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THE GOODSPEED HISTORY OF WILSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE
BIOGRAPHICAL APPENDIX
(originally published 1886)

submitted by William C. Colley Jr.
source: Woodward & Stinson Printing Co. Edition, Reprint 1971
For noncommercial use only.


CONTENTS:





    JAMES N. ADAMS, farmer and merchant, was born in Davidson County, Tenn., August 17, 1851, and is one of three children born to the marriage of Harvey Adams and Mariah Wasson, natives of Bourbon County, Ky., and of Irish and English descent, respectively. The father was born in 1815, and before his marriage (in 1840) was a dealer in fast horses. After residing some time at Nashville he removed to Wilson County where he owned a farm of 187 acres. In 1876 he sold this farm and again removed to Nashville, where he yet resides. Our subject was reared at home, and received the degree of A. B. from Bethany College, West Virginia, and LL.B. from the law department of Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn. He afterward became a teacher in the Oakland Seminary, and continued in that capacity two years. He began practicing law in Nashville, but owing to ill health was compelled to discontinue. May 11, 1881, he wedded Ladie M., daughter of John C. and Mary R. Fowler. She was born August 7, 1862, in Nashville, Tenn. They have two children: Eldon and Charmian. After his marriage Mr. Adams resided on a farm near Nashville until 1885, when he removed to the farm where he now lives, and engaged in his present business. He is a believer in the principles of Democracy, and votes according to the dictates of his conscience. His wife is member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    JOSEPH M. ANDERSON, M. D., was born in the town of Lebanon, Tenn., on the southeast corner of the Public Square, October 17, 1815, being the oldest natural born citizen now living, and is one of the two sons of Patrick and Fannie (Chandler) Anderson. The brother, Thompson Anderson, resides in the city .of Nashville and is worthy of its citizenship. The father was born in Virginia in 1779, and the mother in North Carolina, in 1779. The father was a merchant and one of the pioneers of Tennessee and suffered the privations incident to early times. His death occurred in 1817, and his widow married Maj. William Hartsfield and became a resident of Davidson County, where she resided at the time of her death, in 1838. Our subject was reared without a father's guidance and obtained his education in the schools of Lebanon and at a school called Porter's Hill Academy, afterward Clinton College, in Smith County, Tenn. At the age of eighteen he began the study of medicine under Dr. John Ray, and in 1835 he entered the Transylvania Medical College of Philadelphia, Penn., remaining one session. On September 24, 1835, he wedded Mary Dixson Lypert, a daughter of Lawrence and Mary Lypert. Mrs. Anderson was born October 27, 1820, in Wilson County, and she and her husband became the parents of twelve children, only three of whom are living: Joseph B., Samuel and Kate Lee. In the fall of l836 Dr. Anderson returned to college at Philadelphia, where he graduated as an M. D. in March, 1837. He is now the oldest and one of the most successful physicians and surgeons of Lebanon as well as one of the most enterprising, public-spirited and progressive citizens of the county. He was formerly a member of the old Whig party, but since the death of that party has affiliated with the Democracy. He is a member of the following fraternities: Lebanon Masonic Lodge, No. 98: he became a Master Mason in 1843; Royal Arch Mason, in 1849; Knight Templar, in 1886; Junior and Senior Warden of the Grand Lodge; served as Grand Master for two years, which fact stands unequaled and established a precedent in the Tennessee Grand Lodge for forty years; was Most Excellent Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of the State of Tennessee; Thrice Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council of the State of Tennessee, Deputy Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, and served as Grand Commander the same year. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife of the Christian Church. Our subject has lived a long and useful life, and no man occupies a more exalted place in the estimation of his neighbors and fellow-citizens.

     JAMES AUST, a young and energetic farmer of District No. 3, was born in 1855, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is the son of Thomas P. and Sarah (Riggin) Aust. The father was of German descent and was born in Virginia in 1811. He was a farmer by occupation. When but a youth he left his native State with his father, who went to West Tennessee and took possession of a large tract of land for services rendered in the war of 1812. Thomas Aust lived in Wilson County at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1832. Soon afterward he bought 140 acres of land and engaged in farming. In 1848 he sold out and bought 202 acres three and a half miles from Lebanon. Here he died in 1876. The mother was born in 1812, in North Carolina, and is now living with her son James. Our subject received his education in the country schools and in addition he attended the preparatory schools of the University at Lebanon, and also at Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky. For the past eight years James has had control of the old home place and has managed it in a skillful manner. He is a young man of temperate habits and is courteous and unassuming. His mother is a member of Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    DR. R. H. BAKER, a prominent citizen and physician of Watertown, Tenn., was born in Davidson County June 1, 1847, one of a family of eight children of William D. and Mary (Fuqua) Baker. The father was born in Tennessee October 9, 1812, and was married in 1831. He was a farmer by occupation, and held the office of magistrate for twenty-seven years. Since 1883 he and wife have made their home with our subject, Dr. R. H. Baker, who spent his boyhood days on a farm. He attended the common schools and completed his education at the Nashville University, and afterward entered the medical department of that institution and graduated in 1873. He located at Cherry Valley, where he remained two years, but since his marriage has lived in Watertown, with the exception of a short time spent at a Medical College in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he took a course in homoeopathy. He has had good success as a physician, and is a member of the Philadelphos Society, of Cincinnati, Ohio, an institution for the mutual advancement of students and professors. He owns 100 acres of land which he manages in connection with his practice. The Doctor is conservative in politics. For some time he was a member of the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F., being a Master Mason in the former, but since joining the Christian Church he has ceased to be an active worker in either order.

    CAPT. WADE BAKER, a successful farmer and stock raiser, was born in Smith County, Tenn., January 30, 1824, and is one of a family of two children born to John E. and Elizabeth (Benshy) Baker. The father was of German lineage and a native of Virginia, born January 8, 1781. He was a farmer and stock raiser by occupation. He was in the war of 1812 and participated in the battle of New Orleans. January 8, 1892, he was married. At the time of his death, which occurred October 23, 1866, he owned a considerable amount of property, both personal and real. The mother was born February 2, 1804, in Smith County, and died September 9, 1829. Our subject was reared in Wilson County and received his education in the country schools. In 1850 he commenced farming for himself, and in the space of ten years had accumulated a considerable amount of property. During the late war he enlisted in the Confederate service, and in 1861 was made captain of Company F, Twenty-eighth Tennessee. He was in the battles of Fishing Creek and Shiloh. August 19, 1862, he returned home and married Mary E. Hudleston, a native of Tennessee, born March 27, 1848, and the daughter of William W. and Mary Hudleston. Capt. Baker continued to till the soil and in 1870 he engaged in merchandising in connection with farming, which he continued for eight years. He then retired to his farm where he now lives, enjoying good health, with his wife and three children, named Lee, John E. and Wade. The Captain is a Democrat and a member of the Christian Church. He has been postmaster at Rural Hill for ten years. Mrs. Baker is a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    CAPT. WILLIAM P. BANDY, sheriff and native of Wilson County, Tenn., was born on the 4th of July, 1823, one of five children of Epperson and Harriet (Pierce) Bandy, of German and French origin, born in 1794 and 1804, in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The father was a farmer, and in 1800 came to Tennessee with his parents and became the owner of 300 acres of land. He was twice married, his second wife being Betsy (Denton) Walker. He died in 1868 and the mother in 1831. Our subject attended the county schools, and June 11, 1850, was married to Lucinda Lane, daughter of Bennett Lane. She was born in 1830 and became the mother of these children: Mildred C., wife of George W. Lanius, and Harriet, wife of James Boss. Mr. Bandy moved to Arkansas in 1855. and there his wife died in 1857. He then returned home. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Eighteenth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, being first lieutenant, and rose to the rank of captain. He was in many of the principal battles of the war and was wounded at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, but not seriously. He was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio. He returned home in May, 1865. He served as deputy sheriff from 1865 to 1872, and in 1876 was chosen sheriff, serving as such six years, and the following year was deputy. Since 1884 he has held the office and is a candidate for re-election. In 1871 he wedded Mrs. Virginia (Holmes) Brown, born in New York in 1840. They have three children living: Sallie L., Edward P. and Henry J. Capt. Bandy came to Lebanon in 1880. He owns 183 acres of the old home place. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F. and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    JONATHAN BANDY, one of the prominent farmers of the Fourth District, Wilson County, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., February 20, 1829. and is one of five children born to Epperson and Harriet Bandy. (See sketch of W. P. Bandy). Our subject remained at home until he was twenty-five years of age, receiving his education in the schools of the county. In 1815 he wedded S. M. Ross, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born November 12, 1842, and the daughter of Samuel and Susan Ross. To Mr. and Mrs. Bandy were born four children: Corrie E., Pierce J., Sudie S. and Maxie R. In 1854 he bought land in Wilson County and engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has added to his land from time to time till at the present he has 450 acres. He is a Democrat in polities and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    DANIEL J. BARTON, trustee of Wilson County, Tenn., is a native of this county, born February 6, 1842, son of Gabriel and Jane (Johnson) Barton. The father was of Irish birth, born in Nashville, Tenn., April 4, 1794, and followed the occupation of farming. His father, Samuel Barton, was a native Virginian, and came to Nashville when there were but. four families residing in the place, and when it was necessary to take every precaution to guard against the Indians. Gabriel Barton was the possessor of 333 acres of land at the time of his death, June 5, 1862. The mother died in 1857. Our subject was educated in the country schools, and in July, 1861, enlisted in Company K, Twenty-fourth Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, and was an active participant in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, where he was severely wounded in the right arm from the explosion of a shell, the limb having to be amputated. He then remained in the commissary department until the close of the war. He then returned home and attended school at Taylorsville two years, and in 1868 began farming. In 1874 Mr. Barton was appointed revenue collector for Wilson County for two years, and after farming until 1883 was elected county trustee, and now holds the office. December 14, 1882, he was united in marriage to Eudora, daughter of Robert C. and Anna B. Scobey. Mrs. Barton was born September 21, 1857, in Wilson County, and she and Mr. Barton are members of the Christian Church.

    J. P. BASHAW, an enterprising farmer and stock raiser, was born December 7, 1842, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of a family of five children born to J. W. and Charlotte (Cherry) Bashaw. The father was born May 6, 1804, in Davidson County, Tenn., and was of French descent. He was a farmer by occupation, and December 5, 1838, he married and moved to Wilson County, Tenn., where he carried on stock raising in connection with farming. He died November 6, 1884. The mother was born September 24, 1816, and died August 30, 1844. Our subject was reared in Wilson County, Tenn., in the Twenty-fifth District, receiving his education in the country schools and at Washington and Lee Universities. November 10, 1870, Salura Cook became his wife. She was born March 19, 1851, and is a daughter of Dr. L. M. N. Cook. To Mr. and Mrs. Bashaw were born four children: Kate E., Pierce, Eulixis and James B. Mr. Bashaw bolds to the principles of Democracy, and he and wife are worthy members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    REV. RICHARD BEARD, D. D. (deceased), was born November 27, 1799, in Sumner County, Tenn., and died December 2, 1880, at Lebanon, this State. On March 10, 1819, he joined the Nashville Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, was licensed to preach October 12, 1820, and July 29, 1822, was ordained. He attended Cumberland College at Princeton, Ky., from which he graduated in September, 1832, and the day following this event was made professor of ancient languages in that institution, a position he retained six years. In the summer of 1838 he was elected to the professorship of languages in Sharon College, Mississippi, entering upon the duties of that position the succeeding fall. In September, 1843, he was made president of Cumberland College, Kentucky, and in the spring of 1853 was made professor of systematic theology in Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tenn. He moved to Lebanon, and in March, 1854, assumed the position to which he had been elected, and so continued until his demise. Dr. Beard was a man of keen intellect, extended information, an able instructor, an excellent counselor and zealous Christian. He wedded Miss Cynthia E. Castleman, in Davidson County, Tenn., January 21, 1834. Mrs. Beard was born November 22, 1804, in the county where she was married, and died at Lebanon, Tenn., May 27, 1886.

    HON. E. E. BEARD. a son of Rev. Richard Beard, D. D., and Cynthia E. Beard was born at Princeton, Caldwell Co., Ky., August 27, 1850. His father removed with his family to Lebanon, Tenn., in 1854, where Mr. Beard has resided since that time. He graduated in the academic department of the Cumberland University in 1870, and in the law department in 1871. He has practiced law at Lebanon since his graduation and is now a member of the firm of Williamson & Beard. In December, 1877, he was elected mayor of Lebanon and re-elected in 1878 and 1879. In the year 1881 Lebanon became a taxing district of the second class and Mr. Beard has held the position of treasurer of the board of commissioners since that date. In January, 1879, Mr. Beard was elected treasurer of the trustees of the Cumberland University and now holds that position. In January, 1885, he was elected to represent Wilson County in the lower house of the Tennessee Legislature, filling a vacancy caused by the resignation of John C. Forr. On the 12th of .October, 1876, Mr. Beard married Miss Sarah Livingston, of Davidson County, Tenn.

    MAJ. ROBERT BELL. one of the old citizens and farmers of the Twenty-third District, was born in 1805 in Davidson County, Tenn. He is the son of James and Mary (Dean) Bell. The father was born in 1777, in North Carolina, and in 1783 came with his parents to Sumner County, Tenn., but afterward moved to Davidson County. His father, Robert Bell, our subject's .grandfather, was the father of nineteen children, eighteen of whom lived to be grown. He was a captain in the Revolutionary war, and died in 1816 at the age of eighty-five years. In 1819 James Bell came to Wilson County and bought 515 acres in the Twenty-third District, settled and remained here until his death, which occurred in 1823. The mother was born in 1777, in Virginia, and died in 1829. They had nine children, three of whom are now living. Our subject received his education mostly outside of the school room. During his boyhood days and youth the schools were few and far between, and educational advantages were very poor. After the death of his father. Robert being the eldest child, the responsibility of the family fell largely upon his shoulders. January 21, 1830, he married Polly Hooker, a native of Wilson County, born in 1811, and the daughter of Benjamin Hooker. To them was born one child, Erastus P., who resides in Rutherford County. Mrs. Bell died June 3, 1841, and the following year he married Sarah A. Furgason, a native of Virginia, born in 1818, and by her became the father of ten children, five of whom are living: Jane M., wife of James A. Neal, who lives in Lebanon; Samuel S., Byron, George F. and Willie S., wife of A. D. Peyton. Maj. Bell is now living on the old homestead and is esteemed as an honest and upright citizen. In politics he was formerly a Whig, casting his first vote for Andrew Jackson. February, 1876, he lost his wife, and since then his son, G. F., has been living with him. Maj. Bell is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and has led a conscientious Christian life for the past forty-seven years.

    W. H. BROWN was born in Lebanon, Tenn., December 18, 1837, and is one of seven children of Samuel and Lucy (Chandler) Brown, born in North Carolina and Virginia in 1800 and 1804, and died in 1852 and 1872, respectively. The father was a saddler by trade and after coming to Tennessee always made Lebanon his home. Our subject was educated in the academies of Lebanon, and at the age of thirteen began clerking for A. R. Davis, for whom he worked ten years. February 2, 1860, he wedded Mattie C. Davis, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Davis. Mrs. Brown was born September 18, 1834, and to her and husband were born seven children: Dixon Lee, Frank William, Mary, Robert Samuel, Jordan Harry, Charlie Brittin and Fannie. In 1865 Mr. Brown established a dry goods store in Lebanon with a capital of $1,195, $1,000 of which was borrowed. In 1876 he added ready-made clothing to his stock, continuing until January 1, 1885, when he sold his stock to his son, Dixon Lee. In 1874 Mr. Brown succeeded in organizing the Springfield National Bank, and was appointed cashier, but resigned at the end of six months as he did not wish to leave his old native town and county. In 1881 he organized the People's Bank of Lebanon, a private bank, with a capital of $25,000, and was appointed cashier. This bank paid to its stockholders 13 per cent the first year. January 1, 1883, the capital stock of the bank was increased to $40,000. In June, 1884, Mr. Brown and his stockholders bought out the Second National Bank, of Lebanon, a bank organized in 1872, with a capital of $50,000. June 9, 1884, the People's Bank of Lebanon was consolidated with the Second National Bank, and the capital was increased to $70,000. In the reorganization Selden R. Williams was elected president, successor to James Hamilton, and W. H. Brown was appointed cashier, successor to T. J. Stratton. Mr. Brown owns $23,000 stock in the bank, two business houses in Lebanon, seven houses and lots, a small farm, and has a herd of pure bred Short-horn cattle. He belongs to the Democratic party, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity in Lodge No. 98, of Lebanon. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    T. B. BROWN, farmer and proprietor of a saw-mill, was born in Page County. Va., March 31, 1844. He is one of six children born to Isaac and Rachel A. (Wood) Brown. The father was of German-Irish lineage and was born in Virginia in 1819. He was a cooper by trade and this occupation he followed the principal part of his life. He died in 1885. The mother was also of German-Irish lineage and was born in Virginia in 1821, and is at present living in DeKalb County, Tenn. The subject of this sketch assisted at home until he was twenty-two years of age, receiving his education in the schools of the county. In July, 1862, he enlisted in Company B. Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, Volunteers. He took an active part in the battles of Stone River, Missionary Ridge, Nashville and many other minor engagements. He remained in the field until the close of the war, when he returned home. In 1867 he wedded Cauras, daughter of Howard and Pattie Compton. Mrs. Brown was born in Tennessee in 1846. In 1869 Mr. Brown married Annie, daughter of Isaac and Sarah Smith. To our subject and wife were born four children: Candis, Sally, Lulecta and Daisy. In 1871 Mr. Brown bought four town lots in Alexandria, Tenn., and the year previous had purchased the saw-mill which he is at present operating and has operated successfully for the past sixteen years. In 1876 he purchased 155 acres of land in Wilson County and began tilling the soil. He is now the owner of over 300 acres of land and in connection with his farming carries on the saw-milling business. He has been quite successful in life. He is a Republican in politics and a worthy member of the Christian Church.

    J. W. BRYAN, an enterprising farmer of Wilson County, Tenn., was born in Halifax County, Va., March 7, 1822, and is one of a family of ten children of Richard and Mary (Brown) Bryan. The father was a native of the "Old Dominion," born in 1792, and was married about 1818, and came to Tennessee in 1826. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 and died June 30, 1855. The mother was born in the same State as her husband in 1800, and died March 27, 1884. Our subject's early educational advantages were limited. July 15, 1849, he wedded Unity, daughter of John H. and Elizabeth Bryant. She was born in May, 1821, and died December 15, 1855, leaving three children, one now living, Samuel H. In 1846 Mr. Bryan became a soldier in the Mexican war, enlisting in Company B, First Tennessee Cavalry, and was under Gen. Scott in the bombardment of Vera Cruz for twenty-six days. He returned home in 1847 and resumed tilling his farm of 120 acres, which he had purchased in 1845. April 29, 1856, he married Margaret C., daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Carr) Turner. Mrs. Bryan was born in Sumner County, November 8, 1838. They have eight children: Sarah A., Tennessee, Mary, Alice, Thomas M., Hugh B., Ervin and Zula. To his first purchase of land he has added to until he at one time owned 700 acres, but now owns about 530 acres of valuable farming land. He has been exceptionally prosperous and has given his children good educations, and is himself well posted on all the topics of the day. He is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Henry Clay. He and his wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church.

    PROF. E. S. BRYAN is a resident and native of Wilson County, Tenn., and was born October 13, 1856. He is the second son of six children of Algernon and Elizabeth C. (Phillips) Bryan. The father was a physician, born in 1822. He purchased 177 acres of land in Wilson County, Tenn., and there remained until his career ended. He was educated in the Eclectic Medical Institute, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at the University of Nashville, graduating from both institutions. He was a successful physician and died in August, 1884. The mother was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1830, and like her husband was of Irish descent; she died July 18, 1881. Our subject, after attending the common schools, became a student in the Big Spring Seminary and Cumberland University. In 1880 he became a student in the Commercial College, at Nashville, and graduated in November of the same year. In 1881 he became book-keeper for a Nashville firm, but at the end of six months returned home. He was an instructor of the young about five years, the last two and a half years in Santa Fe, Tenn., and was a good educator and disciplinarian. After serving as book-keeper for J. T. McClain & Co., he went to Louisville, Ky., and attended a business college, devoting the most of his time to penmanship, after which he taught in Santa Fe, as above stated. Prof. Bryan is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Hancock. In 1879 he was deputy postmaster of Lebanon. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and K. of P., and belongs to the United Brethren Church.

    P. B. CALHOUN was born on the 12th of December, 1819, in Wilson County. Tenn., son of Thomas and Mary (Johnson) Calhoun. The father was of Scotch-Irish origin, born in North Carolina in 1782, and came to Wilson County. Tenn., in 1801. He was married in 1809 and died in 1855. The mother was also born in North Carolina in 1784 and died in 1850. Our subject spent about one year and a half in Clinton College, Smith County, and afterward entered as sophomore at Miami College, Oxford, Ohio, graduating in 1841. In 1855 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. and Sarah Jennings, and two children were born to their union, named Mary (wife of John Lamb), and P. J. .Mrs. Calhoun lived but three years after her marriage. In 1864 Mr. Calhoun married the widow of Thomas Johnson, who has borne him the following family: Mattie S., Ewing G., Lilla M., Thomas Wayne and Corrie M. Mr. Calhoun was a resident of Columbus, Miss., a number of years and was clerk of the circuit and county courts for three years. In 1850 he went to Texas and there taught school three years, and was engaged in the land business five years. He then returned home and remained until the war, when he was made commissary agent of the Confederate States and remained in Georgia until the close of the war. Mr. Calhoun is a distant relation of John C. Calhoun. While in Texas he owned 8,000 acres of land, but suffered severe losses during the war. He now owns a good home, and is a Democrat and Mason. and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    JOSEPH CAMPER, a farmer and stock raiser, was born October 31, 1812, in Botecourt County, Va., and is a son of John and Sallie (Level) Camper. The father was born in 1782 in Virginia and was a farmer by occupation. He died in Missouri in 1858. The mother was born in 1778 in Pennsylvania and died in Tennessee in 1838. Our subject received his education in the country schools, and at the age of twenty-two began tilling the soil for himself. In 1840 he was licensed to preach by the quarterly conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church and continued to travel and preach for four years. May 30, 1844, he married Elizabeth A. (Brewer) Camper. She was born February 15, 1826, in Tennessee, and is the daughter of M. and S. Brewer. After marriage he settled in the Twenty-second District of Wilson County on 260 acres, where he now lives. He is the father of three children: Mary J., S. E. and Willie Lee. He is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was elected president of the Tennessee Annual Conference and has the respect and esteem of all his fellow-men.

