Goodspeed's History of Tennessee

 

Biographical Appendix.

 

Goodspeed Publishing Company

 

Nashville, TN. 1887

 

 

Transcribed by

Janette West Grimes, Melody Carter, Pat Stubbs,

Bob Morrow, Pam Vick, Mary Knight, Rae Wayne

For The Smith County TNGenWeb Project

 

SMITHCOUNTY

 

††††† G. D. Alexander, merchant, was born in Smith County, in June, 1849, and is one of nine children of J. L. and Sarah D. [ Donaho] Alexander. The father, Scotch in origin, born in Smith County in 1818, has been a physician near Dixon Springs for forty-six years, and is also a farmer, possessing about 500 acres of the Cumberland River bottom lands, one of the finest farms in the county. The mother, French in ancestry, was born in Sumner [now Trousdale] County in 1829. Educated chiefly at Dixon Springs, our subject began merchandising at nineteen years of age in Smith County, continuing about three and a half years. For five years then he was employed by Jos. T. Thompkins & Co., dry goods, Louisville, Ky., and then before engaging in his present business at Dixon Springs, he spent four years on his father's farm. In December, 1885, he married Bettie, daughter of Jas. and Clarissa [Bravard] Crenshaw, and born in what is now Trousdale County, in 1863. Mr. Alexander is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.

 

†††††† J. D. Allen, a prominent farmer and stock raiser, one-half mile east of Dixon Springs, was born in Sumner County in 1835, ason of George W. and Louise F. [Douglass] Allen. His father was of Irish descent, born in Gallatin, Sumner Co., Tenn., about 1810. He was a lawyer of great brilliancy and prominence. He was attorney-general of Davidson and Sumner Counties for seven years, about 1840. He was the first judge of the Sumner County Court, which position he retained a number of years. He died in May, 1880. His wife was ofScotch origin, also a native of Sumner County, born near Gallatin about 1817, and died in 1849. She was the mother of four children. Our subject was educated in his native place, and at the age of seventeen began merchandise business for himself, the firm being Allen & Cantrell, in which he continued until the war, when he was appointed by Gov. Isham G. Harris to the commissary department, and ordered to Camp Trousdale; afterward was assigned to Robert Hatton's regiment, Seventh Tennessee, and went to Virginia. He served as commissary all through the war. He was in battles of Murfreesboro, Seven Pines, and all the engagements around Richmond and Bentonville. At the time of the surrender he was at Hillsboro, N. C. He was paroled and returned home, resuming his former business. Three years later he went to Brownsville; after one yeaar in trade there he came to Smith County and purchased the farm upon which he now resides; it contains 250 acres, well cultivated, with a pleasant residence and all necessary outbuildings. He is a Democrat and respected, worthy citizen. In 1868 he married a daughter of Morgan David and Elizabeth Buford. Miss Clara V.,born near Dixon Springs in 1846. To this union have been born Ella L., John H., George W. and Alice. Mrs. Allen is a member of the Christian Church.

 

†††††† Jackson C. Apple, a well known resident of the Eighth District of Smith County, was born at the place where he now resides, in 1825. That section was then called Jackson County, afterward Putnam. Jackson C. is one of eleven children born to David and Mary [Thackton] Apple. The father was of German descent, born about 1783 in North Carolina. He came to Tennessee when a young man, settling in the vicinity in which the son now lives. He owned considerable land and engaged in farming, tanning and shoemaking till the time of his death in 1855. The mother was of English descent, born in 1802 in Sumner County, Tenn., and died in 1882. The subject of this sketch received his education in the log-cabin schools of his neighborhood. He remained at home with his parents till after his majority. In 1848 he married Mary J., daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth [Apple]Holford. Mrs. Apple was born in 1832 on Indian Creek, Jackson [now Smith] County. Their union resulted in the birth of three children, two of them were raised: John H. and Tennie [the deceased wife of Prof. S. T. Clark]. Immediately after marriage Mr. Apple moved to the farm on Indian Creek, which he had bought, but remained there only a few months. At the division of the homestead he removed to the portion allotted to him. The first official duties Mr. Apple performed was as justice of the peace of the Eighteenth District of Jackson County, at which time he was only twenty-two years of age. In 1852 he was elected sheriff of the county and moved to Gainesboro; at the expiration of his term he bought an interest in a mercantile house, where he was actively engaged for a year. In 1855 he purchased the entire homestead and moved his family there. During his absence Putnam County was re-established, which included his homestead. Until 1860 his attention was given exclusively to agriculture. He was made justice of the peace of the Twelfth District, serving a term of six years, and was also chairman of the county court in 1862-63. The was interrupted his official duties. April, 1866, he again became justice of the peace in same district. In 1868 the county line was changed, and he became a resident of Smith County. Soon afterward he was elected to same office [justice of the peace] , but by presumption ineligibility, because of his sympathy for the Rebellion. After the amended constitution of 1870 he was called to the office of justice of the peace of the Eighth District of Smith County, and continued to hold the office. He was also county assessor in 1875, giving entire satisfaction. From 1877 to 1887 he was chairman of the county court. At the latter date failing health caused him to decline further service in that capacity. In 1872 he was the Democratic nominee for representative of his county, but was defeated by the Independent candidate, Samuel Allison. Mr. Apple is one of the most efficient and honored men in Smith County. Previous to the war he was a Whig, and is now a Democrat. His first presidential vote was cast for Zachaary Taylor in 1848. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Granville Lodge, No. 342. Mr. Apple, wife and son, are consistent members of the Methodist Church, as was also the deceased daughter.

 

†††††† W. A. Baird is a farmer and stock raiser near Gordonsville, District No. 15. He was born in Smith County in 1845. He is the eldest of eight children of Jesse H. and Jane [Cochrum] Baird. Both parents are natives of Smith County, born in 1824 and 1829 respectively. The father was for several years justice of the peace; he is now living on his farm. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his native county. At the age of nineteen he began farming on his own responsibility. Ten years later he engaged in merchandising at Hickman Mills; he remained there four years, then sold out and came to Gordonsville. He entered into partnership with B. A. James, in the same line of business. After two years he sold his interest in the house to Mr. James, and purchased a farm, upon which he now resides. In 1864 he was married to Miss M. J., the daughter of Hon. J. R. and Martha James. Mrs. Baird was born in Smith County, in 1844. She was a consistent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Her death occured in 1883, leaving two children: Callie C., wife of W. A. Davis and Robert J. In 1884 Mr. Baird was united to Miss Lucy, daughter of John and Martha Gwaltney, who was born in Smith County in 1855. Our subject is a stanch Democrat and an active member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He owns 100 acres of valuable land on the Cumberland River, with a comfortable and commodious residence and all outbuildings. The farm is well stocked and improved. Mr. Baird is a highly respected and worthy citizen.

 

††††† Hon. J. A. Barrett, farmer and miller, was born in 1838, in Smith County, Tenn., one of the children of James and Nancy (Ballenger) Barrett.The father, a farmer and minister, was born in North Carolina in 1812, and came to Smith County when a child.In 1837 he served in Col. Campbellís regiment, in the Florida war, under Gen. Jackson*, and in 1847 was elected to the State Legislature.He was ordained as minister in the Missionary Baptist Church.He died in 1873, owning about 900 acres of land and other wealth.The mother was born in Culpepper County, Va., and is still living with her son, W. F. Barrett.Educated in a Sumner County college, our subject for three years was a teacher.In 1857 he bought his present 114 acres of land, in connection with which he is a large stock shipper.In 1861 he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fourth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, and was orderly sergeant at Shiloh.After the reorganization of the army in 1863 he became second lieutenant, and in August of that year was honorably discharged on account of disability.In 1856 he married Martha H., daughter of Judge W. B. and Elizabeth Whitley, and born in Smith County in 1844.She died in 1865.Their children are William A. and Edward E.In 1867 he married Emma C., daughter of Nicholas and Penelope Smith and born in DeKalb County in 1848.Her death occurred in 1882.Their six children are Robert N., Alfred E., Charles S., Ocia E., Elmer G., and Ernest.††† He owns a two-thirds interest in a saw-mill.In 1871 he was elected justice of the peace; he was also member of the court.††† In 1874 he was elected to the State Legislature.††† He is a member of the Masonic order, being a F. & A. M. and R. A. C. and G. C., and is also a member ofthe Missionary Baptist Church.

 

†††††† Prof. S. T. Clark, of Dixon Academy, was born at Elmwood in 1845, one of five children of H. B. and Martha (Brown) Clark.The father, of Irish origin, born in Virginia in 1802, is a retired merchant and farmer, who lost much by the war.He was justice for several years, andis still living with his sons near Elmwood.The mother, born in Amherst County, Va., in 1806, died in 1863.Educated at Granville and Forest Home College, near Louisville, Ky., our subject began for himself when nineteen, in his chosen profession.In 1868 he married Tennie, daughter of J. C. and Mary J. (Holford) Apple, and born in 1852.Their three children are Compton, at Dixon Springs Academy; Wilbur A., with his grandfather Apple, and John B. (deceased).Mrs. Clark died in 1883.For four years from 1867 Mr. Clark taught at Granville, then for the same time had charge of Snow Creek Academy, when he built theElmwood Institute in 1875.He was principal until 1878, when he associated with him Prof. J. H. Watts until 1883.Then after running it alone for fifteen months he took charge of Dixon Springs Academy, his present flourishing and promising institution.He is a Democrat, a Mason, and he, his wife and two children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

†††††† D. K. Conditt, teacher, was born in 1859 in Smith County, one of five children of J. M. and Mary A. (Trousdale) Conditt.The father, Welsh in ancestry, was born in 1819 five miles north of Elmwood.Leaving home at twenty-two he bought his farm near Elmwood where he remained until his death in 1880.The mother was born in 1818 at what is now Stonewall.Educated at Elmwood our subject began teaching a twenty years of age.He owns eighty acres of the old homestead, and is at present entering on his second engagement as Professor at Elmwood.He is a Democrat, voting first for Cleveland.He is a professor of religion, thought not yet a member of any church.

 

†††††† W. B.Cundall, one of the best know citizens and farmers of the Twelfth District, was born in Walpole County, Mass., in 1815.His parents were Edward T. and Patience (Bailey) Cundall.The father was of English descent, born in Rhode Island about 1798, a son of Abner Cundall, one of the famous Rhode Island Quakers.Edward T. was raised and married in his native State; afterward moved to Massachusetts, and about 1817 went to Washington County, Penn., where he died in 1866.He was a woolen manufacturer the greater portion of his life, but was a farmer a few years previous to his demise.His wife was also a native of Rhode Island.She died about 1880 at the age of eighty-four.Their family consisted of three sons and four daughters, four of whom are living.Both were members of the Old School Scotch Presbyterian Church.The subject of our sketch was educated in the common schools.March 5, 1839, he was married to Miss Emma C., daughter of John andNancy Morgan, of Pennsylvania.Mrs. Cundall was born May 2, 1817, in Washington County, Penn., and died September 8, 1882.To their union nine children were born, of whom two sons and four daughters are living: Nancy (wife of Jones Racky, of North Nashville), John M., Harriet L. (wife of Augustus McEachern)., Isaac B. (of Nashville), Anna M., and Clara S. (wife of D. W. McEachern).For several years in early life Mr. Cundall was a clothier, but farming and milling has been his chief occupation.He was coroner of Washington County, Penn., for three years.In 1870 he moved to Tennessee and located near where he now resides.In 1883 he settled on the farm.It contains 250 acres of land under good cultivation and well improved.He also owns a flouring and saw-mill at Flat Rock.He was school commissioner of the Twelfth District of Smith County from 1873 until 1885.†† He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, as was also his wife.For more than forty years he has been connected with the Masonic fraternity, and has always affiliated w!!ith the Democratic party, casting his first presidential vote for M. Van Buren, in 1840.He began life with nothing, but by industry and enterprise has accumulated sufficient to make him very comfortable.He is a man of fine business capacity, charitable and much esteemed.

