
Willard Maynord, Clarence Arnold, Carson Guthrie, Ernest C. Estes, J. G. Smith, Hobard Bohanan, Jesse Mitchell, Cato Taylor, Ernest Terry, Walter Collins, Elmo Eubanks, Dallas Stephens, Joe Lee Chilton, Houston Roberts, Will Chatwell, Addison Bilbrey, Herman Estes, Floyd McCormick, Carver McCormick, John Eldridge, Willard Speck and others of Livingston, attended the fair at Celina last week.

PAINFUL ACCIDENT
Mrs. Susan Harris was the victim of a painful accident last Saturday when she fell on the stairway at her home. It was not a very serious hurt, but it has kept her indoors for the past few days but it is hoped that she will be able to get out again in a few days.

WHITERIGHT, TEXAS
To the Enterprise and many readers:

I will write again as I have not written in some time.
I am always glad to get the Enterprise, and read all the letters from Tennessee, but I never see a letter from Livingston Route 1. That was my old home when I was there, and I should like very much to read some news letters from that section.
Corn is made at this place. Cotton is very good. We have had plenty of rain out here.
Most people like Texas, but I don't think I would ever get used to the mud, it sticks to ones feet so badly, and the dirt is too black to suit me.
I like old Tennessee the best. The people here are not like Tennesseans they visit very little, and do not seem as socials, however, there are lots of good people here.
I will stop for this time. Hope to see my letter in print.
Mrs. Laura B. Brown.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, September 8, 1915

Call for Committee Meeting
The Overton County Democratic Executive Committee is called to meet at my law office in Livingston, on Saturday September 11 at 2 o'clock P M To consider the question of calling a Primary for County Officials to e elected in August 1916.
W. R. Officer, Chairman

Bilbrey-Gilpatrick
On last Thursday at Olga, this county Mr. Mack Bilbrey and Mrs. Emma Gilpatrick, the popular Home Telephone operator of Livingston, were quietly married, there being only a few friends of the contracting parties present.
The Enterprise joins their many friends thought the County in wishing for them a long and happy married life.

Livingston Route 2
Farmers are in the heat of foddering.
It has been raining for the past two days.
Sarah Sells died last Saturday and was buried Monday at the Sells graveyard, Rev. Turner Holt conducting funeral services.
Mrs. John Kednedy who has been quite sick for some time is no better.
The Eagle Creek Masonic lodge held at Eastern Star meeting Saturday.
September 23, 1915 is field day for the K. of P. Lodge in Tenn.
There are some sick hogs in this community.
Monday is good Roads day.
Hope some good will be done.
Vulcan.

 

A CARD OF THANKS
Mr. D. E. Bradford and Family
Of Nashville
Acknowledge with grateful appreciation
The tender expressions of sympathy extended by Livingston and Overton County friends, in their bereavement.

Enjoyable Affair.
Miss Pauline Dale delightfully entertained a limited number of young people at her home Thursday evening to compliment Misses Sadie Dean Roberts, Gertrude Officer and Lily Dale, three of Livingston's most popular girls, who leave this week for college.
The ever popular game of "Hearts" was played, after which a delicious salad and ice course was served. The prize was awarded to Miss Hilda Thrasher and Ernest Estes.
In addition to the horees, there were present: Misses Allie Maynord, Lily Bilbrey and Hilda Thrasher; Messrs. Cato Taylor, Herman Estes, Shirley Bohanan, Carl Mofield, Paul Caps, Chas. Mitchell, and Ernest Estes.

Mrs. Leslie Johnson of Granite, Okla, is visiting relatives in this county.

Sol Norris and wife, and son Tom, of Nettle Carrier returned last week from a visit to relatives at Sherman, Texas.

J. G. Simms of Monroe was here Monday. Mt. Simms will leave aout the 25th for Chicago, where he has been for the past two years.

Wm. Tinsly Jr. of Gainesboro, who is connected with the Jackson County Sentinel was in town Tuesday, and paid the Enterprise office a very pleasant call. Mr. Tinsly was accompanied by his sister, who entered Livingston Academy for the current term.
Frank Smith who was formerly with J. A. Young has purchased an interest in the hardware and implement business of Bilbrey & Lansden and will take an active part in the business.

Misses Mildred Alyce and Mildred Reagan of Cookeville are here on a visit to relatives.
Dr. L. P. Speck of Monterey route 2 was here Monday to attend the mass meeting.

BIG MASS MEETING
Held at the Court House Monday, to ascertain the Will of the People on Another Bond Election.
A large and most representative meeting of the citizens of Overton county was held at the Court House Monday, for the purpose of ascertaining the will of majority in regard to the all absorbing question of Good Roads, and if there had ever been any doubt as to the sentiment of the people the complexion of this meeting should dispel it. It was a surprise to the most sanguine optimistic Good Roads advocate to find such an overwhelming majority of the people in favor of the movement, and now as never before they feel that the time is ripe for another bond election, and according to the decisive action taken at the mass meeting the voters of Overton county will have another opportunity to vote on the question next month. The people began coming to town early in the morning, and it looked like they were not going to stop coming; they poured in from every direction, and by eleven o'clock the public square was crowded as it has seldom been recently.
At one o'clock the court house was filled to the over-flowing mark and the citizens were anxious to see and hear what was to be done. The meeting was called to order the purpose of same being briefly stated. Dr. Burks was made Chairman of the mass meeting, while G. B. McGee and W. Y. Bennett were elected secretaries. The Chairman stated in the outset that he intended to preside over the meeting in a strictly non-partisan manner, and that each man should be given an opportunity to discuss his side of the question. Gen. W. R. Officer was then called on to address the meeting, which he did in a well chosen speech; he was followed by Mr. V S. Little who made a telling appeal to the people to build good roads. Mr. Geo. Dillon then made a short talk, asking that the participants in the meeting act dispassionately, and not to get excited over the issue; he said that he opposed the movement, but that whatever was done, he wanted to see it done without excitement. Dr.
Burks re-assured the speaker and the meeting in general, that any action that might be taken would be done quietly and with proper deliberation. E. C. Knight then made a short talk, and introduced a resolution, calling on the election commissioners to call an election of the 16th of October. W. J. Chilton seconded Mr. Knight's motion to introduce the resolution after which a vote was called for:
Following is the resolution:
Be it resolved, That it is the will of the tax payers and voters of Overton county in Mass meeting assembled at the courthouse in Livingston, Tennessee, on this Sept. 6th, 1915, pursuant to notice heretofore published and well known, that an election be called by the Election Commissioners of Overton county, to be held at the various voting districts of Overton county, on Oct. 16th, 1915, to ascertain the will of the people as to whether or not Overton county will issue $160,000 Good Roads Bonds as provided by Chapter 544 House Bill No. 1507 of the Acts of 1915.
We R. L. Burks, Chairman, G. B. McGee and W. Y. Bennett, Secretaries, and L. H. Carlock and Mack Smith Tellers of the Mass Meeting held in the courthouse in Livingston, Tennessee, on Sept. 6th 1915, hereby certify that the above and foregoing resolution being put to the meeting in conformity with Parliamentary law, passed by a vote of 350 to 450 representative citizens from every section of the county voted in favor of it, and there was only 7 to 10 out of the entire assemblage voted against the above resolution.
R. L. Burks Chairman, G. B. McGee and W. Y. Bennett, Secty. L. H. Carlock and Mack Smith, Tellers.
L. H. Carlock and Mack Smith were appointed tellers to count the vote. The Chair then put the question, asking that all who favored the resolution to call an election the third Sat., in Oct, to stand. Practically the whole meeting rose to their feet, and the question was declared to have been carried unanimously. However, the Chairman also put the negative question up to the crowd upon which something less than a dozen men responded. Judge J. R. Hogue, J. O. Collins and L. H. Carlock were appointed as a committee of three to present the resolution adopted, to the election commission, C. J. Cullom, the chairman of the county election commission, who was the only member in town, was presented with the resolution by the committee. He stated that he could say nothing officially in regard to the matter, but that the calling of an election had his unqualified approval; that he would call his commission together and that action would be taken in the matter in due course.
Taking it all it was a most glorious day for Good Roads advocates this volunteer uprising of the citizenship of Overton county to express their approval of the movement to get Good Roads. The concensus of opinion is that the Road law passed by the last legislature and voted on last month, is one of the best propositions that could possibly be put up to the people to vote on, as it is fair and the people are familiar with its provisions.

LAND SALE
1st Nat. Bank of Sparta
Vs
R. H. Hankins et als.
No. 545 In Chancery at Livingston
In obedience to a decree made by the Chancery Court of Overton Co. Tennessee, in above case, I will on Saturday, October 9, 1915, within legal hours, at the court house door in Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee, sell the following described property to wit:
The undivided interest of one tract of land situated in the 6th civil district of Overton County, containing 30 acres more or less, bounded as follows: Beginning at a bush west of Eubank's spout soring on the side of the road leading to said mill from Livingston, thence southwest to a white oak, Eubank's corner; thence eastward with Ledbetter to a post oak near a spring on the side of the road thence southeast to a corner in Quint Ferrell's line; thence to the beginning known as the Garrett mill tract.
Said sale will be made to the highest and best bidder for cash in hand, and free from the equity of redemption.
A. J. Carr, Sheriff.
This 8th day of Sept., 1915

Local Happenings.
Gen. W. R. Officer left Tuesday morning for Sparta to attend Criminal court.
Mrs. A. J. Mason of Huntland, Tenn, is a guest of the Commercial hotel.
Miss Cedna White is visiting relatives at Dayton, Tenn.
Miss Bessie Johnson of Chattanooga re-entered Livingston Academy this week.
Dr. M. E. Jones of Cookeville was here this week.
H. T. Whitson of Cookeville, has been here for several days looking after his timber interests.
Ray Burks and family returned from Nashville Sunday.
Jesse Fleming, A. J. Mofield and Carl Mofield motored to Cookeville Saturday to attend the Fair.
Miss Margaret Cooper, who has been visiting friends in Nashville and Cookeville, has returned home.
Joe Johnson of Byrdstown passed through town last week enroute to Cookeville.
Bedford Arnold has had his house re-painted.
A. G. Keisling has about completed the erection of a new house just off the square, next door to the Farmers Bank building.
B. G. Adcock of Cookeville, was here last week attending Chancery court.
Miss Buna Maynord returned last week from Nashville, where she has been for the past ten days. She left for Algood Monday, to take up her work as head milliner for Harp & Pointer Dry Goods Co.
Dawson McCulley who has been working in Chattanooga during the vacation season, hs returned to take up his studies at the Livingston Academy.
Miss Lena Reagan attended the Cookeville Fair last week.
Chas. Hunter of Oklahoma is visiting relatives and friends here.
Miss Hilda Tharsher and Bro. Hall, attended the Cookeville Fair.
Pearson Allred of the Overton Coal & Coke Co., was in town last week.
Ernest Allred, of Allred, this county was in town Monday.
Misses Geneva Bohanan, Allie Maynord and Cleo Draper went to Algood Monday to see the ball game.
Miss Hallie Estes entertained quite a few of the "younger set" at her home last Monday evening.
Miss Mary Price Miller has returned home after an extended visit to relatives and friends at Monterey.
Quite a party of baseball fans journied to Algood Monday to see the game of ball played between the Algood team and the Nebraska Indians. The latter team won by a score of 21 to 6.
Mrs. W. Y. Bennett and children returned Monday from a visit to relatives at Cookeville.
The private Company formed recently for the purpose of building a pike road from Livingston to the Pickett county line, have already begun the survey for the road. H. Atkins of the T. K. & N. R. R. is doing the surveying.
Owen Zachery of Byrdstown entered school at Livingston Academy today.
Shirley Copeland left today for Oklahoma, where he has secured a position.
D. A. Bullock of Hilham visited the family of his son, Jno. Bullock Sunday.
B. M. Stanton returned Sunday from an extended business trip to East Tennessee.
Howard Bohanan left this week for Jefferson City, to attend the Carson-Newman college.
L. F. Myers and T. D. Graff of Cookeville Route 7 were in town Monday.
Miss Lura Maynord and Bro. Herchel went to Cookeville last Friday to attend the Fair.
The Directors of the Home Teephone Co. met on Monday and elected Mrs. Nannie Maynord as operator at Livingston in Lieu of Mrs. Gilpatrick, who was married recently.