    HON. ROBERT CANTRELL, judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, is a native of Warren County, Tenn., and is a son of Isaac and Nancy (Adcock) Cantrell. The parents were of English lineage, born in South Carolina in 1784 and 1790, and died in 1840 and 1872, respectively. He was twice married, his first wife being Bettie Cantrell. He was the father of eleven children, and came to Tennessee in 1816. Robert Cantrell, the seventh son, was educated in the pioneer schoolhouse and in the Fulton Literary Academy at Smithville, Tenn. After his father's death Robert looked after the interests of the farm and cared for his mother. December 23, 1846, he and Martha Magness were married. She is a daughter of Perry and Mary Magness, and was born December 15, 1831. They have eight children living: Mary J., Kate, Harriet P., William M., Robert, Bailey, Minnie and Mattie. He worked on a farm until twenty-one years old, for some time as clerk in a store and afterward became interested in the dry goods business, about 1848 he abandoned this and began studying law. February 9, 1849, he was admitted to the bar, and is now one of the leading lawyers of Wilson County. In 1861 be enlisted in Company F, Twenty-third Regiment Infantry, and was chosen captain of his company, and
was afterward elected lieutenant-colonel and in 1862 was tendered the position of colonel, and was assured he would have no opposition in case he became a candidate, but declined on account of ill health. He assisted in collecting stores for the quartermaster and commissary departments. He was captured by a scouting party in 1868, but was soon after paroled. Since the war he has been a resident of Lebanon. In 1858 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature and in 1860 was nominated for the Legislature again, but having no desire to enter into politics declined the race. In 1878 he was elected to his present position. He is a prominent and popular judge and to-day stands at the head of his profession. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a zealous temperance worker and has been ever since 1848, and says he wilt continue the war on whisky as long as it continues to produce crime, causes murders, makes widows and orphans, fills jails and alms houses and causes our helpless women and children to cry for help as against their oppressors--men who ought to aid as husband, parent and friend.

    JOHN D. CARSON is one of seven children of James and Lucinda (Dalton) Carson,  and was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1826. James Carson was of Irish descent and a North Carolinian by birth. He was brought to Tennessee by his parents when an infant and was a resident of Sumner County at the time of his marriage. He came to Wilson County in 1835 and became the possessor of 280 acres near Lebanon. He died in 1875. The mother was born in Virginia and died in 1852. Our subject made his home with his parents until twenty-six years old and February 4, 1852, was united in marriage to Nancy C. Johnson, born in 1835, daughter of John and Elizabeth Johnson. To Mr. and Mrs. Carson were born the following children: Cornelia (wife of R. M. Williams), Alice, Kit, Bell, Laura (wife of William King), Ida, Dora and Walter. Mr. Carson possesses 377 acres of land in Wilson County. In 1844 he had a stroke of paralysis, which has unfitted him for manual labor, and although in good health is obliged to walk with the aid of canes. He takes but little interest in politics and has not voted for a presidential candidate since 1860. Both husband and wife belong to the Christian Church.

    MAJ. SAMUEL A. CARTER (deceased) was one of the leading business men of Lebanon, Tenn. He was born February 29, 1832, in Wilson County, being one of eight children of William W. and Isabella (Roane) Carter. Maj. William W. Carter was born in Culpepper County, Va., in 1798, and when quite young moved with his parents to Kentucky, and at a later period moved to Tennessee, where he engaged in various pursuits, dealing extensively in tobacco, built and owned two large flouring-mills: one at Lebanon, Wilson County, and the other in the city of Nashville. He also dealt extensively in real estate, owning some of the largest and best farms in the county; notably the celebrated Big Springs farm, containing 1,000 acres, lying seven miles east of Lebanon, and what is now known as the Grigby farm, containing 1,000 acres, three miles from Lebanon. Mr. Carter was noted for his honesty and fairness in all his dealings, and his word was always considered as good as his bond, and with his great energy and good financiering he accumulated a handsome fortune. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for a number of years, and died at his home near Lebanon in 1877 at the ripe old age of seventy-nine, Isabella (Roane) Carter, mother of our subject, was of a distinguished family of this State. Two of her brothers, Samuel and John Roane, were governors of Arkansas. She was also a niece of Gov. Roane, of Tennessee. She died at the old homestead near Lebanon in 1883. Our subject was educated in the schools of Lebanon, and July 4, 1876, was married to Miss Jennie Jackson, daughter of Thomas R. and Elizabeth Jackson, who were born in 1804 and 1814 in, North Carolina and Missouri respectively. Mr. Jackson died May 6, 1883. Mrs. Carter was born March 22, 1853. She and husband became the parents of four children: Estelle, Willie W., Inez and Sammie. Maj. Carter lived all his life in and around Lebanon, and was closely connected with some of the town's principal business interests for years, and by his industry and fine business capacity acquired a considerable estate, and at his death was a large stockholder in the Second National Bank of Lebanon. In 1858 he and J. A. Lester established a family grocery, which they conducted three years. He was also a member of the tobacco firm of Carter & Lester. In 1861 Maj. Carter enlisted a large company of volunteers in Wilson County for the Confederate Army, and was elected their captain, and when the Forty-fifth Tennessee Regiment was organized he was elected major of the regiment. After his father's death he settled on his farm of 220 acres near Lebanon, and there died March 27, 1884. His widow and her mother have since lived on the home farm. Maj. Carter was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is his wife.

    JOHN L. CASTLEMAN, farmer, was born January 15, 1838, near his present home. He is the son of Robert and Artimenta (Reed) Castleman. The father is of Welsh descent, born 1814 in Wilson County, and was a tiller of the soil. His father, Jacob Castleman, was a native of North Carolina, and came to Wilson County, Tenn., about 1800. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Robert lived in his native county at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1834. He settled five miles from Lebanon on the Murfreesboro Pike and bought 150 acres, and here he has since resided. He is one of Wilson County's old citizens. He believed that a rolling stone gathers no moss, as he has never lived more than one mile from his birth-place, and never been farther than Nashville from home. The mother was born 1810 in Wilson County, and died September 2, 1885. They had three children, all of whom are living. Our subject received his education in the county schools of his native county, and in addition he attended the Cumberland University of Lebanon for one year. In 1859 he wedded Sarah J. Holloway, daughter of Ezekiel Holloway. Mrs. Castleman was born 1837 in Wilson County, and by her marriage to Mr. Castleman became the mother of three children: Jef L., Edward and Val. Mr. Castleman bought 140 acres near his old home place, where he has since resided. The Castleman family do not possess the disposition to be dissatisfied. They are content to live in Wilson County. In politics our subject is a Democrat. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, First Tennessee Regiment, but was soon changed to the Thirty-eighth Tennessee. He took an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Corinth, and numerous minor engagements. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    J..P. CAWTHON first saw the light of day in Wilson County, Tenn., September 27, 1817, and is one of three children of Thomas F. and Susan (Daniel) Cawthon. The father was born in Prince Edward's County, Va., August 31, 1792, and came to Tennessee in 1808. He was a farmer and stock raiser, and died in June, 1873. The mother was born, in 1794, and died in March, 1874. Our subject was reared in the Twenty-fifth District of Wilson County, and obtained his education in the country schools. After attaining his majority he began learning the saddlery business, which he mastered in four years' time. December 3, 1840, he was united in matrimony to Ann (Robbins) Cawthon, who was born March 15, 1827, daughter of Thomas and Ruth Robbins. Mr. Cawthon resided for some time at Mount Juliet, Tenn., and in 1850 purchased 100 acres of land, which he has since increased to 220 acres. Since 1857 he has held the office of squire and has given good satisfaction, Mr. Cawthon has eight children: Lunsford Polk, Allie, William H., Sue W., James Edward, Thomas Preston, Mary A. and Emma Lee. Mr. Cawthon supports Democratic principles, and belongs to the I. O. O. F. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    J. D. CHAMBERS, an enterprising farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., September 17, 1844, and is a son of John and Edna (Johnson) Chambers. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1806, and followed agricultural pursuits the principal part of his life. He never left his native county, and died there in 1865. The mother was of Scotch-Irish extraction, a native of Tennessee, born in 1812, and died in Wilson County, of that State, in 1878. The subject of our sketch was reared at home, and received his education in the schools of the county. After the death of his father he took charge of the estate which he superintended, with the assistance of his brothers, for about ten years. In 1874 he was married to Woody, daughter of John and Mary Miller. Mrs. Chambers was born in Wilson County, Tenn., December 19, 1849. In 1867 he bought forty-five acres of land in Wilson County, where he commenced farming on his own responsibility, and is now the owner of 243 acres of land, all lying in Wilson County, Tenn., where he is at present living. He is a Democrat and a member of the Christian Church.

    H. A. CHAMBERS, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., December 23, 1841, and is a son of John and Edna (Johnson) Chambers (for sketch of parents see biography of J. D. Chambers). Our subject assisted in agricultural pursuits on the farm and attended the county schools. September 18, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-eighth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and took an active part ia the battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga and many other minor engagements. At the close of the war he returned home, and in 1866 he was united in marriage to Marcia Holman, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born August 20, 1844, a daughter of William S. and Sophia A. Holman. To our subject and wife were born eight children: Lelia, Eugene, Pearl, Hortense, Daisy, Sophia, Pauline and Bessie. In 1867 he purchased 165 acres of land in Wilson County, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. He now possesses and controls about 400 acres of land in the Fifth District. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Christian Church.

    D. D. CLAYTON, an energetic farmer of Wilson County, was born in Macon County, Tenn., in 1827, and is one of five children born to John and Phoebe (Hogg) Clayton. The father was born in North Carolina, and was a tiller of the soil; he died in 1830. The mother was born in Tennessee and died in Wilson County July 8, 1848. Our subject passed his early life on the farm, and received his education in the schools of the county. In 1866 he was married to Ann E., daughter of A. and E. Kirkpatrick. Mrs. Clayton was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1831, and the fruit of her union with Mr. Clayton was one child--Alexander A. Mr. Clayton is a man of energy and perseverance, and is quite a successful farmer. He is the present owner of 100 acres of land lying in the Fourth District, where he is at present living. He is a Democrat in politics.

    LEMUEL N. M. COOK, M. D., was born in Wilson County, Tenn., August 15, 1815, and is a son of Green and Mary A. (Nicholson) Cook, North Carolinians, born in 1788 and 1787, and died in 1875 and 1853, respectively. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was married in 1814. He was a farmer by occupation. Our subject attended the common schools, and his medical education was obtained in the Medical College of Louisville, Ky., from which institution he graduated in 1838. He was married, April 16, 1845, to Alvira Lassiter, daughter of Enos Lassiter. She was born in Tennessee in 1823 and died February 26, 1883, leaving eight children: E. K. (elsewhere written), Chloe N. (wife of Prof. Kennedy), Seluria (wife of J. P. Bashaw), Joseph L., Ella (wife of Prof. B. M. Mace), Mary, William and Emma (wife of H. L. Pickett). In 1876 Dr. Cook was elected trustee of Wilson County, and served in that capacity four successive terms, returning to his home in 1884. He is an old and highly esteemed citizen, and is a supporter of Democratic principles. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, and also of the K. of  P. lodge, No. 20, of Lebanon, and the I. O. O. F. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    CHARLES H. COOK, farmer, was born in Davidson County, Tenn., March 29, 1826, and is one of six children born to James H. and Jane (Hope) Cook. The father was born in North Carolina in 1779, and was of English-German lineage. He was a mechanic by trade, and was elected constable and served in that capacity for several years. He was also magistrate, and held that office up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1844. The mother was born in 1800 and was of English lineage; she died in 1866. Our subject was reared in Davidson County, Tenn., and learned the plasterer's trade, which he followed successfully for twenty years. In 1850 he wedded Rachel A. Carver, who was born in June, 1824, and who is the daughter of Isaac Carver. Our subject has been engaged in the shoe business, the blacksmithing and wheelwrighting and the saw and grist-mill business since 1861. In 1865 he wedded Cleopatra Ozment, who was born August 5, 1834, and is the daughter of James H. and Martha Ozment. This union resulted in the birth of these children: Mary J., Seleta Ann, Zuella S., James E., Martha L., Oliver C. K., Evalena, Green G. and D. Lillian. Mr. Cook is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church; he is also a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1875-76 he was elected constable, and filled that office in an able and satisfactory manner.

    DAVID COOK was born in Rhode Island in 1795, and died June 17, 1878. He was educated in Newport, R, I., Com. Perry being his schoolmate. He was quite a mechanical genius, and after serving an apprenticeship in a machine shop became a workman of superior ability and was made foreman in large factories in Lowell. In 1841 he came to Lebanon, Tenn., to take charge of a cotton factory, and the following year sent for his wife (formerly Mary Colburn) and family. He worked at several occupations through life, and was a resident of Lebanon for thirty-eight years, being one of the substantial and influential citizens of the town. This tribute to his memory was proclaimed by the mayor of the city at his death: "To the citizens of Lebanon--Death has been among us; he has taken the oldest of our numbers. David Cook is no more. His clear, sound judgment; his moral, upright walk; his active, industrious life; his manly, Christian bearing, all call for our respect and admiration. For more than forty years he has gone in and come out before this community, and we can all bear witness to his many virtues. It is exceeding appropriate that we should show our esteem for such a life. I therefore request that all the business houses of the city be closed from 12 to 4 P. M. as a mark of respect to the deceased. E. E. Beard, mayor." He was a strong adherent of the Masonic fraternity, and was highly honored by that order. Besides having filled all the chairs of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery, he officiated as Deputy Grand High Priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter and Deputy Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery. He was one of Tennessee's brightest Masons, and before the time of his death was said to have been the oldest living Sir Knight in Tennessee. His wife was a sister of Warren Colburn, the author of Colburn's Arithmetic, which is widely known throughout the United States.

    CLARK COOK, farmer, of the Third District, was born in Lowell, Mass., November, 1832, He is the son of David and Mary (Colburn) Cook. [For further particulars of parents see sketch of Julia A. Jones, of the Tenth District.] Our subject came to Wilson County with his parents in 1841 and received his education in the Cumberland University. In 1856 he commenced clerking in a dry goods store in Lebanon. In 1858 he went to South Carolina, and from there to Alabama, where he began buying and selling carriages. During the four years of the war he was a traveling druggist dealing out medicine to the soldiers. In 1864 he clerked in a drug store in the city of New York. The following year he came to Nashville and clerked for his brother. The same year he and Mr. McCarty established a dry goods and grocery store in Lebanon, the first goods brought to the town after the war. In 1870 he went to Missouri and kept a first-class restaurant for eighteen months. In 1873 he came to Wilson County, Tenn., bought 125 acres in the Third District and began farming, which he has continued nearly ever since. January 7, 1869, he married Alice Smith, a native of Canal Dover, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio, born March 27, 1854, and the daughter of John and Annie Smith. To our subject and wife were born four children: George, Harry, David and Mary. Mr. Cook is a man of good moral character, and a useful and enterprising citizen.

    E. K. COOK, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., March 3. 1846. and is one of eight children born to the marriage of L. N. M. Cook and Alvira Lassiter. (See sketch of  L. N. M. Cook). Our subject was educated in his native county, and resided under the paternal roof until he was twenty-six years of age. In 1863 he enlisted in Company B, Fourth Tennessee, Confederate States Army, Cavalry, and was with Jeff Davis in Georgia when the forces were surrendered. He was in all the principal engagements with Sherman on his march to the sea. June 9, 1880, Mr. Cook wedded Susan, daughter of Samuel and Martha Young. She was born March 11, 1864, and has borne her husband two children: Bashie and Mamie. Mr. Cook is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the I. O. O. F., and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    M. W. COWEN, M. D., farmer, was born in Wilson County Tenn., March 7. 1828, and is one of seven children born to James and Nancy (Walker) Cowen. The father was born in Wilson County Tenn., in 1800, and was living in that county at the time of his marriage and followed the occupation of a farmer during his entire existence. He died in his native county August, 1838. The mother was born in Wilson County in 1806, and died in that county in 1847. Our subject passed his early life in assisting on the farm and attending the schools of the county. Later he graduated from the medical department of the University of New York. Having received his first course of lectures from the University of Louisville, Ky. In 1851 he was married to Adeline, daughter of B. and M. F. Hill. Mrs. Cowen was born in Wilson County Tenn., October 12, 1828, and by her union with Dr. Cowen became the mother of an interesting family of six children: Julius E., James B., George W., Matthew W., Albert B. and John W. In 1847 Mr. Cowen came in possession of sixty-six acres of land and in 1851 he bought 150 acres more, in Wilson County and began farming for himself. He has added from time to time and is at present the owner of over 400 acres of land, all lying in the Fourth District, where he is at present living and engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is a Democrat, a member of the Christian Church, and a successful practitioner of this county.

     J. P. COX, undertaker, of Lebanon, Tenn., was born August 15, 1884, in Wilson County, son of Andrew and Sarah A. (Palmer) Cox, born in Virginia and Tennessee. in 1800 and 1804, respectively. The father came to Tennessee when ten years old with his parents, and became a prosperous farmer of Wilson County. He died in 1856 and the mother in 1876. After her husband's death she married W. A. Robinson. Our subject was educated in the common schools and in 1856 married Maria Freeman, daughter of Josiah Freeman. She was born November 4, 1837. Mr. Cox was operating a carriage factory at the breaking out of the war, and in November, 1861, enlisted in the Fourth Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in many of the principal battles of the war. He was captured at Lebanon in 1864 and was kept a prisoner at Nashville until the fall of Richmond. In 1865 he lost his wife, and April 16, 1871, he married Jackie Maud Wright, daughter of James Wright, who was born in 1815. She was born December 19, 1854, in Arkansas. They have four children: Edgar E., Beulah M., W. Andrew and Fannie O. In 1869 Mr. Cox engaged in photography, traveling in Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia and Kentucky. In March, 1882, he engaged in his present business. He is a Democrat and in 1875 he was elected city marshal, holding the office eight years. He is a Knight of Pythias and his wife belongs to the Christian Church.

    W. T. CRAGWALL, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., August 21,1847, and is one of nine children born to William J. and Ellen B. (Harris) Cragwall. The father was of English extraction, a native of Virginia, born April 21, 1807. He came to Tennessee in 1835 and bought about 100 acres of land and began tilling the soil. He is at present living in Wilson County, and is still engaged in farming. The mother was born in Hanover County, Va., March 2, 1811, and died in Wilson County, Tenn., July 15, 1861. Our subject passed his youthful days in assisting on the farm and in getting a fair education in the schools of the county and at White Creek Spring in Davidson County, Tenn. In 1875 he married Sally Welkisen, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born March 4, 1853, and is the daughter of Isaac J. anti Elizabeth J. Welkisen. To Mr. and Mrs. Cragwall were born four children: Albert O., Tepuple O., James W. and Willie C. In 1873 our subject bought 231 acres of land in the Fifth District where he is at present living. He is a Democrat in politics and a worthy member of the Christian Church.

    JAMES A. CURD is a native of Prince Edward's County, Va., born in September, 1809, and is one of twelve children of John and Elizabeth (Lumpkin) Curd. The father was a Virginian by birth, born in 1761, and came to Wilson County, Tenn., in 1818, where he settled and became the possessor of 800 acres of land. He died in 1821. The mother was born in 1775 in Virginia. and died in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1835. James A. Curd was united in marriage to Susan Everett. November 18, 1833. She was born in Wilson County, July 4, 1809. anti is a daughter of John Everett. After his marriage Mr. Curd began to till the soil for himself, and by his energy and industry accumulated about 600 acres of good land, where he and wife now live. To them were born the following children: John, Eliza and Emma. Mr. Curd is a prominent farmer of the county, and favors and supports Democratic principles. He and Mrs. Curd are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    J. N. CURD. M. D., of  Mount Juliet, Tenn., was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1884, and is a son of William and Susan (Davis) Curd, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Tennessee. The father came to Tennessee at an early period and during his lifetime he followed the occupation of farming, owning at the time of his death, in 1842, about 420 acres of land. After her husband's death the mother, who was born in 1814, resided on the home place with her children and added 200 acres to their already extensive farm. She died in June, 1870. Our subject received his early education in the schools of his native county and in addition attended the Union University of Murfreesboro, Tenn., for one year. At the age of twenty-five he began studying medicine under A. J. Winter. In 1860 he attended the medical department of the Nashville University, remaining until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Hardy Brett's company of the Forty-fifth Regular Tennessee Infantry, and served in the capacity of hospital steward and assistant surgeon. He was in many of the principal battles of the war and numerous skirmishes. He returned home May 20, 1865. and resumed his practice. In 1866 he returned to the University of Nashville, from which he graduated as an M. D. in March, 1867. He has a thorough knowledge of his profession and has met with good success. Owing to ill health he has farmed principally for the last eleven years and is the possessor of 469 acres of land. In May, 1869, he wedded Ella Winter, daughter of Dr. A. J. Winter. She was born in 1849 and became the mother of five children: Gela, William E., Elmer, Edgar and May. Dr. Curd is a Democrat and was formerly a Whig, casting his first presidential vote for Gen. Scott. He is a member of the Baptist Church and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Doctor is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being a Master Mason.