 

†††††† Dr. L. H. Davis was born in 1813 in Surry County, N. C., one of ten children of Jacob and Winifred (Herring) Davis.The father was born in 1779 in Virginia; a farmer by occupation, and after 1783 lived in Surry County, N. C. until his death in 1838.The mother, born in Surry County, died in 1865.Our subject, educated in a Surry County academy, became one of the foremost teachers of the county.In 1840 he removed to Overton, Tenn., and the same year began studying medicine under Dr. W. R. Vawter of Salina, Tenn., and in three years began practice.In 1847 he took a course in the Botanical Medical Institute of Memphis, and in 1867 entered the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati.†† He has been a successful practitioner in the counties of Smith, Jackson, Putnam, Macon. Warren, DeKalb, Wilson, Overton, Clay, Sumner, Tenn., and Allen, Trousdale and Monroe, of Kentucky.†† Now about seventy-four, his work is chiefly office prescribing.He is a Democrat, and is a member of the F. & A. M. order, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

†††††† Thomas Dies, a farmer and stock raiser of two miles east of Dixon Springs, was born in Smith (now Trousdale) County in 1817.He is of a family of ten children born to Thomas and Kizzy (Ventress) Dies.The father was of Irish descent, born in North Carolina in 1784.He came to Smith County when a boy.He was a prosperous farmer until the time of this death in 1847.His wife was a native of Smith County, and died in 1819, when our subject was two years old.Thomas Dies did not have many educational advantages.His instruction was received in Dixon Creek Church, which was the first organized in the county.At eighteen he began life as a farmer.In 1839 he married a daughter of John and Susan Merryman, Miss Mary, who was born near Lynchburg, Va., in 1821.To their union twelve children were born, only four of whom are living: Sarah, Francis, Virginia, and Alonzo, who is a farmer.Mr. Dies enlisted in the Confederate service, Capt., Bridgewaterís company, Twenty-first Tennessee, and was elected orderly sergeant.On account of ill health he was discharged in 1862.He returned to his home and resumed farming, which occupation he has since continued with great success.He was a Wig previous to the war and is now a Democrat.He and the entire family belong to the Missionary Baptist Church.Mr. Dies is a honorable, industrious man, well and favorably known throughout the county where his life has been spent.

 

††††† Dr. John Duncan Estes, a practicing physician and surgeon, of Elmwood, was born in 1841, in Wilson County, Tenn.He is the only surviving one of three children, born to Duncan N. and Fanny (Lawrence) Estes.The father was born in North Carolina about 1814, and came to Tennessee when a mere boy, locating in Wilson County, where he engaged in blacksmithing and farming.After his marriage with a native of the county (subject's mother),who was born in 1814, Mr. Estes and family moved to Texas.A few years later he went to Tennessee, where he remained until the late war, when he moved to Illinois, and from there to Kentucky where he died in 1864.He was a soldier in the Mexican war, and a stanch Union man during the late civil war.The mother died in 1846, in her native county.From five years of age our subject made his home with his grandmother, Mrs. Mary Lawrence, on a farm in Wilson County, where he was educated.At the outbreak of the war, in 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Company F. Twenty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, at Murfreesboro.He was discharged at Tripoli, Miss.He returned home, and one month later became one of Forrest's command, remaining as such until April, 1865.He took part in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Bardstown, and was in numerous skirmishes.After the restoration of peace he attended the Three Forks Institute, in his native county.After two years' schooling he began farming on his grandmother's place and a smaller one adjoining his own; at the expiration of two years he embarked in the grocery business, and afterward general merchandise, at Commerce.The following six years he was thus engaged, and at the same time devoted every spare moment to the reading of medicine.In 1873 he attended a course of medical lectures at the Vanderbilt University, of Nashville.The next year he began to practice at Linnwood, Wilson County, and also at Commerce early in 1875.In November of the same year he located at Elmwood, where he has since had an extensive practice.His farm of forty-five acres is valuable and well cultivated.He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Saulsbury Lodge, No. 100, and a Democrat; his first presidential vote was cast for Horatio Seymour in 1868.In 1869 Dr. Estes married Mary, daughter of James and Nancy (Odom) Floyd.Mrs. Estes was born in Wilson County in 1850.Eight children have been born to this union:Howard W.,Turner O., May Pearl, Herschel B. and Fanny Cora.Those deceased are John Clark, James Duncan and William Briggs.Mrs. Estes is a member of the Christian Church.

 

 

†††††† J. J. Eastes, a prominent farmer in the Fourteenth District, was born in Smith County, in 1848.He is one of a family of four children of J. W. and Mary (Walker) Eastes.The father was also a native of the county, born in 1811.He was a farmer by occupation and owned 200 acres of good soil, and was one of the best known and respected men in the Eighteenth District.About 1838 he moved to the Fourteenth District, where he died in 1850.his wife was born in 1814, in Virginia, and is still living on the homestead with her son, J. J., who was educated at the New Middleton Academy.He is one of the county's best teachers, being engaged in that capacity for a term of five months.

He is also one of the most enterprising and prosperous farmers of the section.†† The farm consists of 200 acres, well cultivated, improved, and fenced.All the buildings are first-class.He is to a considerable extent interested in stock raising.He is a Democrat;cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley, in 1872.He is a Royal Arch Mason.In 1875 he wedded Tillitha, daughter of B. M. and Elizabeth F. Baines, who was born in 1854, in Smith County.Their union has been blessed with Wm. T., Lela, Alta D., Jonathan B. and Mary L.†† Mr. and Mrs. Eastes are consistent and highly esteemed members of Missionary Baptist Church.

 

†††††† Wm. Farley, a well known farmer of Smith County, was born in 1818, in Goochland County, Va.He is one of a family of five children born to Roley and Mary (Radford) Farley.The farmer was born in Amhurst County, Va. about 1790, and came to Tennessee in 1835.He worked at his carpenter trade at Dixon Springs and Carthage.He died at Botten Bend of Caney Fork.The mother was also a native of Virginia.She died in 1837 near Dixon Springs, Smith County, Tenn.The subject of this sketch had but meager educational advantages.He attended school a short time at Chapel Hill.At the age of fourteen he was thrown upon his own resources.The following six years he was employed at various places in the neighborhood, going wherever he could get work of any kind.At twenty years of age he was elected constable of Carthage District No. l.he served in this capacity for six years, after which he purchased a farm on Bluff Creek, where he lived for several years.Later he bought the farm situated three miles northeast of Carthage, where he now resides.He married in 1844, Mary, daughter of Logan D. and Polly Key, who lived on Peyton Creek.This union resulted in the birth of four children:John E;Mary, wife of William Bryant;Virginia, wife of John Ford, and William, deceased.Mrs. Farley died in 1850.Mr. Farley married the second time to Jane, daughter of Allen and Patsy (Stanford) Robinson, who was born in 1835.The fruits of this union were nine children, of whom but four are living;Andrew Johnson, Morris Brown, Alice (wife of Thomas J. Carter), and Leroy Cage.Our subject enlisted in the Confederate service, Company A, Forty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, at Carthage.At the battle of Shiloh he was wounded by a minie-ball, in the thigh.He received his discharge in 1862, in Tennessee, since which time he has been prosperously engaged in tilling the soil where he is at present living.He was cast off from home a penniless, mere boy, but by hard and diligent work, he has been able to accumulate considerable good property, although the war was the means of him losing about half of his possessions.His farm contains 400 acres, the bottom land of which is well cultivated.Mr. Farley is a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for James K. Polk in 1844.He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Car lodge No. 14.Mrs. Farley and Morris B. are connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and A. J. is a Missionary Baptist.

 

††††† Hon. T. J. Fisher, Sr., attorney at law, of Carthage, was born in De Kalb County, Tenn., February 22, 1847.he was a son of James and Rachel (Plunkett) Fisher.The father was born in Smith (now De Kalb) County in 1819.He was a prosperous farmer, owning 300 acres of land.He died in 1873 in the county where he was born and married.His parents were natives of North Carolina.His wife was also born in De Kalb County and died in 1864, at the age of forty-five.Their family consisted of seven sons and seven daughters, of whom twelve are living, our subject being the third child.He remained at home until his nineteenth year.His educational advantages had been meager and his desire to gain information great.He soon entered the New Middleton Institute, where, by application, his efforts were crowned with success.His means were limited, which occasioned him to leave school now and then to earn the necessary funds for the continuation of his education.For eighteen months he taught at Shop Springs, Wilson County, and then returned to his studies.During his last session he was assistant instructor.In 1871 he graduated with high honor, being the valedictorian and receiving the degree of A. M.He resumed teaching, but this time in the Geneva Academy at Carthage, and six months at Campbell's Institute, during which time he also studied law, his preceptor being Col. W. H. Dewitt, now of Chattanooga.He was admitted to the bar in 1873, and same year became superintendent of public instruction.He organized the schools under the present system and served a year and a half.In 1876 he was elected to the State Legislature, serving in the Ways and Means Committee, also taking an active part in passing the "four-mile law."In 1884 he was elected attorney-general of the Fifth Judicial Circuit of Tennessee, to fill an unexpired term of H. C. Snodgrass, who resigned.In 1886 he was a candidate for chancellor; was defeated on account of there being six Democratic candidates, which so divided the vote that a Republican was elected.Our subject received more votes than any of his competitors in his party, 4,597 being the number, his next competitor receiving about 2,300 votes.September 2, 1875, he married Amelia, daughter ofNelson J. and Minerva Bryan, of Wilson County.Mrs. Fisher was born November 12, 1848, and educated at the Mary Sharpe College, graduating in 1875.To this union six children have been born:Albert Ernest, James Nelson, Minnie, Virgie, Alice and Thomas J.Our subject is one of the leading and most able lawyers in the county and has an extensive practice.In private life he is courteous and highly esteemed.He is a Council Mason.He and his wife are earnest members of the Baptist Church.

 

†††††† C. S. Fisher, the well known proprietor of a livery stable at Carthage, was born in that place in 1864, a son of Thomas and Mary Jane (Deadman) Fisher.The father was born April 24, 1817, in Smith County.He was a school teacher, also deputy surveyor of the county.Afterward was elected to that office which he held six years.In 1856 he moved to Carthage and became clerk of the circuit court.He was re-elected in 1866, but counted out on account of being a Democrat.In 1870 he was elected, serving four years.He died in 1880.In 1838 he married Miss Deadman, who was born in 1822, same month and day of the month as her husband.Her death occurred in 1885.They had ten children, five of whom are living.At the age of thirteen our subject became an apprentice in a printing office, remaining there one year.In 1882 he obtained a position as traveling salesman for Hill, Woodcock & Co., of Nashville, a family grocery and confectionery house.In 1884 he established a grocery store in Carthage.In 1885 he embarked in his present business, in which he has been quite successful.He has some fine horses, buggies and all necessary vehicles, harnesses, etc., suitable for such trade.He is a young man of enterprise and determination, genial manners, and is a general favorite.

 

††††† Col. John A. Fite, Judge of the Fifth Judicial Circuit, Tennessee, was born in 1832, in De Kalb County, a son of Jacob and Matilda (Baird) Fite.The father, of German origin, was born in North Carolina, and with his father came to Davidson County, then Smith County, and finally settled in De Kalb County, where he passed his days.Jacob married there, and was merchant at Alexandria as well as farmer.In 1846 he moved to near Lebanon, and died at the age of eighty-three.The mother, born in Hickman County, Tenn., died in 1876.Four of their eleven children are Dorcas R., widow of Leonard Scott; John A.; Dr. J. G. of Lebanon, and Edwin C.When fourteen years old our subject went to Wilson County and was educated in the university at Lebanon, and at Irving College.He began studying law at twenty-two, and in 1855 graduated from the law department of Cumberland University, and immediately began practice with his brother at Carthage.His brother being elected circuit judge in 1858, he formed partnership with Hon. W. D. De Witt, now at Chattanooga.In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Seventh Tennessee Regiment, Mooreís Guards, and was elected captain and fought in Seven Pines; promoted major in 1862; he was in Mechanicsville (where he had two ribs broken), Chancellorsville, Cedar Run (where he received a wound in the leg), Fredericksburg and Gettysburg (here he was captured and taken to Fort McHenry), thence to Fort Delaware, thence to Johnsonís Island, where he was retained for nineteen months, and paroled in February, 1865, but remained in North Carolina.After the war he resumed practice with his brother, and in 1871 was appointed clerk and master of chancery court holding it for over six years.In 1878 he and H. M. Hale became partners, and in 1882 he was elected to the State Legislature to fill an unexpired term, and elected to his present position in 1886.December 29, 1866, he married Mary M., daughter of Leroy H. and Eliza Mitchell, and born in Smith County in 1841.Their two children are Bettie and Mattie.He is a Master Mason and he and Mrs. Fite are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.For years he has been one of the leading lawyers of Smith County bar.