LAND SALE
Putnam Overall Mgf. Co. et al
Vs
S. A. Booher et al
No. 512
In obedience to a decree make by the Chancery court of Overton county, Tennessee, in above case and entered upon Minute Book "N" page 445 and an alias execution issued and levied thereunder, I will on Saturday October 9, 1915, within legal hours, upon the premises at Windletown, Overton county, Tenn. Sell the following described property, to wit:
One house and lot located in Windletown, Overton county, Tenn. In the 9th district of said county, and bounded as follows: On the north by Brier Hill Collieries; on the south, by street; on the east by Cooper; and on the west by street.
Also one sewing machine, all of which was levied on rs the property of A. H. Booher, and same will be sold to satisfy the judgement in the above styled case.
Said sale will be made to the highest bidder for cash in hand and free from the equity of redemption.
M. H. Weeks, Dept. Sheriff,
This Sept. 8, 1915.

 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

W. L. Zachery, et al
Vs
Allen Zachery, et al
In Chancery at Byrdstown Tenn
In this case, it aearing from the bill which is sworn to that Allen Zachery, Grdy Zachery and Orion Zachery, the defendants, are non residents of the State, they are, therefore, hereby required to appear, on or before the 2nd Monday in October, next, before the Chancery court, in Byrdstown, Tennessee, and make defense to the bill filed against them in said court by W. L. Zachery, et al, or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise.
This Sept. 7th, 1915.
C. B. Pris, C. & M.
Turner & Knight, Sols


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, September 15, 1915

 

R. L. Mitchell spent the weekend with his family.
W. S. Swallows was in town Saturday.
C. J. Cullom was in Nashville a few days this week.
Carl Mofield, Chas. Mitchell, and Misses Gertrude Officer and Lillie Bilbrey motored to Algood Sunday.
Miss Bonnie Roberts of Byrdstown is at Livingston Academy again this term.
W. Y. Boswell and family of Oakdale, Morgan county, passed through town Saturday enroute to Monroe for a visit to relatives and friends.

Special Election
We will open and hold a special election at all of the voting precincts in Overton County, Tennessee, on Saturday, October 23, 1915, for the purpose of determining by affirmative vote whether or not the qualified voters of said County are in favor of the issuance of $168,000 bonds for the purpose of building roads and construction bridges in said county.
Said election to be held under the provisions of Chapter No. 544, House Bill No. 1507, Private Acts of Tennessee.
This September 11, 1915.
A. L. Maxwell
C. J. Cullom
W. S. Swallows
Election Commissioners for Overton County, Tennessee.

Hilham R. 1
Floyd Setser of Webb City, Mo. Is here on a visit to home folks.
Several schools are suspended a few days on account of fodder pulling.
Prof. Tolbert Masters and Miss Georgia Murphy, opened school today after a vacation of two weeks for fodder, at Oak Grove.
There will be a box supper at Buffalo Hill on Saturday night the 28th of this month.
A Presbytery will begin at the Campground the 23rd of this month and continue three days.
H. M. B.

FOR RENT
Old office building on the North side of the Public Square, Livingston, for rent on reasonable terms. Building consisting of three rooms.
E. C. Knight

Mrs. E. C. Draper is in Nashville visiting relatives.
Oscar Clark of Allgood was here yesterday, talking Overland automobiles.
Misses Gertrude Officer and Lily Dale left Monday for Murfreesboro where they will enter the State Normal College for the term of 1915016.
J. B. Walker of Celina was in town first of the week.

Wright-Hutton.
Howard Wright of Livingston and Miss Lela Hutton of Nashville were quietly married at Nashville on last Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock, and are expected to arrive here this afternoon at 5:15.
The news of the event came as a great surprise to Mr. Wrights many friends in Livingston, who will be none the less sincere however, in offering him congratulations, and wishing for him and his fair bride, a long and happy life.

A. J. Mason left yesterday for a business trip to Celina.
Livingston Route 2
Dear Editor: I will write again, begging pardon for my long silence.
Fodder pulling is the order of the day.
Grant Norrod of Monroe was here Saturday on business.
Miss Nellie Lewis went to Livingston Wednesday to enter school.
Crit Wright and wife visited the family of E. E. Smith Saturday and Sunday.
Miss Maud Taylor has returned from Willow Grove.
Mai.

Maurice Groce of Byrdstown was in town Saturday. He was enroute to Murfreesboro where he will enter the Normal school for the current term.
C. C. Pitts was in Watertown a few days ago.
Rev. W. M. Lantrip and Dr. M. B. Capps attended the Educational rally at Henard Saturday.
A. J. Maxwell of Hilham was here Saturday.
Will Guthrie of Crossville was here the latter part of last week.
Mrs. A. B. Qualls and son, A. B. Jr., returned last week from an extended visit to relatives at Bell-fontaine, Ohio.
Della Cargyle, the little daughter of Wm. Cargyle sustained rather sever cut in the head last Friday from a fall out of one of the windows at Livingston Academy.
Mrs. Leslie Johnson and sons of Granite, Okla., who have been visiting relatives and friends in vicinity for some weeks, returned to the west Today.

FOR SALE
A good business house and lot on the North side of the Public Square, and, also my old office building, well located. On reasonable terms.
E. C. Knight.

Jas. Shirley of Cookeville was here this week.
C. M. Smartt and J. Petter of Cookeville were here this week on business.
Sergeant James E. Savage of the United States Army passed through town yesterday enroute to Byrdstown. Sergeant Savage is stationed at Ft. Serevens, Ga.
Dixie Smith and DeWitt Miller were in Algood Sunday.

NON RESIDENT NOTICE
Emaline Reynolds, et al
Vs
J. P. Crouch et al
No. 628-In the Chancery Court at Livingston, Tenn.
In this cause it appearing from the bill, which is sworn to, that Barlow Crouch, one of the defendants, is a non-resident of the State he is, therefore, hereby required to appear on or before the first Monday of November, next, before the Clerk & Master of said court, at his office in Livingston, and make defense to the fill billed against him in said court by Emaline Reynolds, et al. or otherwise the bill will be taken for confessed.
It is further ordered that this notice be published for four consecutive weeks in the Livingston Enterprise, this 15th day of September, 1915.
Jno. A. Harrove, C. & M.
E. C. Knight, Sol., for complainants.

Bryd Bohanan, Carl Maynord, Clarence Arnold, Scott Maynord, Maurice Groce and Lee Johnson motored to Windle Sunday.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, September 22, 1915

PROMINENT CITIZEN
Of Cookeville Died Thursday, September 16th, And was buried Friday

Will R. Staley died at his home in Cookeville last Thursday, Sept. 16th, after an illness of some weeks, the last two weeks of which he was rendered unconscience from an apparent stroke of paralysis. His remains were interred in the family lot of the Cookeville City Cemetery Friday afternoon, the last sad rites being conducted by Rev. J. R. Goodpasture of Nashville, assisted by Rev. J. _. Tinnon of Cookeville, in the presence of the largest number of people, perhaps, that ever attended a funeral and burial service in the town of Cookeville.
Will Staley as he was familiarly called by his large circle of friends, who were limited only to the extent of his acquaintance, was the very embodiment of the whole-souled, hospitably natured, generous-hearted Southern gentleman, and will be as greatly missed by all classes of people in his town and community as any other one man who could have been taken away. The writer knew and loved him as a friend who was true as steel, not only to a fe_, but to all his thousands of friends, with whom he had lived, and so many of whom he had administered to in the hour of need and of sorrow. It would be safe to say, that during the past twenty years, there has not been a funeral conducted in Cookeville or vicinity without the every-willing hand of Will Staly, with his heart overflowing with kindness and sympathy, to help conduct the last sad rites, and to smooth the path of the grief-stricken family. The floral tributes paid to his memory by is host of friends was one of the most beautiful ever seen in the whole country, and were symbolic especially in this case, of the many flowers that had been strewn in the pathway of sorrowing friends, by the kind words and generous acts of this noble and beloved man.
Mr. Staley was forty-five yers of age, and had spent his whole like in Cookeville, with the exception of about eighteen months, when he was in the Philipine Islands with the First Tennessee Regiment. He leaves a mother and two brothers to mourn his untimely demise, and thousands of friends, who will long remember the cheerful, genial, "always-the-same" Will Staley, who came into their lives, helped to roll the clouds away from stormy days, and left seemingly to soon to go to his eternal home, where the love of mankind, and the charitable deeds done in this world will surely receive their reward.
W. Y. Bennett

 

NEWS LETTERS
From Different Sections of Overton County
LIVINGSTON ROUTE 2

J. D. Holman was here Sunday.
A. T. Lewis moved his shuttle mill to Chinute last week.
Aunt Minerva Holman visited her sisters and other relatives here last week.
J. R. Wright, J. H. Ruble and G. V. Richardson attended the county union at Good Hope Saturday.
Grant Norrod has bought the mill town tract of land from Hankins Bros.
There is some senatorial primary talk here. The majority seem to be for Patterson and McKellar.
Martin Stover has bought the Ben Conner farm from E. D. White.
Vulcan.