    W. P. DAVIS was born in Wilson County, Tenn., August 19, 1833, and is one of seven children of I. F. and Sarah E. (Curd) Davis. The father was a native of Virginia, born in 1800. He was brought to Tennessee when only four years old, and afterward became a prosperous farmer and stock raiser, owning 1,500 acres of land at his death January 20, 1880. The mother was a native of the same State as her husband, born November 10, 1802, and is yet living in Wilson County with her son, R. T. Davis. Our subject was educated in the common schools and the Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn. October 25, 1855, he was married to Margaret Elizabeth (Lindsey) Davis, born in 1834, and daughter of Lewis Lindsey. Mr. Davis was a soldier in the late war and served as quartermaster until its close. He returned home and farmed one year, and then went to Columbus, Ga., and was engaged in the livery business for six years. He then returned to Wilson County, where he manages his farm of 425 acres. He and wife have five children: S. E., Mattie A., Ella B., James L. and A. T. Mr. Davis is a Democrat, and he and family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    R. T. DAVIS may be mentioned as a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Wilson County. Tenn.; was born April 18, 1843, and is one of five children of I. F. and Sarah (Curd) Davis. (For parent's history see sketch of W. P. Davis.) R.T. Davis was reared to manhood on a farm in the Second District of Wilson County, Tenn., and there received his education. In 1867 he became a tiller of the soil on his own responsibility, and on the 14th day of July, 1870, the nuptials of his marriage with Alice Reynolds was celebrated. She was born in Cumberland County, Va., July 25, 1844, and is a daughter of Obadiah Reynolds. She died October 5, 1875, and Mr. Davis took for his second wife Miss Rachel J. Winter, who was born January 10, 1854, in Wilson County, Tenn., daughter of Dr. Winter. To Mr. and Mrs. Davis were born these children: Ovie W., Alice R. and Nora E. Our subject is the owner of about 650 acres of fertile land, and is doing well financially. He is a Democrat, and is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    I. J. DODSON, merchant, of Lebanon, Tenn., was born July 3, 1853, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of four children of Isaac J. and Levina (Edwards) Dodson. The father was born in Davidson County, but was a resident of Wilson County at the time of his marriage. He was twice married and the father of eight children. He died in 1853. His widow married S. T. Nix, with whom she lived until her death in 1883. Our subject was left without a father at the age of one month. His education was obtained in Lawrence College, DeKalb County, Tenn., and Cumberland University, Lebanon. November 17, 1874, he married Sallie Cox, daughter of T. J. Cox. She was born September 8, 1857, and is the mother of five children: Tommie, Sallie L., Maggie, Harry and Isaac J. From 1871 to 1873 Mr. Dodson was salesman for Fondill & Bennett, grocers, of Lebanon, and he then engaged in the business on his own responsibility. A year later he sold out, and he and his father-in-law formed a partnership in the hardware business, the firm being known as Dodson & Cox. Later they disposed of their stock, and Mr. Dodson purchased 400 acres of land and began tilling the soil. In 1879 he sold out and returned to Lebanon, and with John W. Price started a hardware store, and later became connected with J. T. McClain in business, and the firm was later known as McClain Bros. & Co. They have about $30,000 stock, and are doing an extensive business. Mr. Dodson is a man of fine business capacity, and in politics is a Democrat. He is a member of the K. of P. and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. His wife is a Baptist.

    G. T. DODSON, an enterprising farmer of the Twenty-fourth District, was born January 29, 1835, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of six children born to I. J. and Octavia (Ba!lard) Dodson. The father was born in 1808 in Tennessee, and was of Scotch-Irish extraction. He was married in 1829, and in 1850 moved to Wilson County and tilled the soil until his death, which occurred August 5, 1853. The mother was born in 1813, in Wilson County, and was the daughter of George Ballard. Her death occurred in 1842. The subject of this sketch was reared in the Twenty-fourth District, and received the rudiments of his education in the country schools and subsequently attended college three terms. He soon purchased 180 acres of land in the Eleventh District, and May 12, 1857, he wedded Sarah J. Edwards, daughter of James Edwards. Mrs. Dodson died October 5, 1871, and April 7, 1881, he was married to Maggie A. Eatherly. Mr. Dodson is the father of two children: Stonewall Jackson, born May 21, 1866 (who has received a thorough English education, and will take a collegiate course, and will then study law), and Kate, who was born September 13, 1883. In 1861 our subject volunteered in the Confederate service, and was elected captain of the Forty-fourth Tennessee (under Col. J. S. Fulton). He was in the battles of Shiloh and Murfreesboro, received a gun-shot wound, and was captured and taken to Fort Delaware, where he remained for six months, when he was exchanged at Petersburg, Va. He came back, enlisted again, was at Richmond, Petersburg and Knoxville, and was with Lee at Appomattox Court House at the time of the surrender. He then returned home and engaged in farming and stock raising. He is a Democrat in politics and a good man.

    WILLIAM W. DONNELL, clerk of the Circuit Courts of Wilson County, Tenn.,  was born October 25, 1850, and is one of twelve children born to Robert P. and Cleopatra  (Hearn) Donnell. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Virginia. and came to Tennessee in his youth. He was a farmer and owned about 200 acres of land. He was one of the early settlers of the county, and died in March, 1862. The mother was born in North Carolina and after the death of her husband made her home with our subject. She died in 1876. When William W. was but twelve years old his father died. His elder brother being in the army the burden of supporting the family fell upon William. He has only attended school about fifteen months, but in spite of this disadvantage he has a good. practical business education, acquired through study and early contact with business life. He early began speculating in stock, and when eighteen years of age hired out as a clerk in the .general merchandise store of C. C. Hancock, and remained with him seven years. In 1870 he purchased Mr. Hancock's entire stock, and same year the building in which he did business caught fire, and was consumed with the entire contents. He and Marshall Young opened a similar store, but in 1881 disposed of the stock. A year later Mr. Donnell was elected to his present office by the Democratic party for a term of four years, and is now filling the duties of that office very efficiently.

    G. L. DRIFOOS, groceryman, of Lebanon, was born August 14, 1849, in Nashville, and is one of twelve children of L. and Eliza (Harsh) Drifoos. The father was born in Switzerland in 1806 and at the age of seventeen years came to the United States and began his life as a pack peddler. He was economical and persevering and in a few years had accumulated sufficient means to enable him to establish a dry goods store, which he did in Harrisburg, Penn. After his marriage, in 1838, he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1843 came to Lebanon, Tenn., where he has been in the mercantile business nearly ever since. Since 1870 he has lived a retired life. The mother was of German descent, born in Harrisburg, Penn., in 1820. Our subject was educated in Cumberland University and Franklin College, Nashville. When about seventeen years of age he engaged in business with his father but in 1870 began farming on 326 acres of land belonging to his father. In 1883 he purchased his brother Harry's grocery store, which he manages in connection with his farming. January 19, 1871. he married Laura Smith, born in 1850. They have seven children: Leopold. Frank, Alice, Harry, Mary N., Carrie and Annie Laura. Mr. Drifoos is a Democratic Prohibitionist and is a Good Templar and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

     JOHN EATHERLY, farmer and stock raiser, was born February 3, 1821, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is a son of Warren and Peggie (Robertson) Eatherly, both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1780, followed agricultural pursuits, and was married in 1805. He was quite well off in this world's goods, owning over 200 acres of land besides a good many slaves. His death occurred in 1854. The mother was born in 1780 and died in 1866. She was the daughter of Hugh Robertson. The subject of this sketch grew to manhood on the farm and attended the country schools, where he received a practical education. December 23, 1843, he wedded Margaret J. Wilson, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born February 18, 1824, and the daughter of John R. Wilson. To our subject and wife were born eleven children: Nancy C., John W., Margaret, Ann Eliza, T. Hugh, Martha E., Wilson R., Lem R., Charles H., Andrew and Mary F. Mr. Eatherly is the present owner of nearly 300 acres of good land well stocked. He was elected constable of the Second District from 1848 to 1851, which office he filled in a satisfactory manner. He was also elected magistrate and holds that office at the present time. During the late war he was one of the boys in gray and was appointed quartermaster under Gov. Harris.

    DR. J. C. ESKEW, physician and surgeon, was born in 1840 in Wilson County, and is the son of Dr. Andrew and Matilda (McFarland) Eskew. The father was born March 16, 1811, in North Carolina, and was a physician and surgeon by profession. His father, Benjamin Eskew, was one of the pioneer settlers of Wilson County, and assisted in forming one of the first settlements in the district. Andrew Eskew was married in 1840, and after studying medicine for some time he took a course of lectures in the Transylvania College at Lexington, Ky. About the time of his marriage he entered upon his practice, which he continued until his death, which occurred May 6, 1854. The mother was born August 16. 1818, and died November 27, 1854. Our subject was reared at home, and received his literary education in the county schools and at Mount Vernon Academy. At the age of sixteen he began teaching and met with good success. At the age of nineteen he commenced the study of medicine under John Logue, where he remained for one year, after which he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, from which institution he graduated in 1865. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H. Forty-fifth Regiment Tennessee Infantry. He was appointed surgeon in his regiment, and afterward commissioned as hospital steward. He was in the battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Jonesboro, Atlanta, Murfreesboro, Franklin and others. He returned home in May, 1865, and began practicing medicine. November, 1865, he bought 112 acres in the Twenty-second District, a part of the old homestead, where he has since lived. November, 1867, he wedded Martha (Rogers) Carver, born in Wilson County in 1845, and to them were born five children: Alice A., James O., Andrew O., Viola O. and Lula B. Mrs. Eskew had one child, Jonas, by her first husband. Dr. Eskew is one of the leading surgeons of Wilson County, and bears an unsullied reputation. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    J. M. FAKES, senior member of the boot and shoe store of Fakes, Taylor & Co., and senior member of the firm of Fakes & Co., dealers in coal and lumber, was born June 21, 1844, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is a son of W. C. and Elizabeth (Moser) Fakes. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1816, a farmer by occupation, and was married in 1834. The mother was Of Scotch-German descent, born in 18l8 in Wilson County, and she and her husband are yet living. Our subject received a common education, and began doing for himself at the age of twelve. He clerked for some time in Lebanon, and at the breaking out of the war joined the Confederate Army in May, 1861, in Company K, Eighteenth Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. He was captured at Fort Donelson and taken to Camp Butler, Ill. Three months later he made his escape and joined Morgan's command. He afterward joined his own command, and later was one of Hawkins' scouts. He was again captured and taken to Fort Delaware. June 11, 1867, he wedded Rosa A. Gugenheim, born in Nashville in 1848. They have five children: Sally, Mark, Daisy, Gertrude and Clarence. He has been engaged in business in Lebanon for twenty-one years. He is a member of the Masonic, K. of H. and K. of P. fraternities. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    COL. O. G. FINLEY was born in Kentucky in 1787, and came to Tennessee when a young man, locating in Lebanon in 1807. He was a son of Samuel Finley, who was born in the north of Ireland and was of Scotch descent. At what date he came to the United States is not known. He was married to Mary Gains, of Kentucky or Virginia. Col. O. G. Finley wedded Mary Lewis Johnson, of Sumner County, Tenn., in 1811, daughter of Jesse Johnson, of North Carolina, who was a Revolutionary soldier. His wife, Mary Lewis, was also born in North Carolina, and they came to Tennessee, locating in Sumner County at an early period. Col. O. G. Finley's wife died in 1830, leaving the following children: Jesse J., William M., John B. (deceased), Foster G., Sarah A. and Mary (deceased). Col. Finley served in the Creek war, and was a member of the State Senate about 1812 or 1813, when Knoxville was the capital of the State. He was a leather manufacturer, and retired to his farm near Lebanon in 1830. He was a man of strong character, reared in Kentucky when it was a frontier State. He received a limited early education, but owing to his fondness for books and thirst for knowledge he became a finely educated man, and was pronounced by the Rev. Dr. Lindsly, president of the Nashville University, one of the best-read historians in the State. As the epitaph on his tombstone indicates, he was "an honest man." Jesse J., his eldest son, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., November 18, 1812, and received an academic education. He was captain of mounted volunteers in the Seminole war, and afterward studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1838. He located in Arkansas in 1840, and was elected to the State Senate in 1841. He removed to Memphis, Tenn., in 1842, and began practicing law. He was elected mayor of Memphis in 1845, but a year later removed to Florida and was there elected to the State Senate in 1850, and was appointed candidate for presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1852. He became judge of the Western Judicial Circuit of Florida in 1853, and was elected to the same two terms without opposition. In 1861 he was elected judge of the Confederate States Court, but resigned in 1862 and enlisted as a private in the Confederate Army, and arose to the rank of captain, colonel and brigadier-general. In 1871 he located in Jacksonville, Fla., and in 1874 was elected to the United States Congress, and re-elected in 1876, but declined to be a candidate in 1878. He was again elected in 1880, but is now practicing law in Ocala, Fla. He has four children: Lucius, George, Charles A. and Maggie. William M., second son of O. G. Finley, was born in Lebanon, Tenn., October 11, 1816; received an academic education, and in 1836 volunteered and served as private in the Seminole war. He returned home in 1837 and began studying medicine, and in the following fall entered the Cincinnati College of Medicine, but in 1838 removed to Transylvania University at Lexington, Ky., where the title of M. D. was conferred upon him in 1839. He traveled over the "Lone Star State," but in 1840 located in Arkansas. In 1842 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature. In 1843 he removed to Clarksville, Tenn., where he practiced his profession thirty years. In 1871, owing to impaired hearing, he gave up his profession and purchased and located on the old homestead. He was last married to Mrs. V. C. {Conrad) Boyd. They have two children: Virgie Lee and Jessie C. John B., third son of O. G. Finley, was born in Lebanon in 1820. He received a practical education, and early evinced a fondness for military tactics. He possessed a splendid physique, and at the commencement of the late civil war was made captain of a corps of men from Arkansas, where he then resided. Owing to disease he was compelled to resign his command, and, after several painful operations, died at Searcy, Ark., in 1868. He had taken the degree of doctor of medicine, and ranked high in the community where he practiced. Foster G., fourth son of O. G. Finley, was born in Lebanon in 1822, and received a fair English education. He was reared on his father's farm, and immigrated to Arkansas in 1843. He soon after returned to Wilson County, Tenn., where he now resides, and is noted for his generous hospitality and kindness of heart.

    FOSTER G. FINLEY may be mentioned as one of the oldest citizens and farmers of Wilson County, Tenn. He was born March 22, 1822, and is one of eight children of O. G. and Mary L. (Johnson) Finley. (See Dr. Finley's sketch.) Foster was educated in the Campbell Academy at Lebanon, and in 1842 married Mary Buckner, who died the same year. In June, 1845, he wedded Almira Taylor, born October 10, 1826, daughter of Isaac and Margaret Taylor. To Mr. and Mrs. Finley were born this family: Isaac, Mary (wife of Louis Peyton), Maggie (widow of Gus Lampton),William, Charles and Obadiah. Isaac has an orange farm in Florida, and William is in Alabama practicing medicine. Mr. Finley spent five years in Arkansas and some time in Florida, but the greater part of his life has been spent in Tennessee. In 1884 he purchased 50 acres of land in the Ninth District where he yet resides. He has devoted his life to the tilling of the soil, with the exception of three years' residence in Nashville, where he was in the grocery business a short time and then clerked on a steamer on the river. Mrs. Finley is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    ROBERT V. FOSTER, A. M., D. D., professor of exegetical theology and the Hebrew language in Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., was born in Wilson County, Tenn., August 12, 1845, and is a son of Rufus H. and Sarah (Spain) Foster, who were born in Tennessee in 1814 and 1818, respectively. The grandfather of our subject was John Foster, who came from North Carolina to Tennessee in 1796, and followed the life of an agriculturist. He participated in the war for independence, being a soldier in the army of Washington. Rufus H. Foster was married in 1841 and settled on a portion of the old home place, and eventually became the possessor of 240 acres. His wife died in 1876, and he has lived with his son John and our subject since that time. His children are John S., Benjamin S. (the principal of the Lebanon College for Young Ladies), Mrs. Addie Ellington, Mrs. Charlotte Brantly and Robert V., who was reared on a farm and received his rudimentary education in the neighboring country schools. At the age of twenty-two he entered the sophomore class of Cumberland University at Lebanon, graduating as an A. B. in 1870. The following year he was elected to the chair of mathematics in the Cooper Institute at Daleville, Miss., which position he held four years. In 1875 he returned to Cumberland University and graduated from the theological department with high honors, receiving the degrees of D. D, and A. M. The following year he entered the senior Class of the Union Theological Seminary, New York City, and remained one year, receiving the graduating degree, and while there was proffered the professorship of mathematics in the Waynesburg (Penn.) College. He remained one term and received a call to his first alma mater to become professor of belles lettres and Hebrew, and entered on his duties in the fall of 1877, occupying the chair four years. He was then tendered his present position, which he has since filled with credit to himself and honor to the institution. While teaching at Waynesburg he formed the acquaintance of Miss Belle Braden, to whom he was married November 7, 1882. She is the daughter of D. W. Braden, M. D., and was educated in the Waynesburg College and at Vassar, and has traveled in Europe and visited the leading cities of this country, being a very intelligent and refined lady. Prof. Foster is one of the leading educators of the South, and is a member of the Blue Lodge of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    JOHN H. FREESE, merchant tailor, of Lebanon, Tenn., was born in Hanover, Germany, September 4, 1850. His parents were Wessel and Angelia (Ahrens) Freese, the father being a forester by occupation employed by the Government. They were born in 1812 and 1822, and died in 1881 and 1853, respectively. Wessel Freese was twice married and was the father of seven children, four by his first wife. John H. Freese was educated in the schools of Hanover, attending until fourteen years of age. when he became an apprentice at the tailor's trade and worked as such two and a half years. In 1867 he came to the United States, locating in Louisville, Ky., where he worked at his trade until 1872, with the exception of one year spent in Chicago. At the latter date he went to Chattanooga, Tenn., remaining two and a half years and has resided in the following places: Huntsville, Ala., fifteen months; Fayettville, fifteen months; Tullahoma. three years; Nashville, two years, and in 1881 came to Lebanon, where he has since resided. June 8, 1876, he married Alice Crawford, of Tullahoma. Tenn., born in 1858. They have two children: Eva and Katie. Mr. Freese is a skillful tailor and has built up a lucrative trade. He belongs to the following fraternities: Masonic, I. O. O. F., K. of P. and K. of H. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    JESSE H. GLEAVES is a son of Guy T. and Julia A. (Jennings) Gleaves, and was born May 6, 1859, in Wilson County. Tenn. The father was born in 1814 and was a farmer by occupation, and also followed the mercantile business. He was married in 1851 and died in 1867. The mother was born in 1817 and died in 1885. The subject of our sketch was reared and educated in Wilson County. When only sixteen years of age he began tilling the soil for himself and afterward purchased a farm of thirty-five acres and is now a well-to-do citizen. On the 28th of November, 1880, his marriage with Miss Annie T. Hawks was celebrated. She is a daughter of Preston and Cassandra Hawks. Our subject is a highly respected citizen of the county in which he resides, and a strong supporter and believer in the principles of Democracy. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

    EUGENE C. GLEAVES is a native of Nashville, Tenn., born March 24, 1864, and is one of five children of James W. and Emma L. (Stroud) Gleaves, natives of Wilson County, Tenn. They were married in 1861 and six years later moved to Green Hill, Tenn., where the father opened a dry goods and grocery store, continuing until 1873, when he began ginning cotton. In 1883 he sold his cotton-gin and removed to Nashville, where he now resides. The subject of our sketch was educated in the common schools of Wilson County, and at. the age of eighteen began doing for himself. He was married November 30, 1882, to Rosa B., daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth Lowe, She was born March 7, 1865, and became the mother of two children. Mr. Gleaves has the reputation of being an honest and trustworthy gentleman, and in politics is an old line Democrat and belongs to the I. O. G. T. at Green Hill.

    J. B. GRANDSTAFF, a thrifty farmer and native of the Sixteenth District of Wilson County, Tenn., was born February 17, 1831, and is one of eight children of David and Margaret (Phillips) Grandstaff. The father was born in Wilson County about 1805, and was married in 1828 and immediately began farming. He died January 1, 1852. The mother was born in Wilson County two years later than her husband and died about 1865. Our subject was educated in the schools near home and remained on the home farm until twenty-seven years of age. In 1857 he wedded Miss Arsula, daughter of Stacy and Jane (Anderson) Young. Mrs. Grandstaff was born in Wilson County in 1836. She and her husband became the parents of these children: William D., Jane, Frank, Mary and Martha. Mr. Grandstaff is a well-to-do farmer and owns about 230 acres of valuable and well improved land. He has been very industrious and by his own efforts has accumulated a large amount of property. He is conservative m his political views but on national tickets votes usually with the Democratic party. He belongs to the
 Masonic fraternity and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church,

    WILLIAM J. GRANNIS, A. M., principal of the preparatory school of the Cumberland University, was born April 24, 1823, in Morristown, St, Lawrence Co., N.Y. He was educated in the Jefferson County institute at Watertown, N. Y., and the State Normal School at Albany, N. Y., graduating from the latter in 1847. He began his first work in teaching November 29, 1841, and afterward followed that occupation in Chaumont, N. Y., and the following year was elected principal of the graded school at Cape Vincent, being also superintendent of the town schools, which position he held four years. In 1852 he came to Wilson County, Tenn., having been chosen principal English teacher of the preparatory school of Cumberland University. Owing to the war the school was suspended in 1862, and Prof. Grannis was given a clerkship in the quartermaster's department of the Union Army, stationed at Nashville, holding the position until 1866, when he was appointed as deputy internal revenue collector of the Fifth District of Tennessee. In 1878 he resigned, having previously been elected principal of the preparatory school of Cumberland University, and was at once elected to his former position, thus forcibly illustrating his ability as an educator and a disciplinarian. Previous to the war the degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by the Cumberland University, which demonstrates how high a position he held in the estimation of the faculty and board of trustees. In October, 1849, he was united in marriage to Lucy A. Gates, born in Oneida, N. Y., in September, !829, daughter of Eliphas and Lucy Gates. Prof. and Mrs. Grannis are the parents of the following family: Herbert W., who is assistant teacher in the preparatory school of the university; Hattie, who is music teacher in the girls' department, and Henry. Prof. Grannis and family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His parents, John and Marian (Dunlap) Grannis, were natives of Oneida County and Schoharie County, N. Y., born in 1798 and 1802, respectively. The father was a farmer, and always made "York State" his home. He was married three times, and was the father of two children. He died in 1877 and the mother in 1846.

    J. S. GRIBBLE, attorney at law, of Lebanon, was born in Warren County, Tenn., in October, 1834. His education was received in Videmour College and Burrett College, of Warren and Van Buren Counties, respectively. J.S. speculated in stock for several years after leaving his parents, and in 1856 commenced merchandising in his native county, and continued until the breaking out of the war. In September, 1861. he enlisted in Company B, Fifth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and the same month was appointed commissary of his company, holding the rank of captain. He was captured soon after the battle of Missionary Ridge, and taken to McMinnville, where he was paroled with the condition that he was to report every thirty days. After the surrender of the Confederate Army he returned to Lebanon, and entered the law department of the Cumberland University. remaining two sessions. In February, 1856, he went to Woodbury. Tenn., and began practicing with Judge Robert Cantrell, but in 1879 dissolved partnership by mutual consent. In April of the following year Mr. Gribble came to Lebanon. In 1870 he was appointed judge of the Cannon County Court, and held the office one year. In July, 1857, he wedded S. J. Webb, daughter of B. W. Webb. She was born in 1836, and is the mother of these children: Nora (wife of F. B. Martin), Clingman, Gertrude (wife of J. E. Miller), Hilda (wife of Stokely Black), Robert E., Power, Cannon and Vida. Mr. Gribble is an earnest advocate and safe counselor, and has arisen to distinction in his profession
.
    J. V. GRIGSBY, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Wilson County, Tenn., was born in Clark County, Ky., in 1896, and is one of five children of Lewis K. and Fanny (Bush) Grigsby, natives of Clark County, Ky., born in 1801 and 1804, and died in 1864 and 1849. respectively. They were married about 1822, and the father was a wealthy farmer, owning at the time of his death 300 acres of land. J.V. Grigsby was educated at Winchester. Ky., and after the death of his mother assumed control of the old homestead, of which he became the owner, and to which he added acres until he owned 600 acres of land. October 16, 1867, he married Mary C. Robinson, daughter of Dr. Thomas H. Robinson. Mrs. Grigsby was born April 5, 1848. They have six children: Fannie, Mary W., Thomas R., Amanda C., John V. and Lewis K. In 1878 Mr. Grigsby sold the old home place and came to Wilson County, Tenn., where he purchased 618 acres of land. For the past twenty years he has been dealing in fine horses, cattle and mules. His average price for cattle is about $1,000, but he has received as high as $3,000 for one animal. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are church members.

