Descendants of Edward Willett

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

1. EDWARD1 WILLETT: He married ELIZABETH PEGG, daughter of JOHN PEGG and MARY.

 

Child of EDWARD WILLETT and ELIZABETH PEGG is:

2. i. EDWARD2 WILLETT, b. October 19, 1657, Hertford, England.

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. EDWARD2 WILLETT (EDWARD1) was born October 19, 1657 in Hertford, England. He married TABITHA MILL, daughter of WILLAIM MILL and TABITHA HILLIARY.

Notes for EDWARD WILLETT:

Edward Willett (2), the progenitor of those herein enumerated, was born on October 19, 1657, in Hertford, England, the son of Edward Willett (1) and Elizabeth Pegg. Edward Willett (2) was christened in Hertford's Church of All Saints and Saint John, the same Church in which his parents were married on November 18, 1656. According to a deposition in 1718, Edward Willett gave his age as 60. Additional depositions continue to place his date of birth as 1657 / 1658.

During the Colonial Period double year dates are given on many wills and other documents. In 1582 the Roman Catholic Church adopted a new, more accurate calendar known as the Gregorian calendar to replace the Julian calendar. Catholic countries followed suit. England did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until September 1752. The difference in the calendars was significant. The New Year started on January 1 in the Gregorian calendar and March 25 in the Julian calendar. When England and the colonies changed over to the Gregorian calendar a period of eleven days had to be canceled out. The day following September 2, 1752 became September 14, 1752. Riots erupted because of the loss of those eleven days.

While England was not using the Gregorian calendar, they did take notice of it. Documents and legal papers recorded both dates. After December 21, 1637, one might see January 1, 1637/8. Then starting March 25, both calendars would be 1638.

Elizabeth Pegg, the mother of Edward Willett (2), was christened at All Saints and St John's Church in Hertford on February 10, 1632. She was the daughter of John Pegg and Mary ____. John Pegg was christened in the same Church on June 2, 1605 and his Father's name was given as Henry Pegg. Through his mother's side of

the family Edward Willett (2) was raised as an Anglican, with their Church often being referred to as The Church of England, or Episcopalian. Maryland documents reveal St Paul's Anglican Church at Mount Calvert (Charles Town) where Edward Willett (2) lived as early as 1682. Eventually St Middleton, in Baden replaced this deteriorating Church.

Just when his uncle brought Edward Willett into the Province of Maryland has not been proved. It was probably as early as 1666. Edward Willett (2) was in Maryland as a young boy. In 1674 he was sent to London and apprenticed to Daniel Mason to learn the pewter trade. Daniel Mason had been apprenticed to Richard Willett from 1662 to 1669, and then Daniel Mason opened his own shop in 1672. When Edward Willett (2) enrolled in London to learn the trade of a peweter, his father's name was given as Edward Willett (1).

Richard Willett, the London peweter, was a first cousin of Edward Willett (1), the father of Edward Willett (2). As a very young lad, this cousin of his father's may have inspired Edward Willett (2). the peweter mark of Richard Willett, who received his mark in London around 1660, bore the 'willett bird'. Edward Willett's (2) mark bore the willett bird and his name.

In A SHORT HISTORY OF PEWTER, by Elsie Englefield printed in London in 1933, she states:

Pewter is mainly composed of tin. The highest priced metal in the trade, known as 'tin and temper'(best quality) is an alloy with copper and antimony, and is free from lead... The original standards of quality for making different articles in Pewter have survived the ages... English pewter dates back to the tenth century, and was in common use until the middle of the 18th century. The Pewter manufacturers had no competition and were generally very wealthy (pgs 24-27).

The earliest records of the Worshipful Company of pewters are to be found in their ordinances for the year 1348. These regulations insisted upon a high standard of quality and workmanship in the trade, and also included fines and penalties if disregarded. Evidence of insistence of good work can be seen in specimens of Pewter preserved to this day in museum and in the collections of expert Pewter lovers. In 1503 an Act of Parliament gave the Company authority to control the trade, making it compulsory for all makers to stamp their ware with a Touch mark or Punch; also to register their mark on the Touch Plates of the Company. All makers were compelled to adhere to the standard of quality demanded by the regulations of the Company. Searchers were appointed to visit the Pewter markers, and inspect the work. If found to be inferior it was destroyed, and in some cases the makers fined. Registration of Touch marks continued to about the year 1824, and it is by this means that the date and the maker can be determined.