BOOZ
Dear Editor: I will write again.
There will be a funeral preached at Shiloh today.
Prof. Gunter sang at Highland yesterday with a large crowd in attendance, and all seemed to have a good time.
Born to Mr. Qualls and wife recently, a baby girl; also to Mr. Smith and wife, twin babies.
Mr. Baily Gunter and Miss Pearlie Bullock were married recently, Rev. Huffines officiating. We wish them a long and happy life.
The literary school at Highland has been discontinued on account of Prof. Gunter being sick with typhoid fever.
Happy Girl.

Buffalo Hill
A splendid sermon was preached at the Campground Church Sunday by Bro. Swaringham with much interest manifested by all.
The box supper at Buffalo Hill is called off on account of the Presbytery. The box supper will be the Saturday night following the Presbytery, Oct. 2. Everybody come.
B. B. B. & J. W. B.

Cookeville Route 7
Mrs. Martha Brown is reported no better.
Mrs. A. C. Brown is able to be about on her crutches. She has been suffering with rheumatism.
W. F. Moody is running his sawmill most every day, sawing walnut timber to make gun stocks for the folks across the frog pond to kill each other with.
R. F. Moody has about recovered from a recent illness.
Mrs. T. Q. Smith who went to Algood some three weeks ago for an operation is getting along well. Will be able to come home soon.
M. J. Phillips and a part of his family are here from Texas on a visit.
Miss Martha Warden is reported no better.
Rev. Jas. Brady preached at Hardy's Chapel last Sunday. A fine crowd was out to hear him.

TO THE PUBLIC
I call the attention of the voters of Overton County to my announcement in this paper for re-election to the office of Trustee, and respectfully solicit their votes and influence in the coming Democratic Primary. I do not believe I am asking too much of the people when I ask them to give me a second term as this has always been a custom, especially with two year offices. I have endeavored to give the county good service since my term of trustee began a little over a year ago, and am willing for the public to judge me by my record as an officer. I greatly appreciate the past support accorded me, and earnestly solicit the votes and influence of all Democrats in the primary election to be held Nov. 20th, 1915.
Yours Sincerely,
T. D. Gragg

Evening Reception
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wright entertained last Wednesday evening, at their home in north Livingston, in honor of their son Howard Wright and his bride, who had just arrived from their wedding trip, with a six o'clock dinner and reception. A menu of fine courses was served. The dining room and reception room was prettily decorated. A musical programe was enjoyed, and later and ice course was served. A limited number of guests were invited to this enjoyable affair.

 

We have just learned of a business deal of importance which has just been consummated. J. A. Young has sold his stock of Goods to Harding Winningham and T. J. Ray.

LAND SALE
By virtue of an venditioni exponas issued to me by J. A. M. White clerk of the Overton County, Tennessee, on the 8th day of Sept. 1915, in the case of G. A. Knight vs Hays Green, I will on the 25th day of October, 1915, at the courthouse door, in the town of Livingston, between legal hours, offer for sale, for cash in hand, the following described real estate, subject to a homestead right, bounded as follows: on the north by Spicer on the east by Smith, on the north by Smith, on the west by Smith or Beason, containing 30 acres more or less.
Said sale will be made to satisfy a judgement recovered by G. A. Knight against Hayes Green, before J. W. Wisdom, J. P., together with a bill of cost, judgement and cost amounting to $9.70, plus the cost of this sale.
This 20th day of Sept., 1915.
James Needham, Dep. Sheriff.

LAND SALE
By virtue of an veuditioni exponas issued to me by J. A. M. White clerk of the Circuit court of Overton county, Tennessee, on the 8th day of September, 1915, in the case of W. T. Gofl & B. L. Speck vs Alex Sells, I will, on the 35th day of October, 1915, at the court house door; in the town of Livingston, between legal hours, offer for sale, for cash in hand, Alex Sells' individual interest in the following described tract of land, lying and being in the 11th district of Overton county, Tennessee, and bounded on the north by lands of Ledford, on the east by lands of Copeland, on the south be lands of Copeland, on the west by lands of Ledford, containing 10 acres, more or less, and known as the Tennessee Sells tract of land.
Said sale will be made to satisfy a judgement recovered by W. T. Goff and C. L. Speck against Alex Sells, before F. G. Bilbrey, S. P. together with a bill of costs, judgement and cost amounting to $22.40, plus the cost of this sale.
This 20th day of September, 1915.
A. J. Carr, Sheriff

Mrs. W. A. Bussell, who has been suffering for the past week with a blood poisoned hand, we are glad to report is better, and no further trouble from the accident is anticipated.
Mrs. Philip Myers left yesterday for Nashville.
J. B. Lansden went to Nashville yesterday.
Ed Sewell of Willow Grove passed through here Monday enroute to Nashville.
A party of Albany, Ky., people passed through town Monday evening on their way to the state fair at Nashville.
Dr. Ed Clark and family of Willow Grove left Sunday for Granite, Oklahoma, which place they expect to make their home in the future. Dr. Clark has formed a partnership professionly with Dr. J. B. Landsen formerly of Hilham, and the two Tennessee physicians will practice medicine together in the west.
Uncle Wash Daniels of Herd, passed through town Sunday enroute to Nashville.
Chancellor A. H. Roberts returned home Sunday from Carthage.
Oscar Clark of Algood was here Saturday and Sunday.

LAND SALE
By virtue of an venuitiont exponas issued to me by J. A. M. White Clerk of the Circuit Court of Overton County, Tennessee, on the 8th day of Sept., 1915, in the case of R. L. & R. C. Walker vs C. R. Roberts I will on the 25th day of October 1915, at the court house door, in the town of Livingston, between legal hours, offer for sale, for cash in hand, the following described real estate, lying and being in the 9th district of Overton County, and bounded on the north by the lands of J. W. Welch; on the south by the lands of the Brier Hill Collieries; on the west by the lands of J. W. W__ch; and on the east by the lands of J. W. Welch. This levy is made subject to life time estate of defendant, C. R. Roberts.
Said sale will be made to stisfy a judgement recovered by R. L. & R. C. Walker against C. R. Roberts before L. A. Key, J. P., together with a bill of cost judgement and cost amounting to $26,60, plus the cost of this sall.
M. H. Weeks, Dept. Sherriff
This 20th day of Sept., 1915.

Atty W. G. Curry of Memphis was here last week for a short visit to E. C. Goodpasture and other friend.
Alex VanTrease has resigned his position as ass't Cashier of the Farmers Bank. He left Friday for his home in Alexandria. Shirley Bohanan has been appointed ass't cashier in Mr. VanTrease's place.
Mrs. A. J. Mofield who has been quite sick for several days, is better.
Dixie Smith left for Nashville yesterday.

DEATH OF INFANT.
The little eleven months old baby of Luther Ledbetter and wife, died last Thursday night, and was buried the following day.

C. J. Cullum was in Knoxville on legal business last week.
Mrs. Joe Wright and Miss Olga Conatser attended the Harp & Pointer Millinery Opening at Algood Friday.
S. K. Garrett of Monroe attended the meeting of the Democratic Executive committee here Saturday.
J. W. Henson is in Nashville attending the state fair.
Dr. W. A. Howard of Algood was here the latter part of last week.
Lee Coulson, who has been in Florida for the past few years, has returned to this section. He motored over from Algood last week to visit relatives here.

LAND SALE
By virtue of an venditioni exponas issued to me by J. A. M. White Clerk of the Circuit Court of Overton County, Tennessee, on the 8th day of Sept., 1915, in the case of John Looper vs J. H. Norrod et al. I will on the 25th day of October, 1915, at the court house door, in the town of Livingston, between legal hours, offer to sale for cash in hand the following described real estate lying and being in the 9th district of Overton County, Tennessee, and bounded on the west by lands of W. M. McCowan; on the east by the lands of the Brier Hill Collieries; and on the south by the lands of the Brier Hill Collieries, and on the north by the lands of the Brier Hill Collieries.
Said sale will be made to satisfy a judgement recovered by John Looper against J. H. Norrod et al before L. A. Key, J. P. together with a bill of cost, judgement and cost amounting $40.20, plus the cost of this sale.
J. M. Hensley, Constable
This 20th day of September 1915/

A. J. Mofield, Carl and Miss Mamie left this morning for Nashville.


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, September 29, 1915

Corn Club Prize
Homer Ray, son of T. J. Ray, won the first prize in the Boy's Corn Club contest, which was a free trip to the state fair, given by Mrs. P. E. Clark, president of the T. K. & N. R. R. The estimate was made in order to allow the winner to make the trip to the Fair last week. The young man raised 83-1/2 bushels of corn on an acre of ground at a cost of twenty and two tenths cents per bushel. Another member of the club made 86 bushels on one acre, but his cost was something over 30 cents per bushel. All of the prizes have not been awarded yet, as some of the corn has not matured enough for gathering. This will be done in a short time now and the results published.

GOOD NEWS
To the Voters of Overton County.
I offer myself to the voters for Trustee of Overton county, in the Democratic Primary to be held November 20th, 1915, and I will appreciate anything that anyone may do or say in my behalf and for my nomination in said election for Trustee.
I will try to see you in person, or as many voters as possible. Do all you can for me.
I. E. Handy

RUNAWAY
The four children of Wirt Eubanks and a son of John Little were the victims of a runaway yesterday morning. They were driving in a surrey when the horses became frightened and ran for quite a distance, turning the surrey over and jarring the occupants up considerable. One of the little girls was right badly hurt but it is thought that her injuries will not prove serious.

When a girl marries she usually loses a good friend and gets a grouchy boarder.

TO THE PUBLIC
I call the attention of the voters of Overton County to my announcement in this paper for re election to the office of Trustee, and respectfully solicit their votes and influence in the coming Democratic Primary. I do not believe I am asking too much of the people when I ask them to give me a second term as this has always been a custom, especially with two year offices. I have endeavored to give the county good service since my term of trustee began a little over a year ago, and am willing for the public to judge me by my record as an officer. I greatly appreciate the past support accorded me, and earnestly solicit the votes and influence of all Democrats in the primary election to be held Nov. 20th, 1915.
Yours Sincerely,
T. D. Gragg

LIVINGSTON ROUTE 2
Tom Richardson has returned home from California.
Andy Conner has bought a tract of land from Hassel Wisdom paying $500 for it.
Miss Ava Allred is spending a few days at Anthen.
Mrs. John Kennedy who has been sick for some time is better.
Mrs. S. H. Flowers who has been sick is better at present.
James Wright and wife visited the family of John Kennedy Sunday.
John Atkins and son, Lacy, are visiting at Cook Place. Mai.


SERIOUS ACCIDENT
Stephen Myers who lives near Windle sustained a serious injury last Monday, and his condition is thought to be somewhat critical. Mr. Myers was working on a scaffold doing some carpentering work at his barn, when he fell from the scaffold, striking his right side against a joist and it is feared that the internal injury may be very serious.