    WILLIAM HAY HALBERT was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., March 26, 1847, being the son of Pleasant and Nancy (Crawford) Halbert, both of whom were born and raised in the above county. Our subject was brought up on the farm, and attended college at Cain Hill, Ark., for three years under Prof. Buchanan. In about 1867 he began the study of medicine, and in 1872 entered the Eclectic School of Medicine in Cincinnati, and remained until 1873, at which time he returned to his native county and began the practice of his profession. He enlisted in the Ninth Regiment of Tennessee Confederate Cavalry, and before he had reached his eighteenth year was commissioned color-bearer of the same. After six years and a half spent in the practice of medicine in Lincoln County, our subject removed to Lebanon, Wilson County, in order to give his children the benefit of the excellent schools, and also to practice medicine. In September, 1870, he was married to Susan J. Beatie, who was born also in Lincoln County in 1846. To them have been born two children: Thomas Edwin, born in July, 1872, and Mary Beatie (deceased), born September, 1876. Our subject and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Though practicing in a comparatively new school of medicine (the eclectic), Dr. Halbert has succeeded in building up a large practice, and occupies a prominent position in the medical fraternity of Wilson County. He is a member of the National Eclectic Medical Association, and makes a practice of attending all the meetings of the State Association. He is devoted to his profession, and is one of the very few physicians who practice for love of the profession as well as for gain. Our subject's father was one of the wealthiest land and slave owners in Lincoln County before the war.

    W. F. HAMBLEN, an enterprising farmer and stock raiser of the Twenty-fourth District, was born March 30, 1817, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of a family of eleven children born to Joseph F. and Martha (Hill) Hamblen. The father was born in Virginia in 1790 and was of Turkish extraction. In 1815 he immigrated to Wilson County, Tenn., purchased land in the Second District and engaged in farming. By energy and perseverance he accumulated considerable means which enabled him to enjoy the comforts of life. He died May, 1861. The mother was also a native of Virginia, and died in Wilson County in June, 1871. Our subject was reared in the Twenty-fourth District of Wilson County, Tenn., and secured a fair education in the country schools. November 3, 1841, he purchased a farm of 112 acres in the Twenty-fourth District, and in the same year he was united in marriage to Sallie Foster (Cloide) Hamblen. Mr. Hamblin has always followed the occupation of a farmer and in this he has been quite successful. He is a Democrat in politics.

    HON. JAMES HAMILTON, president of the Bank of Lebanon, and one of Wilson County's prominent farmers, was born August 14, 1814, in Loudoun County, Va., and is one of six children born to William and Margaret (Hugley) Hamilton. The father was of Irish descent, born in Virginia, and was a farmer by occupation. In 1815 he came to Wilson County, Tenn., and located in the Twenty-fourth District. He was quite successful as a farmer, owning 1,000 acres at one time. His death occurred in 1840 or 1841. The mother was of English descent and was also a native of Virginia. She died about 1870 at the advanced age of eighty years. Our subject was educated in the country schools and later in the Cumberland University at Nashville. At the age of twenty-two he began teaching, which he continued for several years. May 20, 1841, he married Jane McFarland, daughter of James and Dicy McFarland. Mrs. Hamilton was born August, 1824, in Wilson County. They have five children: Nannie, wife of Dr. W. G. MilIer; Emma, wife of John L. Jones; James W., a farmer; John M., a druggist, and Robert Hatton, a lawyer. In 1856 he bought 1,200 acres in the Third District, where he now resides. In 1881 he succeeded Dr. Owen as president of the Second National Bank of Lebanon, where he remained until 1884, when the Bank of Lebanon was organized, and he was elected as its president. About 1881 he was elected president of the Humbold Carriage & Wagon Factory. Mr. Hamilton has dealt largely in buying and selling land, and at one time was running 1,800 acres, and is a man of marked business capacity and a successful financier. In politics he is a Democrat, and in 1843 he was elected to the Legislature and in 1847 he was elected to the Senate in the State Legislature, and again in 1872. During the war he was appointed colonel of the State militia in Wilson County, and thus he is known as Col. Hamilton.

    J. W. HAMILTON. JR., was born August 10, 1853, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is the eldest son born to Col. James and Jane (McFarland) Hamilton. Our subject was reared on the farm. and received a rudimentary education in the county schools. At the age of fifteen he entered the Central College at Fayette, Mo., which institution he attended for two and a half years, graduating from the mathematical department. After leaving school he secured the position of passenger conductor on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, his line of travel being from Nashville to Lebanon. This position he held for eight years. During the time he was on the railroad he was in partnership with J. R. Shorter in the livery and feed stable business in Lebanon for a period of two years. September 14, 1883, he wedded Ruth Lee Powell, who was born in 1865, and who is the daughter of William and Sarah Powell. To our subject and wife was born one child, James W. In 1884 Mr. Hamilton abandoned the railroad business and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He owns 780 acres on the Nashville Pike, five miles west of Lebanon. The first county court ever held in the county assembled on his farm. Mr. Hamilton is a young man of push and energy, which are essential to success. He is a practical business man, and understands the modern idea of cultivating and enriching the soil. He is very conservative in regard to politics, voting for principle rather than for party. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    SAMUEL HAMILTON, farmer, was born in Guilford County, N. C., March 7, 1818, and is the son of George and Rebecca (Greer) Hamilton. The father, born in Guilford County. N. C., in 1795, was of Irish extraction. He was a farmer by occupation, and in 1819 left his native State and immigrated to Williamson County, Tenn., where he bought 200 acres of land. His death occurred in 1869. The mother was born about 1793 in North Carolina, and died at the unusual age of eighty-five. Our subject was reared on the farm, and secured his education in the country schools held in the old-fashioned log-houses, with stick and mud chimney, greased paper for window lights, puncheons for seats, and the wide fire-place so prevalent in those early days. October 31, 1844, he married Fredonia Rice, daughter of James Rice. She was born about 1825 in Wilson County. This union resulted in the birth of two children: Andrew J. and Rebecca A. After marriage Mr. Hamilton settled on 180 acres in the Twenty-fifth District, which his Grandfather Hamilton received for services rendered in the Revolutionary war. He is very conservative in politics, voting for principle and not for party. He was formerly a member of the old Whig party, casting his first vote for W. H. Harrison in 1840.

    HON. R. A. HANCOCK, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., January 17, 1827, and is one of twelve children of Lewis and Frances (Adams) Hancock, horn in Virginia in 1788 and 1791, and died in Tennessee in 1866 and 1864, respectively. The father was of English origin, and came to Tennessee with his brother, Richard, in 1809. He was married in 1812. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days on a farm and acquired the rudimentary portion of his education in the schools near his home, and afterward attended the Liberty school in DeKalb County, Tenn. January 12, 1858, he married Ann J. Sneed, daughter of John and Annie Sneed. Mrs. Hancock was born in Wilson County, January 29, 1835. She and husband became the parents of these children: Delta (deceased), Etna (wife of Jacob Young), Addie (deceased), Walter, Hallie and Myrtle. After attaining his majority, Mr. Hancock began farming for himself, but at the end of three years went to Texas where he remained six years. He then returned and purchased 500 acres of land in Cannon County, where he remained until the fall of 1879. In 1870 he purchased his present farm and now owns 250 acres of valuable land, also 166 acres of fine land in Cannon County, including the old home place of his father. Mr. Hancock has held various civil offices, and in 1884 was chosen to represent Wilson County in the State Legislature. He is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is always ready to assist laudable enterprises, and has been instrumental in organizing and starting a number of schools. He is a grandson of Benjamin Hancock, who helped prepare the Declaration of Independence. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

    WESLEY HANCOCK, farmer and stock raiser, was born in 1829 in Wilson County, and is the son of Wesley and Polly (Lee) Hancock. The father was born 1787 in the State of North Carolina, and in his early life was a hatter, but in his latter days engaged in farming. He was married in 1815, and in 1818 emigrated to Wilson County, Tenn., where he died in 1865. The mother was born in 1796 in North Carolina, and after the death of her husband made her home with her son, James H. She died January 13, 1883, at the advanced age of eighty-six. Our subject received his education in the schools of his native county, and remained at home until twenty-one years of age. June 6, 1856, he married Margaret Drake, daughter of James and Jane Drake. Mrs. Hancock was born in 1834 in Wilson County, and by her marriage to Mr. Hancock became the mother of three children: Samuel L., Hettie L. and Kate. After marriage our subject bought 244 acres in the Twenty-first District, four miles south of Lebanon, on the Murfreesboro Pike, where he now resides. He has added to his land from time to time, and at the present owns 564 acres. Mr. Hancock is highly esteemed as a good citizen and neighbor. During the late war he was a Union man, but was formerly a member of the old Whig party. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    PROF. J. B. HANCOCK, A. B., A. M., principal of Maple Hill Seminary, was born in July, 1848, in Wilson County and is the son of Martin and Martha (Handcock) Hancock. The father was of Scotch lineage and was born in 1827 in Wilson County. He was a farmer by occupation. His parents, our subject's grandfather and grandmother, were natives of Virginia, coming to Tennessee as early as 1796. They remained in the fort at Nashville for a short time and then came to Wilson County. The grandfather settled on Pilot Knob and assisted in farming the first settlement. Martin Hancock located in the Nineteenth District and purchased 300 acres of land. Here he remained until his career ended. He died April 16, 1876. The mother was of Scotch lineage, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., and her birth occurred in 1832. Since her husband's death she has been living with her son, Prof. J. B. Hancock. The subject of this sketch was reared at home and received the rudiments of his education in the county schools. At the early age of fourteen he assumed control of his father's farm and managed it successfully for some time, and when nineteen years of age he entered the sophomore Class of the Cumberland University, graduating with honors June, 1870. He then entered the teacher's profession and was elected president of Woodbury College, Cannon County, where he remained for two years. Subsequently he was president of different colleges and at the present is president of Maple Hill Seminary, of which institution he is the founder and proprietor. It was organized September 1, 1880, for the purpose of educating young ladies. It is beautifully situated west of Lebanon on the Nashville & Lebanon Pike. It had a gradual increase from its organization and at the present accommodates 118 pupils. Prof. Hancock owns 268 acres of land and supplies his boarding school from the products of this fertile farm. He also owns the old homestead of 300 acres. As an educator, Prof. Hancock ranks among the leaders of the county and is universally recognized as a very able instructor and disciplinarian. In 1870 his alma mater conferred on him the degree of A. B., and in 1873 the degree of A. M.; October 15, 1874, he wedded Julia J. Harris, daughter of Baker W. and Sarah Harris. Mrs. Hancock was born October 29, 1852. in Wilson County. Our subject is a member of the Masonic fraternity (Knights Templar) and K. of P., having taken all the degrees. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and his wife of the Christian Church.

    J. E. HANCOCK, an enterprising farmer of District No. 21, was born August 19, 1852. where he is now living. He is the son of William and Sophia (Hines) Hancock. The father was born June 14, 1818, in District No. 21, Wilson County, and was a farmer by occupation. At the time of his marriage, which occurred February 10, 1842. he was living in his native county. In July, 1845, he bought 135 acres in the Twenty-first District, where he located and remained until his death, which occurred August 18, 1872. He was quite successful as a farmer, owning at one time upward of 1,000 acres. The mother was born January 17, 1824, in Lincoln County, Tenn., and died July 30, 1866. There were seven children born to this union, six of whom are living. Our subject received his education in the country schools, and in addition he attended Woodbury College at Woodbury, Tenn. October 10, 1877, he wedded Carrie Alsup, a native of Wilson County, born September 17, 1860, and the daughter of Rev. A. H. Alsup. To Mr. and Mrs. Hancock were born two children: Homer and Howard. After marriage our subject remained on the old home place where he now resides. He is a young man of push and energy, and owns 590 acres in the Twenty-first District, and he and his wife own 295 acres in the Twenty-third District. In politics he is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    WILLIAM HANNAH, M. D., is a son of John M. and Amelia (Jones) Hannah, and was born October 12, 1828. The parents were of Welsh and Scotch descent, born in 1802 and 1806, respectively, in Tennessee. The father was a farmer, and died in 1830. His widow then married Dr. Hardin Ragland, and died December 15, 1885. Our subject was educated in the Cumberland University, and when twenty-one years old began studying medicine under Dr. Ragland. In 1851 he graduated from the Louisville (Ky.) Medical College, and in February of that year wedded S. E. Hankins, born in 1835 in Wilson County, and daughter of Matthew C. and Martha P. Hankins. They have one child living--John Matthew. Dr. Hannah was with Dr. Ragland two years, and then moved to Cherry Valley and practiced about the same length of time. In 1860 he bought 160 acres of land, and carried on farming with his practice. In 1885 he sold out and moved to Lebanon, and a year later established a livery and feed stable, with Merrit House as partner, still continuing his practice. The Doctor and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he belongs to the Good Templars.

    DR. J. S. HARALSON, farmer, was born August 2, 1832, in Davidson County, Tenn., and is the son of Jara and Margaret (Hessa) Haralson The father was of English descent, born in 1802 in Halifax County, Va., and was a farmer by occupation. He came to Tennessee, and in 1824 was married. In 1839 he bought 500 acres in the Twenty-second District, Wilson County, where he died in 1879. He was twice married, and was the father of six children, three of whom are living. The mother was of Irish descent, born in 1803 in Virginia. She died in 1836. Our subject was reared without a mother's love or training, she having died when he was but four years old. He was educated in the country schools and in Booth Spring Seminary. At the age of twenty-four he commenced the study of medicine, which he continued for three years. In 1854 he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, and took a course of lectures. October 18, 1856, he married Sarah Sanders, a native of Tennessee, born in 1840, and the daughter of Thomas Sanders. To Mr. and Mrs. Haralson were born five children: Leonard, James, Samuel, Chorus and Beulah. In 1857 he began practicing, and continued until the war, when he enlisted in the Second Tennessee Cavalry. He was in the battle of Coffeeville, Belmont, and numerous skirmishes. In February, 1863, he was discharged, and returned home, settling near the old home place. After his father's death he moved to the old homestead, where he has since resided. Dr. Haralson lost his wife in 1872, and in 1881 he married M. F. Gleaves, a native of Tennessee, born in 1854, and by this union became the father of three children: Zara, Mary and Etta G. The Doctor now owns 394 acres, and is a Prohibitionist. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

    WILLIAM M. HARKREADER, clerk of the Wilson County Court, was born February 9, 1839, the youngest of three children born to John F. and Judith (Oldham) Harkreader. The father was of German origin, born in Virginia in 1805, and a wheelwright and farmer by occupation. He came to Robertson County, Tenn., in his youth, but after residing some time in Kentucky came to Wilson County, Tenn., and there resided until his death in 1878. The mother was born in 1810, and came from Virginia to Tennessee in her youth, and here died in 1878, only a few hours previous to that of her husband. William M. was educated in the schools of Wilson County, and at the breaking out of hostilities between the North and South he enlisted in Company I, Seventh Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and participated in many of the bloodiest engagements of the war. He was so severely wounded at the second battle of Manassas that his left arm was amputated. At the reorganization of the army he was made second lieutenant, and rose to the rank of first lieutenant. After receiving his wound he was given post duty until 1864, when he resigned, but was captured at Rome, Ga., and taken to Johnson's Island, where he remained until the surrender. After his return home he attended school ten months, and in 1870 was elected revenue collector of Wilson County for two years, and in 1873 was appointed to fill an unexpired term in the same office by the county court. In 1877 he was appointed deputy clerk of the county court, and served until 1880. Since 1882 he has held his present office, and has given good satisfaction. December 5, 1878, he married Ella L. Coe, daughter of J. F. Coe. Mrs. Harkreader was born in 1859 in Lebanon. They have one child, Mary L. Mr. Harkreader is a Mason, a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P. and A. O. U. W.

    J. A. HAYNES, proprietor of a boot and shoe store and manufacturing establishment of Lebanon, was born March 2, 1825, in Williamson County, Tenn., son of Anderson and Margaret (Swift) Haynes, born in Virginia, the father in 1784. He was a carpenter, and after his marriage came to Williamson County, Tenn., where he died in 1830. The mother died in 1827, thus leaving our subject without a protector. At the age of eight years he was bound out to John M. Wright, of whom he learned the shoe-maker's trade, continuing four years, at the expiration of which he was bound out to William Denning, of Nashville, remaining with him seven years. In 1844 he came to Lebanon and in 1845 established a boot and shoe establishment. At the latter date he married Elizabeth Harrington, daughter of H. and L. Harrington. Mrs. Haynes died in 1848, having borne two children, both of whom are deceased. September 2, 1849, Mr. Haynes married Martha Smith, born in 1831, daughter of James and Elizabeth Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Haynes have two children: John and Elizabeth. Mr. Haynes is the oldest business man of Lebanon, and his boot and shoe establishment is the next oldest in the United States. By his straightforward course through life he has deservedly prospered. He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk. He is a Mason and a member of Lodge No. 98, of Lebanon, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    LEE HAYS, farmer, was born at Cottage Home, Tenn., in September, 1834, and is one of nine children born to James T. and Marlinda (Knight) Hays, natives of North Carolina, born in 1803 and 1807 and died in 1864 and 1875, respectively. They were married in Tennessee in 1825. Our subject was educated in the schools near his home, and on the 24th of April, 1861, wedded Miss M. P.. daughter of James M. and Nancy Weatherby. She was born in Rutherford County in 1844, and departed this life April 12, 1877. To them were born five children, four of them now living: Martha L., James P., Hattie M. and Lockie D. In March. 1880, he wedded F., daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Kiolon. Mrs. Hays was born in 1854, and has borne three children: Stokley B., Mary E. and Fannie. Our subject remained under the paternal roof until he was twenty-six years of age, but began farming for himself some time before. Since his marriage he has lived on the old homestead and now owns 100 acres of valuable land. In 1859 he began merchandising at Cottage Home, continuing until the war. In 1881 he began the business in partnership with J. B. Eastes, and at the end of one year became sole proprietor. Later he disposed of his stock and has since given his attention to farming, and has dealt extensively in mules and hogs for upward of thirty years. He is a Democrat and a member of the I. O. O. F., and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

    JAMES B. HORN, farmer and an old citizen of District No. 3, was born in 1828, near his present residence, and was reared without a father's care or training, his father having died when our subject was but six years old. His education was received in the pioneer schools of his native county. May 4, 1854, he married Margaret A. Vaughan, who was born November 5, 1833, in Davidson County, Tenn. To this union were born three children: Bettie, Fannie and James A. Mr. Horn is living on the old place and owns 128 acres of the old home tract, but his son James looks after the interest of the tract in a skillful and successful manner. Mrs. Horn died September 12, 1861, and for the past seventeen years Bettie Horn has been keeping house for her brother and father. Mr. Horn was at one time a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In politics he is a Democrat. He is the son of Etheldred P. and Elizabeth N. (Baker) Horn. The father was born in 1796, in the State of North Carolina, and was a tiller of the soil. He came to Tennessee in the early part of the present century, and bought 640 acres in District No. 3, five miles west of Lebanon, where he settled and where his career ended September 1, 1835, while he was yet in the prime of life. The mother was born about 1792, in Baltimore County, Md. After the death of her husband she lived on the old home place with her son James, our subject, until her death, which occurred in 1873.

    J. M. HORN, farmer, was born in 1843. in Smith County, Tenn., son of Burrell and Abigail (Traywick) Horn. The father was of English descent, and was a native of Hanson County, N. C. He was married in his native county, and was a farmer by occupation, immigrating to Smith County, Tenn., about 1837. At the time of his death, which occurred in 1866, he was living in Lawrence County, Ark. The mother was of Welsh descent, a native of Hanson County, N. C., and since her husband's death has been living in Arkansas. They were the parents of ten children, five of whom are living. At the age of sixteen our subject left home, and when hostilities broke out between the North and South he enlisted in May, 1861, in Company B, Seventh Tennessee Regiment Infantry, Confederate States Army. He took an active part in the battles of Cheat Mountain, Romney, Seven Pines, Cold Harbor, where he was wounded in the right arm and released from active duty for about two weeks. He afterward fought in the battles of Cedar Run, Second Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, where he was captured and taken to Fort Delaware, but was kept a very short time. He returned to Smith County after the war, and in a few days came to Wilson County, and has lived there ever since. In connection with farming he began the study of law, and in 1869 was admitted to the bar, and from that date to the present he has been practicing his profession. December 31, 1882, he married Isabell R. Harris, a native of Wilson County, born December 6, 1860, and the daughter of W. D. Harris. Mr. Horn commenced life as a poor boy, but by perseverance and industry is doing finely. He now owns 1,400 acres, and is an honest and respectable citizen. In politics he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Jefferson Davis. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    J. W. HUDDLESTON, retired physician and surgeon, of Lebanon, was born in Tennessee in 1834, son of W. W. and Mary (Tarver) Huddleston. The father was born in Buckingham County, Va., in 1808, and was a farmer and merchant by occupation. He came to Tennessee in his boyhood and was married in 1827, dying in 1855. The mother was born in Tennessee in 1812, and died in 1854. J.W. Huddleston attended the academies of his native county and the University of Nashville for nearly two years. At the age of twenty he began studying medicine under Dr. Alsup, and the following year entered the medical department of the Nashville University, graduating in March, 1857. as an M. D. He practiced for some time in Nashville, afterward in Wilson County; thence to Marshall County, in 1877. In 1884, he finally located in Lebanon, where he purchased property and has since resided. He has been a leading man in his profession, and in 1862 was surgeon in the Confederate armies. In politics the Doctor is a Democrat, but was a Whig while that party was in existence. In February, 1858, he was married to Alice Robertson, daughter of Dr. Peyton and Ellen (Davis) Robertson, and granddaughter of Gen. James Robertson, one of Tennessee's most noted pioneers. He was a sturdy, brave and influential man, and Robertson County was named in his honor. (See history for further facts concerning him.) Mrs. Huddleston was born in Nashville, in 1838, and she and husband have two children, Nellie (wife of W. R. Chambers) and Josie.