 

†††††† R. D. Flippen, farmer, was born in Smith County in 1827, the son of Roger D. and Elizabeth (Dyson) Flippen.The father, of English origin, was born in Virginia, and in his youth came to Tennessee with his father Armstead, who was one of the first settlers in the county.The father lived in Smith County at the time of his marriage and died in 1827.The mother, of Welsh descent, was born in Virginia and died here at the age of thirty years.Our subject, one of six children, two living, and left an orphan, lived with his grandfather, Mark Dyson, until about fifteen years old.He then attended school a few years at Rome, Tenn.He then began farming for himself.In 1847 he enlisted in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Regiment Infantry, Capt. Goodall:he was soon appointed orderly sergeant.April 18, 1850, he married Tennessee, daughter of Samuel and Sallie High, and born in Smith County in 1831.Their six children are Samuel H., Elizabeth, wife of S. F. Ward; Luther B.; Virginia, wife of W. E. Myer; Tebitha and Maud.After his marriage he began an overland journey to California, being ninety days on the road and sixty daysí actual travel.He mined partly, and dealt in mine supplies by pack-mules, going out in the summer to buy stock, which trips were full of Indian adventure, and returning to camp in winter; but butchering occupied his attention the last four years.Returning in 1857 he soon settled on his present farm.Enlisting in Capt. Sanderís Independent Company, and elected second lieutenant he fought the Northern forces at Fishing Creek and Shiloh, and at the reorganization of the army returned home.Mrs. Flippen died in 1873, and November 25, 1874, he married Mrs. Annie McFarland, born in Rutherford County in 1840.In 1865 he bought 383 acres, but as relief from growing cares he disposed of 230 in 1884.Formerly a Whig he has been a Democrat for years.He is a Mason.His wife and three daughters are members of the Baptist Church, and his son, Samuel H., a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

††††† G. C. Flippin, a prominent contractor and builder, was born in Smith County in 1822.He is a son of Abner A. and Eliza (Hobson) Flippin.The father was born in 1799 in Cumberland County, Va., where his wife was also born in 1806.After marriage in 1824 he came to Smith County where, in 1836, he was elected captain of State militia, serving in that capacity until 1845, when the law abolished the militia.He was an influential and highly respected man; his death occurred in 1860.His wife, who was the mother of thirteen children, died in 1877 in De Kalb County, Tenn.Our subject received a liberal education in the common schools of his native county.In 1849 he went to Nashville, where he was engaged as clerk in a city hotel, for about six years, after which he returned to Smith County, Seventeenth District, where he now resides and owns 50 acres of land.In 1856 he married Parthenia, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Heelmantoller, who was born in the county in 1828.To this union have been born Robert H., Candace P., Tenn F., Bettie G., John A. and Joseph C.At the outbreak of the war in December, 1861, Mr. Flippin entered the Confederate Army.He enlisted in Company C, Fifty-fifth Tennessee Infantry Volunteers.On December 25 he was promoted to regimental commissary, acting at same time for the brigade.He took part in the battle of Shiloh; he was honorably discharged in May, 1862. He is connected with the K. of H., and is one of the most esteemed, honorable and worthy citizens of the county.Mr. Flippin and wife are active and earnest members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

†††††† W. W. Ford, clerk of circuit court, was born in 1854 in Smith County.He is the son of Christopher C. and Martha (Nichols) Ford.The father was born in Smith County, Tenn., about 1821, and the grandfather, Zach, Ford, was one of the earliest settlers of the county.The father married in Smith County and is the owner of 124 acres in the Sixteenth District.He has been magistrate for over thirty years.The mother was born in Smith County in 1827.One of ten children, our subject, lived at home until twenty years old, and was educated at Snow Creek Academy.In 1875 he and his brother established a general store at Snow Creek, now Elmwood, and after eighteen months began speculating.In 1880 he was elected as register to fill out an unexpired term of a deceased incumbent.In August, 1886, he was elected to his present office.He married, February 28, 1883, Gertrude, daughter of Hugh and Martha Bradley, and born at Dixon Springs, Smith County; their only child is Nannie L.In politics he is a Democrat, and he and his wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

††††† Col. A. E. Garrett, attorney at law of Carthage, was born in 1830, in Overton (now Pickett) County, a son of Stephen and Sarah (Flowers) Garrett.The father was of English-French descent, born in Buckingham County, Va., in 1802.When ten years of age he immigrated with his father, Elijah Garrett, to what is now Pickett County.He was one of the first white settlers of that portion of Tennessee.It was here that Stephen married, and died in 1860.His wife was of Irish-French descent, born in 1806 in Virginia, and died in 1882.The Flowers family is noted for longevity.Mrs. Garrettís parents lived to the age of eighty-three and ninety-six respectively.Her brother reached the unusual age of one hundred and six, and there are now five sisters living, the eldest one being ninety--four, the youngest seventy-two.Our subject is the only surviving child of his fatherís family.He remained on the farm until his majority, assisting his parents, who were in limited circumstances.†† He had inferior educational advantages, but was eager to gain information.He accumulated as much money as possible, and entered the Poplar Spring Academy in Kentucky, attending several sessions.About this time he also commenced the study of law, under guidance of W. W. Goodpasture.In March, 1852, he married Miss Louisa Greer, who was born in Barren County, Ky.Four children of this union are living; Clarence, Isaac, Belle (wife of Jas. Barkett) and Louisa.After marriage they located on the old home place, taking many of the cares and responsibilities of the farm.After the fatherís death the mother made her home with him until she, too, was called away.In 1853 our subject was admitted to the bar.He was a stanch Whig previous to the war and a Democrat afterward, yet a strong Union man.In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, First Kentucky Cavalry.At the expiration of eighteen months he was authorized to raise a regiment.It was the First Tennessee Mounted Infantry; he was lieutenant-colonel and commander.For fourteen months he remained in Tennessee.At Grandville, Jackson County, July 1, 1864, one of his men attempted assassination; Col. Garrett was shot through the bowels and right hip, the right limb being paralyzed below the knee.His family located in Carthage in 1863, and in 1865 he was elected to the Legislature.In 1868 he became a candidate for Congress, his opponent being Wm. Stokes.Col. Garrett was elected by a complimentary and large majority, but Gov. Brownlow ruled that 2,700 votes should not be counted, consequently Mr. Stokes got the seat.In 1870 he became candidate, and our subject received a majority of 6,500.In 1876 the Colonel lost his wife, and the following year he married Mrs. Addie McDonald, nee Hayes, a daughter of Addison Hayes of Nashville, Tenn.Mrs. Garrettís brother, A. Hayes, Jr., married ex-President Jefferson Davisí daughter.Mrs. Garrett was born at Holly Springs, Miss.Her first husband was Col. McDonald, who was killed in Memphis during the war.To this union there was one child, Charles, who is head bookkeeper for the Standard Oil Company, Nashville.To Colonel and Mrs. Garrett have been born three children:Addison, Ellison and Addie.Mrs. Garrett is an elegant, accomplished woman, and member of the Episcopal Church.The Colonel belongs to the Missionary Baptist; he is also a Royal Arch Mason.He is a self-made man in the true sense of the word, an able and prominent lawyer, and one of the most worthy and respected citizens of the county.

 

†††††† G. H. Glass, a well known farmer and brick-mason, was born in 1822 in Nelson County, Va.He is one of nine children born to Thomas and Sophia (Dameron) Glass.The father was born in 1783, in Halifax County, Va.In 1827 he moved to Kanawha County, W. Va., where he remained until death in 1863.He was a shoemaker by occupation.His wife was born in 1787, and departed life in 1822, when G. H. was born.Our subject received a good practical education in the common schools of his native county, and located in Smith County in 1840.In 1844 he was wedded to Eliza A., daughter of Moses B. and Nancy Reeves, who was a native of the county, born in 1827.In 1880 Mr. Glass was census taker of the Fourteenth District, and in 1882 he was elected by a most complimentary majority as justice of the peace, for the same district, and has given perfect satisfaction.He was one of a committeeof five on the new courthouse, and superintendent of the construction of the new asylum.He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Henry Clay, in 1844; is also a Knight Templar in the Masonic order.Mr. Glass has been very prosperous, and is a judicious manager and honorable man.He owns 135 acres of good land, highly cultivated, well fenced, and with first-class buildings on the place.There still remains on the farm a house which was erected in 1822, and was at that time considered one of the finest places in the section.

 

†††††† W. D. Gold, clerk and master of chancery court, editor of The Record, and lawyer, was born in Smith County in 1847.He is son of Pleasant and Constance (Gwaltney) Gold.The father, of English origin, was born in 1806, in Culpeper County, Va., and when fourteen he came to Wilson County, Tenn., with a sickly brother and four or five small sisters to care for, orphans.Here he was largely engaged in sawing lumber by whip-saw, and rafting it down to Nashville.In 1844 he bought a farm near Gordonsville, and from 1856 to 1870 he with his brother was merchandising, and speculating in tobacco a few years after.He died in 1876.The mother, born in 1812 in Smith County, is still living with her two younger sons.Our subject, one of seven children, graduated at New Middleton College (co-educational) in 1870.He taught five monthsí school in his 1869 vacation, and after graduating was principal of Liberty Masonic Academy, Tennessee, for twenty-five months.In 1873 he began the study of law under Hon. W. S. De Witt, Carthage, now of Chattanooga.Admitted to the bar the same year, he acquired a reputation for accuracy in chancery court proceedings.He devoted his entire time to practice until appointed clerk and master of chancery court by Judge Crowley in 1877, since which he has held office.He began his editorship in 1883.The Record is now one of the newsiest local papers in the State, with a weekly issue of 1,344 copies, and constantly increasing subscriptions, was practically a dead paper when he took it, issuing 600 copies free with no subscription list.Printed entirely at home, it now receives outside news by telegraph, and in its politics conservative and Democratic.In April, 1876, he married Willie Cullom, daughter of Mrs. V. A. Cullom, and born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1852.They have four children:William I., Marie, Virginia N. and Leslie J.Mr. Gold is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, while his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

†††††† John Harrison Gordon, a prominent merchant of Stonewall, was born in 1852, one mile north of Gordonsville, in Smith County,He is one of six living children of a family of ten born to Matthew A. L. and Lucy Lee (Ward) Gordon.Both parents were natives of Smith County.The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1828.He was a prosperous farmer.The principal portion of his life was spent tilling the soil.In 1853 Matthew took his family to Mississippi, where he had purchased a farm in Leake County.He remained there until the close of the was, when he returned to Tennessee and bought a tract of land, a portion of his grandfather's estate, where he died in 1876.The mother was born in 1830, and departed this life in 1879.The subject of our sketch received his education in the common schools of his native county, remaining with his parents until his majority, when he went to Californina.For two and a half years he engaged in farming and trading in the San Joaquin Valley.At the expiration of that time he returned to his father's place and carried on the same business.In 1878 he and his uncle, F. M. Ward, bought the mercantile stock of Perkins, Durham & Co.the firm of Ward & Gordon continued about three years, when J. A. Ward, a son, bought Mr. Gordon's interest in the concern.During the following year he traded extensively, and made a prospecting tour to Arkansas.After his return he purchased some stock and F. M. Ward's farm, which included the ferry and blacksmith shop.He also handles a great deal of tobacco, and with more success than the majority of traders.He is an enterprising, genial and well respected young business man, who by shrewdness and judicious management has accumulated considerable means, all since his return from California and by his own efforts.He is a member of the Methodist Church and a Democrat; gave his first presidential vote for Samuel J. Tilden in 1876.In 1880 he wedded Julia Hatten, daughter of Squire Henry and Araminta Perkins.Mrs Gordon was born about one mile north of Stonewall in 1862.Four children were born to this union, two of whom are living:Elzie Lee and Herschel P.Henry A., the second child, was born April 3, 1882; died May 2, same year.An infant, now deceased, was the last born.Mrs. Gordon is an estimable lady and consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

††††††† A. B. Hall, a prosperous farmer of the Seventh District, was born in Smith County in 1833.He is third of a family of seven children born to James and Annie (Deadman) Hall.The father died when our subject was about five years old.The mother was born in Smith County about 1812, and is sitll living.Her father, John Deadman, was a native of North Carolina, and came to Tennessee at an early day.He was one of the first settlers of Smith County, where he died in 1860 at the age of eighty-two.His wife lived to the unusual age of one hundred years.The subject of this sketch received a rather limited education in his native county.Bereft of his father at a tender age, he had to work hard and support his mother.In 1864 he married Louisa, daughter of Dr. Washington and Sallie Irwin.Mrs. Hall was born in 1843.To this union nine children were born:Lassie D., now Mrs. Lawrence; Mrs. Sallie W. (Hall) Davis, M. Bettie, James W.,Ophelia B., Mattie, William P., Thomas P., and Daisy May.For several years Mr. Hall rented and engaged in agriculture.Meeting with success, he was soon enabled to purchase ninety acres, to which he has since added 135 more acres, all of which are well cultivated and improved.The farm is situated on the Alexander road, five miles from the town.Mr. Hall is an honest, industrious and highly respected man, and has accumulated his property by his own labor and good management.He is a life-long and stanch Democrat.Mr. and Mrs. Hall and three children are earnest members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

††††††† Henry E. Hart, physician, was born at Carthage, Smith County, in 1852, one of four children of H. W. and Laura (Young) Hart.The father, of Scotch origin, was born in the same place in 1822, and graduated in Lebanon Law School in 1847; an influential farmer, owning 214 acres of land.He served in the Mexican war under Gen. Taylor; served two years in the Legislature from 1852 and as county clerk four years from 1854.In 1861 he enlisted in an independent Confederate company of Tennessee volunteers, and was a captain during his service.Since 1873 he has resided in Nashville.The mother, of Irish origin, was born in Smith County in 1831, and is still living.Educated in St. Mary's College, Kentucky, our subject, in 1878 entered the medical department of Vanderbilt University, and graduated in 1882, and has successfully practiced ever since.In 1874 he married Sally, daughter of Dr. J. G. and Kitty Goodpasture.They have two children: Lacy and Alexander S.In politics he is a Democrat, and is a member of the F. & A. M. fraternity; in belief, a Methodist, of which church his wife is a member.