When he was twenty-three years of age, Edward Willett received his mark and became a Pewterer. He was given leave to strike his touch, in the Pewterers Hall of London in 1684/ 1685 (Older Pewter by Cotterell, pg 337, #5161). The family coat of arms was sometimes used as an inscription on the pewter's touch. Toward the end of the 17th century, the touches appeared with the maker's names. Edward Willett (2) incorporated both practices in his touch.

The Willett families in England had coats of arms so similar that it is certain they were originally of one family. On the top of each Willett coat of arms is found a bird over a crown, as Edward Willett (2) had struck on his touch. The original will of Edward Willett (2) of Prince George's County, Maryland, still in existence in the Hall of Records in Annapolis, carries his seal - his mark. The seal bears the imprint of a bird with a crown over it. His seal places Edward Willett (2) as an English Willett descendant. The bird found on the top of the crest and coats of arms is said to be a willett, a large light-colored shore bird, known for it's loud cry 'wil-, wil-, willett'.

On October 6, 1684, Edward Willett (2) was in the pewter business with John Corinall for a short period. Edward Willett never had his own shop as his name does not appear on the British yeomanry list of Pewters. Sometime after 1685 and prior to 1692 Edward Willett returned to the Province of Maryland and settled at Mount Calvert near the Patuxent River. Edward Willett's pewter business was no doubt slight in the limited population near Mount Calvert. Edward Willett is ranked among the earliest of American Pewters by Laughlin in his book THE PEWTERERS OF THE SOUTH. To date, no pewter bearing the touch of Edward Willett has been found.

In 1692, Edward Willett is recorded in Maryland records as Clerk of the Vestry, St Paul's Parish in Mount Calvert. Edward Willett, a well-educated man, had to be a man of standing in his Episcopalian community in order to be clerk of St Paul's Parish. In other records Edward Willett is noted as 'pewterer' and 'planter'.

On October 10, 1694 Edward Willett witnessed the will of Thomas Barnard of Calvert County. I n the accounts of Thomas Barnard's estate on May 12, 1696, it states that Edward Willett received payment for the schooling of two of the sons of the deceased. Edward Willett appears to have done some tutoring. In 1695, with Samuel Magruder and William Mill, Edward Willett was named as overseer for the will of Thomas Blanford of Prince George's County, his step father-in-law. In the will of Richard Chaffee of Prince George's County in 1698, Edward Willett and Samuel Magruder were named as overseers for his will. All these gentlemen were parishioners of St Paul's Parish in Mount Calvert.

In 1697, as clerk of the vestry of St Paul's Church at Mount Calvert, officially called Charles Town, Edward Willett presented a petition to have the court clear the title of the Church property, which was done.

Prior to becoming the County Clerk, Edward Willett held some civil post in Prince George's County. In 1696 the Civil officers and Magistrate of the Province of Maryland sent a letter to the King which Edward Willett signed. The letter read in part:

Addressing your Majesty and Joyning with the rest of your

Loyall Subjects in Congratulating your deliverance from

the horrid designed Assassination against your Sacred person...

Edward Willet was influential in civic affairs as well as Church affairs. In 1698, Edward Willett, pewterer, was appointed clerk of the county court of Prince George's County, replacing Joshua Cecil who had kept the records since the erection of the County. Edward Willett served as clerk from 1698 - 1711.

Gentlemen, I have herewith Sent you a Commission for
MR WILLETT to be Clerk of your County home after
Security given and the Oaths taken According to the
Usuall manner you are to Admitt. See that all Records
and other matters to your Court belonging be delivered
to him. So I remaine your Loving Friend. (This was signed
by Francis Nicholson on August 23, 1698, at the Prince
George's Court which was held at Charles Town).