    R. M. IRELAND, agent of the Southern Express Company and freight agent of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad at Lebanon, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., July 28, 1844, and is one of twelve children born to the marriage of Benjamin W. and Fannie (Stratton) Ireland, who were of Irish descent, born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1789 and 1817, respectively. The father was a teacher by profession, but later in life followed merchandising and farming. He died in 1853. The mother was a daughter of James and Fannie Stratton and after her husband's death lived on the old home place with her children until 1875, when she broke up housekeeping and afterward resided with her children. She died in Nashville in 1881. Our subject attended the common schools and one session at Chapel Hill Seminary in Marshall County. In 1871 he was appointed deputy sheriff of Sumner County, and held the office four years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Second Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in many of the battles of the war, serving until the close, not being wounded or captured during his service. December 9, 1867, he married Maggie Scroggin, who died in January, 1875. A year later he came to Lebanon and became night watchman for the Lebanon Depot, and eight months later was appointed express messenger and baggage master on the railroad between Lebanon and Nashville, and in 1878 was given his present position. October 2, 1878, he married Addie Kelly, daughter of Hanson and Annie Kelly, of New Orleans. Mrs. Ireland was born October 2, 1857. They have three children: Laura, Hanson and Fannie. Mr. Ireland is very popular as a railroad official, and in politics is a Democrat. He is a member of the K. of P., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    THOMAS JENKINS is one of ten children born to Simon and Nancy (Muse) Jenkins, and was born in Warren County, Ky., September 10, 1822, and there received his education. He made his home with his parents as long as they lived and then he and a brother managed the homestead for several years. In 1869 he came to Lebanon and in 1871 engaged in the grocery business, and after continuing for seven years he added hardware to his stock, but sold out in 1855. In July, 1884, he purchased a beautiful home, consisting of fifty-eight acres in the suburbs of Lebanon. During Mr. Jenkins' career as a merchant in Lebanon he carried a No. 1 stock and was one of the leading business men of Lebanon for fifteen years. During his long lease of life he has proved himself to be "an honest man, the noblest work of God." He is liberal in all benevolent movements, and is an earnest member of the Baptist Church. He is a Democrat. The father and mother were born in Virginia in 1793 and 1800, and died in 1845 and 1847, respectively. They were married in Virginia about 1809 and moved to Warren County, Ky., and there purchased 680 acres of land and became a very successful farmer. He at one time owned 1,826 acres, but gave liberally to his children.

    J. M. and J. L. JENNINGS constitute the firm of Jennings Bros., merchants of  Statesville, Tenn. They are two of five children of J. L. and Martha (Doss) Jennings. who were born in Wilson County. Tenn., and DeKalb County, Tenn., October 20, 1827, and July 7, 1828, respectively. They were married in 1830 and located near Statesville, where they still reside. J.M. Jennings, the older member of the firm, was born in Wilson County September 31, 1836, and in 1880 entered into partnership with his cousin A. L. Jennings in the mercantile business, continuing for about eighteen months when he purchased his cousin's interest, and up to 1885 carried on the business by himself. At that time his brother J. L. became his partner. He was married January 26, 1885, to Miss Lena, daughter of J. P. Hale. She was born August 17, 1867, and has borne one child--Mamie. Mr. Jennings is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. J.L. Jennings was born December 25, 1858, and remained with his parents until he attained his majority. He purchased a farm near Statesville, on which he lived several years, and in 1885 became a partner with his brother in the mercantile business. He is also proprietor of a hotel in Statesville, and controls a large share of the traveling public. October 13, 1881, he wedded Miss S. A., daughter of Dr. T. H. Knight. He is a Democrat, and he and his brother are recognized as honest and upright business men.

    C. L. JOHNS was born in Lebanon, Tenn., in 1850, being one of two sons of Charles L. and Elizabeth (Davis) Johns. The father was a Baptist minister of the State of Tennessee, and after his marriage also worked at the printer's trade. At the time of his death, in 1850, he was a resident of Lebanon. The mother was born in 1823, and since her husband's death has been living with her mother and son in Lebanon. C.L. Johns was educated in private schools and in the Cumberland University. When quite young he began working in a brick-yard, receiving 25 cents per day for his services, and also clerked in W. H. Brown's dry goods store in Franklin, Ky., and in Lebanon for several years. In 1871 he went to Nashville, and after clerking there two years returned to Lebanon and resumed work with Mr. Brown, with whom he remained until 1879, when he established a dry goods store of his own in Lebanon, which he has conducted very successfully to the present time. February 5, 1879. he was married to Kate Cowen. who was born in 1854, daughter of Dr. M. W. and Addie Cowen. Mrs. Johns died June 28, 1880, and since that time Mr. Johns has resided with his mother. Mr. Johns is a good business man and one of the first merchants of Lebanon. He is a Democrat and a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P., and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    J. C. JOHNSON is one of nine children born to the marriage of James and Cassandy Johnson, natives of the Old Dominion, were born in 1772 and 1774, and died in 1848 and 1846, respectively. They were married about 1800, and came to Tennessee in 1806, where they purchased land and followed the occupation of farming. Our subject, J. C. Johnson, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., December 20, 1816. He was reared on a farm. and his education was obtained in the district schools near his home. December 23, 1841, he led to the hymeneal altar Miss Locky Craddock, daughter of Richard and Nancy Craddock. She was born in February, 1817, and departed this life July 20, 1864. To them were born these children: Richard, Locky (wife of Lewis Tribble), Mary J. (wife of H. C. David), Emily (wife of T. K. David) and Dr. J. H., now a practicing physician of Nashville. After attaining his twenty-first birthday our subject went to West Tennessee, where he remained one year and then returned home and began managing his father's farm. For his second wife he wedded Mrs. Malissa (Bedel) Branch, who was born June 24, 1833. They have three children: Joseph M., Andrew and Ida. Mr. Johnson is a well-to-do farmer, and has always contributed liberally to church and school organizations. He is a Republican, and was strongly opposed to secession. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    CALVIN JONES, an enterprising farmer of Cherry Valley, Tenn., was born in Wilson County, November 23, 1819, being one of eight children of William and Lucy (Wamack) Jones, natives of Virginia, born in 1791 and 1798 respectively. The father came to Tennessee when a boy, and was married September 25, 1816. He was a farmer by occupation, and died December 7, 1848, and the mother in 1835. The subject of our sketch was reared on a farm and received his education in the schools near his home. June 18. 1846, he was married to Miss Susanna, daughter of Ethelrid and Nancy Barby. Mrs. Jones was born November 3, 1824, and has borne her husband two children: Nancy A. (wife of George Donnel) and Mandy (widow of John H. Berry). At an early day Mr. Jones learned the blacksmith's trade, and after his marriage worked at that business for twenty-two years. After his father's death he and his brother Alfred purchased about 170 acres of the home farm and discontinued smithing. He has devoted his time to farming, but spent a few years in operating a saw-mill. He now owns 211 acres of land, on which he erected a fine dwelling house. Mr. Jones is noted for his honesty, and is much esteemed by a large circle of friends and relatives.

    J. H. KENNEDY is one of thirteen children of William B. and Drusilla (Hobson) Kennedy, and was born in Wilson County, Tenn., June 23, 1816. The father was born in the "Old Dominion" in 1781, and went to Kentucky with his widowed mother when a youth, and later came to Tennessee and died in September, 1840. The mother was born in Tennessee in 1801, and died in 1853. Our subject was educated near home, and February 28, 1839, married Lucinda C., daughter of James and Nancy Ewing. Mrs. Kennedy was born in 1819, and has borne five children: J.W., N. D. (wife, of Horace Knight), Mary E. (wife of Daniel Smith), J. T. and S. A. (wife of C. P. Rich). At the age of eighteen our subject began working for Tally & Bro., merchants, of Statesville, and a year later became a soldier in the Seminole war, and his company acted as advance guard for the regular army. After again serving some time as salesman he purchased 200 acres of land where he now lives, and which he has increased to 300 acres. He suffered large losses from the effects of the civil war, but in the main, fortune has dealt kindly with him. He belongs to the Democratic party and the Masonic fraternity. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.

    JOHN D. KIRKPATRICK, D. D., professor of historic and practical theology in Cumberland University and editor and proprietor of the Lebanon Register, was born July 8, 1836, son of Anderson and Eliza (Moss) Kirkpatrick, who were the parents of nine children. The father was of Scotch-Irish lineage, born in Wilson County in 1808, a farmer and stock raiser by occupation. He was married about 1828, and has since resided on the the old homestead, which consists of several hundred acres. The mother was born in 1814 in Christian County, Ky., and died in 1875. Our subject received his rudimentary education in the county schools, and afterward attended the Hartsville High School for three years and the high school at Mount Juliet two years. At the age of nineteen he entered Cumberland University, remaining two years. In 1857 he entered the Theological Seminary of. the same institution. He began teaching in 1854, and in 1858 became a minister of the Presbyterian Church, being ordained in 1860. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Maney's company, First Tennessee Regiment. In 1862 he returned to Sumner County and raised Companies C and D, and was elected captain of Company C, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry. He participated in many of the principal battles of the war, and rose to the rank of colonel. He was seriously wounded at Cynthiana, Ky., and was compelled to give up active duty, and was given charge of the enrolling department at Richmond, Va. He was also chaplain of his regiment. After his return he resumed teaching, and November 1, 1866, he married Susan Kirkpatrick, who has borne him four children: Curry B., Donnell B., John D. and Harry B. In 1865 he was given the pastorate of the Goodlettsville Cumberland Presbyterian Church, where he remained four years, and then took charge of the Second Cumberland Church of Nashville. In 1875 he was called to Lebanon to become the financial agent of Cumberland University, and at the same time accepted the chair of historic and practical theology, which lie has since filled with credit to himself and honor to the institution. In 1880 he was made managing editor and proprietor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Review. This he disposed of, however, and in 1885 took charge of the Register. In December of the same year the building caught fire, and was consumed with all its contents. He immediately re-established himself and is at present editing a newsy and valuable paper. In 1884 the degree of D. D. was conferred upon him entirely unsolicited. He is a man of unsullied reputation, a gentleman and a scholar. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and K. of H. and K. of P.

    N. P. LANOM, farmer and miller, of District No. 23, was born in 1839, in Wilson County, and is the son of William R. and Sallie (Leath) Lanom. The father was born November 25, 1809, in Rutherford County, Tenn., and was a farmer by occupation. Soon after his marriage he moved to Bedford County, and in four or five years moved back to Wilson County, where he bought upward of 400 acres of land in the Twenty-third District. He died in 1874. The mother was born July 22, 1811, and is now living with her daughter, Mrs. W. N. Flowers. Our subject's grandfather, Nathan Lanom, was a native of North Carolina, and came to Wilson County previous to the year 1800, and was one of the first settlers of that county. Our subject was reared at home, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company G, Seventh Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and fought in the battles of Seven Pines, Richmond and Cedar Run. In the last named battle he was wounded in the thigh, the cause of which relieved him from active duty about four months, he being in the hospital at Charlottsville, Va. After recovering from his wounds he received an unlimited furlough and returned home. In the fall of 1863 he enlisted in Company D, Tennessee Cavalry, and remained out until after the surrender. February 2, 1864, he married Caldonia Tennessee Burke, who was born in Wilson County December, 1844, and the fruits of this union were six children: Sallie A., William J., Lucy J., Laura L., Freddie and Nannie A. In 1866 Mr. Lanom bought 160 acres in the Twenty-third District, where he now lives. He has been a hard-working and industrious man. and now owns 600 acres of land. In 1884 he purchased a saw-mill, and the following year added a grist-mill, both of which he runs in connection with his farm. He is a Democrat in politics, casting his first vote for John Bell, in 1860. He and wife are worthy members of the Baptist Church.

     JOHN A. LESTER, merchant, miller and farmer, of Lebanon, Tenn., was born on the 21st of April, 1827, in Wilson County, and is a son of Henry D. and Malinda (Jones) Lester. The father is a native of Virginia, born in 1800. He came with his parents to Tennessee when he was about nine years old and located in Wilson County. He became a wealthy farmer and an influential citizen and held several county offices. He died in 1875. The mother was born in Tennessee in 1805, and died in 1874. Our subject was educated in the Campbell Academy of Lebanon, and in 1855 formed a partnership with his father in the grocery business, continuing two years. In 1858 he and Mr. S. A. Carter became partners in the grocery business, continuing until the breaking out of the war. In 1863 he began milling and formed partnerships with the following gentlemen: W. Hallum, William Carter and J. D. Lester. Mr. Lester is the oldest and one of the most successful merchants and millers in the State. He owns a farm of 800 acres and resides in a beautiful and substantial dwelling-house. June 12, 1860, he wedded Martha (Dillon) Williams, daughter of Thomas and Harriet (Roane) Dillon. The mother's uncle, Archibald Roane, was the second governor of Tennessee. Her brother, John Seldon Roane, was governor of Arkansas, and her brother, Samuel C. Roane, was judge of the Supreme Bench of Arkansas. Mrs. Lester was born September 9, 1833, and had two children by her former marriage, Seldon R. and Dixon C. Seldon is president of the Second National Bank of. Lebanon, and Dixon is the noted evangelist of Tennessee and is at present in California. Mr. Lester and family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    WILLIAM J. LESTER was born in 1825 in Wilson County, Tenn., the eldest son of Henry D. and Malinda (Jones) Lester. (See J. A. Lester for parents' sketch.) William was educated in the Campbell Academy of Lebanon, and after residing with his parents until twenty-one years old he worked at the blacksmith's trade and the following three years tilled his father's farm. December 18, 1851, he was married to Othelda Haney, daughter of Elijah and Clarkey Haney. Mrs. Lester was born in 1833 in Smith County, Tenn., and bore her husband one child, Matilda E., who wedded Anderson Crookshankes and died in 1885. Mr. Lester purchased 237 acres of land near Lebanon, where he now resides. His wife died in 1853 and in 1856 he took for his second wife, Sarah F. (Seay) Belcher, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Seay. Mrs. Lester was born in 1835 and died in 1885, having borne one child, Daniel R. who is a farmer in Smith County. Mr. Lester joined Company F, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and was in the battles of Murfreesboro, Wartrace, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Marietta, Ga., and many minor engagements. He was so severely wounded in the left leg at the last named engagement that amputation was performed June 22, 1864. He kept a grocery in Georgia for some time but returned home in June, 1865. He has been a prosperous farmer of Wilson County for many years and previous to the war speculated in mules. He is.a Democrat in polities, formerly a Whig, and belongs to the order of Good Templars and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    J. R. LESTER, M. D., was born November 1, 1836, and is one of nine children of Henry D. and Malinda (Jones) Lester; the family is of English descent. Our subject resided with his parents until he reached man's estate. He received his education in the Cumberland University, and at the age of nineteen began studying medicine and graduated, in 1860, from Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Penn. He then returned to his birth-place, where he has ever since practiced his profession. May 20, 1861, he enlisted in the Seventh Tennessee, Hatton's regiment and was appointed assistant surgeon. After the battle of Seven Pines, Va., he became commander of a company of cavalry in Col. Baxter Smith's regiment and served in this capacity until the close of the war. August 16, 1865, he wedded Miss Sallie, daughter of William Williamson, of Wilson County, and became the father of five children: Nellie, Jennie, Jimmie, Marie and John. Dr. Lester is a stanch Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Buchanan. The Doctor and his wife are leading members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is one of
the leading physicians of the county.

    J. D. LESTER'S birth occurred near Lebanon, Tenn., in 1839; son of Henry D. and Malinda (Jones) Lester. He received his education in Cumberland University and Jefferson College, and at the breaking out of the war between North and South he enlisted in Company D, Seventh Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and during his service took an active part in many of the principal battles and skirmishes of the war. He returned home May 20, 1865. June 18, 1862, he was married to Marcella Henderson, daughter of William and Mary Henderson, and by her became the father of nine children: Henry D., Gertrude, Robert E., Albert D., Floyd H., Jessie F., Blanche, Wade H. and Joseph A. In 1867 Mr. Lester began working in the flouring-mill of Carter & Lester, as book-keeper, remaining with them in this capacity eight years. In 1875 Mr. Lester purchased a one-fourth interest in the mill, but in August, 1877, sold his interest and purchased 200 acres of land near Lebanon, which he has since increased to 330 acres. He uses modern methods of cultivating the soil and his land yields him rich returns. In politics he is a Democrat and is a member of the Baptist Church and his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    N. LAWRENCE LINDSLEY, LL.D. (deceased), one of Tennessee's most prominent and influential educators, was born September 11, 1816, in Princeton. N. J., and is a son of Philip Lindsley, who was also a leading educator of New Jersey and Tennessee. In 1817 he was elected as vice-president of the college of New Jersey. and in 1822 was acting president of the same. The followilng year he was chosen president of the University of Tennessee, but declined the honor. In 1824 he was again elected, and Janurary, 12, 1825, he assumed control and was president of that institution until 1850. In May of the latter year he was elected professor of ecclesiastical polity and Biblical archaeology in the New Albany (Ind.) Theological Seminary. In 1853 he resigned, and from that date until his career ended, in 1855, his time was spent in study and devotion to his friends. Lawrence Lindsley left his native State in 1825 and came to Nashville, Tenn. with his parents. At the age of sixteen he was nominated to a cadetship at West Point, being appointed by President Jackson, who was a personal friend of his father's, but remained only two years, owing to the severity of the climate. He entered the University of Nashville, graduating with honors in 1836. In 1841 he wedded Julia M., daughter of Moses B., and Sarah (Bedford) Stephens, the father, being a prominent educator of his day. Mrs. Lindsley was born July 30, 1823, in the building now known as the Nicholson House, in Nashville. To Dr. and Mrs. Lindsley were born these children: Philip, a lawyer of Dallas, Tex.; Henry S. (deceased); N. Lawrence (deceased); John B., a stock trader of Lebanon; Joseph W., a farmer of Wilson County, and Kate S. (wife of Edgar Waters). The maternal grandfather was a student in Princeton (N. J.) College and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war from North Carolina, receiving for his bravery the "Lawrence Grant" of 2,640 acres of land in Wilson County, Tenn. of which our subject received 500 acres. In 1844 Lawrence Lindsley was elected professor of Latin and Greek in the Cumberland University. and in 1859 established the Greenwood Seminary for young ladies, which became a model of its kind. The degree of LL.D. was conferred upon him by the Cumberland University. He died October, 10, 1868 and it may be truly said of him that he was an accomplished and profound scholar. At the time of his death he was engaged on the production of a work called "An Encyclolexicon of the English Language," which was intended to be a complete dictionary of the English Language. He was the soul of honor and manliness, a philanthropist and Christian. At his desire his wife became principal of the school he had founded, and conducted it successfully until her death July 8, 1883. She was a lady of more than ordinary accomplishments and energy, and her object and aim was to give to young ladies a grand conception of real life, and while her death occurred in the midst of a prosperous work, her life was such that its good influences have not ended, and her name is a house hold word in many Southern families. Both husband and wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    FRANK LINDSLEY, farmer of Twenty-First District, was born in Davidson County, October 13, 1856, son of Hon. Adrian V. S. and Eliza (Trimble) Lindsley. The father was born in Princeton, N. J., September, l4, 1814, and immigrated to Davidson County when but a boy, and soon after entered the University of Nashville where he graduated at the very early age of seventeen. He then commenced the practice of law in which he was quite successful, During the war he was postmaster at Nashville after which he was for some time president and secretary of the Mount Olivet Cemetery, and also had an important railroad position. In 1867 he represented Davidson County in the State Senate, and was for forty-six years president and secretary of the board of trustees of Nashville University. In 1834 he married Miss Eliza Trimble, by whom he became the father of twelve children, nine of whom are living. His father, Philip Lindsley, was president of Princeton College, but resigned that position to accept the presidency of the University of Nashville. Our subject remained at home until he was twenty four years of age, receiving his education at the University of Nashville, and graduated from that institution when but eighteen years of age. He then entered the medical department of the Nashville and Vanderbilt University, where be remained two years. About seven years subsequent to his leaving school he was engaged in assisting his father in his railroad business. In 1881 he purchased 530 acres of land in District No. 21, Wilson County, a part of a tract which was donated to his great-grandfather, Nathaniel Lindsley, for services rendered during the war of Independence. October, 13, 1880, he wedded Lucy Brutton, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and by her became the father of two children: Eliza V. and Lucy. Mr. Lindsley is one of the most substantial members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    T. G. LOGUE, deceased, was a farmer and the proprietor of a tannery, and was one of six children born to C. and M. (Randels) Logue. His birth occurred March 11, 1820. The father was born June 29, 1778. and was of English descent. He was a tiller of the soil and after reaching a good old age died March, 1863. The mother was born in Robertson County and died in Wilson County, Tenn, in 1843. Our subject received a fair practical education in the country schools and for some time carried on the tannery business for his father. July 11, 1844, his marriage with Nancy Bass, was solemnized. To this union were born eleven children: Margaret E., Mary E., James R., Tapley G., Catharine B., Robert H., Tennessee, Joshua C., Lucy A., Martha and Franklin L. Mr. Logue had accumulated considerable land and at his death, which occurred July 28, 1882, was the owner of about 1,200 acres. He had an unsullied reputation and was much esteemed by all who knew him. He was a supporter of the principles of Democracy, a member of the I. O. O. F. and belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Logue, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    ANDREW B. MARTIN, LL.D., attorney at law and professor of law in Cumberland University was born in Smith County, Tenn., in 1836, son of Matthew and Matilda (Crow) Martin, both born in Virginia and Ireland, respectively. The father was born about 1800 and was married about 1822. He was a physician and was educated at Clinton College. At the time of his death in 1849 he was a resident of Paris, Texas. The mother was born in 1804 and came to the United States with her mother in 1812. Soon after her husband's death she returned to Tennessee with her family of twelve children. She devoted her life to their welfare and died in 1876. Our subject early cherished the idea of becoming a lawyer, but owing to the untimely death of his parents and other adverse circumstances, he was compelled to abandon the idea for some time. At the age of eleven years he worked in a brick-yard all summer for $13 and at the age of thirteen he left home and began earning his own living. In April, 1852. he reached Lebanon, Tenn., an entire stranger, without money and eighty-five miles from home. He secured a position in the drug store of Allison & Cook with whom he remained five years. His leisure hours were spent in study and in 1857 he began reading Blackstone. He was aided by the faculty of Cumberland University and was made their book-keeper for his tuition. In 1858 he graduated from the same and immediately entered upon the practice of his profession and was regarded as a successful, earnest advocate and safe counselor. He formed a partnership with W. H. Williamson, but at the breaking out of war he enlisted in Company H, Seventh Tennessee Volunteer Infantry and fought in many bloody battles. He served as third lieutenant of his company for some time and was then made adjutant-general upon the staffs of Gen. G. G. Dribrell and Gen. Wheeler. He served about four years and returned home May 20,1865. He immediately resumed his practice and May 6, 1868, wedded Alice Ready, daughter of Hon. Charles Ready, of Murfreesboro. She was born in 1842 and has borne her husband five children: Mary, Martha, Andrew, Helen and Bennett. In 1876 he was elected professor of law in his old alma mater and has since held the position. In 1871-72 he was a member of the lower house of the State Legislature, being chairman of the Judiciary Committee. In 1880 he was elector of the State at large in the election of Hancock and English and canvassed the State in their behalf. He has been special judge of the circuit and chancery courts numerous times and is in every sense of the word a self-made man, and from his childhood has displayed qualities of head and heart which have enabled him to surmount obstacles which would have discouraged many men.