Mrs. H. Atkins and Miss Willie Harris attended the Paterson speaking at Cookeville Saturday.
Judge Roberts is at Jamestown this week holding Chancery court.
W. R. Officer made a business trip to Arkansas last week.
B. M. Johnson of Cookeville was here Monday.
Mrs. J. L. Maynord and son Herschel spent Saturday in Algood.
E. B. Gray and wife who have been visiting friends and relatives in Cheatham county, returned home Saturday.
Rev. W. M. Lantrip was in Cookeville Saturday.
Hon. Kenneth D. McKellar will speak here Friday in the interest of his senatorial candidacy. Come out and hear him.
Miss Sadie Dean Roberts left last week for Bristol, where she has reentered Sullins College.
Criminal court will convene here Monday, October 18th.
Mrs. S. A. D. Smith returned Friday from a few days stay in Algood.
J. G. Eastland is preparing to build on his lot recently purchased in West Livingston.
E. C. Knight is in Jamestown attending Chancery court.
R. E. L. Profit of Cookeville passed through town yesterday enroute to the upper country, where he will buy walnut timber.
Leland Cook now has charge of the civil engineering corps of the new turn pike corporation, and is continuing the survey between here and the Pickett county line. It is presumed that if the bonds are voted next month, the present plans will likely be discontinued and the work turned over to the county.
James McCormack of Cookeville was here yesterday.
Dr. Officer of Monterey was in Livingston last week.
Buchanan Matheney of Pickett county was in town Tuesday.
Oscar Clark and Arthur Matheney motored over from Algood yesterday.
Miss Capps of Byrdstown entered Livingston Academy Monday.
C. Allison Roberts, J. Lincoln Maynord and A. Lafayette Dale attended the state fair last week at Nashville.
John Hargrove made a business trip to Nashville last week.
J. B. Norris of Harriman is here visiting relatives.
Henry Dies of Cookeville Motor Car Co., was here yesterday.
Prof. Ben E. Groce and family of Byrdstown spent a day or two here visiting friends, last week enroute home from the state fair.
A. M. Gibbs of Cookeville was in town Monday.
Bob Poston attended the state fair last week at Nashville.
Miss Willie Harris is in Jamestown this week.
Carl Mofield has entered Fall's Business College at Nashville and will be there for the current term.
Mr. M. J. Qualls who was confined to his room everal days last week on account of sickness is again able to be out.
J. C. Bilbrey has recovered from his recent illness.
The L. A. foot ball squad are fast rounding into form, and will be ready for battle by the time the frost is on the pumpkin.
J. T. Stonecipher returned Sunday from a trip to Chattanooga, where he went to be with his brother, who underwent an operation for appendicitis.
I. H. Bilbrey returned from Nashville Sunday.


LIVINGSTON ENETERPRISE
Wednesday, October 6, 1915

ANDREW COOK
The Enterprise this week publishes the announcement of Mr. W. A. Cook, of the 12th district as a candidate for Trustee in the coming primary Election. Mr. Cook was born and raised in Overton county, and has lived all his life in the 3rd, 12th, and 4th districts, and is 41 years of age. He has held the office of district Tax Assessor for his district and is now Justice of the Peace for his district, and also member for this district of the County Democratic Executive Committee. Andrew Cook, as he is familiarly known, is a good man, has always been a loyal and true democrate, and is thoroughly competent to fill the office to which he aspires, being fitted by education and business training and experience to perform the duties of the office himself, without outside help or assistance.
Mr. Cook is well known over the county, and has been prominently identified with public affairs in the County, and has a host of warm personal friends. That he will be an important factor in this race is conceded.

BROKEN ARM
Mrs. W. H. Fleming, who lives with her daughter, Mrs. B. H. Hunt, sustained a broken arm a day or two ago, as the result of a fall. We are glad to report that she is getting along fairly well, and it is hoped that she will soon regain the use of her arm.

Mr. McKellar's failure to meet his appointment to speak here last Friday has not boosted his prospects in this vicinity any that we know of, and they were not very bright before.

Miss Myrtle Kinnard of Cookeville has been visiting friends here for several days.
R. S. Windle of Monroe ws here Monday.
I. E. Handy of Crawford, candidate for Trustee in the coming Primarty election, was here Monday, mixing with the voters.
T. D. Gragg, Trustee, was here Monday to attend county court and to mix with the voters.
F. Y. Gibson of Cookeville is here on business.
Mrs. J. E. Smith and little daughter, Edith, of Brush Creek, Smith county, are here visiting relatives.
Hon. W. J. Matthews of Windle was in town this week.
G. C. Pitts of Algood was here yesterday.
J. H. Bowling has returned from a business trip to Nashville.
Dr. J. W. Davis of Windle was here Monday.

Livingston Route 2
Rev. L. P. Reeder filled his appointment at Old Bethel Sunday and preached at Henard at night.
Mrs. S. H. Flowers has been quite sick for some days.
T. A. Smith of Monroe was here Sunday.
S. G. Flowers is putting up a gasoline mill at Taylor X Roads.
L. H. Harvey has moved his stock of goods to his new house near Taylors X Roads.
W. T. Bilbrey is hauling the logs on the J. L. Conner farm to the river.
Curtis Melton is logging the lumber of the Bob Chilton farm.
There is little interest in the Senatorial Primary here. It seems McKellar is leading. Vulcan.

Mrs. W. Y. Keisling and children of Netle Carrier are here on a visit to relatives.
Mayor W. D. Guthrie and family returned Sunday from a few days trip to Monterey.
Geo. Barksdale of Celina passed through town Monday, enroute home from Nashville.
Ex Governor Patterson will speak here Saturday, October 16th, at 1 o'clock p.m. Come out and hear him.
Tom Speck was here yesterday


LIVINGSTON ENTERPRISE
Wednesday, October 13, 1915

 

Crawford
Editor Enterprise; As we seldom hear from this neck of the woods through the Enterprise, I will pen a few items that may be of interest to some in other parts of the country.
We are still on the map of fair Overton county, and very much alive to the best interest of our people along progressive lines of internal improvements that will place our county in rank with our sister couties in this state, or any other state:
Our people here in Crawford are rejoicing over tha fact that the 23 day of October is close at hand, when we can go and vote for 160,000 dollars bond issue for the purpose of building good roads that we need worse than anything else for the time being in order to open up our country; to develop greater industrial enterprises, to invite capital amony us for investment in factories of various kinds; to properly prepare the products of the farms for the markets of the world. Before we have good roads that will connect the country with the railroads we need never look for anyone to invest capital among us for any enterprise whatsoever. The bonding system that enables the boundless business enterprises of the entire world to be carried on successfully, so it is amusing to listen to some of these prophets of Baal predicting a Waterloo in the event of a bond issue, and never offering a substitute or pointing out some better way or system than the one now in use. So now my fellow voters who are in favor of greater development of our natural resources in Overton county, tht will bring more money to us, better homes, better churches, and attendance, better schools, and attendance and a better citizenship.
On the morning of the 23rd, arm yourself with your last poll tax receipt, if you need one, and go and vote for the bonds, and exercise a right you owe to yourself and your dear family and to your county.
Peter Klopc

Booz
Most all the farmers are about through foddering.
Millard Brown, son of M. C. Brown has been very sick but is reported some better.
School is rogressing nicely at Union Academy under the management of Prof. Roy Oakley.
Mrs. John Speck is on the sick list this week.
Prof. Oakley took his school out picnicking last Friday and all reported a nice time.
The Henard ball team marched over to Rushing Springs last Saturday and took their scalps by the score of 5 to 0 the feture of the game was the playing of the whole Henard team. Oakley was in the box for the Henard team and pitched a great game, holding his opponents to two scattered hits. T. S. Looper featured at the bat getting three hits our of four times up and two of these being three baggers.
Mrs. W. T. Livington died last Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bilbrey visited Mr. L. N. Oakley's Sunday.
School is getting along fine at Highland under the management of Prof. Sherley Looper.
Two funny boys.


Overton County News…Successor to Golden Age
March 1, 1922

Published each Wednesday by Harry L. Meade
Subscription Rates: $1.50 per year; $1.00 per year to those paying in advance and living within 150 miles of Livingston

 

Miss Lily Bilbrey, who is teaching school at Willow Grove, spent the week end here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bilbrey.

Mrs. Duncan entertained the Juniors of the Methodist church Saturday afternoon at the church with a Martha Washington party.

E. Gaston Collins pent the week end here the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Myers and filled the pulpit at the old Christian church Sunday morning and evening.

Don't forget, please, that there is a Great Egg Contest going on at Overton Supply Co. They are giving something away. Please get in this contest by selling us your eggs every week and every month till Dec. 20. It will be worth your while to win one of their premiums.

Mrs. John Hart is recovering from a case of pneumonia.

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Maynord entertained on Saturday evening in honor of Horace French, of Oklahoma.

Rev. Duncan, of the M. E. church recently completed a census of Livingston, showing 1,554 white people and 151 colored people, making a total of 1,705.

Mrs. Herman Estes entertained with a miscellaneous shower Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Turley Knight. Receiving with the honoree and the hostess were Mrs. Millard Hankins and Mrs. L. E. Terry. Delicious refreshments were served.

Officer Copeland has been retired from the Livingston police force, as a matter of economy. Mr. Copeland was deputy sheriff for a month in Pickett county and has served as a policeman here for several months. He leaves Celina today for Nashville, as pilot on a raft of logs, belonging to Mr. Barksdale.
J. M. Birdwell was in Nashille last week.

J. T. Birdwell, of Jefferson City, is visiting his son, J. M. Birdwell, the grocer man.

John Chase, the tie man from Chattanooga, has purchased a 3,500 acre tract of virgin timber in the southern part of Fentress county, part of the old Mark Twain tract.

Mrs. Nina Neal and little son have returned from Cookeville where they have been visiting her cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Farley.

J. C. M. Bilbrey of Rickman was in town Thursday of last week.

S. B. Harward, who has various interests here, has moved his offices into his commission house, which he recently purchased from Watertown Produce Co. and is now comfortably located.

Jno. A. Hargrove visited his father, who is quite sick, at Willow Grove.

James Barnes passed thru this city Saturday enroute to his farm near Somerset, Ky.

Cordell Brown spent the week end with relatives at Highland.

Horace Johnson spent last week in Cookeville with relatives.

Horace French, of Granite, Okla., is visiting his parents Mr. And Mrs. K. L. French.

Mrs. W. T. Goff and little daughter, Anna May, have returned from a visit with relatives at Crawford.

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Almonrode and children have moved to Texas. He has been operator for the home phone here.

Frost proof Cabbage plants 35 cents per hundred or 40 cents per hundred by mail. Order now. J. M. Birdwell

Ladies Spring Coats and Suits just arrived at Fleming and Myers. Special new prices.

Mr. James Bobo and little daughter, of Cookeville, are the guests of her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Speakman.