Edward Willett's duties were written as follows:

The condition of this obligation is such that whereas the
Honorable Sir Thomas Lawrence Barronett, his Magesty's
Secretary of Maryland hath constituted and appointed the
Said EDWARD WILLETT to be Clerk of Prince George's
County and thereby committed to his care and Custody
all the bookes Records Court Rules and other things and
papers to the Said office and place of Clerk aforesaid 
belonging and Appertaining Now if the Said EDWARD
WILLETT doe in all things according to the duty and
trust of the said office and place well and truly Execute
and performs the Same trust and Charge and the Said
keeper and take Care of and preserve well and faithfully
make and Enter without any Fraud concealment or delay
and the Said Office and place with all the Bookes, Records
and Court Rules and other Deeds and writeings thereunto
belonging doe Surrender and deliver up when here shall
be Lawfully discharged of the Said Office and place of
Clerk as aforesaid that then this Obligation to be voyd or
else to Remaine in full force and virtue. (Signed by Edward
Willett, Ninian Beall and Samuel Magruder in the presence
of Thomas Hollyday, John Wightt, and John Hawkins)

In 1708 Edward Willett was employed by the justices to write the rules of the court on parchment, frame them, and place them in the most visible place in the courthouse.

While he was fulfilling the office of Clerk, Edward Willett recorded the dates of his children. In the August 1699 court he recorded, "Bridgett Willett dau to Edward and Tabitha Willett borne in Mount Calvert the 18th day of July 1699". In the November Court of 1708 the following children were recorded as having been born to Edward and Tabitha Willett: Ninian Willett born on November 30, 1701, Edward Willett born January 12, 1703, and Thomas Willett born August 9, 1708.

For Edward Willett life began at forty. His only marriage was to Tabitha Mill, the daughter of William Mill and Tabitha Hilliary. After his marriage Edward Willett received his first deed for property. Edward Willet became clerk of Prince George's County in 1698. In July of 1699 his first child was born and in August of 1699 he had his mark for cattle and hogs recorded. So within a two-year period Edward Willett became a professional person, a husband, a father, a planter, and the owner of a small plantation.

On July 28, 1698 Edward Willett purchased from Ninean Beall a 43-acre tract called "Beall's Craft" on the west side of the Western Branch of the Patuxent River near the property of William Shelby. On February 25, 1700 Edward Willett purchased from James Moore a 100-acre tract called "Horse Race", which joined "Beall's Craft on the south. On April 18, 1702 Richard Jones sold Edward Willett a tract called "Bealington" on the west side of the Patuxent River near the land of William Croome which included a dwelling house, barn, stables, yards, gardens, and an orchard, plus an additional 100-acre tract called "Good Luck". Both tracts adjoined the property, which he already possessed. Prior to this time, Edward Willett had resided in Mount Calvert on property he had inherited

from his merchant uncle, William Willett. Later, in his will, Edward Willett(2) bequeathed this lot in Mount Calvert to his daughter, Ann Swan.

"Bealington" became the home plantation of Edward Willett and later the home of his son, William Willett (3), and then later the home of his grandson, Edward Willett. The spot on the land where the house of William Willett stood was recorded on a survey plat used in a boundary dispute case in 1789. The land owned by Edward Willett (2) and the house were home to three generations of Willetts.

During the colonial period in Maryland the outstanding land records kept by Lord Baltimore are still in existence. Once Lord Baltimore patented land to an individual, the tract was given a name. To enable the Lord Proprietor to collect the quit rents due two records were kept: the rent rolls which gave the tract name and the notations concerning transactions in regard to it, and the debt books which listed the person's name and tracts they owned, and the rents annually due. The rent rolls cover the entire colonial period. The debt books, which are still in existence, cover from 1752 to 1774.

On July 6, 1702 a record was recorded in Prince George's County concerning the heirs of Richard Allen of Middlesex, England, who were trying to recover money, which Edward Willett had borrowed from Allen. On April 7, 1700 Joseph Webb, and Sarah, his wife, the daughter and executrix of Richard Allen, gave power of attorney to John Parker, who was going to Maryland to recover from Edward Willett, late of London, pewterer, then and still in Maryland, sums, goods, merchandise, and effects due Allen. Parker employed Jacob Regnier of Annapolis to represent him. The record shows Edward Willett was from Maryland prior to going to London to learn to learn the pewter trade.

As a young boy, Edward Willett (2) was brought into the Province of Maryland by his uncle William Willett. He lived with his uncle in Mount Calvert, Maryland, until he was nearing the age of eighteen. In 1674 Edward Willett was sent by William Willett to London to learn the trade of a pewterer. By the time Edward Willett was ready to return to Maryland, his uncle William Willett had died intestate. Thomas Stotle who was to administer William Willett's estate had also died. With no money to return to Maryland, Edward worked as a pewterer in London for a time. Then he borrowed money to equip himself with the necessary tools to start his pewter trade and for his return voyage to Prince George's County, Maryland.