    J. B. MARTIN is one of six children born to George W. and Judith (Bradley) Martin. The father was born in Virginia in 1796 and came to Tennessee with his parents when but two years of age. In 1820 he married and located on a farm in Wilson County, where he lived until his death. The mother was born March 8, 1803. Our subject was born August 23, 1823, and educated in the district schools and remained at home looking after the interests of his father's farm until October 31, 1850, when he married Lucinda R., daughter of J. and Mary Holmes. She was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1833, and died June 19, 1879, leaving two daughters: Mary (wife of A. B. McKnight), and Annie (wife of R. G. Byrn). November 6, 1884, Mr. Martin married Mrs. Thompson of the Fifteenth District, born in Wilson County, in November, 1836. Since his first marriage Mr. Martin has resided on the home place, where he owns 169 acres of land. He and wife are members of the church, and he is a Democrat in politics and belongs to the I. O. O. F.

    W. D. MARTIN, one of the old citizens and farmers of the Twenty-first District, was born September 28, 1826, in Wilson County. He is the son of Lindsey C. and Nancy (Stacy) Martin. The father was born about 1794, in Virginia, and was a farmer by occupation; he moved to the Twenty-second District near Gladesvi!le, where he settled and remained until his death, which occurred in December, 1884. He was ninety years of age. The mother was born August, 1791, in North Carolina, and came to Wilson County when quite young. They crossed the mountains by team. She died in 1877 at the advanced age of eighty-six. Our subject received his education in the county schools and October 2, 1851, he wedded Mary J. Shannon, a native of Tennessee, born April, 1836, and the daughter of James and Mary Shannon. To our subject and wife were born two children: Mary D., wife of Dr. Finis Shannon, Jr., and James L., who married Fanny Steed, to this last union were born four children: John A., Elsie M., Marcus W. and Mary O. After marriage our subject bought 150 acres in the Twenty-third District, where he lived sixteen years. He then sold out and bought 273 acres in the Twenty-first District, where he has since resided. He is one of Wilson County's old citizens and is highly spoken of as an honest citizen and good neighbor. In politics he has been a life-long Democrat, and he and wife members of the Baptist Church. In 1876 he was elected magistrate of the Twenty-first District, which office he held in an able manner for six years.

    HON. R. P. McCLAIN, attorney at law, of Lebanon, Tenn., is a son of John A. and Minerva (Ross) McClain, and one of their ten children. He was born February, 1838, in Wilson County, and received his rudimentary education in the academies of his native county, and afterward entered the Cumberland University as a junior at the age of twenty, graduating in June, 1860. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H, Seventh Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and in 1862 was given a position in the quartermaster's department. In 1862 he was made paymaster in A. P. Hill's division, and held the position until the close of the war. From 1866 to 1867 he studied law in Cumberland University, graduating at the latter date. February 26 of the same year he married Hettie McKenzie, daughter of Alexander McKenzie. Mrs. McClain was born in Illinois in 1842, and is the mother of four children: Jennie, Minnie, Alexander and Hettie. Mr. McClain first practiced his profession with A. Vick as partner, continuing until 1870, when he was appointed deputy clerk of the county court, succeeding his uncle, J. S. McClain, who had been clerk for forty years in succession. He held the position, by re-election, for eight years, in 1875 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature, and from 1876 to 1883 was clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Wilson County. Since then he has practiced law. In 1875 he and his brother, J. T., became proprietors of a dry goods store, and since 1884 the firm has been known as McClain Bros. & Co. They keep a general line of goods and occupy eight rooms 100 feet long. Mr. McClain has been a leading man of Lebanon for the past twenty years, and is a shrewd business manager and successful financier. The father, John McClain, was of Scotch-Irish descent and was born in Tennessee in 1807. He was a farmer and the possessor of 400 acres at the time of his death in 1867. The mother was of Scotch descent, born in Wilson County in 1809.

    JOHN B. McCLAIN, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., April 26, 1842, and is the son of Anson and Minerva (Rocks) McClain. Our subject received his education at Silver Spring High School, of Wilson County, and made his home with his parents until hostilities broke out between the North and South, when he became one of the boys in gray. He enlisted May, 1861, in Company B, Forty-fifth Regiment of Tennessee Infantry. He took an active part in the battle of Shiloh and numerous other engagements. The last two years of the war he was in the quartermaster department, being stationed most of the time at Petersburg. He returned home in the spring of 1865 after an absence of nearly four years. August 9, 1877, he married Sue Brent, daughter of Joe and Amanda Brent. Mrs. McClain was born August 23, 1849, in Davidson County, Tenn., and by her union with Mr. McClain became the mother of two children: Anson Brent and Lollie Bell. After marriage Mr. McClain remained on the old home place and cared for and looked after the interest of his father and mother. In 1881 he bought 125 acres in the Third District, six miles west of Lebanon, where he settled and has since resided. Mr. McClain bears the reputation of being an industrious and conscientious citizen. He is a Democrat in politics, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    ROBINSON McMILLAN, attorney at law, is a son of Frank P. and Jane F. (Robinson) McMillan, and was born March 25, 1857. The parents were both native Tennesseans, the father having been born in 1829, and the mother in 1832. Of their seven children but three are living: Robinson, Edward E. and Frank P., Jr. Frank P. McMllan was a farmer in Giles County before the war. Having lost all his property he moved to Rutherford County in 1870 to begin life anew. It was then that he took Robinson from school, and put him in the cotton field, where he worked with the negroes till his twenty-first year. At this age young Robinson was a pretty fair scholar, notwithstanding his lack of opportunities. He had improved every spare moment by studying standard works of various kinds, especially works of mathematics, history and poetry. On obtaining his majority he came to Wilson County to try his luck at pedagogy. After teaching a school in the Seventeenth District he went to the Twenty-fifth, to Hamilton Academy, where he began with sixteen pupils. At the end of four years he ended his school at that point with 115 pupils present. He afterward taught at Gladeville with similar success. His precarious state of health continually interfering with his duties as a teacher, he entered Cumberland University to study law. In 1885 he graduated with honor, representing the entire senior class by their unanimous choice. In the year 1885 he was elected superintendent of public schools for the county of Wilson. As county superintendent he has exerted himself to disentangle the county finances, to raise the standard among teachers, and to rouse the people on the subject of education. At the beginning of the year 1886 he associated himself with Rufus P. McClain, of the Lebanon bar, with whom he has since been practicing his profession. In April, 1883, he was married to Josephine Hewgley, daughter of C. W. Hewgley, of Nashville, Tenn. Mrs. McMillan was born January 13, 1861. They have one son--Murray. Mr. McMillan is a Democrat in politics, and a liberal Methodist in religion. He is a Good Templar, a Pythian knight and a Free Mason.

    MRS. E. C. McMURRY was born December 25, 1809, in Sumner County, Tenn., and is a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (McCorcle) Anderson, born in North Carolina and Kentucky, in 1779 and 1791, and died in 1852 and 1870, respectively. They were married in 1809. He was quite successful as a farmer, owning upward of 400 acres of land. The mother came to Tennessee with her maternal grandparents, and resided in a fort a number of years to protect themselves against the Indians. After her husband's death she lived with her daughter, Mrs. E. C. McMurry. Our subject was educated in the female department of a college at Gallatin, and December 27, 1888, was married to Rev. John M. McMurry, son of David and Anna McMurry. Rev. McMurry was born in Wilson County in 1804, and attended school in Gallatin. He entered the ministry in 1833. being a circuit rider for a short time, and then was given local work. In 1837 he became agent of the endowment fund for the Cumberland University, serving eight years. During that time he was very successful, raising about $60,000. In 1856 he became pastor of the church at McMinnville, Tenn., remaining seventeen years, with the exception of a few years during the war. Owing to ill health he gave up ministerial work in 1869, and retired to his farm, where he died in April, 1875. He was very public spirited, and was a man of talent and influence in the county. His wife and daughter reside in Lebanon, both being earnest workers in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    JAMES NELSON is a native of Fayette County, Ky., and is a son of James and Theodica (Bush) Nelson, born in Virginia and Kentucky in 1799 and 1803, and died in 1864 and 1834, respectively. The father was a teacher in early life, and at a later period became a tiller of the soil, and owned 425 acres of land. He became the father of twelve children, nine of whom are living. Our subject was born in 1828, and received his rudimentary education in his native county, and later attended Bacon College, Harrodsburg, Ky., for two years. In September, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Eighth Kentucky Cavalry, Gen. Morgan's command, and was with him on his raid through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio. He was captured at Burlington, Ohio, and sent to Chicago, where he was retained until spring. He returned home in March, 1865. Before the war (1859) he purchased 117 acres of land in Wilson County, on which he located and where he has since lived. He is a man of good business capacity, and is at the present time the possessor of 470 acres of fertile and well cultivated land. He has been a life-long Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for F. Pierce in 1852. In 1876 he was elected magistrate of his district, and has held the office to the present time, to the satisfaction of all
concerned.

    JOHN D. OWEN, M. D., is a son of John Owen and Mary A. (Goodwin) and was born in Smith County, Tenn., June 21, 1825. The father was of Welsh descent, and his ancestors first located in Maryland and Virginia. He was born in North Carolina in 1787, and was a physician and surgeon by profession. He married and came to Tennessee in 1812. locating in Smith County, where he practiced medicine. He and his wife organized and established the first Sabbath-school ever taught in Smith County. He died September 5, 1826. He was a stockholder and president of a branch of the old Bank of Tennessee at Carthage, and was a member of the town board for several years. The mother was born in 1787 in North Carolina. She was a devout church-member, and a life member of the American Bible Society. She died at our subject's home, in Lebanon, January 2, 1879. John D. was educated in the Cumberland University, of Lebanon, and the Nashville University. At the age of twenty he began the study of medicine under the direction of his brother, Dr. B. R. Owen, and in the fall of 1846 went to Philadelphia, Penn., and entered the same institution from which his father graduated. He graduated in 1848. He has always practiced in Smith County, and has met with well-deserved success. In 1853 he moved to Lebanon, and November 1, of the same year, married Fannie Jamison, daughter of J. and A. (Porter) Jamison. Mrs. Owen was born April 9, 1835. Dr. Owen and another gentleman established a drug store in Lebanon, but was soon compelled to abandon the business owing to ill health. In 1870 he was the prime mover and stock-holder of the Bank of Wilson County, and was made its president, continuing such after it became the Second National Bank. He resigned in 1882, and has since lived a retired life. He has in his possession a copy of the old stamp paper which was issued by the British Government in 1765, compelling the colonies to use stamped paper, it being the only original copy on record; its value is 5 shillings. The Doctor is an enterprising man of Lebanon. His wife died January 6, 1886. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as were all the Owen family of his branch.

    J. HARRISON OZMENT, an enterprising farmer, was born September 11, 1853, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of three children born to John C. and Amanda (Wright) Ozment. The father was born October 5, 1833, in Wilson County, and is a farmer by occupation. He is the owner of about 100 acres of land, and is now living in the Twenty-fifth District. The mother was born March 4, 1834, and is the daughter of Hollis and Elizabeth Wright. Our subject was reared in Wilson County, and received a practical education in the country schools. In 1877 he began farming for himself, and December 20,1876, Emma A. Clemmons became his wife. She is the daughter of William L. and Elizabeth (Carver) Clemmons, and was born March 12, 1857. Mr. and Mrs. Ozment are the parents of three children: Clara, Lenna and Horace. Mr. Ozment has a fine farm of 200 acres in the Twenty-fifth District, and is a gentleman in every respect. He is a Democrat in politics, and a consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Ozment is a member of the Christian Church.

    JOHN PALMER, one of the old settlers of Wilson County, Tenn., was born in that State April 13, 1804, and is the eldest of thirteen children born to William and Sarah (Rankins) Palmer. The father was of English extraction, born in North Carolina in 1777, and immigrated to Tennessee in 1804. At the time of his marriage he was living in Sumner County, Tenn., and followed the occupation of a farmer during his entire life. He died in Wilson County in 1858. The mother was born in North Carolina, in 1782. and died in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1859. The subject of this sketch passed his early life in assisting on the farm and in securing an education. In 1826 he was married to Mary Reese, daughter of Thomas B. and Margaret Reese. Mrs. Palmer was born in Wilson County in 1803, and by her union with Mr. Palmer became the mother of five children: Margaret A. (wife of H. W. Robb), Louisa (wife of J. S. Chambers), Richard H., Henry Clay and Ella. In 1828 he bought 154 acres of land in Wilson County, where he commenced the occupation of farming, and is at present the owner of 1,600 acres of land, the principal part being in Wilson County. Mr. Palmer is one of Wilson County's oldest citizens. By his energy, industry and close application to business he has accumulated gradually from year to year and at present is one of the wealthiest farmers in the county. He is always obliging and kind to the poor, and is highly esteemed as an honest and useful citizen. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Christian Church.

    THOMAS A. PARTLOW, chairman of the Wilson County Court, was born September 5, 1825. He received his education in the Gladesville school, and remained with his parents until twenty-two years old. May 19, 1847, he wedded Margaret Williamson, a native of Wilson County, born in August, 1825, and the daughter of Thomas Williamson. To our subject and wife was born one child, Cloe. After marriage Mr. Partlow located near the old home and followed agricultural pursuits. January 20, 1859, his wife died, and in 1863 our subject married May Ann Robins, who lived only eighteen months after marriage. In September, 1866. our subject was again married to Martha E. Wray, a native of Wilson County, born April 2, 1836, and the daughter of William Wray. To Mr. and Mrs. Partlow were born four children: William A.. James R., Natlie M. and Haywood R. In 1865 Mr. Partlow moved to the Twenty-second District, and previous to this, in 1840, he had learned the tanner and currier's trade, which he carried on for some years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G, State guards. He took an active part in the battles of Lexington, Oak Hill and Springfield. In 1865 he came home, and in the fall of the same year enlisted again, and was with Gen. Morgan until he made his famous raid through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio, after which he returned home. Our subject is the son of Thomas and Cloe (Hooker) Partlow. The father was of French descent, born in 1796 in South Carolina, and was a farmer by occupation, owning at one time 513 acres. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and fought in the battle of "The Horse Shoe Bend." The mother was of German descent, born in 1797 in North Carolina, and died in November, 1876. Mr. Partlow has always taken a very active part in public education. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    THOMAS PHILLIPS, a farmer of the Eighteenth District of Wilson County, Tenn., was one of nine children and born June 10, 1826. He was educated in the district schools and reared on a farm. November 15, 1848, he wedded Miss Henrietta Henderson, daughter of Preston and Dorothea (Teague) Henderson. Mrs. Phillips was born January 11, 1882, and became the mother of the following children: H. A., William P., David B., Bettie (wife of John Bass), Mary D. (wife of Samuel Ashworth), Sally E. (wife of Andrew Short), Laura J., Minnie, T. W., John M. (deceased), Ada, Mattie and Eugene. Mr. Phillips resided with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age. He then purchased 105 acres of land which he has since increased to 165 acres, and also owns 112 acres of land in the Seventeenth District. He served as constable two years, and six years as magistrate. He is conservative in politics and was strongly opposed to secession. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church. His parents were David and Mary (Waters) Phillips, who were born in Wilson County in 1794 and 1802, and died in 1846 and 1873, respectively. The father was a farmer and a soldier in the war of 1812.

    HARDIN PHILLIPS, merchant, of Cherry Valley, Tenn., was born in Wilson County May 11, 1848, one of nine children of Josiah and Malinda (Bass) Phillips. The father was of English descent, born in Pennsylvania in 1800 and followed farming through life. His death occurred in Wilson County November 15, 1868. The mother was born about 1818 and died December 23, 1882. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and October 15, 1868, he married Miss Lizzie Pendleton, daughter of Lewis and Nancy (Moore) Pendleton. Mrs. Phillips was born April 22, 1851, and to her and her husband were born three children, two now living: Josiah, Hattie and Bessie (deceased.) At the age of eighteen Hardin began working for himself, and in 1869 was elected constable, an office which he held for six successive years, and then became associated with Henderson & Co., merchants, of Cherry Valley, continuing until 1877, when he and Dr. Grantstaff became partners, but in about one year their building and goods was consumed by fire. A short time after Mr. Phillips began business for himself and has met with flattering success. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    HON. S. S. PRESTON, an old citizen and farmer of the Twentieth District, was born November 22, 1827, in Bedford County, Va., and is the son of John and Martha (Early) Preston. The father was born about 1793 in Bedford County, Va., and was a farmer by occupation. At the time of his marriage he was living in the Old Dominion, but in 1835 he immigrated to Wilson County, Tenn., where he died in 1853. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was the father of ten children, six of whom are living. The mother was born in 1799, in Bedford County, Va., and died in 1850 in Wilson County. Our subject was educated in his native county and in Wilson County. At the age of twenty-one he left home and went to Huntsville, Ala., and hired as a clerk in a dry goods store, where he remained for nearly three years. January 12, 1853, he married Ann M. Keyes, a native of Alabama, born June, 1835, and the daughter of James H. Keyes, of Mississippi. To our subject and wife were born seven children: James H., John F., Laura (wife of William T. Watson, of Texas), S. S., Jr., Ella, Alice and Mattie. During the late war our subject enlisted in Company G, Forty-fifth Tennessee Regiment, and was made captain of his company. He took an active part in the battles of Shiloh, but soon after, on account of ill health, was discharged and returned home. Mr. Preston owns 260 acres, and is one of Wilson County's much respected citizens. January, 1872, he was elected as chairman of the county court, and in November of the same year he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature. In October, 1882, he was again elected chairman of the county court, which position he held for three successive years. During the years 1884-85 he was a resident of Lebanon, where he lived for the purpose of educating his children.

    G. A. PURSLEY is a son of William B. and Sophia (Rutherford) Pursley, and was born September 13, 1837, in Sumner County, Tenn. The father was of Irish descent, and was born in Tennessee in 1802, and was a tanner and currier by trade, but later devoted his time to agricultural pursuits. He came to Wilson County in 1839, where he became quite a prosperous farmer, owning 500 acres of land at one time. He died May 16, 1880. He was twice married, his first wife being Harriet Johnston. The mother was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1814 and died in 1885. Our subject came to Wilson County when only two years old. He attended Irving College in Warren County, and the Cumberland University in Lebanon. September 22, 1857, he married Ann Vance, daughter of Ed R. and Mary Vance. Mrs. Pursley was born November 11, 1840, and became the mother of seven children: Hattie (wife of J. R. Gollithan), Minnie (wife of J. M. Hannah), Lizzie A., Alice M., Brice B., Edwin V. and Philip H. Mr. Pursley was first the owner of sixty acres of land, but by industry and economy is now the possessor of 305 acres. He has been a life-long Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Stephen A. Douglas. September 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Fourth Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and after the reorganization of the army was appointed second lieutenant of his company, but returned home in the summer of 1862, owing to ill health. He was arrested and kept a prisoner at Murfreesboro for about three months. He belongs to the Good Templars, and he and wife are church members.

    JAMES H. RAGLAND, resident of Lebanon, Tenn., born in 1845, and is a son of Dr. Hardin and Amelia A. (Jones) Ragland. Hardin Ragland was born in Tennessee in 1812, son of Pettis Ragland, of Virginia. Hardin was educated in Campbell Academy and received his medical education in the University of Lexington, Ky. After his marriage he located in Cherry Valley, where he continued to practice until 1878, when he gave up active work and came to Lebanon. He had a thorough knowledge of his profession and for many years was the leading physician in his section of the country., and was a much respected citizen. He died February 6, 1882. The mother was of Scotch descent, born in Wilson County in 1806. She died December 13, 1885. They were the parents of three children, two of whom are living: Mrs. Hattie Page and our subject, who was reared and educated in his native county and White Springs, Davidson County. When sixteen years of age he enlisted in Company C, Fourth Tennessee Regiment, and was in the battles of Chickamauga, Bentonville, Knoxville, Perryville, and numerous lesser engagements. After the surrender of Richmond he returned home, and August 10, 1870, he married Agnes A. Clark, daughter of L. J. Clark. Mrs. Ragland was born in l852, and is the mother of two children: Hardin and Clark. Soon after returning from the war he, his father and W. S. Phillips kept a general merchandise store at Cherry Valley for three years. He then sold goods at Tucker's Cross Roads for two years, and about 1879 he and W. G. Page established a family grocery and hardware store in Lebanon. Our subject has since sold his interest to P. Y. Hill, and has been speculating in notes and securities. He is a Democrat. His wife died in 1878 and his sister has since been keeping house for him.

    JOHN H. RAMSAY, farmer, was born in 1828 in Sumner County, Tenn., and is a son of William and Diana (Austin) Ramsay. The father was a native of the State of Virginia. and in early life worked at the hatter's trade. In late years he followed agricultural pursuits, having purchased upward of 100 acres in Sumner County, where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1850. The mother was born in Sumner County about 1816. After the death of her husband she lived on the old place for some time, but at present she is living with her daughter, Polly Hobson, who is a resident of the Fifth District. Our subject received his education in the county schools, and at the age of fifteen left the parental roof and served as an apprentice to a house carpenter, working thus for two and a half years; after which he worked on his own responsibility. In 1853 he bought 188 acres in the Third District of Wilson County, where he located and where he has since resided. The same year Lucinda Tarver became his wife, but died the following year. In 1855 he married Roxana Tompkins, who died February 5, 1880, and in October, 1881, he married Mary C. Ramsay, a native of Indiana, born January 2, 1858, and a daughter of John and Rebecca Isom. To Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay were born two children: William H. and Ella Myrtle. Mrs. Ramsay has one child, John I., by her first husband. Mr. Ramsay has been a hard working and an industrious man. By his energy and good management he now owns 336 acres of good land. During the late war he was agent, assisting the Commissary Department in supplying food and clothing to the boys in gray. In politics he advocates the principles of Democracy. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are worthy members of the Baptist Church.