 

††††††† B. A. James, a merchant, farmer and livery man, of Gordonsville, was born in Smith County in 1831.He is the son of J. R. and Martha (Allison) James.His father was born in 1810, in Montgomery County, N. C., and was one of eight children born to Bartlett and Sarah (Rollins) James.The father (grandfather of our subject) was born in Virginia in 1780; he was a farmer by occupation, and moved to Montgomery County, N. C., when a young man.In 1823 he came to the Fifteenth District of Smith County, Tenn., and purchased 640 acres of land.He died in 1845.His wife was born about 1778, in Virginia, and died in 1855.J. R. James was educated in the common schools of Smith County and the Shady Grove Academy, near Gordonsville, Dr. F. H. Gordon being the principal.In 1830 he wedded Martha, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Allison, who was born in 1815, in Jackson County, Tenn., and died in 1871.Their children are Bartlett A., Sarah E., William N., Robert A., Martha G., John F., Eliza, Callie C., Joseph H., Mary J., and Henry Clay.In 1843 Mr. James was elected justice of the peace of his district, and served in that capacity twenty-six years.In 1845 he became chairman of the county court, holding the office about twelve years.In 1868 he became tax collector; after two years he resigned and was elected to the State Legislature.He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Andrew Jackson in 1832.He owns 330 acres of land, highly cultivated, and with all modern improvements, and raises all kinds of stock.He is a worthy, respected citizen.He and the family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.The subject of this sketch was educated common schools of his native county.At nineteen years of age he began his career as an agriculturist.Twenty-six years later he embarked in merchandising at Gordonsville, in which he is still engaged, his partners being the Gold Bros.They have a substantial and extensive trade, being amoung the leading merchants of the county.In 1850 Mr. James married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of W. and Martha Dowell, who was born in Smith County in 1830.In 1861 our subject organized Company G. Fifty-fifth Tennessee Volunteers.He was elected captain, and served in that capacity until after the battle of Shiloh, when he was discharged and returned home.He was elected justice of the peace in 1868, and has held the office continuously since that time, having made an efficient and satisfactory officer.He is a stanch Democrat; no man in the community is better or more favorably known.

 

††††††† Dr. J. L. Jones was born in De Kalb County, Tenn., in 1849, one of ten children of Fredrick and Maria (Squires) Jones.The father, of Scottish origin, and a tailor by occupation, was born in Surry County, Va., and came to Smith County in 1837.After working at his trade until 1855, he engaged in the hotel business at Nashville - the Rock City Sun.From 1859 to 1870 he lived on his farm, of 200 acres, in Bradford County, but returned to Nashville, where he died in 1881.The mother was born in Smith County in 1811, and died at Nashville in 1873.Our subject was educated at Elmwood Academy, Bedford County, and at Union University, of Murfreesboro; graduated from the medical departement of Nashville University in 1872, since when he has had an extensive practice.In 1874 he married Mary W., daughter of Joel M. and Martha L. Nichols, and was born in Smith County in 1854.Their two children are Mattie I. and Pearl.In politics he is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

††††††† W. T. Jones, a prominent agriculturist of the Seventh District, was born February 24, 1843, in Smith County, the sixth of eight children born to Isaac and Elizabeth (Malone) Jones.The father was of English-German descent, born in North Carolina in 1813, and came to Smith County about 1820.He served as magistrate of his district for fourteen years; he was an efficient officer and highly respected.His death occurred about 1881.The mother was of Scotch-Irish ancestry.Our subject received a liberal education in the academy at Alexandria.He assisted his father on the farm until his seventeenth year.At the outbreak of the war he enlisted in Company F, of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee Infantry.He took active part in all engagements into which his regiment was drawn, and of which he was sergeant.He was captured at the battle of Missionary Ridge, and retained as prisoner at Rock Island sixteen months, regaining his liberty but a short while before the close of the war.November 1, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine E. Patterson, who was born December 1, 1845.To this union nine children have been born:J. Sidney, Edgar D., Frederick W., Willard S., Shela Wilson, Kate and Ula; Ada and Ora, deceased.After the war Mr. Jones began life a poor man.He rented and farmed.In 1868 he bought seventy-six acres near Alexandria. After buying and selling several times, he finally purchased the place upon which he now lives.It consists of about 210 acres of valuable and productive soil, situated on Hickman Creek, about six miles north of Alexandria.Mr. Jones is an industrious, energetic, honest man, respected by all.He is a life-long Democrat; cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley.Mr. and Mrs. Jones are active and exemplary members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

†††††† James B. Jones, one of the leading farmers and tobacco dealers of the Twelfth District, was born one mile from where he now resides, in 1833.He is the fourth of eight children born to Jefferson and Nancy (Haynes) Jones.The father was a native of Tennessee, born about 1804, a son of Banks Jones, an early pioneer of Smith County.Jefferson received a good common-school education, and spent nearly all of his life as a tiller of the soil.He was a man of ability and influence, and for several years a magistrate.He died in 1851.The mother was born in Sumner County, and departed this life June, 1884, at the age of about eighty-two.Both were members of the Missionary Baptist Church.Of their children, four are living.Our subjectís educational advantages were limited, as his parents were poor.He remained on the farm with his mother until 1861, when he married Miss Susan, daughter of John and Virginia Hughes.Mrs. Jones was born in Smith County, in May, 1846.Nine children have been born to them; those living are James F., William W., Nevada Lou, Cornelia, Susan, Virginia, and Thurman.Mr. Jones remained on the old homestead until 1880, when he purchased the farm upon which he now lives.It consists of 202 acres of land, well cultivated, with a fine and commodious dwelling.The place lies two and a quarter miles southwest of Dixon Springs.Our subject started in life a poor man, and has accumulated his possessions by industry and judicious management.He gives his children the best educational advantages, is charitable and honest.He and his wife are active and esteemed members of the Missionary Baptist Church.Mr. Jones is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Millard Fillmore in 1856.

 

†††††† W. L. Kemp, Jr., was born in Smith County in 1842, and is of a family of thirteen children born to Asa and Mary (Williams) Kemp.The father was born in 1823, in West Virginia, of English descent.He moved to North Carolina with his parents in 1833, and in 1840 came to Smith County, where he now resides.He is a prosperous farmer owning 220 acres of fine land.He is an influential and respected citizen.The mother was born in Smith County in 1827, and died in 1882.Our subject received a fair education in the schools of his native county.In 1861 he entered the Confederate Army, in William H. Hartís independent company Tennessee Infantry Volunteers.Soon after the organization he was elected orderly sergeant, and served in that capacity until 1863, when he was transferred to the command of Gen. John H. Morgan, cavalry brigade, when he was again elected to the same rank.He took an active part in the battles of Farmington and Corinth, Miss.; LaVergne, Stone River, Snow Hill, Milton, Dixon Springs and Greasy Creek, Ky.December, 1863, he was made prisoner and taken to Carthage, where he took the oath of allegiance and returned home.In 1864 he married Sarah T., daughter of William D. and Lucy H. McCawley, who was born in 1848, and died in 1869.Two years later, in 1871, Mr. Kemp was united to Mary A., daughter of William and Jane Hockette, who was born in 1855.To this union there are seven children:Claude E., Maud L., Eva S., Eddie M., Asa E., Sallie J. and Hettie L.In 1870 our subject was chosen to fill the unexpired term of eighteen months, of C. W. West, justice of the peace, of the Fifth District.August, 1871, he was elected by a large majority to the same office, which he held for six years, being re-elected at the end of the term.He was again called to fill out the unexpired term of E. J. Yeaman, deceased.In 1886 he was commissioned by Gov. William B. Bate as notary public, for four years.For seventeen years he has been one of the leading commercial men of the county.He was a heavy lumber dealer, and built two saw mills.In February, 1882 he had the misfortune to lose heavily by the rising of the Cumberland River, a large quantity of lumber being carried away by the water.He is now a member of the firm of Witt & Kemp.They have an extensive mercantile trade, and are among the most enterprising and successful merchants in the section.Mr. Kemp is a Democrat, and gave his first presidential vote for Horatio Seymour in 1868, and is also a member of the Masonic order.He is an earnest and respected communicant of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

†††††† Dr. Abram Hassell King, a practicing physician and surgeon of Chestnut Mound, was born in 1850, at Carthage, Smith County, Tenn.He is one of the two living children out of a family of eight, born to Abram H., Sr., and Mary T. King.The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1810, near Gallatin, Sumner Co., Tenn., where he was raised by his uncle, Jennet Hassel, as his parents both died when he was quite small.Until the age of twenty, he was employed in the laborious duties of farm life.He became dissatisfied in tilling the soil, and resolved to prepare himself for a physician.After hard study, and graduating at Cincinnati, he became the most popular, skillful, and financially successful practitioner in all of Smith County.After a long useful and prosperous life, he died in 1873, at Carthage.The mother was of French origin, born in 1818, near where Dixon Springs is now located.She is still living in Carthage, an esteemed Christian woman; her health is quite feeble.Our subject received his literary education at New Middleton.When twenty-three years of age, he went to Nashville, and attended Vanderbilt University one session.He then returned home and located a present place of residence.In 1881 he married Miss Sadie Duke (Rev. Green P. Jackson officiating), who was raised and educated by her grandfather, Blake Thackston.Mrs. King was born in 1858 in Sullivan Bend, of Cumberland River, Smith County.To this union three children came:John Howard, Joseph Robert and Brien Thackston.The late civil war having destroyed all his fatherís accumulation, Dr. King was compelled to borrow money to complete his medial education, consequently, in 1875, when he settled to begin the practice of his profession, he was deeply in debt.Since that time, so extensive and lucrative has been his practice, that he has cleared his debts, bought a fine farm of 120 acres at Chestnut Mound, another of 107 acres at Carthage, each well cultivated, and valuable.He has also built an elegant, modern residence, with all the necessary improvements and outside buildings, and an office at the Mound.He is one of the most prominent physicians and enterprising, worthy men in the section.He is a stanch Democrat, casting his first vote for Horace Greeley in 1872.

 

†††††† Dr. R. W. King, a leading practicing physician of Gordonsville, was born in Wilson County in 1849.He is one of the four living children of a family of eleven, born to Ira W. and Deborah (Brown) King.His father is of Scotch-Irish descent, born in North Carolina about 1819.When a boy he located in West Tennessee with his father.He is a Cumberland Presbyterian minister.In 1852 he settled in Smith County, and was elected trustee, which office he held about six years.He is now in the drug business in Alexandria.The mother was born in Wilson County in 1818 and died in November, 1874.The subject of this sketch was educated at the New Middleton Academy.He began the study of medicine in 1873.He attended the Vanderbilt University at Nashville during 1876/77.After his return home and remaining a short length of time, he went to Silver Springs, Wilson County, where he practiced about two years, then came to Gordonsville, where he has since had an extensive and lucrative practice.In 1879 he married Miss Mary, the daughter of John and Lucy Simpson.Mrs. King was born in Smith County in 1854.She is a sincere and respected member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.Dr. King is a Republican.He is a skillful and popular physician and widely esteemed citizen.