Jesse Fleming, who has had an attack of rheumatism, is now some better.

Porter Garrett left Saturday for Grace Chapel, Alabama. He took his little nephew Otis Smith with him and will visit his brother for three weeks.

J. T. Williams, the county tax assessor, was painfully injured when a mule fell with him a couple weeks ago. He is much better now.

The Supreme court, of Tennessee, reversed the decision of the local court, which convicted Carlos Winningham last October of violating the age of consent law. Attorneys C. C. Gore and C. J. Cullom were the attorneys who were successful in clearing the boy of the charge on a review of facts.

Mrs. A. M. Speakman is quite sick.

Mrs. J. H Myers, who has been sick, is now some better.

Miss Beulah Murphy, of Hilham spent the week end here with friends.

Little Johnnie Ethel Winningham has returned from Cookeville, where she has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Winningham.

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Harward have moved o the Roberts place in East Livington. Mr. Millard Marcom has bought the home them moved from and will take possession at once.

Mrs. R. A. Nunnally has been sick the past few days.

Miss Beuna Maynord has returned from Cincinnati where she bought spring millinery for Harp and Pointer, of Algood.

Bob Poston, of Netherland, was in town Saturday.

Mr. Ault was here Friday.

Mrs. Turley Knight is visiting home folks at Cookeville.

"Uncle" Bill Hunter is still improving.

Miss McClanahan, of Alpine passed through town Thursday of last week enroute to Nashville, where she will have her tonsils removed.

Miss Lena Pierce, of Nashville, was in town Thursday on business.

Mrs. Arthur Ward and children are visiting her mother at Baxter.

Casto M. Gist, registered optometrist of Sparta was here last week, giving free examinations and fitting many with glasses.

Hon. Billy Mathews, of Windle, was in this city last week.

George Matthews, of Hennard, was here last week.

The Misses Katheryne Cooper, Gertrude Officer and Agnes Hargrove were in Cookeville last Wednesday.

Mesdames Jesse Fleming and Ben Hunt entertained Saturday afternoon with a miscellaneous shower, in honor of Mrs. E. S. Myers.

Mrs. Douglas Sloan of Chattanooga, has been the guest of Mr. And Mrs. Turley Knight.

Mrs. Sue Harris is in Nashville visiting her sister, Mrs. Linnie Marshbanks.

Miss Ina Myers is in Knoxville.

"LUM" KIMES CALLED BY DEATH
H. C. Kimes, an old Confederate veteran, of the eighth district, passed away last Wednesday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wilburn Pitman, near Russian Springs after an illness extending over several years.
Mr. Kimes was a man of wealth and influence and a prosperous farmer.
He was laid to rest in the Speck graveyard.
He leaves several children to mourn his loss.

GEORGIA LETTER
Just a few lines to the Overton County News.
When I receive your paper it brings to my mind many friends in Overton county, as I think there is no place like it.
I left Livingston in the latter part of December, 1921 and landed in Newnan. Ga., where I have been practically two months. Was accompanied by my wife and friend, V. H. Little.
Little and myself are taking a course in telegraphy, getting along fine for the time we have been here. Expect to stay here one more month, then will proceed back to Tennessee for further extension of our course.
Well, I don't fancy this state or winter resorts, rains one day, clear and cool the next. Weather changes nearly every twenty-four hours, sure is disagreeable. Land is poor here, produces but little cotton, don't see how the farmers live. Practically all the farmers are "darkies" and are fond of such unprogressive soil. Just so this live, I suppose.
Sure have roads here throughout the state. This state is noted for "darkies. Two-thirds of the people are of that race.
Have the poorest stock here I ever saw.
I was at a K. K. K. parade last Thursday night. They are about 1,800 strong in this burg.
If a man commits a crime they line up and pay him a visit and carry their buggy switches along and give him or her, whichever it may be, until they think their time has come. So I am a good boy while I stay here.
Hope the L. A. school is carrying on their work fine, also glad my home citizens are interested enough to have a winter school there. Hope they will have school nine months out of the year.
Guess I have told all I know about "Dixie" at present, so will close, extending my best wishes to the people of Overton county and trust the New year which has started will bring prosperity and happiness to all.
Mr. And Mrs. Dewey Cole
Newnan, Ga.

CANTRELL IS FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER
The most important case herd at this session of the court was that of Arter Cantrell, who was charged with the murder of Will Neely.
The jury found Cantrel guilty of murder in the first degree, with mitigating circumstances.
Judge Gardenhire gave him a sentence of 25 years in the penitentiary. Attorney E. D. White, who represented Cantrell, made a motion for a new trial.
Cantrell has been in jail here since October, when the crime was committed. It is alleged that he has been making whiskey and is also under indictment on whiskey charges.
Will Neely, the victim, was a married man with wife and family and a prosperous farmer of this county.

Wirmingham
Health is good in this neighborhood, except bad colds.
Mrs. Alvin Garrett is still improving.
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Reynolds are the proud parents of a new boy.
Sunday school is still progressing nicely if it doesn't rain.
Willard Booher and May Wright were married Sunday.
Herb Sims entertained the young folks ith a social Saturday night.
Herb Smith visited at Windle last week.
Mrs. Elsie Parrott is over at her father's. He is very low.

Oak Grove School
Health is improving in this vicinity at this writing, but not the weather.
School at this place is progressing nicely with a good attendance. A very interesting debate was pulled off Friday night by the school. The subject being, "Resolved, that war has caused more trouble and suffering than intoxicating liquors". The affirmative side was represented by Oscar Lee, Charlie Carmack, Bryant Johnson and Edward Carmack. The negative by Stanley Danner, Oscar Eldridge, Carson Wright and Gaskell Masters. The negative won the decision. We have n interesting subject to be debated upon next week.
Rev. Wm. Dycus filled his regular appointment at Camp Ground Sunday.
Charlie Carmack said that the good looking in the Dodson Chapel community are as numerous as the sands of the sea.
Mr. Bowen Smith, Pete Giesling and Walter Boles have traded farms.
Joe Masters has been appointed road overseer and we hope the people of this county will prosper during his administration.
The marrying epidemic has rather subsided in this part of the county.
Bryant Johnson and Gaskel Masters have been quarantined.

Moore
Will write a few lines from this place. We have been having some rain the past day or two.
Health is not very good in this neighborhood.
Jim Wisner is on the sick list, but is improving at this writing.
Bille Grant and his son-in-law are planning to crop together.
Clarence Cravens and wife visited Miss Ollie Garrett at Monroe Sunday.
Bud G. Wisner bsM lee olh (sic)
George Ford is visiting home folks this week.
Miss Bettie Byer is on the sick list.
Bob Byer and his father were in town Saturday.

IUY Point
Dear friends and readers this is my first time to write a few words from this place and so if my letter escapes the waste basket will come again.
Health at this place isn't very good at this writing.
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Smith visited their uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McDonald Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. McDonald who have been sick for a few days are improving.
Fred Carr, who is visiting his aunt, Mrs. Nannie Ledbetter, took dinner with Jim Beaty Sunday and reported a nice time.
Edgar Ledford made a trip to Cook Place Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Ledford are the proud parents of a new boy, but can't find a name for it. Will some one please send it a name.
Drew Ledbetter is smiling mightily over his dog's return.
Fout Smith visited his sister Mrs. Ry Vaughn at Wirmingham Sunday.
Two of Mrs. Kasie Hargis boys are very sick with severe colds.
Bugg McDonald and brothers are very busy improving their new home.
Ben Vaughn made a business trip to the Horsepound this week.
Cull Threet is on the sick list.
Vergie Smith, who has been sick or some time is improving nicely.

Livingston
Mrs. Benton Smith, of Windle, was in the city last Wednesday.
S. B. Harward has purchased the building occupied by his office and produce house on Depot street from A. G Keisling. The building is 40 X 90 feet and Mr. Harward may add a second story for offices.
W. H. Winningham, of the Overton Supply Co., is in Oklahoma, where he holds valuable oil interest. He will visit in St. Louis and Chicago this week making his spring purchases.
The revival services at the M. E. church are drawing large crowds, about 400 at the evening services and 130 in the afternoon. Evangelist Patterson is giving some fine talks on China and the Chinese, he having served five years there as a missionary.

Rickman
There's quite a bit of sickness in this community.
Owen Bilbrey, who has been attending the Automobile college at Nashville came home last week and has been confined to his room with the flu ever since.
Miss Sallie Cooper and Mrs. Ofa Peek went to Cookeville on business Saturday.
Luther Harris, a former teacher of Rickman high school, passed through here on his way home Friday. Mr. Harris is attending school at Cookeville.
Mr. And Mrs. Alex Cooper have one to housekeeping.
Horace Webb, the small son of Scott Webb, is very low with pneumonia.
A large crowd attended church and singing at Paron last Sunday.

Dog Walk
Mrs. Kate Walker, who has been on the sick list, is improving.
Mrs. Koger has returned from Algood.
J. B. Dovis' baby is real sick.
Fred York has moved back on the McDonald farm.
It is very early in the season for buds to be putting forth, but they have been seen for several weeks past in Dog Walk. The people think it is a sure sign of an early spring.
Fate Wilson, of Wilder, Ten. entertained with music at Fate McDonald's Friday evening. The guest present were Mrs. Eva Newberry, Mrs. Floro Reagan and the Misses Morgaret Lura, and Lyla Reagan, and Messrs. Bill Reagan, Fred York, Erastus Newberry, Tom Newberry, Henry Koger, Garland Koger, Blaine Koger, Ewin Hill, Will Crawford, Porter Reagan, J. W. Dalton, Allan Smith, Clarence Wisner, Clarence Beaty and Hubert Newberry.

Pickett County News - Chanute, Tenn
Claud Huddleston bought a store from Bent Russel a few days ago. It was the store that T. P. Meek was running near Chanute. Claud has two stores now.

Red Banks
Will write a few lines from this place.
It is raining here today. Wash Garrett, the weather profit, speaks of local showers and gully washer the last of the week.
McKinley hew make (sic) and family and John Daugherty and family visited at west side the week end.
Bob Garrett and wife, of Byrdstown, visited friends and relatives in West Red Banks last week.
John Wright and wife, of Wirmingham, visited Frank Flowers over Sunday.
McKinley Shewmake has bought a farm in South Red Banks and is erecting a house on it.
Miss Lou Garrett and Miss Rosey Shewmake, of this place spent the week end with Mrs. Hilary Shewmake, near Jay Bird.
Jimmie Young, of Wirmingham, passed through here Sunday.
L. F. Davis is on the sick list.
James Garrett, of this place has been at West Fork the past week running a saw mill.
James Smith and wife visited at Wirmingham Sunday.
Rev. J. E. Garrett, of West Red Banks, who has been real sick is reported better.
Mate Smith has purchased a pair of English fox hounds.
Work in the rock quarry is progressing nicely.
Herbert Smith, of Wirmingham, visited his father at Windle last week.
Josh Shewmake was seen on the streets here Sunday.
J. B. Taylor, one of our merchants, made a business trip to Livingston Saturday.
Henry Shewmake passed through here last week enroute to the Mire Branch country.
J. P. Story, of the Story Mercantile company made a flying trip to Livingston one day last week.
Herchel Smith, of Alpine visited home folks over the week end.
Red Banks is a new town and is growing rapidly. Quite a few buildings have gone up recently and it is rumored that others are going up soon.
The out of town farmers are very busy preparing for crops.
Health is very good here except a few cases of sickness reported in the upper town district.
Mr. and Mrs. Lonza Lacy of Eagle Creek, passed thru here last week enroute to see home folks.
Mrs. Emerine Smith was seen on the streets a few days ago, after being confined to her home in the suburbs of the town.
On March 11th there will be a big land sale and all parties wishing to buy a nice home should come and see.