    J. M. RICE, an enterprising farmer, was born September 19, 1859, in Rutherford County, Tenn., and is one of a family of eight children, born to J. H. and T. A. (Welsh) Rice. The father was born June, 1837, in Wilson County, Tenn., and was a merchant, which occupation he followed for twenty-five years. About this time he felt a strong desire to preach the gospel, which inclination he followed. At the same time he carried on the merchandising business. The mother was born in April, 1838. in Wilson County, Tenn., and is the daughter of Mitchell Welsh. Our subject was reared in Rutherford County, and received a good practical education in the country schools. February 9, 1882, he led to the altar Jeffella Brett, a native of Wilson County, born May 16, 1862, and the daughter of Alexander Brett. Our subject and wife's married life was happily blessed by the birth of one child, Clide Alexander. Mr. Rice is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is a Democrat in politics. Mrs. Rice is a member of the Baptist Church.

    G. L. ROBINSON, M. D., of Lebanon, Tenn., was born October 8, 1821, in Smith County, one of eight children of Stephen and Mary (Lancaster) Robinson, who were of English origin. The father was born in Virginia in 1778, and was a farmer by occupation. He came to Tennessee in his youth and his parents were among the very first settlers of Middle Tennessee. He died in January, 1846. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was twice married, being the father of nine children. The mother was born June 6, 1798, in Tennessee, and died the same year as her husband. Our subject's early education was acquired in the common schools, and served in the Mexican war in Joseph E. Thomas' Tennessee Cavalry, serving twelve months. After his return he began studying under Dr. G. M. Alsop, of Statesville, and in 1848 entered the medical department of the Louisville (Ky.) University and graduated as an M. D. in 1850. He practiced his profession in Statesville, Alexandria, and in 1854 came to Lebanon, where he has since resided. September 7, 1851, he married Emily D. Anderson, daughter of Frank Anderson; she died June 7, 1875, leaving one child, Churchwell, who died in 1877. In 1878 the Doctor married Valeria Huddleston, daughter of Winston and Mary B. Huddleston. She was born January 21, 1839, and she and the Doctor are members of the Christian Church.

    HON. R. C. SANDERS, clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Wilson County, Tenn., was born July 23, 1826, in Sumner County, and is one of three children of James and Letitia (Carey) Sanders. The father was born in North Carolina, in 1779, and in youth came with his parents to Sumner, Tenn. ,where he followed the occupation of farming. He was married to Letitia Carey in 1825, and died in 1861. He was twice married and was the father of ten children. The mother was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1800, and died April 16, 1871. Our subject graduated from Enon College and for one session was a student in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon. In 1847 he began teaching school and continued that and farming until 1849, when he became principal of the Smithfield (Tenn.) High School. continuing until 1853. December 23 of that year he wedded Rhoda A. Reeves, daughter of John and Sarah Reeves. Mrs. Sanders was born February 17, 1836, in Smith County, Tenn., and became the mother of the following children: Nora, John C. and Nat. In 1854 Mr. Sanders was chosen superintendent of the high school at Carthage, Tenn., and in 1857 was elected to represent Smith County in the State Legislature. After his return to Carthage upon the adjournment of the Legislature, he again began the study of law, and in 1859 was admitted to the bar and practiced his profession until the breaking out of the war. In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fifth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and was immediately appointed its adjutant and served until the re-organization of the army at Corinth, when he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the same regiment. He had command of the regiment for several months, the colonel, S. S. Stanton, being absent. He and Col. Stanton, owing to trouble with the brigadier-general in command, resigned, and returned to Middle Tennessee and raised another regiment (infantry), the Eighty-fourth Tennessee; this was consolidated with the Twenty-eighth Tennessee Infantry. Col. Sanders was appointed quarter-master and acted as such until the close of the war, receiving his parole at Washington, Ga., June 9, 1865. Col. Sanders, although quartermaster, went into the ranks as a private, and took part in the capture of Dalton, Ga., in the battle of Spring Hill and Franklin, and in the engagements around Nashville. After the close of the war he resumed the practice of law and formed a partnership with Judge Cantrell, of Lebanon, with whom he remained eight years. In 1874 Col. Sanders moved to Louisville, Ky., but after a two-years residence, returned to Tennessee and resided one year in Gallatin and then came to Lebanon. He and his son, John C., are partners in the practice of law, the latter being a graduate of the law department of the University of Louisville, Ky., and of the same department of the Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn. In 1881 Col. Sanders represented Wilson County in the lower house of the State Legislature. He was made chairman of the Committee of Claims and in 1883 was appointed to his present position. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and he and his son constitute one of the leading law firms of the county.

    ERVIN K. SHANNON is a farmer of the Nineteenth District, of Wilson County, Tenn., and son of J. H. and Isabella (Braden) Shannon. He was born March 22, 1841, in the county where he now resides. His father was of Irish descent and was born December 19, 1803. When he was about twenty-five years of age he came to Tennessee. His parents died when he was quite young and he was reared by a man by the name of Shaker, with whom he learned the tanner's trade, and followed this occupation in Tennessee for about ten years. He then moved to a farm belonging to his wife. He was married about 1834, and became the father of seven children, five now living. He was a soldier in the late war and his death occurred in June, 1870. His widow died in 1876. Our subject resided with his parents until their respective deaths. He received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood, and in 1862, in company with his brother, assumed control of the tanning business, continuing about eight years. Since that time our subject has been engaged in farming, and owns the old homestead. He enlisted in the Forty-fourth Tennessee, Company C, and was in the battles of Shiloh and Perryville, Ky., and was wounded in the latter engagement and returned home. In politics he is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    ALEX SHANNON, proprietor of a grocery and hardware store in Lebanon, Tenn., is a native of Wilson County, born in 1844, and is one of five children of J. H. and Isabella (Braden) Shannon. Alex Shannon was reared on his father's 180-acre farm. He was educated in the country schools, and December 22, 1870, was married to Maggie Holloway, daughter of Richard and Eunice (Shannon) Holloway. She was born in 1847 and is the mother of two living children: James R. and Nebar. In 1872 Mr. Shannon bought 146 acres of land and followed agricultural pursuits until 1882, when he sold out and removed to Lebanon and clerked in the hardware store of McClain Bros. for two years. Since November, 1885, he has been connected with J. K. Buchanan in the grocery and hardware business, and is doing well. Mr. Shannon is conservative in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    FINIS E. SHANNON, SR., one of the oldest citizens of District No. 22, and a prominent farmer, was born November 20, 1814, in Wilson County. He is the youngest child of Henry and Jane (Hayes) Shannon. The father was of Irish descent, born January 10, 1766, in Virginia and was a farmer by occupation. About 1795 he came to Davidson County but afterward removed to Wilson County where he died September 25, 1844. The mother was born March 22, 1772, in Virginia, and died December 10, 1832. in Wilson County. The subject of our sketch received his education mostly outside of the school-room. July 31,1838, he married Nancy Hearn, daughter of Milbry Hearn. Mrs. Shannon was born February 6, 1818, in Wilson County and by her marriage became the mother of two children: Norman P., who is a farmer, and Mary C., wife of James Doughty. After our subject's marriage he located on the old home place. In 1856 his wife died, and in the following year he married Rosanna A. Hunt, a native of Rutherford County, born in 1826, and the daughter of Samuel Hunt. To Mr. and Mrs. Shannon were born three children: Finis E., Texannah and Frusey. In 1861 he sold the old home place and bought land in District No. 22, where he is now living. He lost his second wife in 1862, and in 1867 he married E. J. O'Neal; she lived but a short time after marriage and December, 1868. he married Elizabeth J. Etherley, a native of Wilson County, born in 1829. Mr. Shannon is one of Wilson County's old citizens and has been quite successful, owning at the present time 500 acres of land. He has been a life-long Democrat casting his first vote for Martin Van Buren. He has also been an active business man, is obliging and courteous and is a good neighbor.

    REV. S. G. SHEPARD, an enterprising farmer, was born in 1830 in Wilson County; son of John and Frances G. (Graves) Shepard. The father was of Scotch descent, and was born about 1785 in Prince Edward County, Va. He was a teacher by profession, and in connection with this did farming. At the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1807, he was living in Wilson County. He was not permitted to live the time allotted to man, but was cut down in the prime of life. He died in 1835 with the cholera. The mother was of French origin, and was born in Virginia about 1800; she died in 1860. There were eight children born to them, four of whom are living. Our subject's grandfather, Samuel Shepard, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis, at Yorktown. About 1800 he immigrated to Wilson County, Tenn., where he settled and lived to an advanced age. He cast his first vote for George Washington, and his last for Henry Clay. Our subject received his education in the county schools, and at the breaking out of the late war he enlisted in Company G, Seventh Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was made captain of his company. After the death of Gen. Hatton, May 31, 1862, our subject was appointed lieutenant-colonel of his regiment. He led his men in twenty battles, the leading ones being Seven Pines, seven days around Richmond, second Manassas, Sharpsburg, etc. At the close of the war he returned home, and August 3, 1865, married Mattie Major, a native of Wilson County; born in 1845, and the daughter of Samuel and Fanny (Chambers) Major. To our subject and wife were born four children: Samuel G., Alice, John and Agnes. After marriage our subject began farming, and now owns 800 acres, and is a well-to-do farmer. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Masonic fraternity. In 1870 he was elected as one of two representatives from Wilson County to assist in revising the constitution of the State of Tennessee. In 1872 he was elected as member to the State Legislature, and in the same year he was ordained as a Missionary Baptist minister. His ministerial duties have been principally confined to Wilson and Rutherford Counties. At present he has charge of four churches, three in Rutherford and one in Cannon County at Woodbury.

    J. R. SHORTER, proprietor of a livery and feed stable, at Lebanon, Tenn., was born in Wilson County in 1845, and is a son of James and Martha P. (Wyoone) Shorter, who were of Irish descent, born in Tennessee in 1815 and 1819, respectively. They were married about 1836. and tilled a farm of 200 acres until 1858, when they purchased a 150-acre farm. Here the father died in 1860, and the mother in August, 1884. Our subject only attended school about three months during his life. September 19, 1867, he lead to Hymen's altar Easter C. Graves, daughter of Lorenzo J. and Mary Graves. Mr. and Mrs. Shorter have three children: Lorenzo J., Susie and Robert. In 1869 Mr. Shorter came to Lebanon and established a retail liquor store, but in 1871 bought a family grocery store, continuing three years. He then farmed three years, and in 1877 returned to Lebanon, and with W. G. Swindell began keeping a livery and feed stable. A year later Samuel Golliday purchased Mr. Swindell's interest, and he in turn was bought out by J. W. Hamilton. Since 1883 Mr. Shorter has carried on the business alone. He keeps ten horses, nine single and six double vehicles, and runs a buss to each train, and has met with merited success. He is a member of the K. of H. and K. of P., and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

    W. H. SMITH, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., May 29, 1834, and is one of fifteen children born to James and Martha (Johnson) Smith. The father was a native of Virginia, born in 1796. He followed agricultural pursuits during his lifetime. He died in Wilson County in 1874. The mother was born in Kentucky in 1800, and died in Wilson County in 1853. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm and educated in the schools of the county. In 1858 he wedded Lucy J. Johnson daughter of Berry and Miranda Johnson. Mrs. Smith was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1836, and by her union with Mr. Smith became the mother of seven children: Martha J., James B., Miranda E., William H., Eddie W., Emma and Bubie. In 1862 our subject bought 141 acres of 1and, and began tilling the soil; he added to his farm quite often and is at present the owner of 240 acres of good land. In 1881 Mrs. Smith died, and in 1883 he married Mary F. Williams. daughter of Elijah and Polly Williams. Mrs. Smith was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1849, and by her marriage with Mr. Smith she became the mother of
two children: Winfield and Lelia. In politics Mr. Smith is a Democrat.

    J. E. STRATTON, dry goods merchant of Lebanon, Tenn., was born February 27, 1842, son of Thomas J. and Caroline M. (Golladay) Stratton. J.E. Stratton was reared at home and was educated in the Cumberland University. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Seventh Regiment Tennessee Infantry Volunteers, and participated in all the battles of the Virginia campaign in 1861-62. He was severely wounded at the battle of Seven Pines. He was cared for in the house of the Misses Forbes, sisters of Col. Forbes, of Clarksville, Tenn. He resided for some time with his uncle, in Granada, Miss. In 1862, while in Kentucky, he was arrested by Federal troops, but after taking the oath of allegiance was released and remained in Kentucky until the fall of Richmond. March 24, 1864, he married Mary Grimes, who was born in 1842, in Kentucky, daughter of James and Fannie Grimes. To Mr. and Mrs. Stratton were born these children: James G., Thomas E. G. and Caroline May. In 1866 Mr. Stratton returned to Lebanon, where he was engaged in the general merchandise business with his father and brothers. He soon after went to Todd County, Ky., where he engaged in the same business three years and farmed six years. From 1873 to 1876 he was a druggist in Allensville, and at the latter date went to Nashville and established a merchant and tailor's establishment. In the fall of 1879 he returned to Lebanon, clerking until 1881, when he engaged in the dry goods business in the same room as that occupied by his father in 1865-66. In 1881 the building burned, and a year later he erected his present fine building. He is one of Lebanon's first merchants and citizens and is a member of the K. of P., and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    S. G. STRATTON. The Bank of Lebanon, Tenn., was organized in August, 1884, with a capital stock of $25,000, James Hamilton, president, and Thomas J. Stratton as cashier. In January, 1885, Mr. Stratton died, and S. G. Stratton, our subject, was chosen as his successor. He was born January 30, 1844, in Lebanon, and is one of five children of Thomas J. and Caroline M. (Golladay) Stratton. The father was born August 5, 1818, in Sumner County, Tenn., and was a resident of Lebanon at the time of his marriage, in May, 1838. He established a general merchandise store in Lebanon, but a few years later began dealing in dry goods only. He was engaged in the Florida war. His partners at different periods were Benjamin Ireland, Maj. Andrew Allison and lastly, before the war, Samuel Golladay. Mr. Stratton was a leading business man of Lebanon and an influential citizen. In 1870 he was elected cashier of the Bank of Wilson County, and he continued its cashier after it became the Second National Bank, continuing as such until August, 1884, when he was chosen cashier of the Bank of Lebanon, continuing until his death, in January, 1885. He was twice married and became the father of six children, his second wife being Fannie (Watkins) Helm. Our subject's mother died August 15, 1865. S.G. Stratton was educated in the Cumberland University. During the war he first attached himself to the Thirty-eighth Tennessee Infantry, under Col. Looney, of Memphis, and afterward enlisted in Capt. J. W. Britton's company, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and was in the service until the fall of 1864. November 9, 1865, he married Alice Fisher, who was born October 10, 1844, who bore him two children: Houston F. and Franceway C. Mr. Stratton was first after the war engaged in the mercantile business with his father, and afterward with R. Green. In 1872 he was appointed clerk of the circuit court, to fill an unexpired term, and was twice afterward elected and held the office until 1882. In 1881 he became engaged in the dry goods business, in the firm of J. E. Stratton & Co., and at present is one of the firm of J. T. Odum & Co. October 22, 1877, Mrs. Stratton died. and December 1. 1881, he married Leila M. Owen, born in 1861, in Talbot County, Ga., daughter of Sidney Owen. By this marriage he has one daughter, Mildred Owen, born February 2, 1883. Our subject succeeded his father as cashier of the Bank of Lebanon. In 1873 he was elected mayor of Lebanon, having served several years, before and after, in the city council. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lebanon Lodge, No. 98, and has filled, among other offices, that of Worshipful Master, Most Excellent High Priest of the Chapter, Eminent Commander of the Commandery, and is a member of the K. of H and K. of P. He and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    L. D. STROUD born in Wilson County, Tenn., Oct. 7, 1842, is one of eight children of O. B. and Lucie (Lester) Stroud who were born in Halifax County, Va.. and Wilson County, Tenn., May 2, 1803 and June 29, 1824, and died April 14, 1863, and March 11, 1875, respectively. They were married November 11, 1841. The mother was a daughter of Joshua Lester, founder of the Baptist Church at Smithfork, Tenn., and its pastor for thirty-seven years. Our subject received his education at what was known as the "Three Forks Institute'' and afterward attended the Mount Vernon Institute. When sixteen he entered the teachers' profession continuing until the breaking out of the war when he enlisted in Holton's Seventh Tennessee Infantry and participated in the battles of Seven Pines and Cedar Run; was wounded in the arm at the former battle and yet carries the ball in his shoulder. He was severely wounded at the latter battle and has never entirely recovered from its effects. After his return home he resumed teaching and paid off a debt of $300 which his father had contracted for his schooling. In 1877 he accepted the presidency of the Woodbury College for a period of two years, but ill health obliged him to abandon the profession entirely. March 13, 1865, he wedded Leathy A., daughter of John and Anna Sneed, born December 22, 1841, and has borne six children: Cornelia (Mrs. A. G. Penuel), Minnie (Mrs. R. B. Penuel), Angie, Nettie, Bernice and Garland. In February, 1884, Mr. Stroud took a trip to Mexico for a business house at Nashville, and while there acquired a thorough knowledge of the Spanish language. Mr. Stroud is the owner of 250 acres of fine land and his home is pleasantly and picturesquely situated. He is a Democrat in his political views and took an active part in State politics in 1879. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and his wife belongs to the Baptist Church.

    A. SULLIVAN, an enterprising farmer and stock raiser of the Twenty-fourth District, was born March 22, 1815, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of a family of nine children born to A. and S. Sullivan. The father was born in Guilford County, N. C., and was a farmer by occupation. He married in his native State and immigrated to Wilson County and settled in the Twenty-fourth District, where he purchased 141 acres of land. He died in March, 1835. The mother was born in Guilford County, N. C., in 1775, and came to this county with her husband, where she remained until her death, which occurred in 1855. Our subject was reared in Wilson County, Tenn., and like the average country boy received his education in the common schools. June 16, 1839. he wedded Clerky Patterson, daughter of Elijah Patterson. The fruits of this union were three sons, only one of whom is living. One son was killed at Richmond and another at Corinth. Miss. Mr. Sullivan is the owner of 300 acres in the Twenty-fourth District, and by his affable and courteous manner has made many friends. He is a Democrat in politics.

    B. J. TARVER, attorney at law of Lebanon, was born in Warren County, N. C., and is one of two sons of Silas and Nancy (Harris) Tarver. The father was a Welshman by descent, anti was born in 1794 or 1795 in North Carolina. He was a farmer, and came to Tennessee in 1808 with his father, Benjamin Tarver, one of the pioneers of the county. After his marriage, in 1823, Silas located on a farm where Tucker's Gap is now situated, and there remained until his career ended in 1860. The mother was of English birth, born in North Carolina, and died in 1845. Our subject secured an academical education, and afterward entered the law department of Cumberland University, graduating in 1851. He has since practiced his profession, and has met with marked success. He commenced at the bottom round of the ladder, but by perseverance and knowledge of his profession he has steadily climbed upward in his profession until be ranks among the first of the Wilson County bar. In 1878 he was appointed judge of the chancery court of Tennessee, and held the office for one year. In 1875 he wedded Susan White, who was born in 1829, and a daughter of James D. White. Mr. and Mrs. Tarver are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    J. B. TARVER, farmer and resident of Tucker's Gap, was born June 14, 1835, in the house where he is now residing. He is the youngest son of a family of seven children, only two of whom are now living: our subject, and Judge B. J. Tarver, of Lebanon. Silas and Nancy (Harris) Tarver were their father and mother. Our subject received his education in the Cumberland University at Lebanon in the literary department. February 23, 1856, he married Lucy Hobson, daughter of Henry and Lucy (Tarver) Hobson. Mrs. Tarver was born August 2, 1837, in Wilson County, and by her union with Mr. Tarver she became the mother of six children: Mattie E,, A. Benjamin, John E., Walter A., Nannie and George. In 1853 our subject entered the law department of the Cumberland University, attending two sessions. In 1856 he went to Arkadelphia, Ark., and commenced his law practice, which he continued until the breaking out of the war. In February, 1862, he returned to his birth-place, where he has since lived engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Tarver now owns 440 acres, and is an honest, enterprising and successful farmer. In polities he is a Democrat, but was at one time a Whig. He is a Good Templar, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    WILLIAM B. TATUM, one of the prominent farmers of the Twenty-second District, was born in 1821, in Sumner County, Tenn., and is the son of Ira and Martha (Eddins) Tatum. The father was a native of North Carolina and a teacher by profession in his younger days, and later in life he followed farming. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1825. The mother was born in North Carolina in about 1800, and died about 1872. Our subject at the age of seventeen commenced working at the tanner's trade, which he continued for four years. At the age of twenty-one he went to Macon, Tenn., and bought 130 acres and commenced farming on his own responsibility. In three years he returned to Wilson County, and in March, 1846, he wedded Sarah A. Goldston, a native of Wilson County, born in 1823, and a daughter of Eli and Elizabeth Goldston. To Mr. and Mrs. Tatum were born eight children: Martha E., A. Frank, Mary E., William A., Emily A., Thomas E., Edward L. and Ira J. About 1851 our subject bought 111 acres in the Twenty-second District, where he located and is now living. In connection with farming he carried on the tannery business for a period of twenty-five years. Mr. Tatum started in life as a poor boy, but by energy, economy and good management he now owns 440 acres. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

    JAMES H. TAYLOR, one of the old settlers of Wilson County, was born in Tennessee, August 24, 1807, and is one of ten children born to Perrygan and Sarah (Wilson) Taylor. The father was of English descent, born in North Carolina in 1761. and came to Sumner County about 1800. He was a farmer by occupation, and at the time of his marriage was living in North Carolina. He died in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1826. The mother was of Irish descent, and was born in Maryland in 1764, She died in Wilson County. Tenn., in 1822,. At the age of twenty our subject left home; he had received a fair education at the county schools, and in 1827 Martha Hunter became his wife. She was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1810, and was the daughter of Isaac and Selina Hunter. To our subject and wife were born seven children: Caroline. Evaline, Lashophine, Leona (wife of R. C. Morris), Isaac, John and William. In 1832 Mr. Taylor bought 150 acres of land, and from that time to the present has added to his land from time to time, and now owns 262 acres, upon which he is at present living. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and wife are consistent members of the Cumberland Church.