 

 

†††††† Elijah Haynie Knight, a physician and surgeon of the Eighth District of Smith County, was born in 1841 in the Sixteenth District, and is a son of Robert G. and Susan (Haynie) Knight.The father is of Scotch-English descent, born in 1811 in North Carolina.His parents died in his early childhood.At the age of eight years he came to Tennessee with his uncle, James High, and settled where Wm. Derickson now lives.Mr. Knight became a farmer and was quite prosperous.For many years he was thus engaged on the farm in the Sixteenth District now owned by William Gibbs.In 1858 he sold out and moved to Chestnut Mound where he now resides with his son, in the enjoyment of good health and pleasant old age.The mother is of English origin born in 1818 on Peyton Creek in Smith County.Of her family of seven children, five are still living.Mrs. Knight is highly esteemed by all who know her.Our subject received his literary education in the common schools of his native county.In the summer of 1958 he began the study of medicine in the office of his cousin, Dr. John P. Haynie, which he prosecuted until the breaking out of the civil war, when, in April, 1861, he joined Company B, Seventh Tennessee Regiment, Confederate service.He took part in the famous battles of Seven Pines, Gaines Mill, Ox Hill, South Mountain and Fredericksburg.At the latter place he was shot in the lung with a rifle ball, in consequence of which he was indefinitely furloughed.About eight months after his return home he was captured by Federal troops and taken to the prison at Gallatin, Tenn., where he was retained three months, at the expiration of which time broken down in health he took the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government and went home.While in the hospital at Charlottesville, Va., he attended a course of medical lectures, afterward devoting some two years to the study of the profession.He began to practice in 1866, at Chestnut Mound, where he had an extensive patronage.Physical disabilities have forced him to abandon active practice for the past two or three years. He engaged to a considerable extent in the raising of stock, and farming, in all of which he has been successful.He owns 350 acres of fine land on Caney Fork, and 110 acres of ridge soil.He is not only a skillful physician and surgeon, but also a first-class manager and financier.He is a Democrat and gave his first presidential vote for Horatio Seymour in 1868.He is a Master of Pekin Lodge, No. 563, Masonic order, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.In 1870 he was elected trustee of the county, serving one term of two years with entire satisfaction, and would, no doubt, have been re-elected had he not changed his place of residence to Putnam County, where he practiced four years.In 1872 the Doctor married Eliza, daughter of Robert E. and Jane (McKinley) Fain.Mrs. Knight is a native of Putnam County and was born in 1852.The fruits of this union are six children:Jeanne, Robert, Sam, Mabel, Tom and Frank.Mrs. Knight is an exemplary Christian and devout member of the Methodist Church South.

 

†††††† Michael Lancaster, an old resident and well-known farmer of the Ninth District, was born in Smith County, November 23, 1815, within one and a half miles of his present place of residence.He was the youngest of seven children born to Thomas and Frances (Lancaster) Lancaster.Both parents were natives of Virginia.The father, Thomas was born about six months after the death of his father, and fifteen days after he entered this world, his mother, too, passed away, and he was raised by his grandparents.In 1808 he moved to Kentucky.After participating in the war of 1812, under command of Col. Allen, he settled with his family in Smith County, where after many years of prosperity he died in 1855.Our subject received a fair education in the common schools of his native county.He was about ten years of age before he ever had a pair of boots or shoes, either in summer or winter.The first pair he had were made of cow's hide, and tanned in a trough.He inherited from his father a number of slaves and about 85,000 worth of property.The war, of course, liberated his negroes and desolated most of his land.He now owns 2000 acres, a part of which is located on Smith Fork, and Caney Fork.From 1851 to 1861 he served as postmaster, and gave great satisfaction.He was also justice of the peace for six years, and constable four years, and always made an efficient officer.He has never united with any denomination, but is a liberal contributor to all charitable, religious, or worthy purposes.††† He was a Whig previous to the war, and is now a Democrat.May 8, 1845, he wedded Miss Jane Kelly, with whom he had several children, only one living to maturity---Mary Frances, now Mrs. Kelly.Mrs. Lancaster died in 1855, and the following year he married Miss Rox Laney Cowen.Their union resulted in the birth of ten children:Michael, Thomas, James, and the deceased are William R., Sarah M., Ira C., J. W., Wade C., West and an infant.Mr. Lancaster is an industrious, honorable and esteemed man, and in comfortable circumstance; would have been in affluence had he not had the misfortune to have several security debts to settle.

†††††† John B. Luster, editor of the Carthage Mirror, and attorney at law was born in Sumner (now Trousdale) County, in 1837.He is one of three surviving children of William and Virginia (Bressie) Luster.The father was of English descent, born in 1806 in Buckingham County, Va.; came to Tennessee when a young man and located at Hartsville, where he remained until after the late war, when he moved to Alabama, where he died in 1886.He was a trader during the greatest portion of his business career.The mother was a Tennessean of Scotch-English origin.She was born in 1819, and died in 1853 at Hartsville.Our subject received a good common-school education.He worked on the farm until his seventeenth year, when he went to Nashville, and obtained a situation as clerk in a wholesale grocery house.Two years later he began the study of law, completing his course at the law school in Lebanon, Tenn.He was licensed to practice in the State in 1859; soon afterward he went to New Orleans, where he studied civil law and received his license in 1860.In 1861 he entered the Confederate Army and became quartermaster of a battalion organized by Col. J. G. Bennett, also second command organized by the same officer, in 1862, which became attached to Morgan's forces.He was engaged in battles at Shiloh and Farmington as aid to Gen. Ruggles.He was also in the battle of Hartsville, and numerous skirmishes.After the close of the war he located at Carthage, where he gave his attention to his profession in partnership with his father-in-law, James B. Moores.May 21, 1883, he established the Carthage Mirror which he has since so ably edited.He is a stanch Democrat; cast his first presidential vote for John C. Breckinridge.He is a member of the Masonic order, Carthage Lodge, No. 14.In 1861 he married Miss Moores, who was born in 1843, in Carthage.To this union have been born Berry, who is a resident of Texas; Percy J., who though only nineteen years of age, is a licensed minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is now filling an appointment in Williamson County, Tenn.Moores is sixteen years of age; he is assistant editor and foreman of the Carthage Mirror.Mrs. Luster is an esteemed and consistent member of the Methodist Church.

 

†††††† Thomas J. Mabry, a prominent agriculturalist of the First District, was born in 1841, in Overton (now called Clay County), Tenn.He is one of a family of nine children born to Thomas and Minnie (Creed) Mabry, both parents of Irish descent and natives of North Carolina and brought when small to Tennessee by their families.The father was born in 1805, and the mother in 1810.After their marriage they went to Illinois; two years later they returned to Overton County, settling on a farm where the mother died in 1883, leaving three children.The father departed this life in 1884 at his sonís home in Smith County.Our subject was educated partly in the common schools of his native county, and Tompkinsville, Ky.When eighteen years old, he entered the Confederate service, Company A, Eighth Tennessee Regiment, at Celina.At the reorganization of the company he became lieutenant, and served in that rank until the close of hostilities.He took an active and gallant part in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro and Chickamauga.He was with Johnson all the way to Atlanta, and in many skirmishes.At Perryville he received a rifle-ball shot in the arm, and at Peach Tree Creek, near Atlanta, June, 1864, he was wounded in the knee.He was honorably discharged in 1865 at Macon, Ga.He returned home and began farming on his fatherís place.In 1867 he married in Monroe County, Ky., Mary A. daughter of Hamilton and Freelove (Martin) Savage.Mrs. Mabry was born in Jackson (now Clay) County, Tenn., in 1843.The fruits of this union are ten children:Minnie Freelove; Sarah Rebecca; Willie Jeff; Hamilton Savage; Martha Bell; Davis Winfield; Jay; Mary Beulah and Ginla Cathaline.For several years Mr. Mabry lived in Clay County and in 1883 he moved to the farm he had previously bought in Smith County, which is one of the finest places in the vicinity; it contains 427 acres, well cultivated and highly improved.He has obtained his property and means by continued industry and careful management.He is a demitted member of the Masonic order.Celina Lodge, No. 398, and a stanch Democrat; his first presidential vote was given for Horatio Seymour in 1868.Mrs. Mabry and eldest daughter are members of the Christian Church.

 

††††††† Thomas A. McCall, a prominent citizen and farmer of the Thirteenth District, was born four miles southeast of Rome, August 25, 1841.The youngest and only living of two children born to Dr. John and Mary T. (Allen) McCall.The father was of Irish descent; born in North Carolina on November 6, 1803, a son of Alex McCall, who was a native of Ireland, and immigrated to America when a young man, soon locating in Stokes County, N. C.He was married to Mary Armstrong about 1803.He moved to Tennessee.After spending some time in Jackson, Sumner, Davidson and Wilson Counties, he finally settled in Lincoln County, where he passed the remainder of his life, dying in 1833.Four of his sons were prosperous and able physicians.Dr. John was raised in Smith County; educated in the common schools.He graduated in medicine at the Transylvania University in 1829, at Lexington, Ky., and immediately began to practice in Rome and that vicinity.For thirty years he was one of the most successful practitioners of the county.He was a man of intellect, literary accomplishments and keen judgment.He was a close observer and accurate reader of human nature.He died in 1884, on his farm near Rome.His wife was born in Trousdale County near Dixon Springs, February 23, 1818, and died in 1842, a member of the Presbyterian Church, and her husband of the Christian.Our subject was raised by his grandmother McCall, receiving his literary education at Rome, Franklin College, and Lebanon, completing his course at Bethany College, Va.In 1868 69, he attended the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, but did not enter upon the practice of his profession.In 1861 he enlisted in Company E, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army.He took part in the battles of Chickamauga, Drewryís Bluff, Va., and numerous severe skirmishes.He was captured at Perryville and retained four months.He was exchanged and rejoined his command in September, 1864.His attention has been always given to agricultural pursuits on his present farm, which contains 474 acres of land; it is located two miles south of Rome.He also owns sixty acres in Obion County, and 100 in Trousdale.He is a man of high cultivation and literary attainments, and devotes a great deal of time to reading and study.He was formerly a Whig, but affiliates with the Democratic party, although he has never cast a vote at a general election.He has been a faithful and consistent member of the Christian Church for nearly a quarter of a century.October 20, 1875, he married Miss Tobitha B., daughter of the eminent Dr. F. H. and Catherine C. Gordon.Mrs. McCall was born at the Old Clinton College farm, and educated partly in Smith County, and finished at the Cumberland University.

 

††††††† Mrs. Maria McClellan, who is an esteemed resident of the Second District, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1838.She is one of thirteen children born to Dr. Thomas and Elizabeth (Clay) Norman.The father was of Scotch descent, born in Davidson County, Tenn., in 1801.He was an able physician and surgeon.His residence was in Lebanon.For about forty years he was the leading practicing physician of Wilson County.He died in 1876.His wife was a native of Smith County, born in 1814, and departed this life in 1857.The subject of this sketch received a liberal education at the Abbey Institute, of Lebanon, and a college at McMinnville.February 22, 1865, she married D. S. McClellan, who was the son of Samson and Louisa (Cornwell) McClellan.He was born October 24, 1833, in Smith County, and educated at Erwing College, Warren County, and Cumberland University at Lebanon.At the outbreak of the late war he enlisted in Capt. Hartís company, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry.He took an active and gallant part in the battle of Shiloh.In 1864 he was honorably discharged on account of disability.After marriage he located in the Second District, where he was one of the most prosperous farmers in the section.He owned 500 acres of productive soil.He was by trade a mechanic, and in connection with his farm operated a saw-mill, and was an extensive lumber dealer, also dealt in grain, shipping immense quantities of it to Nashville.He was a stanch Democrat, and a highly esteemed, honorable man.He never united with any church, but was a Christian, and died in the belief of a reward hereafter.His death occurred May 7, 1882.Mrs. McClellan is a intelligent, estimable woman, and held in the highest respect by the community.She is an exemplary member of the Presbyterian Church.