On August 12, 1702, Edward Willett purchased from Thomas James a tract of land called "Little Dean" which contained a dwelling house, barns, stables, and 103 acres of ground. A mortgage on this property was recorded on August 19, 1702 between Edward Willett and Jacob Regnier of Lincoln's Inn in order for Edward Willett to pay the debt which he owed to Richard Allen's heirs. "157 acres, part of "Horse Race:...formerly taken up by James Moore and since sold to Edward Willett...also "Little Dean", 103 acres taken up by Thomas James and sold to Willett" were mortgaged. In order to void the mortgage, Edward Willett agreed to pay at the State House in Annapolis ~L173:02:00 in five yearly payments. Edward Willett paid off his mortgages and these tracts were later bequeathed to his children.

On May 3, 1702 Edward Willett had a survey taken of "Bealington" and found that whereas his original deed stated there were 100 acres in the tract, the resurvey showed the tract actually contained 209 acres of land (Land office DD#5:98).

This was not an uncommon occurrence in this period as many tracts had undeveloped and uncleared wood lands. When a resurvey was taken, there was almost always surplus acreage.

On December 9, 1704 St Paul's Parish was divided with the line "by the plantation of a certain Edward Willett". St Paul's Parish was relocated at Baden, since St Paul's Church in Mount Calvert, built in 1682 was deteriorating. In the register of the newly formed parish, St Barnabus, a Chapel of Ease of St Paul's, Edward Willett is listed for contributing 420 pounds of tobacco for the building of a Church on March 8, 1708. St Barnabus was completed in 1711.

Thomas Sprigg, Sr, wrote his will on May 9, 1704 and desired Samuel Magruder, Sr, Edward Willett, and John Smith to divide his estate among his heirs. Edward Willett with his wife Tabitha, along with Ann Smith were testators for the will of Samuel Magruder on November 23, 1710. Edward Willett witnessed the will of Ninian Beall on January 15, 1717. On April 10, 1717, with Isaac Cecil he administered the estate of Joshua Cecil. He was overseer for the will of Benjamin Berry on November 7, 1719.

On January 22, 1711, Edward Willett acquired a tract of land called, "Dean" which was a part of "Good Luck", from the Widow Susanna Magruder. This 100-acre tract had "edifices, buildings, yards, gardens, and orchards". On June 23, 1719, Edward Willett purchased from Hugh Riley a 172 acre tract called "Riley's Point" on the eastern branch of the Potomac River. This tract contained "old edifices, buildings, yards, gardens and an orchard". On September 10, 1726, Edward Willett witnessed the will of William Carter, tailor, in Prince George's County.

A road went through the pasture on Edward Willett's plantation to the brick Church in Collington Hundred in the March Court of 1729, when he was 71 years old, he asked to have the road closed so he would not have to open and shut the gates. His wish was granted.

The great affection which Edward Willett bore for his children is shown in deeds when he bequeathed land to them. Edward Willett, Sr, planter on June 31, 1728 deeded "for natural affection and fatherly love to his well beloved son Ninian Willett, who is his heir-at-law (eldest son), part of "Good Luck" 100 acres on the west side of Patuxent River purchased of Richard James, "the land which Ninean Willett then lived". On September 10, 1728, Edward Willett, Sr, Gentleman, deeded to Edward Willett, Jr., "in consideration of the natural affection and fatherly love", part of Bealington. On June 12, 1732, Edward Willett purchased a 100-acre tract called "Lick Hill", and before the patent was issued he assigned this tract to his son, Thomas Willett. On December 14, 1743, Edward Willett, pewterer, granted 172 acres of land called "Riley's Plains" for "Natural affection and Fatherly Love", to his daughter Ann Swan and her husband, James Swan, cooper.

Edward Willett owned servants and slaves. Several court records exist pertaining to them.