    COL. R. E. THOMPSON, a citizen of Wilson County, Tenn., descended from the old Thompson, Cockrell, McNairy and Robertson families of Tennessee. Gen. James Robertson and John Cockrell were the first white men that ever stood on Capitol Hill. Col. Thompson was born at Cockrell's Springs, near Nashville, in 1822. He was partly educated in Nashville, and in 1840 came to Lebanon and finished his education at Cumberland University. He married Miss Mary E. Tolliver, the eldest daughter of Col. Zach Tolliver, of Lebanon, Tenn., by whom he has six living children--two sons and four daughters--all of whom are doing remarkably well. His youngest son, Lillard, is attorney-general of the Seventh Judicial Circuit. Col. Thompson is a lawyer and farmer, and is noted as a criminal lawyer, and defends nearly all the criminals in his section of the county, but refuses to prosecute, never having prosecuted a man, although offered large fees to do so. In politics he is a low-tax Democrat, and is opposed to taxing the people to pay the railroad debt. He has been seven or eight times elected to the State Legislature, three or four times to each branch, and took a very active part in common school education and in the cause of temperance. He is not a very zealous advocate of the four-mile law, and offered a bill, and got it passed, excluding intoxicating liquors from every place in the State, excepting Nashville. Knoxville and Memphis. but the supreme court decided it was unconstitutional. He is a bold and fearless advocate of the rights of the masses of the people and zealous of encroachments upon their rights by the monied corporations, consequently is often before the people, securing large majorities over very popular men. He still practices his profession, in which, together with other resources, yield him a competency in his old age. He is a Missionary Baptist in faith.

    WILLIAM T. THOMPSON, an enterprising farmer, was born August 13, 1846, in Wilson County, and is the son of George and Martha (Baird) Thompson. The father was of Irish descent, born October 17, 1822, in Wilson County, and is a farmer by occupation. His father, Moses Thompson, was born in 1782, in the State of North Carolina, and came to Wilson County at a very early date. He died in 1842. George Thompson lived in his native county at the time of his marriage, which, occurred November 11, 1845. He settled in the Nineteenth District, where he has since resided, moving only once since that time. He has lived on the farm where he now resides since 1851, and has been quite successful as a tiller of the soil, owning at the present time upward of 550 acres. The mother was born July 4, 1826, in Wilson County, and died July 12, 1878. Our subject is one of eight children who are living. He received his education in the country schools and February 6, 1868, wedded Fanny Martin, a native of Wilson County, born March 19, 1849. and the daughter of John Martin. To our subject and wife were born four children, three of whom are living: Emma, John B. and Fannie E. In 1869 he bought forty-five acres in the Twenty-first District, where he resided until 1877, when he bought 200 acres where he now resides. Mr. Thompson lost his wife August 5, 1876, and September 12 of the following year he married Lucy Logue, a native of Wilson County, born December 20, 1852. To this union were born four children: Samuel, Mattie, Nannie and Spurgen. Mr. Thompson is an enterprising business man, and now owns 382 acres. His wife has 120 acres in Davidson County. In politics our subject is very conservative, voting for principle and not for party. In connection with farming he has speculated in timber; has been employed several years by the Western Union Telegraph Company to furnish poles to them. He has also furnished Nashville with many telegraph poles.

    ED. L. VANCE. JR., junior member of the livery and feed stable of Johnson & Vance, of Lebanon, Tenn., is a son of Edward R. and Drucilla (Hearn) Vance, and was born in Wilson County November 28, 1859. The father is of Irish extraction, born in 1817, in Rutherford County, Tenn., and is a farmer by occupation. In 1837 he came to Wilson County, where he purchased 300 acres of land, and was married in 1839. He has been twice married and is the father of fifteen children. Our subject was educated in the schools near his home and in the Big Spring Seminary. At the age of eighteen years he left home and leased 396 acres of land, which he farmed two years, and the following three years worked on a tract of 400 acres of land in Davidson County. In 1884 he and  his brother, Joseph T., purchased the livery and feed stable of Orgain & Ragland, in Lebanon, but at the end of six months M. House became one of the proprietors. In October, 1885, Mr. W. A. Johnson bought Mr. M. House's interest, and since then the firm has been Johnson & Vance. They keep about fifteen horses and twelve single and eight double vehicles, and are doing a good business.

    B. J. VANHOOK, superintendent of county poor of Wilson County, was born in 1849 in Wilson County,Tenn. He is the son of Joel N. and Mary T. (Hickman) Vanhook. The father was of German lineage, born in 1822, on the line between North Carolina and Virginia, and was a farmer by occupation. He came to Tennessee with his mother, and at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1841, was living in Wilson County. He bought land in Barton's Creek, in the Twenty-first District, where he lived for forty years. In 1885 he moved to the Twenty-second District, where he now resides. He is the father of six children, all of whom are living. The mother was born about 1824, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is also living. Our subject received his education in the county schools. December 31, 1869, he wedded Virginia Ligon, a native of Wilson County, born March 31, 1850, and the daughter of Richard L. and Roseline Ligon. To Mr. and Mrs. Vanhook were born six children: Riley C., Orrie, Bettie V., Carrie, Huston and Howard. Our subject settled on Barton Creek, and in 1877 he was elected to the position he now occupies. The county farm contains 220 acres and is located five miles west of Lebanon. The average number of poor is about thirty, and they are properly fed, clothed and cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Vanhook. In politics Mr. Vanhook is a Democrat. In 1882 he was nominated and elected as magistrate of District No. 22, and is at present holding the office. In the same year he bought 130 acres in the Twenty-second District. Mrs. Vanhook is a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

    W. C. WALKER, farmer, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., January 8, 1838, and is the son of James D. and Celia L. (Hamilton) Walker. The father was born in North Carolina in 1777, and followed the occupation of a farmer. At the time of his marriage he was living in Wilson County, where he died May 29, 1849. The mother was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1795, and died in Wilson County January 18, 1884. Our subject was reared on a farm and received his education in the schools of the county. In 1820 he was married to Katie, daughter of James and Eliza ______. Mrs. Walker was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1844, and the fruits of her marriage to Mr. Walker are an interesting family of eight children: Edwin L., Munroe V., Cornelia L., Edna E., Lillia, Addie, William C. and Washington B.H. Mr. Walker is the present owner of 315 acres of good land in the Fourth District, where he is now living. He is a successful farmer and has the respect of all who know him. In politics he is a Democrat.

    W.H. WALLACE, a dealer in lumber, was born April 6, 1852, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is a son of J. F. and Catherine Wallace. The father was born in 1836, in Sumner County, and in 1849 he moved to Wilson County and settled in the Second District. He followed agricultural pursuits, and in 1883 moved to Davidson County. The mother was born in 1834, Wilson County, and lived there until her death, which occurred in 1867. Our subject received a fair education in the country schools, and at the age of nineteen began working for himself. September 22, 1870, he married Martha J. Gibson, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born September, 1852, and the daughter of Thomas W. Gibson. To Mr. and Mrs. Wallace were born six children: James W., Lillie, Lizzie, Daisie, Harvey W. and Alvin. Mr. Wallace, by his industry and energy, has accumulated a considerable amount of this world's goods and is respected by all who know him.

    J. S. WAMACK is a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born October 14, 1818, and is one of five children of Richard and Agnes (Smith) Wamack. The father was born in Virginia about 1790, and came to Tennessee, when about twelve years of age. He was a farmer, and married when about twenty years of age, and about thirty years afterward, his wife died, and he then married Mrs. Elizabeth (Pucket) Bailey. J. S. Wamack was educated in the district schools, and August 8, 1839, he married Miss Dorcas Hall. daughter of Samuel Hall. She was born in Wilson County, in 1821, and died August 24, 1857, leaving five children: John K., a theological student at Louisville, Ky.; America (wife of H. C. Patton), Josephine (wife of Eli Vaught), James R. and A.P. Mr. Wamack began doing business for himself after attaining his majority, and became the possessor of 100 acres of land near Cherry Valley, which he has increased to 325 acres of valuable farming land. In November, 1857, Mr. Wamack wedded Mrs. E. E. (Thomas) Boyle, but about a year after her marriage, she died, leaving one child--E. E. (wife of James M. Berry). April 13, 1859, Mr. Wamack lead to Hymen's altar, Mary (Anderson) Vick; she was born in Wilson County October 11, 1832, and bore her husband four children: California, Jourdan (deceased), Agnes (wife of S. Henderson), and an infant (deceased). Our subject and family reside on a farm of 100 acres near Cherry Valley, and in connection with farming, has kept a nursery for about ten years. He has been quite an extensive traveler, and has always contributed liberally to all public and private enterprises. He is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Harrison. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

    J. M. WATKINS, proprietor of the Watkins Hotel, at Lebanon, Tenn., was born April 3, 1841, and is one of eight children of Moses and Jane (Scoby) Watkins. The father was born in 1812 in Virginia, and was a farmer through life. He came to Tennessee with his parents when about six years of age, and resided on different farms up to 1876, when he moved to Lebanon, where he died in the fall of 1884. The mother was born in Smith County, Tenn., and since the death of her husband has lived with her daughter Mary (Mrs. D. W. King). Our subject attended the schools of his native county, and in 1862 enlisted in Company B, Forty-fourth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and took an active part in the battle of Shiloh. He returned home in 1864, and after farming two years became clerk in the Sweeney House, in Nashville. December 22, 1868, he married Dora Cartwright, daughter of Wilson T. and Elizabeth Cartwright. Mrs. Watkins was born in 1852 in Nashville. She and her husband have three children: Archie Wilson, Emma Bell (deceased) and Lena May. In 1877 Mr. Watkins came to Lebanon, and he and W. M. Organ purchased a livery and feed stable, which they managed for eighteen months, and for the following year Mr. Watkins conducted the business on his own responsibility. In 1879 he and Mr. D. C. Williams became partners, continuing one year. In 1881-82 Mr. Watkins kept a grocery and restaurant, and in 1883 established himself in the hotel business, and is an obliging and courteous landlord. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    DR. R. L. C. WHITE. editor and proprietor of the Lebanon Herald, was born June 11, 1844, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is the only living child of Capt. John W. and Sally C. (Cannon) White, who were of English descent, born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1804 and 1807, respectively. The father died in 1871. He was a merchant in early life, but later became engaged also in manufacturing interests. He came to Tennessee in 1821, and in 1831 became a resident of Lebanon, and was always an active worker for the old Whig party. He was clerk of the circuit court a number of years, and was married in 1841. The mother resides with our subject, who was educated in the Cumberland University, of Lebanon. In 1862 he enlisted in Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in the battles of Perryville, Chickamauga, Murfreesboro, Atlanta, and numerous minor engagements. He remained in the field until the surrender of Johnston's army, when he returned home and entered upon the study of medicine in the Nashville Medical College, remaining one year. In 1867 he attended the Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, and graduated in 1868. In 1869 he purchased a one-half interest in the Lebanon Herald, and since 1871 has been sole proprietor and editor. Previous to 1872 the Doctor practiced his profession, but since that time has given his time and attention to his paper, which is very newsy and instructive, and is quoted throughout the State as one of the leading journals. The Doctor is a member of the Masonic fraternity (Lebanon Lodge. No. 98. F. & A. M.), of Baldwin Commandery; No. 7, Knights Templar; Magnolia Lodge, No. 30, I. O. O. F.; Lotus Lodge, No. 20, K. of P.; Lee Lodge, No. 22, K. of H. In 1878 he was elected Grand Chancellor of the State of Tennessee of K. of P., and held the position nearly two years. In 1883 he was elected Grand Keeper of Records and Seal of the State of Tennessee of the same order, and now holds the position. Since 1880 he has been one of the two Supreme Representatives of Tennessee of the Supreme Lodge of the World, K. of P. He has also been Grand Treasurer of K. of H. of Tennessee since 1880. Until 1882 the Doctor was a Democrat, but at that time, owing to a controversy on the State debt, the party was split, the Dr. taking sides with that faction which favored the payment of the debt. He was secretary of the State Executive Committee of the State credit wing of the Democratic party during that canvass. His faction was disastrously defeated, and since that time he has affilliated with no party. Since 1882 he has been magistrate, and has held the position of notary public, and is one of the directors of the Bank of Lebanon. May 23, 1869, Dr. White married Ella M. Wade, daughter of M. B. and Elizabeth Wade, of Rutherford County. She was born in 1851, and is the mother of five children: Ethel, Opal, Coral, Mabel and Kenneth.

    J. H. WILLIAMS is a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born March 6, 1841, son of J. H. and Margaret (Cason) Williams, born in North Carolina in 1794 and 1802, respectively. The father came to Tennessee when about twenty years of age, and was married some three years later. He soon purchased a small tract of land, and at the time of his death had acquired 2,000 acres of valuable laud. He died April 13, 1862. The mother yet resides in the old home place. Our subject was educated at Cold Spring Academy, and June 10, 1862, was married to Miss S. C. Owen, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Robertson) Owen. Mrs. Williams was born in Wilson County, Tenn., June 29, 1844, and has borne her husband nine children: Bettie, R. B., Mahala C., Mattie M., William H.,. J. H., Margaret I., Alex and Earnest. In 1862 Mr. Williams purchased 200 acres of his father's estate, and is very comfortably situated. After the war he met with some financial embarrassments, but by his industry and business ability has overcome these difficulties. In 1882 he was elected magistrate, and still holds the office. He is a Democrat and belongs to the Masons and I. O. O. F. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church. In 1861 he enlisted in Company I, Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry, and was in the battles of Fort Donelson (where he was wounded and disabled for six months) and Chickamauga. He was in cavalry service, and was engaged in numerous cavalry fights. He returned home in May, 1865.

    W. W. WILSON is one of the firm of Wilson & Waters, proprietors of a dry goods house at Lebanon, Tenn. He was born October 9, 1858, in Mississippi, and is the son of Eaton G. and Margaret L. (Roberts) Wilson. The father was born in Alabama and was a farmer. His death occurred in 1884. The mother was born about 1832 in Alabama, and is now residing with her son, W. W., in Lebanon. The latter was educated in Selma, Ala., but his school days were previous to his fifteenth year. He then began the battle of life for himself, and came to Lebanon and began clerking in the dry goods store of Price & Paty. About a year later he hired out to J. T. McClain & Co., with whom he remained seven years. During these years he was improving his education by study during his leisure moments, and is now a well educated man. In 1881 he owned a one-half interest in a jewelry store, his partner being B. J. Dillard, and for about a year owned a one-half interest in a livery and feed stable, the firm being styled Murphy & Wilson. In January, 1882, Mr. Wilson and Edgar Waters formed a partnership in the dry goods business, and have continued successfully in the same up to the present time. Mr. Wilson is a good business man and a skilled financier, and bears the reputation of being one of the finest salesmen in the city.

    R. Q. WORD, a trader and farmer, was born in Wilson County June 6, 1840, and is one of seven children of John and Elizabeth (Quarles) Word. The father was of Irish extraction, and was born in Virginia about 1798. He is a farmer, and came to Tennessee when but six years of age. He was married three times, and is now living in the Fifth District. The mother was of Irish extraction also, and was born in 1798 and died in 1870. Our subject was reared at home, and received his education in the common schools. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company H, of the Seventh Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was captured at the second battle of Manassas. He remained a prisoner about thirty days, when he was returned to the Confederate States Army authorities. He was in all the principal battles, and at one time was the only man in his company (officer or private) able to report for duty. After the war he was engaged for some time with the Louisville Oil Company, for which he traveled. February 21, 1867, he wedded Pemelia Freeman, a native of Tennessee, who died March 13, 1871. To this union were born two children, Charles and Elizabeth. He contracted a second marriage May 31, 1872, with Rachel Patton, a native of Kentucky, and the daughter of James H. and Sallie Patton. In 1871 Mr. Word went to Lawson, Ray Co., Mo,, and at different times was in a grocery, furniture and hardware store. In 1873 he returned to Tennessee and became one of the proprietors of the Silver Springs Mills. This occupied his attention for five years, since which time he has followed trading in live-stock. He has lately become a candidate for county trustee, subject to the county election August 5, 1886. He holds to the true principles of Democracy. He is a member of the Masonic lodge No. 98, and of the Royal Arch lodge and the K. of P. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and his wife of the Baptist Church.

    GEORGE W. WRIGHT, an enterprising farmer and merchant, was born November 21, 1838, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is one of a family of eleven children born to Lewis and Temple (Eddings) Wright. The father was born in 1794 in the State of Virginia, and when only fifteen years of age immigrated to Wilson County, Tenn., and located in the Twenty-fifth District. He was married in the year 1820, and by industry and perseverance soon purchased about 220 acres. Death called him away March 10, 1872. The mother was born in 1800 in Wilson County. Our subject received a practical education in the county schools, and June 18, 1862, he was united in marriage to Lucy (Guill) Wrlght. She was born September 26, 1843, and is the daughter of James Guill. To Mr. and Mrs.Wright were born two children: Monroe A. and Temple E. Mrs. Wright's death occurred January 28, 1868. June 20, 1869, Mr. Wright married Mary Robison, daughter of John Drennan. She was born in Wilson County, and by her union with Mr. Wright became the mother of five children: John, Lee, Cora, Lena and Annie. Mr. Wright is a good man, and one of the most energetic farmers of the Twenty-fourth District.

    J. K. WRIGHT, an enterprising merchant and farmer of the Fourth District, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., October 24, 1847, and is one of six children born to William and Margaret J. Wright. The father was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1814, and followed the occupation of a merchant and farmer, and at one time was owner and proprietor of the first woolen factory that was operated in the State of Tennessee. He was married in his native county, and died there in 1870. The mother was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1819, and died in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1859. Our subject passed his youthful days at home, and when twenty years of age received the rudiments of his education in the schools of the county, and subsequently attended Boyd's Commercial College at Louisville, Ky. In 1869 he was married to Eliza G., daughter of Dr. Henry B. and Susan Vaughn. Mrs. Wright was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1850, and by her union with Mr. Wright became the mother of five children: Maggie S., Alice B., James K., William H. and Graham C. In 1873 he bought eighty-five acres of land in Williamson County, where he commenced farming on his own responsibility, and at the present owns 145 acres of land, all lying in the Fourth District, where he still continues to farm. In 1867 Mr. Wright opened a grocery and dry goods store in La Guardo, and followed this business until 1873, when he sold out his store and continued farming until 1880. when he purchased his present store. He is postmaster at La Guardo, a Democrat and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

    ROBERT YOUNG (deceased), a successful farmer, was born May 7, 1822, in Wilson County, Tenn., and was one of twelve children born to James and Nancy (Branch) Young. The father was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1797, and is of Irish descent. He was a farmer by occupation, and lived to a good old age, his death occurring June 7, 1881. The mother was born in the year 1800 in Wilson County, and died April 17, 1875. Our subject was educated in his native county, and December 1, 1842, was married to Nancy Neal, and by her became the father of eight children: James W., Mary E. (wife of George Sullivan), George, Pallas, David, Nannie (wife of T. Hamilton), William F. and Effe L. In the year 1866 he. moved and settled in the Twenty-fourth District, where he purchased 325 acres of land, and carried on farming and stock raising until his death, which occurred June 22, 1885. He was a good man, and had the respect and esteem of all who knew him. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and held to the principles of Democracy, and was a worthy member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Young survives her husband, and manages the farm in a skillful manner. She is a consistent Christian and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    G. D. YOUNG, a farmer of the Fifteenth District of Wilson County, Tenn., was born October 28, 1823, and is a son of Joseph D. and Margaret (Stewart) Young, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1785 and 1796, and died in Tennessee in 1873 and 1875, respectively. They were married in 1812. G.D. Young, our subject, received his education in the schools of his native county. January 8, 1846, he married Miss Miranda, daughter of Andrew and Ritter (Kelly) Thompson, by whom he had six children: A. R., wife of J. D. Pemberton; Joseph D., A. T., Margaret E., J. M. and William B. After attaining his majority Mr. Young began farming on his own responsibility. After his marriage he purchased 135 acres of land which he has since increased to 185 acres. Mr. Young has been quite successful as a farmer and business man, and in addition to his farming has given some attention to the shoe-maker's trade and stone-masonry. He was a Whig as long as that party existed, but is now a Democrat. He belongs to the I. O. O. F and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    JOSEPH YOUNG was born near Big Springs, Wilson Co., Tenn., August 1, 1826, son of D. and Sarah Young, who were of Irish descent, and born in Tennessee and Virginia, respectively. The father was born in 1804, and resided in Wilson County until his death in 1874. He was married about 1825. Our subject was educated in the district schools, and December 20, 1849, was married to Nancy Marks, who was born in Wilson County, Tenn., March 3, 1827, daughter of John and Mary Marks. She died April 19, 1858, having borne three children, one--Laura--is now living. November 23, 1860, he wedded Emily Sneed, born December 30, 1839, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth Sneed. To Mr. and Mrs. Young were born these children: Sarah E., Mary, James, William H., Holly and Joseph. Soon after his first marriage Mr. Young purchased a grist-mill and has carried on that and farming to the present time. He owns about 200 acres of land. He was involved to the extent of $3,600 during the war, but by indomitable and persevering will has overcome these difficulties, and has since purchased and paid for 120 acres of excellent land. He is a Democrat politically and has held the office of justice of the peace a number of years. He and Mrs. Young are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

    J. W. YOUNG, a farmer, is a son of Robert and Nancy (Neal) Young, and grandson of James Young, who were of Irish descent. Robert Young was born in 1822, in Wilson County, Tenn., and followed the occupation of farming, owning at the time of his death, in 1885, 325 acres of land. The mother was born in 1824, and is yet residing on the old home place. They were the parents of twelve children, eight of whom are living: Mary, George, Palace, David, Foster, Nannie, Effie and J. W., our subject, who was born in Wilson County, in 1842, was reared at home and educated in his native county. At the breaking out of hostilities between the North and the South in 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and was in many of the principal battles and skirmishes of the war. At the battle of Stone Mountain he was shot in the left hand and was released from duty sixty days. He served until the fall of Richmond, and then returned home after an absence of nearly four years. October 22, 1868, he married Mary L. Luck, born in 1846, and daughter of W. W. and Fannie Luck. Mr. and Mrs. Young have four children: Robert, Elbert W., James and Omar A. From 1966 to 1880 our subject resided with his grandfather, James Young. He now has a good farm and a comfortable home. He is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.
 

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Transcribed 1999 by William C. Colley Jr.
source: Woodward & Stinson Printing Co. Edition, Reprint 1971
For noncommercial use only.