 

††††††† S. S. McDonald, a prominent agriculturist of Smith County, was born in 1828 near Granville, Jackson (now Putman) Co., Tenn.He is one of a family of eight children, born to James P. and Susan (Edleman) McDonald.The father is of Irish descent and was born in 1809 in Jackson County.He was raised in comfort and without any knowledge of work, despite which fact he was of an industrious, active temperament and labored most successfully in after years.He is now eighty years of age, an honorable and respected old gentleman.He lives on his own farm about ten miles east of Carthage.He married at the age of eighteen.Miss Edleman was of Dutch extraction, born in North Carolina about 1807 and died in 1875, leaving five children.Mr. McDonald was married the second time to Mrs. Evaline Bolton.The subject of this sketch received but a limited education in the common schools of Smith County.He remained with his parents until after his majority, when, with his fatherís assistance, he purchased the farm upon which he was born.In 1862 he sold the place.He enlisted in the confederate Army, Capt. McDonaldís company, Twenty-eighth Regiment.He was a first-class teamster and was appointed driver of a six-mule team, which capacity he served in for two years, when he became ill with typhoid fever while in Walker County, Ga., and was taken on to Cherokee County, Ala., and left five miles west of Alpine with a family, where he was sick for three months.He returned home and bought an interest in the farm with his father, upon which the latter is residing.Three years later S. S. sold his interest and invested in a place containing 297 acres, where he is now living. It is situated near sand shoals of Cumberland River, in Smith County.In 1870 he married Fanny, daughter of Robt. J. and Fanny (Cook) Glover, of same county.Mrs. McDonald was born in 1848 at place of marriage.This union resulted in the birth of five children:Alva Wright, Edna Winfried, Mattie Lelia, Willie Sydney, and Callie May, the first child died in infancy in 1872.Mr. McDonald returned from the war a poor man, but by continued industry and judicious management has succeeded in accumulating some very good property, and with his brother owns the ferry that crosses Caney Fork of Cumberland River.His farm is moderately well cultivated and improved.Previous to the war he was a Whig and is now a stanch Democrat.His first presidential vote was for Gen. Winfield Scott in 1852.He was at one time a member of the Grange as was also his wife.Mr. McDonald has not united with any denomination but favors the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; his wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

††††††† Ridley R. McDonald, a well known resident and native of Smith County (formerly Jackson County), was born in 1830 near the present line between the two above mentioned counties.He is a son of James Porter and Susan (Edleman) McDonald.The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1809 in Jackson County and is at present living at the head of Hurricane Creek.The mother was of Dutch origin, born in North Carolina in 1807 and departed this life in 1875.The subject of this sketch received a limited education in the common schools of his native county.In 1853 he began farming,, renting land for that purpose; about 1857 he was enabled to purchase a farm in Putman (now Smith) County, and remained on same about twenty-five years.He then bought his present place of residence, which is a farm of about 220 acres, situated on the Cumberland River.In 1853 he married Ruth, daughter of Robt. and Charity (Knight) Warren.Mrs. McDonald was born in 1837 on Caney Fork in Hill Bend.To their union eleven children were born, of whom seven are living:Leonard H., Lou, Landen A., Alfred A., Minoa Bostick, Bebie and Sidney.In 1863 Mr. McDonald enlisted in the Confederate Army, at Chestnut Mound, in the Twenty-eighth Tennessee.He was in active service about ten months, when he was honorably discharged at Shelbyville, Tenn., at which time he was a cavalier.He never participated in an engagement.He is a Democrat, previous to the war was a Whig and voted first time for Gen. Winfield Scott.Mr. McDonald is a self-made and highly respected man.By hard work, both day and night, he has become the possessor of a 300-acre farm, which is well cultivated and productive.His wife, and the eldest five children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

††††††† John McDonald, a respected and well known farmer of the Eighth District of Smith County, was born in 1837, in Jackson (now Smith) County, Tenn.He is a son of James P. and Susan (Edleman) McDonald. The father, who is still living, is of Scotch-Irish extraction, born in 1809, in Jackson County, Tenn.He is a farmer by occupation; has been twice married; the last wife was Mrs. Evaline Bolton.The mother of our subject was of Dutch descent, born in North Carolina in 1807, and died in 1875, leaving five children.John McDonald received but a limited education in the common schools of his native county.He remained beneath the paternal roof until about twenty-seven years of age.In 1864 he married Martha Washington, daughter of Robert and Fanny Glover, who was born in 1839, at the place where their marriage occurred.This union resulted in the birth of seven children:Leona C., wife of G. D. Saddler; Ada, George A., Sion B., Lassie and Calvin P.; the fourth born, Fannie, deceased.Soon after marriage Mr. McDonald settled on a portion of the homestead, and since that time purchased the interests of the brothers and sisters, now owning the entire farm, which consists of 240 acres.He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862, in the Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Capt. Trousdaleís company.By the discharge of a gun in the hands of a careless party Mr. McDonald had his right forefinger shot off while on his way to enter the army.He was delayed by the accident until the following year, when he was elected second lieutenant of Capt. McDonaldís company, in which capacity he served till the fall of 1863, when he was sent home as a recruiting officer.He was cut off from the Southern Army by the Federal troops, whose headquarters were at McMinnville.He was not again able to join the Confederates.He became a loyal citizen in the latter part of the same year.He was a Whig previous to the war, casting his first presidential vote in 1860; he is now a Democrat.He is an honest, industrious and enterprising man.By his own efforts he has become possessed of the old homestead, which is in a good state of cultivation and improvement.He and the eldest two sons are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and George is only waiting for an opportunity to join.Mrs. McDonald is connected with the Methodist Church.

 

††††††† Mrs. Julia G. McDonald, who is managing one of the best private boarding-houses in Carthage, was born in Union County, Ky., in 1817.Her parents were Abner and Charlotte (James) Davis.The father was also a native of Union County, a merchant and a farmer by occupation and a prominent politician.He represented his district in the State Senate one term.He died in 1880, at nearly eighty years of age. His wife was born in Davidson County, Tenn., and died in Kentucky in 1817, when our subject was but eighteen days old.She was raised by her grandfather, Thomas James, with whom she remained until her marriage in 1835.She wedded Edmond L. Powell, a native of Smith County, born in 1811, by whom she had four children.The only surviving one is James L., who resides in Nashville.Mr. And Mrs. Powell settled in Davidson County, where he owned about 250 acres of fine land.He died in 1841, and in 1846 Mrs. Powell married Col. Henry B. McDonald, who was born in 1793, in Chester District, South Carolina.He was a soldier in the war of 1812; was also in the battle of New Orleans, with Gen. Jackson.He settled in Smith County on a farm; about 1850 moved to Carthage, where he engaged in the practice of his profession----Law.By this union Mrs. McDonald became the mother of four children, three of whom are living:Mary, wife of Col. Thomas Waters; Julia D., wife of John B. Robinson, a lawyer of Smithville, and David N., a graduate of West Point and second lieutenant in the regular army.Previous to his marriage with our subject Col. McDonald was a widower.Of his first union there are five children:Darthula, widow of Matthew McKinley; Melvina, wife of Dr. Lemons, of Texas; James, a resident of Anderson, Tex; Dr. Henry C., of Carthage, and William H. H., a lawyer and professor.The Colonel died in 1872.†† He was an honorable, respected man, and one of Smith Countyís most distinguished citizens.Mrs. McDonald, since the war, has been engaged in keeping a boarding house, one of the best and most extensively patronized in the section.She is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and one of the most estimable and best known ladies in the county.

 

††††††† James E. Newbell, a well know agriculturist of the Seventh District, was born September 23, 1849, in Smith County.He is the third of five children born to Edman and Louisa (Dougherty) Newbell.Both parents were natives of Smith County.The father was born in 1814, was of English descent and a son of William Newbell.Edman was a clerk of the Missionary Baptist Church for many years.He was a man of extensive knowledge and cultivation, and a prosperous farmer, one of the most substantial and respected citizens in that section.His death occurred in 1870.The mother was born about 1827, also of English origin, and is still living with her sons.Our subject was educated in the common schools of his native county.Since his fatherís decease he and his brothers have been farming on their motherís place, which consists of 300 acres of fertile and valuable land.Mr. Newbell receives one-fourth of the proceeds of the farm.He has been an exemplary member of the Missionary Baptist Church since early manhood.He is a stanch Democrat and one of the most enterprising and esteemed residents of the district.

 

††††† Henry Petty, merchant, liverymen, undertaker and hotel proprietor, was born in 1841, four miles south of Chestnut Mound, and is one of ten children (five dead) of Stephen and Sarah (Carr) Petty.The father, Irish inorigin, was born in 1811 in Smith County, and the mother, of the same descent, was born in 1815 in Putnam County.The father, a farmer and prominent justice of the peace, died in the fall of 1885.The mother died in 1865 at the place where our subject was born and reared.Leaving home at the age of twenty-eight years, he became a clerk for S. H. Smith of Laurel Hill, Tenn., in general merchandise, and sixteen months later they went into partnership at Chestnut Mound.After 1874 Mr. Petty managed the business himself until he added trading in tobacco in 1877, when he added livery and feed stables and hotel-keeping.The undertakerís department he added in 1883.Besides these, he rented out two farms of twenty-five and 250 acres.In 1874 he married Harriett, daughter of A. M. and Elizabeth (Farmer) Betty, born in 1840.Their three children are Stephen A., Martha E. and Isaac S.Mr. Pettyís first salary was $12.50 per month, and now, besides his four branches of business, owns 275 acres (100 acres from his father).He is a Democrat, a demitted member of the F. & A. M. fraternity, and h and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

†††††† S. M. Phelps, superintendent of the county poor, is a native of Davidson County, Tenn., born in1831.His parents were Silas and Margret (Rigely) Phelps.The father was born in North Carolina in 1794, and immigrated to Tennessee after marriage, locating three miles from Nashville.His death occurred in 1869.His wife was born in Virginia, and died in 1860 at the age of sixty-five.They had thirteen children, our subject being the tenth.He remained with his parents until his eighteenth year.In 1849 he married Miss Martha, daughter of WilliamDowns, who was born in Davidson County in 1831.To this union there is one child - Margret Jane, wife of G. T. Henry.After marriage Mr. Phelps hired to drive a milk wagon near Nashville, and worked four years.In 1857 he moved to Smith County and became an overseer, also driving a milk wagon.When the war broke out in 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Seventh Tennessee Infantry.After twelve months of faithful service he was discharged on account of disability.He was taken with the measles, and has since had poor health.In 1866 he was employed by the poor house committee to oversee the county poor, receiving $175 per annum, and board for himself and his family.A year later he became the superintendent, his salary being $250.Twenty-one years he has held this position, giving the utmost satisfaction.When he first took charge the institution was situated on Peytonís Creek.In 1871 the commissioners purchased a farm of 211 acres in the Twentieth District, and erected frame buildings at a cost of $3,500.In 1885 they built a large and commodious brick building with all modern improvements, heated by two hot air furnaces.The home is kept in first-class order, neat and comfortable.The inmates are treated with kindness and respect by our subject and his estimable Christian wife.The county has just cause for the pride she feels in possessing such an institution and superintendent for her homeless unfortunates.The largest number of inmates in twenty years, at one time in the home, was forty-seven.The average is seventeen.At present there are fourteen, only one male.Mr. Phelps has by industry and economy become the owner of 180 acres of valuable land two and a half miles from Carthage.He is a Royal Arch Mason, and his wife a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

††††† J. C. Prichard, a highly respectable farmer of the Ninth District, was born June 19, 1840, in Smith County, and the eldest of six children of William D. Rebecca (Malone) Prichard.Both parents were natives of Smith County, born in 1819 and 1822, respectively.The mother died May, 1865.The subject of this sketch received his education in his native county, and assisted his father on the farm until July, 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fourth Tennessee Infantry.He was sergeant of his company.He was wounded at the battle of Stone River, and captured at Missionary Ridge, taken to Rock Island and retained sixteen months; was then taken to Richmond, Va., and paroled.From there he went to South Carolina, and was with Gen. Johnstonís army at the time of surrender in 1865.The two following years he remained at home on the farm.February 20, 1867, he was wedded to Melissa, daughter of William and Elizabeth Lancaster.Mrs. Pritchard was born February 25, 1848.To this union seven children were born:Willie, John and James.Four died in infancy.Mrs. Pritchard is an estimable, intelligent woman, but has not yet connected herself with any church.Mr. Pritchard is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian.He is a Democrat and gave his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley.August, 1876, he was elected justice of the peace, which office he still holds tot he entire satisfaction of all.He owns 390 acres of highly cultivated and productive soil, situated on Smithís Fork, twelve miles from Alexandria, and thirteen miles southeast from Carthage; a portion of this property was inherited from his father-in-law.