"Elizabeth Clifford age 4 yr Old the 4th of November last by consent of her mother Abigaile Clifford was bound to Edward Willett till she arrives to ye age of 16 years old", dated June 1701. "Mary Sparrow, dau of William Sparrow is bound to Edward Willett until she comes of age she being 2 years old the 12th of March, last", dated August 1714. In the March 1721 Court "Elizabeth Grimes, a mulattoe servant of Edward Willett, planter, had two bastard children whose father was a negroe". In the January 1728 Court "Edward Willett keeping and clothing Ann Rooksby for the time until Nov. 1728 court". In March 1732 "Elizabeth Grimes bastard child Rachel was bound to Edward Willett until she shall arrive at the age of 16 years".

Edward Willett's children were well educated. No records were found to tell whether they studied in Europe or were taught by their father. Records do exist to show that Edward Willett stood by his family in the good times as well as difficult times. When his grandson Charles Willett had a suit brought against him, Edward Willett paid for the damages involved. When his wayward grandson, Ninian Willett, was repeatedly brought into Court for misdemeanors, it was Edward Willet who paid his fines.

Edward Willett was an ancestor all descendants will fell proud to claim. He lived a long, full, and fruitful life, dying in the winter of 1744 at the age of 86. His inventory lists "one old bible, A prayer Book & the Whole duty of man"-- one answer to his gracious wholesome life. Edward Willett's faith in God, his love of his family, and his closeness to his friends is exemplified from available records. The original will of Edward Willett with his signature, and the original inventory with the signatures of his sons Ninian Willett and James Willett, who signed as next-of-kin., are housed in the Hall of Records in Annapolis. His personal estate, which did not include land, was valued at ~L122:05:04, plus an additional ~L8:15:09, showing him to be a well-to-do man for his period in history. William Willett (3) made the final accounting of his father's estate on April 24, 1746:

The Will of Edward Willett (2) reads:

In the name of God Amen June the Sixteenth One thousand Seven Hundred and forty Three I Edward Willett of Prince George's County in the province of Maryland being in perfect mind and memory thanks be to God Doe may and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in manner and form following. That is to say First I recommend my Soule into the Hands of the Almighty god that Gave in Hoping through the Merits of Jesus Christ to be received into Eternal Rest my Mortal Body I commit to the Earth to be Decently Buried at the discretion of my Executor hereafter Named and Touching my worldly goods I Give and bequeath the Same in manner and form following viz.

Imprimis That all such debts that I owe and have Contracted her in Maryland and funeral charges be justly paid without trouble or Lawsuites -

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Eldest Son NINIAN WILLETT five Shillings Sterling and the plantation which he now Lives on which I some time agoe Gave to him by A deed of Gift which may be found Among the records of Prince George County-

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son EDWARD WILLETT five Shillings Sterling and Sixty acres of Land being part of the Tract of Land I now Live on and made over to him by A deed of Gift Some Time Ago-

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son THOMAS WILLETT & his Heirs Lawfully begotten for Ever all that Tract of Land Called Lick Hill belonging to me-

Item I Give and Bequeath unto My Beloved Son William Willett (3) all that Tract of Land called Beale Craft containing forty-three Acres and Eighty Seven acres of tract of Land Called Bealington being that part where I now live with the dwelling house and orchard and all appurtenances there unto belonging to him and his Heirs and Assigns for Ever and I further Give and Bequeath unto My said Son WILLIAM WILLETT (3) All My Pewterers Molds and Other tools thereunto Belonging provided he Doth what necessary pewter the rest of my children shall want for their own proper use in their House they finding Mettle (metal)-

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son JAMES WILLETT and the Heirs of his body Lawfully begotten forever all the Remaining part of my Tract of Land called Bealington that is over and above to his two Brothers EDWARD & WILLIAM (3)

WILLETT but in case the Said JAMES WILLETT Shall Die or depart this Life without an Heir of his Body Lawfully begotten then I give and Bequeath the Same to WILLIAM WILLETT (3) and his heirs and assigns for Ever-

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter ANN SWAN and the Heirs of her body Lawfully begotten forever all that Tract of Land called Ryley's Plains Near or Joining to the Land of Cuttbeard Anderson containing One Hundred & Seventy two acres and I also Give and Bequeath to the said ANN SWAN the acre of Land I Bought of Mr Stodart in the Town of Mount Calvert with the premises therunto belonging but in case She Should Depart this Life without issue of her Body as afore said then I Give and Bequeath all the Said Lands to my Sons THOMAS WILLETT, WILLIAM WILLETT (3), and JAMES WILLETT and their Heirs and assigns forever -