Hilham - Route 1
Health seems to be improving some at this writing.
Walter and Albert Brown are in Nashville on business this week.
Debate at Oak Grove Friday night, March 3rd, subject Resolved that the peaceful annexation of Mexico to the United States would be of interest to both countries. The affirmative is represented by Oscar Lee, Edward Carmack, Charlie Carmack, Stanley Danner and Haskell McCarmack. The negative is represented by Robert Eldridge, Bryant Johnson, Carson Wright, Oscar Eldridge and Gaskell Master. Everybody invited to hear the subject discussed.
Charlie Carmack and Amos Danner are visiting in the Dodson Chapel community.
Rev. J. M. Setser filled his regular appointment at Union Sunday.
Dewey Vance has a very sick baby at this writing, it having pneumonia.
Several boys from Oak Grove school went to Hilham spelling match Friday night and reported a nice time.
Several from this community attended court last week at Livingston and reported a large crowd here.
Robert Eldridge seems to have a very sore arm from the effects of the vaccination against the marrying epidemic.

Fairview
Health is very good at this place except bad colds.
We are having some rainy weather.
George Barksdale measured logs at Bugscuffle last Sunday for M. B. Sullivan.
The boys are having a jolly time playing marbles at Bug Scuffle.
Mr. and Mrs. Hamp Spicer paid Mr. Jim Spicer a visit Sunday.
Otha Wright has been working for Halton Hummel in the Wilderness.
Forest Nelson passed thru Bug Scuffle Sunday on his way to Clarksville, where he has been attending school.
Bro. Hankins and family paid N. B. Sullivan a visit Saturday night.
Scott Wright and Herman Sidwell have been cutting logs on the Jim Nelson place.

Fairview
The weather is getting awful cool at this place.
Mr. Wright has the grippe.
Bony Sullivan got kicked by a mule and had three teeth knocked out.
Dock Zachry got the premium for playing marbles at Fairview.
Bailey Sullivan is going to Nashville on a raft.
Porter Means and Haltie Huffer are attending school at Willow Grove.
Ota Wright is learning to hit a marble.
Mr. Leabert Sullivan is logging this winter.
Burr Wright is going to start to Nashville next fall.
J. S. Means is selling out and will buy hogs and cattle this fall.
Mr. Means and Mr. Wright are going to start for Algood tomorrow.
Haltie Huffer and Scott Wright were rabbit hunting yesterday.
Porter Means likes his position as school teacher at Fairview
Haltie Huffer is making a lying trip to Willow Grove.
Thomas Sullivan is buying lots of produce.
Hulton Hummell has purchased a new car and is having Porter Means run it for him.
The women of this place are busy setting hens.

Sourwood
Will write a few lines from this place.
Health isn't very good in this community.
Lesley Harvey is very sick this week.
The little daughter of Joel Clark is on the sick list this week.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Joe Clark a girl.
Hialand Daniel visited Joe Clark Tuesday.
Ella Linder visited Mrs. Bill Clark Wednesday.
Eunice Linder and little sister visited Herb Daniels Wednesday.
Joe Sells and Frank Linder made a flying trp to Livingston Tuesday.
Martin Stover and John Taylor are cutting logs this week.
Joe Sells bought a mule of Sherman Linder the other day.
John Taylor and Ofal Clark made a business trip to Celina a few days ago.
Sherman Garrett is going to school at Nashville for two months and is going to visit his wife, Lizzie Garrett in a few weeks.
Uncle Johnnie Hill, who has been sick for some time is slowly improving.
Audrey Smith, who has been staying with Lizzie Garrett is visiting home folks this week.

Oakley
Health is very good, except bad colds.
The farmers are busy preparing for crops.
Bill Stofer and J. T. Melton have sold their mill to J. W. Melton, they are moving ti to Pleasant Hill.
George Fletcher has bought him a saddle mare.
Willie Sidwell and wife ate the parents of a big boy.
J. S. Means sold six fine shoats to Ray Sidwell.
Halton Hummel was seen going through town with a big bunch of shoats.
Oscar Bonham is busy making singletrees.
Hay Taylor was seen in here today.
C. J. Peoples has two find pigs to sell.
J. S. Means is busy buying pigs.
J. T. Sullivan is busy swapping mules.

Allons
Just a few lines from this community. Health is very good at this place, considering the weather.
Mr. Ben Ogletree has moved to Ed Christian's farm near Allons.
Several from this place attended court at Livingston last week.
Leo Busk was in Livingston Monday on business.
Leonard Cole has swapped his cripled pig to Gui Holeman for an opposum dog.
George Brown is fixing to start his saw mill at Allons, opposite from W. A. Cole's
Esquire Davis went to Livingston last Friday to sell onion sets.
J. H. Watkins was on the sick list this week, until E. J. Maynord came to his house to trade mules with him, that revived him and he got out of bed, rolled up his ox and went to the Andrew Cove and that put him on his feet again.
Leonard Cole was in town Saturday on business.
School will close Friday, March 3rd for the last term this winter.
Pearl Little has bought a farm at Allons from Bea Johnson and has moved.
Floyd Ray is going to put up a soap factory with Forest Hoover as general manager.
Church at Allons 1st and 5th Sundays.
George Hoover has whistled "Hot Time" so much in the last month for his boy that he has swung his mustache all off.

Oak Grove
S. H. Robbins visited his brother, Carrol, at Allred over Sunday.
Miss Loretta Waites was the guest of Miss Lula Robbins Saturday night and Sunday.
Lansden Ledbetter and Clay Sweat took a load of eggs to Livingston Saturday.
Mrs. J. M. Lebetter has been visiting her father who has been sick.
Some of the young people of this place went to Alpine Saturday night and report a nice time.
Earl Copeland has been working in the shop most of last week.
Herman Robbins has been troubled with a vaccinated arm.
Herman Ledbetter made a trip to Alpine Saturday.
Joe Ledbetter made a business trip to Livingston Saturday.
Albert Ledbetter who has been sick is reported better.
The daughter of Burr Ledbetter is still low with pneumonia.
Bud Morgan, of Monroe, visited relatives at this place.
B. D. Robbins has gone near Jones Town on business.
Rev. J. M. Robertson will fill his appointment at Oak Grove Sunday. Everybody welcome.

Fredonia
Health of this place is reasonably good.
Miss Vanda McCormick spent the week end with friends at Alpine.
Business in this section is picking up.
They are moving a mill near Bee McCormick's to cut ties and golf sticks.
Mrs. T. W. Almonrode spent the week end with her sister, Mrs. J. R. Bullock, at Livingston.
Miss Jewell Almonrode was in Livingston Saturday having dental work done.
Everybody invited to the pie supper at Fredonia Saturday night, March 11th.
Epworh League every Sunday at 1 o'clock.

Livingston, RTE 4
We are having some very bad weather at present.
Hershell Goodpasture went to Hilham Saturday.
Bird Thomas and family are on the sick list.
Charlie Ward returned home a few days ago from Asheville, N. C.
I hear some folks say that marriage is an epidemic, but I have just about come to the conclusion that it is just like Fashion. If one young man sees another with a new suit of clothes on, it doesn't matter what style it is cut or how it is made he wants something just like it. And it is the same way with the girls of this country, as to their dress and head gear. Let one girl get a new dress a little out of the ordinary and you can hear the other girls say, "Oh my, isn't that nice" and the next time you see them they are all dressed alike.
But, if matrimony is an epidemic, R. S. Masters says he has been exposed and it has not took effect, yet.

Independence
We have had some nice little showers the past week.
School at Oakley closed out a few days ago with a big candy treat.
Dillard Martin made a business trip to Livingston Tuesday.
The Misses Audie Hix, Chlora Reeder and Audie Ferril visited Mis Lola Vann Saturday.
J. D. Coffee and Earnest Winningham spend most of their spare time in the Jackson Swamp duck hunting now.
T. C. Young and family visited W. C. Smith Sunday.
Sam Martin has erected a new addition to his crib.
Albert Coffee is as happy as a coon, he got fifty three duck eggs last week.
Bill Vann and family visited John Martin's Sunday
Mrs. L. W. Stover has been on the sick list the last few days, but is reported better.
P. C. Langford is preparing for a big watermelon patch this year.

Byrdstown
Will write a few lines from this place.
Sim Pryor is on the sick list this week.
E. A. Garrett made a flying trip here today.
We have seven in jail at this place.
Mr. and Mrs. Reeder are on the sick list.
Dillard Pierce and Helen Walker married February 5th and are happy.
Boss Pendergrass and wife visited their parents last week.
H. D. Pryor and Estes Walker are making rails and slats for Mrs. Reeder.
Bud Pendergrass has gone to Christian Camp to work.
Boy Reeder is visiting here.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Neal a big girl.
Singing at Clark Town Saturday and Sunday.
We re having a hard time getting boose in Pickett county, the sheriff gets all the stills before they can make any. If the flu was to hit this county we couldn't get white mule.
Sam Smith and Johnnie Robbins made a business trip to Byrdstown Tuesday.
I wish somebody would send a letter from Bolestown.