 

†††††† Thomas Powell, a prosperous farmer of the Seventh District and member of one of the oldest families in the section, was born in Smith County in 1834.He was the third of six children born to David and Hannah (Baird) Prowell.His father was also a native of Smith County and died about 1852.The mother departed this life in 1847.His grandfather Prowell was a valiant soldier of the war of 1812, and took part in the battle of New Orleans.The maternal grandfather (Baird) was a native of North Carolina.He entered the matrimonial state when only sixteen years of age, and entirely without capital.He immigrated to Smith County in 1803, when the country was almost a wilderness, and filled with wild animals.He and his wife made their own clothing.Their shoes were often made from the skins of the beasts with which the woods abounded.Mr. Baird was a shrewd, close manager and became very wealthy; a large portion of his money was made by ginning cotton.The subject of our sketch went to live with his uncle, as both his parents died.He wedded Miss Minerva Waters, by whom he had five children:Bettie K., Ira and Iva (twins), Thomas Waters and William (deceased).For several years after marriage Mr. Prowell rented land and farmed until he was enabled to purchase 160 acres, where he resides, and to which he has since added thirty-seven acres.His farm lies five miles north of Alexander, on Brush Creek.It is in a good state of cultivation and well improved; all has been bought by his own industry, economy and judicious management, as he never inherited but $170 in his life.In 1862 he enlisted in Capt. Jamesí company, and served faithfully for fifteen months.On account of sickness he was honorably discharged in 1863 at Rome, Ga.He is independent in politics and votes for the best man, regardless of party.Mr. and Mrs. Prowell and daughter are sincere and esteemed members of the Presbyterian Church.

 

†††††† J. S. Prowell, a well known farmer of the Seventh District, was born about 1830 in Smith County.He is the second of six children born to David and Hannah (Baird) Prowell.The mother was a native of the Seventh District.The father was born about 1784 in North Carolina.He was an extensive and successful tobacco dealer.He sent the tobacco to New Orleans by boat, thus made twenty trips; twice he returned on foot.His father (grandfather of subject), Thomas Prowell, was a shoemaker by trade, at Cowpens, N. C.He was burned to death while at work on his bench in the fort when it was fired by the British Army.The maternal grandfather served in the war of 1812 under Gen. Jackson, and took part in the battle at New Orleans in 1815.The subject of our sketch received a fair education in the common schools of his native county.After his fatherís death he made his home with his uncle until his twenty-second years, when he began to teach writing, and traveled for three years.March 7, 1855, he wedded Miss Louisa Waters. To them were born five children:Martha J. (Mrs. Agee), William D., Dora J., Sarah C. and James W. (deceased).Mrs. Prowell died April 28, 1879.He was married the second time September 26, 1880, to Miss Sarah Sykes.After marriage Mr. Prowell moved to a farm in Crittenden County, Ky., which he had previously purchased, but only remained there a few months and returned to Smith County, where he bought fifty acres, which he sold afterward and then invested in 275 acres, where he now resides.It is in a fine state of cultivation and improvement, located six miles northeast of Alexandria, on Hickmanís Creek.With the exception of $110 inherited from his first wife, he has accumulated his possessions and means by his own efforts.Mr. Prowell witnessed the cars running on the first fifteen miles of railroad west of the Mississippi River.He is independent in politics, voting without regard to party.He and his family are consistent and respected members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

††††††† Wm. Robinson, a prosperous farmer and native of Smith County, was born about 1840 in Horse Shoe Bend, on the Cumberland River.He is one of two children born to John and Agnes (Olmstead) Robinson.The father is of English descent, born in the vicinity of where William first saw the light of day, in 1810.After his fatherís death and at the age of eighteen.John began farming with his brother Allen on the place which had been left to them.Fifteen years later he sold out to his brother and purchased a farm in the same neighborhood.He is now living with William.The mother was a native of Smith County and died when our subject was a small child, at the place where the grandfather departed this life.The subject of this sketch had no educational advantages, but through deficient in that respect he has, since the age of twenty-five, been successfully engaged in tilling the soil of the farm partially owned by his father.It is located about three and a half miles northeast of Carthage in the bend of the Cumberland River.Williamís marriage was a romantic affair.John and Lavinia Smith, of Chestnut Mound, had a fair daughter, Louise, with whom our subject was deeply in love.The parents objected to the suitor, so the young couple made their escape and were married in 1858.Mrs. Robinson was born in 1841 near Ancient Creek, in Putnam County, Tenn.Their union was blessed with two children, Agnes and John.Mr. Robinson enlisted in the Confederate service, Company H, and three months after reaching Camp Trousdale, was very ill, consequently was sent home.He began life with comparatively nothing and no education, but has managed, by industry, shrewdness and economy, to accumulate about 500 acres of good land.He is a stanch Democrat, cast his first presidential vote for James Buchanan in 1856.Mr. and Mrs. Robinson are respected and earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

††††††† Elijah Saulmon, a well known and respected farmer of the Seventeenth District, was born in Virginia in 1807.He was the second of nine children born to John and Martha (Kidd) Saulmon, both of whom were of English descent.The grandfather Saulmon was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.He was taken prisoner by the Indians, and held in captivity for seven years.The maternal great-grandmother (Miss Williamson) was kidnapped in England when ten years of age, and traded to the owner of a ship in lieu of passage to America.Our subject immigrated to East Tennessee in 1817, and in 1835 came to Smith County and settled on Mulherin Creek.Until his majority he was hired out by his father, consequently never had any educational advantages, but is possessed of a good practical mind and sufficient knowledge to transact all his business affairs.When he reached manhoodís estate he began life for himself without a penny.For three or four years he worked here and there wherever he could find employment.In 1831 he married Miss Martha Morris, by whom he had these children:Those living are Martha J. now Mrs. Buchanan, N. Caroline (wife of Mr. Davis), John W., Elizabeth, Francis T. (wife of Mr. Turner), and Thomas S.The deceased are Nancy, Mary A., Sarah G. and Minerva A.After marriage Mr. Saulmon rented land and farmed until he was enabled to purchase 100 acres, where he has since resided.He has added to his place and it contains 320 acres of valuable land on the Carthage and Alexander road, five miles from the latter place.He has been an industrious and honorable man all his life, and has the good-will and esteem of the community.He had the sad misfortune to lose his wife September 15, 1886, since which time his daughters have been house-keeping for him.The entire family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.Mr. Saulmon is a stanch Republican.

 

††††††† Robert L. Scruggs, a respected farmer of the Twenty-second District, was born in the Tenth District of Smith County in 1835.He was one of four children born to James A. and Leona (Dillard) Scruggs.The father was of Irish descent, born in Virginia in 1809.He came with his parents, when but a small child, to Tennessee.They located in Caney Fork, in the present Tenth District, where James was raised and educated.He was a farmer and mechanic; remained in the vicinity all his life.He married a native of Smith County (mother of subject) who was born in 1812 and died in 1838, leaving two children.The father then married Louisa Mitchum, by whom he had ten children, three of whom are dead.Mr. Scruggs died in 1882.The step-mother lives with her son, Rufus Lee.The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of his native county.When he attained his majority he left home, rented some land and entered upon his career as a farmer.At the outbreak of the late war he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Company C, Smithís Fourth Tennessee Cavalry at Carthage.He participated in the battles of Fishing Creek, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and many minor engagements.He was captured on Salt River, Kentucky, in 1862, and held prisoner about thirty days, when he was exchanged at Vicksburg, Miss.He was wounded in the right arm and left hand at Murfreesboro, May, 1864, at New Hope, Ga., while Johnston was falling back to Atlanta, he received a shot to the left arm, which resulted in that member becoming two inches shorter.He was so severely disabled that he was unfit for further duties.He remained in the hospital until the close of the war.After his return home he again resumed his agricultural employments.In 1872 he bought 220 acres in the Twenty-second District, on Caney Fork.In 1874 he wedded Delia A., daughter of William C. and Nancy (Williamson) Avant, in De Kalb County, Tenn.Their family consists of six children: Hattie, Orleana, William, Fanny, Pearl and John Fite.Mr. Scruggs started life with nothing, although he received $1,000 in Confederate money from his grandfather, at the beginning of the war.He has, by continued labor and enterprise, met with considerable success.He owns 250 acres in a good state of cultivation and well improved; also, in partnership with G. W. Cardwell, owns five miles of Lebanon Turnpike, and Trousdale Ferry.He is a stanch Democrat, first presidential vote being cast for James Buchanan in 1856.He is a member of Masonic order, Snow Creek Lodge, No. 346.Mr. and Mrs. Scruggs are earnest and respected members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

††††††† Dr. D. V. Seay, physician and surgeon, was born in Smith County, in 1831, one of nine children of Maj. W. W. and Ann (Stanfield) Seay.The father, of Scotch ancestry, was born in Virginia, in 1801, and was son of John Seay, a native of Halifax County, Va.He was one of the earliest settlers of Smith County, on Round Lick Creek, where he owns a large tract of land.Here the father was born, and spent most of his time as a farmer, and as a tobacco dealer for nearly forty years, shipping to New Orleans on flatboats twice a year.He was one of the most extensive farmers of this part of the State; a Knight Templar, a major of militia.He died in 1874.The mother was born in Virginia, in 1807, and died in 1872; both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.Educated chiefly at Clinton College, in 1853 our subject began the study of medicine under Dr. F. H. Gordon, and in 1855 and 1856 attended at Nashville University; practicing in Salisbury, Wilson County, until 1869, he removed to Rome intending to enter the drug business.†† His practice has been most successful.He owns about 270 acres of improved land, and since a resident of Rome has engaged in the drug business, and since 1872 added dry goods, etc.The stock is now worth about $3,500, and the firm named, Seay & Cado.In March, 1875, he married Julia, daughter of Robert H. and Amanda Cato.Their only child is Neva I.Mrs. Seay was born in Smith County in 1850, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.Formerly a Whig, he has since the war been a Democrat.He is a Mason.

 

†††††† Hon. W. R. Shaver was born in Sumner County, April 28, 1837.He was educated at the Three Forks Institute, Wilson County.He owns the celebrated Clinton College farm of 500 acres, which was in its day the alma mater of noted statesmen, and the finest college in Tennessee.He is president of both FarmersíAssociation of Smith County, and the Agricultural Mechanical Association of De Kalb, County.He is a stockholder and director of the Lebanon National Bank, and president and chief stockholder in the Lebanon and Trousdale Ferry Turnpike Company.His herd of thorough-bred registered shorthorn cattle, and other stock are of the best.February 3, 1861, he married Lou C. Newby of Smith county.Their three children were Lou D., Hettie L., and Annie L.The first two died in childhood, and the last in her sixteenth year, December 5, 1883, at Maple Hill Academy.In politics a Democrat, he was elected senator to the XLIV General Assembly, November, 1884.He has been Deputy Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, in Tennessee; Grand Lecturer of the same, and Grand Master of the Grand Council in Tennessee.At present he is Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge and Chapter of Virginia, and Tennessee, and of the General Grand Council of the State of Minnesota in Tennessee.Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.His father was born in 1813, in Sumner County, and was a farmer and carpenter.After his marriage, in 1839, and about two years in Missouri, he came back to Lebanon and bought 100 acres near there and while carpentering died in 1846, from lockjaw caused by running a nail in his foot.Mrs. Shaverís mother, Susan Sangford Shaver, was born in 1815 in Sumner County, Tenn., and died in 1881 in Benton County, Mo.,

 

†††††† J. F. Shaw, proprietor of a lumber and flouring-mill, was born in Wilson County, in 1842, and is one of ten children of Solomon R. and Elizabeth Shaw.The father, of Irish extraction, was born in North Carolina in 1803, and came at two years of age to Smith County.He was a farmer and miller, and in 1863 died in Wilson County from a wound received in Vicksburg.The mother, French in origin, was born in Smith County, in 1810, and is living with her children in Texas.Our subject began in the saw-mill business at twenty-two years of age, and two years later spent a year in Rutherford County, in the same occupation.He then returned to Wilson County, and in 1868 to Smith County, and engaged in his present business.In 1866 he married Mary, daughter of B. and J. Bufford, and born in Smith County, in 1847.Their five children are J. L., Phillip D., James (deceased), Jerry F. (deceased), and B. A.In 1862 Mr. Shaw enlisted in Company G, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and was at Red Mound, Fort Donelson and Spring Hill, and near Sparta disabled for about a year by an arm broken in an engagement, after which he returned home and resumed lumbering.He is a Democrat, once a Good Templar, a member of A. O. U. W., and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.He has been in the saw and flouring-mill business successfully for seventeen years.