Item I Give and Bequeath to my Three Sons THOMAS WILLETT, WILLIAM WILLETT (3), & JAMES WILLETT and my Daughter ANN SWAN all that Tract of Land called Little Dean that I bought of Thomas James and all that part of the Tract of Land Called Little Dean I bought of Thomas James and all that part of the Tract of Land Called the Horse Race I Bought of Col Ninian Beall and all my Estate both Real and personal that I Shall Die possessed with all or Thereafter in or Not in this my will Other way Given or Disposed of I Leave to be Equally Divided between them and their Heirs and assigns forever-

Item And Lastly it is my will and Desire and I Doe hereby Make Constitute and appoint my Well beloved Son WILLIAM WILLETT (3) whole and sole executor of this my last will and Testament in witness whereof I have hereunto Sett my hand and Seale the Day and Year above Written-

Edward Willett (2) signed his will and affixed his seal. His will was probated on Febuary 7, 1744.

 

Notes for TABITHA MILL:

Tabitha Mill

Wife of Edward Willett

William Mill, the father of Tabitha Mill (2), was born in England in 1628. In a deposition given in 1658 he gave his age as 30. William Mill was living on the Patuxent River in 1659 when a dispute arose over the land on which he resided. He often set on the jury for the Court of Calvert County. He was a witness for several wills in which he signed with his mark "W". On November 24, 1660 William Mill was named as overseer in the will of Jane Fenwick, the Widow of Cuthbert Fenwick of Fenwick Manor on the Patuxent.

On January 18, 1663, William Mill patented his first tract of land called "Trenant" (Patents 7:517). In the Will of John Boage, written July 8, 1667 and probated on December 16, 1667, legacy was left to his countryman, William Mill. Through this legacy William Mill became the possessor of more acreage of

"Trenant", "Dunbar", and "Haddington" which had been patented to John Boage in 1663. These tracts adjoined William Mill's own tract of "Trenant". The property

of William Mill is marked today by a point on the Patuxent Bay called "Milltown Landing". Milltown Landing Road runs through the original William Mill's property.

William Mill wrote his will in Calvert County, Maryland. on March 13, 1676 and was probated on April 26, 1676. In his will he bequeathed his tracts of land, previously mentioned, to his sons after the death of his wife. His wife, Tabitha, was named as executrix. He named his eldest son William Mill, his second son, John Mill, and the daughters (unnamed). He named Alexander Magruder, Samuel Tayler and Ninian Beall as overseers of his will.

TABITHA MILL (1), the widow of WILLIAM MILL (1), married secondly Thomas Blandord. "Tabitha Blanford the relict and executrix of William Mill, late of Calvert County deceased... exhibited her account of the execution of the Testament of the said MILL'S and showed that soon after the decease of the said MILL'S she intermarryed with the said Blanford & that the said Blanford managed her whole business in the Execution of the said Test & payd all the debts of the said deceased & therefore prayed that her acc't be admitted..."

The estate of William was valued at 29,559 pounds of tobacco. A manservant, a boy servant and a woman servant amounted to 6,200 pounds, and his debts were 11,313 pounds. The widow received 6,082 pounds, her third, and the unnamed orphans received 12,164 pounds. At this period of history in Maryland, wealth was determined in pounds of tobacco, and later in pounds of sterling.

Thomas Blanford made his will in Prince George's County on November 18, 1695 and it was probated on April 28, 1698. He named his wife, Tabitha, and his five Blanford children. The overseers for his will were Samuel Magruder, William Mill, and Edward Willett (2). Tabitha Blanford and her son William Mill administered the estate of Thomas Blanford on April 28, 1698, valued at ~L6118:19:02. By January 20, 1700, Tabitha was deceased. Her goods and chattles amounted to ~L93:00:02. Her son, Thomas Blanford administered her estate. "The account of Thomas Blanford adm of all the Singular Goods Chattells and Credits of Tabitha Blanford Widow late of Prince George's County, deceased..." One item in the disbursements was "1000 lbs tobacco was paid Edward Willett (2) part of the portion of Tabitha Mill & in full the same". As the husband of Tabitha Mill Willett (2), Edward Willett (2), was paid her part of her mother's estate.