Emry Cove - Allons, Rte. 1
Health isn't very good at present.
Elmo Langford's family is on the sick list.
Osville Stover is still improving
Mrs. W. L. Stover has been sick for several days, but is slowly improving.
Mrs. Carles Ramsey, or Grandma Ramsey, as she is commonly called, is on the sick list.
When on her way to school Thursday morning, Miss Nona Langford's mule fell with her, throwing her off and the mule stepped on her hand.
Uncle George Chowning's health has been very good this winter.
The sore eyes have about died our in this community.
Several from this community attended court last week.
Mr. Cloyd Ferrill, Bennie and Carl Reeder visited their uncle, Johnnie Reeder, Monday night.
Harland and Stacy Langford visited their uncle Palo Langford, Tuesday night.
Miss Clarice Stover visited relatives at Eagle Creek Saturday and Sunday.
Little Miss Estelle Reeder visited her sister Mrs. Elsie Vaughn, of Oakley, last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Hardy Ferrel visited relatives near Cedar Grove Saturday.
Miss Ermine Mullins spent the night with her sister, Mrs. Emmett Jackson, Thursday night.
Mrs. Rob Ramsey spent the day with Mrs. Willis Ramsey, Thursday.
Coulis Ferrel visited down about Willow Grove Sunday.
Vincent Vaughn left for California one day last week.
Work on the farm was progressing nicely those warm days.
Hardy Ferrell is getting along very well with his clearing.
School is progressing very nicely at Independence.
Farley Hix has about completed his barn with the aid of Porter Langford.
Mrs. Addie Roberts, of Ky., has brought her two little step-daughters here to put them in school. She will remain here with them and later on Mr. Roberts and the other children will join her.
Grant Norrod, of Monroe, was in this city several days last week.


Wednesday, June 28, 1922

Mr. Carlos Lee, and Miss Ethel Carr were married Sunday afternoon at the home of Geo. Stockton, Rev. A. V. Watkins, officiating. After the ceremony they went to the home of the groom where a delicious wedding dinner was served. The groom is the son of W. T. Lee of this place and the bride is the daughter of Elmer Carr of Ruths Chapel.
The News joins their host of friends in wishing them a long and happy life.

J. H. Myers is treating his home to a new coat of paint, which adds to its appearance.

Sell your Produce of all kinds to S. B. Harward. He appreciates your business.

J. E. Crouch, of Goree, Texas, passed through Sunday enroute to Ky., where he will visit with relatives. He has been attending the old soldiers reunion at Richmond, Va.

Misses Myrtle Smith and Elizabeth Huddleston, have gone to Rockwood, where they have a position.

Herman Murphy passed through Friday enroute from Nashville to Hilham.

Shirlie Ledbetter has moved his family to Crawford, where he is working in the mines.

O. C. Webb, has accepted a position with the Livingston Power & Light Co.

Wilard Maynord, was in Celina last week.

J. L. Speck, the Rickman drummer, was quite busy with the local merchants part of last week.

J. L. Brown was down from Booz last week.

Pryor Robertson, of Algood was among the visitors here last week.

S. B. Harward wants to buy your WOOL
of all kinds.

Hatcher Judd, a patient at the Ridgetop Sanitarium at Nashville, is visiting his sister Mrs. J. S. Fleming of this place.

Floyd Speck of Crawford was here on business part of last week.

Clarence Price, of Timothy, was a visitor in this city last week.

Miss Irma Ferril, of Alpine, visited relatives here last week.

S. T. Hudson spent Sunday with homefolks at Algood.

Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Looper, visited in Algood the past week end.

Jim Green came up from Hilham Saturday to witness the ball game.

J. A. Goolsby and family visited relatives in Cookeville this week.

Miss May Cobble, has returned from a visit with relatives near Rickman.

Rube Reeser spent the past week fishing ner Baxter.

Mrs. May Cooper, of Algood, visited relatives here the last week end.

Arthur Little, was the week end guest of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Little.

Mrs. Neely, of Cookeville, was the guest of Mrs. J. A. Hargrove last week.

Mrs. Oakley, left Thursday for Crawford where she will visit her daughter, Mrs. Ed Tipton.

Mrs. J. S. Fleming entertained Saturday night in honor of Miss Louise Smith.

Miss Monta Williams, of Monroe, spent the week end with friends here.

Miss Verta Winningham is visiting relatives in Cookeville and Montery.

Mrs. Harden Winningham spent the week end with relatives in Cookeville.

Paul Copeland is spending a few days with his grand parents at Eagle Creek.

Willie Carr, of Sulphur spent Saturday night with relatives here.

Rhion McGee, of Cookeville, spent Sunday with friends in this city.

Bruce Estes, who is working in a store at Crawford spent Sunday here.

Loyd and Arlie Norris and Wheeler Freeman motored to Cave Springs Sunday, to attend the Childrens Day exercises.

Mrs. A. S. Frisbie, has been spending a few days with her son Nelson Frisbie and family in Nashville.

Herman Gentry, of Baxter, was in town Friday.

G. W. Carmack, G. C. Ward, and Benton Ward, were among those attending court from Hilham.

John Bilbrey has returned from the hospital at Knoxville where he underwent an operation.
Mr. and Mrs. George Metzer, are visiting at the M. H. Hank home.

E. E. Peek, of Algood, made his regular call to the merchants here, Saturday.

Buster Stephens hes returned from Carthage, where he has been at work with the Carthage Marble Works.

Shirlie Speck, is having his residence remodeled.

Hudson Mullins, of Alpine, was here Thursday.

Miss Ellen Ramsey was here part of last week.

A. J. Mofield and family have returned from a visit with relatives.

Dr. Felknor was in Knoxville the first of the week.

T. B. Huddleston, spent several days in Byrdstown last week.

W. C. Murphy, a prominent merchant of Hilham was among the Livingston visitors Saturday.

Dr. W. A. Howard of Cookeville, was here one day last week.

When in twn have your barber work done at the 'shop of service', Askew & Creacy.

Miss Edith Cannon, of Algood visited relatives here the past week.

The boys at Follies say that the last thing Arlie Norris has brought into fashion is getting a hair cut on the chin. They say he was the first to try the experiment and ther results were satisfactory.

Chas P. Maxwell has returned from Ft. Myers, Florida.

Byrdstown
Farmers in this section have been taking advantage of the pretty weather and corn crops are looking very good.

Brother Kirby Smith, of Cave City, Kentucky, closed his meeting at this place Sunday morning. We regret very much that he could not stay with us longer, tho we hope to remember the great Gospel truths that he made so plain to us. During this meeting there were thirty-two who chose the better part and accepted Christ as their Savior. At three o'clock Saturday afternoon twenty-nine were baptized in Wolf River near the bridge. A very large crowd was present to witness this sacred ordinance.

Miss Mattie Mullins, of Livingston, has been attending church and visiting friends in town the past week.

The Masonic meeting at church Saturday was attended by a large crowd. A number of the members of the lodge delivered very interesting lectures, after which the crowd was entertained with a good dinner.

W. D. Clark, of Livingston, Johnnie Taylor and S. O. Huddleston, of this town, starter (sic) for Louisville, Ky., Sunday morning. We expect them back Tuesday afternoon with their new Ford cars.

Mrs. B. E. Groce and children, of Livingston, have been visiting relatives and friends here for the past few days. They are now at the home of her parents, Mr. Mullinix's.

Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Groce spent Saturday night and Sunday with their sister, Mrs. S. O. Huddleston.

Mrs. Johnnie Woods has been quite sick for some time, but is reported some better.

Miss Maudie Neal is very sick at present. She has been in bed for seven or eight years.

A two weeks' normal began Monday for the benefit of Pickett county teachers. Two professeors (sic) from Cookeville are the instructors.

Prof. Ben Elder, who has been in school work in Kentucky for years, is visiting relatives and friends here.

S. A. Robbins and son, Hyle, of Pickett county, were in town on business Monday.

FOR SALE- 5-room house with 5 acres land, good water and pasture. Plenty fruit. Possession in 30 days. E. F. Copeland.

Curtis Stonecipher is spending a few weeks at St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville, where he is having his limb treated.

Four expert barbers at Askew & Creacy's.

Livingston
Mrs. Halsey Wilson, of New York, gave an address in the interes (sic) of Democracy, at the courthouse Monday afternoon to a lare and appreciative audience. Mrs. Wilson has charge of training lady speakers for this state for the coming campaign.

Miss Ruth Little, of Cookeville is the guest of her cousin Mae Little here.

Dr. McLean of Cookeville spent Sunday in Livingston.

Jim Johnson, of Nashville was in town on business the first of the week.

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Wilson have returned from a visit in New York and Boston.

Eugene Morgan was in Menterey Snday.

Carl Mofield is enjoying a vacation at Mayland.

Chas. P. Gray spent the fore part of the week in Celina.

W. H. Estes is in Willow Grove on business.

Evening Star Chapter No. 136 R. A. M. conferred degrees on three candidates at a called meeting Monday evening.

Come to the Fourth of July celebration at Oak Grove - All kinds of music, speaking races and contests. Refreshments served on te grounds. Come and enjoy yourself.

For Sale - Two tons soy bean hay, at $1.15 per hundred. Also have pair of good weight mules, 6 years old, and I have a good saddle mare would sell. Prices right.
W.H. Mullins, Alpine Exchange

Miss Reba Burgess, daughter of Prof. Burgess, is home from Cleveland, Ohio, after finishing a course in Hiram College.

Fate Copeland, who left Nettle Carrier 21 years ago to accept a railroad job in Indianapolis, is visiting old friends and relatives. Mr. Copeland is train inspector in the Indianapolis station and has worked for over ten years without missing a day.

Newell Stephens was up from Carthage for the week end, returning Wednesday. His sisters and Misses Elizabeth and Leland Marie, accompanied him home and will visit their sister, Mrs. L. G. Cason, a few days.

Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Hankins entertained with a very enjoyable picnic at Garretts Springs on Monday evening. Mr. and Mrs. George Metzmer, of St. Louis, ere the guests of honor. Mr. and Mrs. Metzmer were just recently married.

McClure (Tot) Stephens left Monday for Nashville and other points. "Tot" is headed for Detroit, if he doesn't decide "there is no place like home."

Austin Peay, candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, will speak at Hilham at 10 a.m. Thursday morning of this week and at Livingston at 1 p.m. the same day.

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

All parties owing the estate of Elizabeth Lacy, deceased, and all parties having claims against said estate, are hereby notified of the death of Elizabeth Lacy, late of the 11th district, of Overton county, Tenn., and of my appointment as her administrator June 5, 1922 and all creditors are notified to file their claims properly proven with the County Court Clerk and al parties owing said estate will make settlement with me as Administrator of said estate.
June 5, 1922 F. K. Reeser, Administrator
E. D. White
Attorney

Political Announcement
To the Voters of Overton County
Having received strong solicitation to become a candidate for the office of County Superintendent of Public Instruction, and having received the endorsement of the Republican Mass Meeting of May 1st, 1922 I wish to announce my candidacy for that office.
I hold a certificate qualifying me to make this race and my record of about twenty-five years, mostly in the rural schools of our county is before you.
I most earnestly solicit your support, and promise, if elected, to discharge the duties of the office to the best of my ability.
Yours very sincerely,
S. D. Bilyeu.