 

†††††† B. F. C. Smith, a lawyer of considerable prominence, was born in 1832 in Smith County, Tenn.He is one of a family of ten children born to Josiah R. and Barthena (Cloud) Smith.The father was born in 1797 in Davidson County, Tenn.He was by occupation a farmer.About 1823 he was ordained a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and entered the Holsten Conference, Tennessee, remaining in the work four years.He then returned to the homestead, serving the church in capacity of local preacher until his death in 1882.His wife was born in Lee County, Va., and is still living.The subject of this sketch was educated at Irving College, Warren County.†† His legal knowledge was acquired by his own efforts.He began practicing about 1854 in the county and justiceís courts.†† In 1870 he was admitted to the bar, receiving his license from Judges Goodpasture & Fite and has been quite successful.In 1855 he was elected county surveyor, and served four years.In 1869 he was appointed by Gov. Senter commissioner of registration of voters.In 1870 he became clerk of the county court, holding that position four years.In 1853 he wedded Rhoda M., daughter of Dr. F. H. and Rhoda Gordon, who was born in Smith County in 1835, and died April 30, 1864.She bore two children who died in infancy.In 1873 Mr. Smith married Maggie T., daughter of John and Allie Wilson who was born in March, 1845.To this union three children have been born: B. F. C., Earnest C., and Maggie W.Mr. Smith is a Democrat, cast his first vote for Millard Fillmore in 1856.He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being a Knight Templar.In 1853 he was elected Secretary of his lodge, and five years later became the Master, which office he filled four years.He was one of the charter members of the New Middleton Royal Arch Chapter.He was Recorder about six years, and High Priest four years.He was commissioned Deputy Grand Master to organize a Council of Royal and Select Masters at Gainesboro.He is also a member of t!!he Baldwin Commandery of Knights Templar.He was appointed by the governor as delegate to the Western Water Ways Convention at New Orleans, in 1884; was also acting as deputy United State commissioner during the war about six months.

 

††††† Dr. Frank Swope, an eminent physician and surgeon of Carthage, was born December 31, 1850 in Overton County, a son of Maj. A. A. and Elizabeth (McKinney) Swope.The father is a German descent, born in 1819 in Cumberland County, Ky.His parents died when in his seventh year, and he made his home with his grandfather, George Swope, until his majority.His educational advantages were very limited, and his first work was in a coal mine.He soon was given a place in the office, devoting every spare moment to learning, as he had an ambition to cultivate his mind.Later he attended school, and then began teaching.At the age of twenty-four he began studying law.October, 1847, he was examined by ex-Gen. Wm. Campbell, and admitted to the bar.The same year he married Miss McKinney, a native of Overton, County, who died in 1861.In1865 he wedded Bethenia Douglass nee Crutcher.For several years he made Jamestown, Fentress County, his home; there he did his first practicing and became deputy clerk of the circuit court, and was afterward elected clerk but resigned to resume his professional practice.In 1850 he moved to Lingston, and the same year was appointed as major of the State militia.Overton County.In 1865 he came to Carthage, where he has since resided.He has always been a stanch Jeffersonian Democrat.In 1882 he was elected member of the State Legislature, and took an active part in settling the State debt.He is one of the oldest citizens, most able lawyers, and respected men in the county.He has always been of the higest moral standing never using liquor, and has ever been a leader in the temperance work.He has never sworn an oath.In 1882 he had the misfortune to lose his wife.Dr. Swope was fourteen years of age when his parents came to Carthage, and in that place he received his literary education in the Geneva Male and Female College, also at the Knoxville University of Tennessee, where he remained two years.At the age of twenty he began the study of medicine under tui!!tion of Dr. A. H. King of Carthage.In 1873 he entered the Louisville Medical College, attending two sessions.He located at Granville, Jackson County, November 1874.Three years later, owing to ill health, he returned to Carthage where he has since been actively engaged. December 18, 1884, he married Miss Mary Fuller, daughter of J. B. Love, who was born in Edgefield, Davidson County, Tenn., in 1862.They have one child, James B.Dr. Swope is one of the leading and most popular physicians of the county, and has an extensive and lucrative practice.He is in both private and professional life, highly esteemed.He is a stanch Democrat, giving his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley.

 

††††††† J. P. Temple, a physician and surgeon of the Fifteenth District, was born in 1856, in Smith County, Tenn.He is one of three children born to Dr. W. P. and Elizabeth (Davis) Temple.The father, was a native of Bedford County, born in 1828, and a physician and surgeon.In 1845 he began reading medicine with Dr. Preston Frazier, in his native county, and later entered the medical college at Nashville.He was a successful practitioner, and became very popular.His death occurred in 1859.The mother was born in 1830, in Smith County.She makes her home with her son, W. D., in Bedford County.Our subject received his literary education in the New Middleton Academy.In 1875 he commenced studying medicine with Dr. Lem Robinson, and a year later with Dr. Bridges of New Middleton; after ten months he entered the medical department of the Vanderbilt University at Nashville, and graduated in the class of 1878, since which time he has had an extensive practice.He is recognized as one of the most able and esteemed physicians in the county.In 1878 he wedded Nannie P., daughter of John S. and Betty Gill, a native of Smith County, born in 1858. Three children have blessed the union:Willie P., John G. and Jimmie D.The Doctor and his estimable wife, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.The Doctor is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Samuel J. Tilden in 1876.He is also prominently connected with the Masonic fraternity being a Royal Arch Mason.

 

†††††† George W. Thackston, a prosperous merchant of Chestnut Mound, was born in 1855 in Jackson County, Tenn.He is a son of Anthony W. and Elizabeth (Dillard) Thackston.Both parents were of English Descent, and natives of Smith County.The father was born about 1830.He was a cabinet-maker and carpenter, at which trade he worked until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted in the Confederate service.He was a brave and valiant soldier, and met his death in 1863, at Baton Rouge, where he was shot.The mother died when George was about six months old.He was raised and educated by his grandfather, Blake B. Thackston.When about fifteen years of age he began clerking in a store at Snow Creek.Eighteen months later he bought an interest, and entered into partnership with J. N. Ford, in a general merchandise business, in which he has since been engaged.The firm has once changed, Mr. Ford going out and Wm. C. Boye being admitted.By their fair dealing and courtesy to patrons, they have established a large and substantial trade, being among the leading merchants of the county.Mr. Thackston, who began life with the small amount of $2, now owns a two-thirds interest in a fine farm of 215 acres, on Snow Creek, and a half interest in a good stock and first-class merchandise.He is an energetic, industrious man, and greatly respected.He is a stanch Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Samuel J. Tilden in 1876.He is Master Mason of Snow Creek Lodge, No. 346.In 1879 he was united in marriage to Fanny B., daughter of Jesse and Martha (Vaden) Nichols.The ceremony took place at the resident of the brideís grandfather, B. J. Vaden, on Snow Creek, where Mrs. Thackston was born in 1862.To this union three children have been born:Lela N., Earnest W. and Jesse V.

 

††††††† Capt. R. R. West was born in Smith County in 1826.He is by occupation a farmer, and one of seven children of Jesse and Elizabeth (Harper) West.The father was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1795.With his parents, he came to Tennessee when a small boy, and located in Smith County, where for many years he was a prosperous farmer, and an extensive tobacco freighter as they were called in that day.He died in 1835.The mother was born about 1803 in Smith County, and died in 1866.Our subject received his education in the common schools of his native county.In 1849 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Drury and Jane Cornwell, who was born in 1832 in Smith County, and died in 1854, leaving two children:Isaac Newton and Julia.Mr. Westís second union was with Narcissus, daughter of Isaiah and Jane Pyron, who was born in 1882 in Jackson County, Tenn.Two children have been born to this union:William L. and Luther B.In 1846 our subject enlisted in Capt. W. B. Waltonís company, First Tennessee Regiment Infantry Volunteers; was in active service for twelve months, took part in the battles of Monterey, Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo.He was discharged in 1847.In 1861, when hostilities broke out between the North and South, Mr. West became one of the boys in gray.He organized Company H, Twenty-eighth Tennessee Regiment.He was elected captain, and did brave and gallant service at the battle of Fishing Creek, Ky., Shiloh and Chickamauga.Since the war he has been farming at his present place of residence, owning 414 acres of good land.He is also a tobacco dealer, shipping his produce to Nashville.He is highly respected for his honor and integrity.He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Zachary Taylor in 1848.

 

††††††† D. H. Witt, merchant, was born in 1849 in Smith County, Tenn., one of six children of D. A. and Elizabeth (Williams) Witt.The father was born in West Virginia and is a farmer and lawyer.Spending a short time in Macon County when a boy he came to Smith County, Tenn.Besides practicing law considerably he was justice of the peace and a heavy dealer in horses.The mother was born in Smith County and died in 1849.With a common-school education our subject in 1876 began mercantile life, and now has a stock worth about $3,000.He married Fanny Kemp, daughter of B. and L. Kemp, and born in Smith County in 1848.Their four children are Valeria E., Robert A., Howard S. and Geo. W.He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political faith he is Democratic.

 

††††††† W. C. Wright, merchant, was born in 1849 in Smith County.He is one of thirteen children of Stephen and Francis E. (Deadman) Wright.The father was born in 1826 in Illinois and came to Smith County when a boy.He is a farmer and stock dealer, owning 375 acres of improved land.He served in the Mexican war under Gen. Taylor.The mother, born in 1828 in Smith County, died in 1853.With ordinary school advantages our subject and his brother began two years of merchandising, after which he sold out and became a farmer.In 1877 he again became a merchant, and now successfully carries a stock of $4,500.In 1870 he married Callie, daughter of Joe and Elizabeth Moss, and born in 1850 in Smith County.She died in 1873.Their one child is Francis E.; in 1874 he married Nancy J., daughter of F. M. and Mary J. Ward, and born in 1856 in Smith County.Their six children are Cora A., Willie A., Surrepta I., Dealar L., Grace C. and Robert T.He is a Democrat politically and his wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

††††††† Hon. J. H. Young, farmer and stock raiser, of the Fourth District, two miles northeast of Dixon Springs, was born in Jackson County in 1828.He is of a family of fourteen children, born to James and Elizabeth (Draper) Young.The father was of English origin, born in South Carolina in 1788; he came to Tennessee when a small boy.He was a farmer and merchant of Jackson County.In 1814 the militia of Tennessee was ordered to New Orleans.He went under Maj. William Carroll, of Nashville, and served as adjutant of a regiment in the battle of New Orleans on the 8th of January, 1815, acquitting himself with high honor.He served his county in the capacity of sheriff and justice of the peace for many years.He represented Jackson County in the State Legislature of 1837-38; his death occurred in 1860; the mother was born in South Carolina in 1788 and departed this life in 1871.The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Jackson and Smith Counties, and later attended Burritt College, at Spencer, Van Buren Co., Tenn.He began business for himself at the age of seventeen years.In 1849 he engaged in merchandising in Smith County, and continued until the outbreak of the war.In 1859 he married the only child of Wilson Y. and Mary B. (Bridgwater) Martin, Miss Nannie E.She was born in Smith County in 1834 and became the mother of three children:Sam M., who is justice of the peace in Smith County and a successful stock raiser; Mary M. (deceased), and Fannie M. Young, who is now a student in the Nashville College for young ladies.Mr. Young previous to the war was a Whig and is now a stanch and influential Democrat.He represented Sumner and Smith Counties in the State Senate in 1871, the first session of that body after the adoption of the new constitution.He served as justice of the peace in the Fifth District of Smith County from 1853 to 1857, resigning on account of other business duties.He has been unusually successful in life and now owns about 1,400 acres of valuable land.He is living now on the farm upon which the father of Judge Peter Turney was raised.Mr., Mrs. and Fannie Young are devoted members of the Christian Church.The grandfather of Mr. Young, whose name was William, was of English descent and was born in Virginia.When a lad he was taken prisoner by the Cherokee Indians and held by them eight years, and was exchanged by treaty.He married a Miss Holland and moved to South Carolina.Later, he moved to Simpson County, Ky., and about 1791 to Peyton Creek, now in Smith County, Tenn.He died on his farm there about 1799.

 

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