 

On March 10, 1703 the bond of Thomas Blanford for the administration of Daniel Jenkins was signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of Edward Willett and Tabitha Willett, with Tabitha making her mark "T". As clerk Edward Willett was a witness for a number of bonds. Tabitha was often one of his other witnesses. Sometimes Thomas Blanford, the half brother of Tabitha also signed.

William Mill II, the brother of Tabitha Mill Willett, signed as the next of kin on the inventory of Thomas Hilliary. Thomas Hilliary is thought to be the brother of Tabitha, their mother, making William Mill and Tabitha Hilliary the parents of William Mill II, Sarah Mill who married Samuel McGruder (not proven), John Mill, other unknown daughters, and Tabitha Mill Willett, the wife of Edward Willett (2). There were close relationships between Samuel McGruder, Edward Willett, and the children of Thomas Hillary, named in his will.

William Mill II, the son of William Mill and Tabitha Hilliary, died in 1704 /05. His widow Elizabeth married secondly Thomas Price, "Elizabeth, widow of William Mills now wife of Thomas Price".

William Mill, Tabitha's brother, after his widow remarried. Edward Willett recorded in the Prince George's County Court Records the dates of birth of the children of William Mill in 1705 as: Tabitha Mill, born October 26, 1697, Verlinda Mill, born January 7, 1699, and William Mill, born October 11, 1695. In the court records of Prince George's County, Maryland during the period while he was Clerk, the only births of children recorded were those of himself and Tabitha Willett, and those of William Mill, Tabitha's brother.

Thomas Price died in Prince George's County in 1727 and his heirs were his widow Elizabeth and their children: Thomas Price, Richard Price, Benjamin Price, Mary Price, Ann Price, and Sarah Price.

On March 10, 1717 William Mill III requested a warrant for a 240-acre tract granted to his Father William Mill, the son of William Mill, who had patented the tract on July 18, 1664. Before the warrant was granted William Mill III died. On August 2, 1718 Tabitha Mill (born October 26, 1697), his sister, administered the estate.

On September 7, 1718 a deposition was made by Edward Willett (2) and Isaac Cecil which stated, "The deponents made oath on the Holy Evangelists that Whereas there was a special warrant granted until William Mill of Prince George's County, deceased for the resurveying a certain Tract of land in the said County called Trenant, he the said William leaving an only sister going by the name of Tabitha Mill who now...to have said Warrant renewed in her own name...that the said Tabitha is the only heir thereof and that the right of inheritance doth, belong to the said Tabitha and further say not." The tract of land called "Trenent" and the surplus land was re-patented to Tabitha Mill, the sister of William Mill, III.

William Mill, III's sister Tabitha Mill married Thomas Sheredine. On October 30, 1739 they sold the 250 acres of "Trenent" and a tract of land called "Dunbar" to James Wilson, and moved to Baltimore County, Maryland. Tabitha was deceased by 1756.

John Mill, the other brother of Tabitha Mill Willett, died in 1717 and in his will named his children: William, Robert, Richard, John, Ellinor, Velinda and Mary Travis and her two children: John Travis and william Mills Travis.

Tabitha, the wife of Edward Willett was living in 1737 when they witnessed the will of Charles Willett, a first cousin of Edward Willett. Sometime between that date and 1743 when Edward Willett made his will, Tabitha died. Edward Willett and his wife Tabitha were buried in the cemetery on their homestead at Bealington.

When the Willett and Mills families settled on the beautiful and fertile lands along the Patuxent River, the chief means of transportation was the river itself. Only gradually was the land cleared and homes built among the forests of trees. Although they owned slaves and indentured servants, the Willett men themselves must have spent their days in planting and cultivating the tobacco fields, raising corn and other plants for food, hunting in the backwoods, and fishing in the Western Branch of the Patuxent River that ran near their home. The waters provided them with an abundance of fish, oysters, and duck, while the forests supplied them with wild deer, turkey, and other game.

 

Like most people in this period of history, the Willett family initially lived in a wooden structure. Material for their clothing and other manufactured goods were supplied when merchant's ships arrived from England. The seamen on these vessels also brought them news from Europe.

Horses were wild and plentiful in the region. In 1715, "the Assembly enacted legislation requiring that horses must be kept within enclosures between May and November". With the use of horses, roads were eventually built and small communities grew. From court records it is known some of the willett men were instrumental in helping to build these roads.