CRIMINAL COURT PROCEEDINGS
Criminal court which was held here all last week under Judge Gardenhire handeled (sic) a large number of cases.
Minor Smith was tried for the murder of Dick Sells and the jury brought in a verdict of murder in the first degree under mitigating circumstances. The Judge gave him a sentence of 25 years in the penitentiary. A motion for a new trial was over ruled. The case was appealed to the supreme court. The defendant is out on a $12,500 bond. Attys. C. J. Cullom of this place, and John M. Davis of Wartburg defended Smith and Knight Gore and White prosecuted.
Carlos Winningham was convicted of violating the age of consent law upon the complaint of Miss Monnie Sells. He was given from three to ten years in the penitary (sic) The case was appealed to the Supreme court. This case had been tried here once before and was reversed by the supreme court. Winningham ws represented by Attys. Gore and Cullom and prosecuted by White and Knight.
Jim Brown, tried for felonious assault on the person of J. L. Gawe, resulted in a hung jury and a mis-trial was entered. The defendant was represented by Gore and White and prosecuted by Atty. Genearl Mitchell.
About 65 misdemanories (sic) were disposed of.
The grand jury returned 43 indictments.
The State continued the case of Johnnie and Will Smith charged with the Murder of Myrtie Smith.

Allons
Just a few lines from this place to say health at present is very good.
Most everything is moving along fairly well.
Most all of the crops are looking good, but need rain. Quite a few oats are cut short, and ruined by rust and lack of rain.
There is preaching at the Baptist church every first Sunday.
The Sunday School has a large attendance, an is progressing very nicely.
There will be an all-day singing and program at Allons schoolhouse the second Sunday in July. Short talks on Orphanage by Rev. J. B. Brown and Rev. Edd Hancock. Talks by the county Supt. And county Board, as to how literary schools (sic) are aided by Sunday schools. Sunday Shool (sic) Supt., C. H. Cope, and S.A.D. Smith how to montain (sic) attendance in Sunday school, and S R. Peterman a talk to the primary folks. Also others who ight be present wishing to give a short talk in general on similar topics are most cordially invited. Everybody welcome. Come and bring dinner, and enjoy the day with a large crowd. Dinner of the ground.

Rickman
Health in this section is fairly good so far as the writer knows.
Farmers are behind with their, owing to so much rain up until the last two weeks.
Owen Bilbrey, who has been attending an automobile school in Nashville has returned home.
Quite a lot of our folks here attended the childrens Day at Oak Hill Sunday.
Rev. Baxter, assisted by Rev. Duncan of Livingston is conducting a weeks meeting at Oak Hill.
Our drummer, D. E. Bilbrey is on his usual round this week.
Mr. Odell, the pole man loaded a car of poles here this week.
Uncle Dock Eldridge attended Childrens Day at Oak Hill Sunday. He was seen going in that direction again Monday, and when questioned where he was going, said he thought he herd another sheep bleat.
John L. Speck left this week for several points in Tennessee and Kentucky.
R. E. Bilbrey and family leave at once for their summer home at Mayland.
Mr. and Mrs. Epps Webb, of Algood were very much surprised and entertained with a birthday surprise dinner given by their children in honor of Mr. Webb's 60 birthday. Those being present were, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Webb, of Rickman, Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Webb, of Windle, Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Webb, of Algood, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Swallows, of Rickman. There were 17 grandchildren present, and the following guest were present: Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Carr, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. McCulley, and Rev. Ras Williford of Brotherton.
We all spent one happy day, but fear there will never be another such day as that one.

Bolestown
Health is very good.
We are having some very hot weather.
Gardens are beginning to need rain.
Farmers are very busy working their corn.
Wheat and oats are harvested, and reports are the wheat crop is good, but the oat crop is not very good.
Sunday school is progressing nicely at Bolestown.
Preaching at Bolestown next Sunday at 11 a.m. by Rev. Cooper. Also preaching in the afternoon by Rev. Coleman. There will be dinner on the ground, and everybody is invited at attend.
B. M. Ramsey visited his brother John Ramsey at Cookplace, Sunday.
Shirley Reagan of Spurrier was here Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Beaty are the proud parents of a new girl.
There is quite an excitement in this part of the country over what is reported to be a fine oil well which has been drilled on the J. L. Lacy farm. The well was struck last week, and it is reported that the oil flowed over the top of the derrick for some time.

Hilham, Rte. 1
Health is good at this writing.
Farmers are trying to get through with their crops, but.
An excellent program was redred at the Childrens day exercises, and was enjoyed by all present.
Rev. A. A. Gibson will begin a series of meetings at Hilham, Thursday.
Jacob Carwile and Hubert Bilyeu left Friday for Anderson, Indiana.
Claud Smith has returned from the St. Thomas hospital in Nashville, where he underwent an operation.
The young peoples Bible Society is progressing nicely and a fine program is rendered every Saturday night.
Come to the Fourth of July celebration at Oak Grove and hear some good music and speaking, and see the contests, and enjoy yourself with the crowd. Everybody invited. Come and hear the "Crazy Crank" from Cuba. He will keep you tickled "pink".

Carrol Robbins Suicides
Tuesday morning Carrol Robbins, a prominent citizen of West Fork, was found hanging to an apple tree, back of barn. Mr. Robbins was worth considerable money but had met with financial reverses recently.

Strand Theatre
Monroe
Next Saturday Night
William Russell in
"Quick Action"
A Western Picture
Charlie Chaplin in
A two reel comedy.
Admission 15 and 25 cents

 

Rickman
Health is very good in this community at present.
Mrs. J. D. West and daughter, Clara, attended the district conference at Sparta last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Verble visited relatives near Rickman Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Eldridge are the proud parents of a new boy.
Sallie Bilbrey, Clara West and Demas Bilbrey of this place and Dixie Smith of Livingston, were the guest of Mayme Stockton Sunday.
Mrs. Cooper Deck of Livingston spent the week end with her sister Mrs. Will Speck.

Brief Mention
Miss Lena Reagan, who has been teaching school at Paulina, Iowa, is home for the Summer vacation.
Judge J. N. Cannon, of Algood, visited relatives and friends here the week end.
Hassel Norris, of Alpine was helping in Follies Café the past week.
Friday afternoon the second nine base ball team of is place journeyed to Hilham, where they defeated the Hilham team to the tune of 20 to 1. The feature of the game was the hard hitting of Arlie Norris for Livingston, who hit a home run.
If you want a bath go to Askew and Dreacy's Barber Shop, West side of square, best in town.
Judge Snodgrass is holding court at Celina this week. Attys. Gore, Knight and White from this place are in attendance.
Rev. Kirby Smith, of Cave City, Ky. Was in town Monday.

Vitamine Cold Slaw
Red cabbage is nice for this but if impossible to secure, use white - which also contains a plentiful supply of health-giving vitamines when raw. Slice one small head of cabbage fine; add two minced onions, one cup chopped Spanish green olives (stoned); vinegar, salt and pepper to taste. It's a new slaw, a healthful slaw and a delicious slaw.

Letter from Pennsylvania
Overton County News:
I have been a subscriber of your worthy paper for some time, and will now take the privilege in saying that yours is a worthy paper.
We who are so far away from our native home, through reading your paper get a fair idea of who is buying fertilizer, and who is spreading it. We also know that a large quantity of the fertilizer is not the genuine tobacco stem quality, for instance the kind I am now spreading.
Laying all jokes aside now I guess I had better introduce myself before I go any further.
Since I left your proud metropolis my experiences were innumerable, but I'm not going to bore you with a full account of these, but will merely give you a brief summary of everything in general.
I have gone over a large part of the grand old U.S.A. in my course of travels. It is useless to make mention of the number of times I have cursed, discursed and disgusted. I have been robbed, cashed bad checks, and committed matrimony, the latter fact of which you are undoubtedly well aware. The only reason I am still going is to see what the duce is going to happen next.
At present I am deputy sheriff of Cambria county, State of disorder and Pennsylvania. I am at present located in Flinton, Thirteenth Sled Division out of Cresson. I don't know where I'll hang my hat when the morning comes and tells me that a new day is started.
As my original intention was to write only a few lines, I had better close, wishing my best to the many friends who will with doubt be glad to hear from me.
I beg to remain very truly,
Hershal S. Sells, Flinton, Pa.

Will T. Sewell
E-M-B-A-L-M-E-R
Calls answered promptly
Day or Night
Baxter, Tennessee

 

Dr. C. H. Dowell
Dentist
Office Over Fleming & Myers

 

Grove's
Tasteless
Chill Tonic
Invigorates, Purifies and
Enriches the Blood 60 cents

Political Announcement
To the Voters of Overton County:
Having been solicited by both Democrats and Republican to make the race for Sheriff of Overton county, also having the endorsement of the Republican Mass Meeting at Livingston, May 1st, I have decided to submit my claims to the voters in the August election. I solicit your vote and influence.
Yours respectfully,
Emett Conatser

 

Announcement
We have been appointed the Exide Service Station for this locality.
In addition to selling
Exide
Batteries
The right battery for your car, our
Service includes skilful repair work
On every make of battery. You can
rely on responsible advice and reasonable prices here.
We look forward to a call from you.
Keisling Garage

The Church of Christ, Hilham, are expecting a protracted meeting to begin there next week, Rev. Armstrong Trailor to preach and lead the singing during the first week, and Rev. J. H. McBroom, of Shelbyville, the second week. All are cordially invited.
Prof. C. E. Brehm of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will deliver a lecture at the Courthouse at 1 p.m. Saturday of this week. All interested in the raising of strawberries are invited to attend. An effort is being made to have a large acreage planted to berries, as they are a great money crop.

A barn belonging to Mrs. Thomas caught fire Saturday afternoon from some unknown cause and burned to the ground. The barn was used by W. T. Spurrier who lost about $100 of hay, 20 bu. Corn and other feed and 36 geese. There was no insurance.

During the past week, raiding officer W. T. Lee captured three wildcat stills. One was captured near Spicewood hill, between Hilham and Celina; one was located near Wirmingham, and the other near Reeser. Also he captured three stills during the week before.

 

LETTER TO BEN FRANK SMITH FROM BENTON McMILLIN

Mr. Ben F. Smith,
Dear sir and friend:
Remembering with appreciation your life long friendship, and knowing that you are interested in my candidacy for Governor, I take the liberty of writing you this letter to let you know that everything is going well and that I confidently believe I will be nominated. One thing is certain- if I am nominated, I will be elected, and my desire to restore the party of our fathers to power in Tennesse (sic) is the one thing that inspired my candidacy.
When I get through with "ole limber" in the coming campaign instead of being a famous fox hound, he will look like a cheap possum dog.
I know that you - a valiant Ex-confederate, who fought and suffered side by side with my own brother, will take a keen interest in promoting my candidacy, and whatever the result may be, I shall never forget you as long as life lasts.
With my very kindest wishes,
Truly your friend,
Benton McMillin
Editor's Note - If there were one or two B. F. Smiths in each county of the state Benton McMillin could abolish his headquarters at Nashville an go home and wait the result.


Return to Overton County TNGenWeb Page