As Maryland continued to develop, Edward Willett prospered. Calvert County and Charles County were divided and Prince George's County was established on the feast of St George, April 23, 1695. This was a memorable event in the history of Maryland and a great event in the lives of Edward and Tabitha Willett who were married in that year, or shortly thereafter. "Charles Town" as it was officially called but which continued to be known as Mount Calvert, on the west side of the Patuxent River was selected for the new county sear, the location where the earliest Willetts were living.

The Willett family initially belonged to St Paul's Parish. Church activities and gatherings were big occasions in their life. Edward Willett (2) may have met his bride-to-be at a Church function since the Mill family also belonged to St Paul's Church.

 

Children of EDWARD WILLETT and TABITHA MILL are:

3. i. WILLIAM3 WILLETT, b. Abt. 1715, Prince George's County, Maryland.

ii. BRIDGETT WILLETT, b. July 18, 1699, Mount Calvert.

Notes for BRIDGETT WILLETT:

Bridgett Willett died young

 

iii. NINIAN WILLETT, b. November 30, 1701.

iv. EDWARD WILLETT, JR, b. January 12, 1702/03.

v. THOMAS WILLETT, b. August 09, 1709.

vi. ANN WILLETT, b. Abt. 1712.

vii. JAMES WILLETT, b. Abt. 1717.

 

Generation No. 3

 

3. WILLIAM3 WILLETT (EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born Abt. 1715 in Prince George's County, Maryland. He married MARY GRIFFITH.

Notes for WILLIAM WILLETT:

William Willett (3) was born around 1715 in Prince George's County, Maryland, the son of Edward Willett and Tabitha Mill (2), on land called Bealington. Here William Willett spent his entire life. In the 1733 census of Prince George's County, William Willett was dwelling in his father's home. About four years

later William willett married Mary Griffith, the sister of George Griffith, their parents not proved.

From the will of his father, William Willett received 43 acres called "Beals Craft", the home plantation called "Bealington", and pewter molds and tools - provided he made pewter dishes for his brothers and sister if they provided the metal. With his brothers Thomas Willett and James Willett, and his sister Ann Swan, he received two tracts of land called "Little Doan" and "Horse Race" and his father's personal estate. William Willett also had 26 1/2 acres of "Chaffey's Delight" and 8 acres called "Reston's Addition".

William Willett continued the pewter business of his father. In the Maryland Gazette on Thursday January 8, 1756 and for the six Thursdays thereafter William Willett ran the following ad:

William Willett, Pewterer living about 2 miles from Upper Marlborough
on the Blandenburg Road now molds Old Pewter at 9d per pound or
will return one half good new Pewter for any quantity and to be cast in
whatever forms employer pleases, either flat or soup dishes, or flat or
soup plates. N.B. He will wait on any employer within 20 or 30 miles
to receive their old or return their new pewter, and they may depend on
being served faithfully and honestly dealt with.

 

In Across the Years in Prince George's County, Bowie sates, "most of the pewter ware that went to Kentucky in early days was made by William Willett of Prince George's County, Maryland and some by his father, Edward (2).

William Willett was also a planter and owned a large tobacco barn. In a land dispute in 1786 a map was drawn of his 264-acre tract "Bealington" and the exact spot where his house was located was marked. In the court proceedings mention is made of William Willett's tobacco house, and that his plantation overseer and brother-in-law George Griffith, had been clearing the land for him for 24 or 25 years.

William Willett had some connection with Prince George's County Court. At the March 1768 court it was ordered that Ninian Willett, Sr, be appointed overseer of Mount Calvert Hundred Upper Part "in the Room of William Willett.". At the June 1768 court "William Willett Senior prefers to the court here his Petition for his Negro Woman named Sall to be levy free for the future...Petitioner have effect of his prayer." Later he made a similar plea for his Negro man who had rheumatism and was unable to work.

Two orphans were placed under the care of William Willett. In the November 1743 court "Philip Grimes an orphan age 3 years is bound to William Willett and his assignes untill he arrive to the age of 21 years. And the Said William Willett in his proper person in Court here Promises to give the said Philip one year schooling and at the Expiration thereof to give him a Decent Suit of Apparell". In the March 1744 court "John Grimes age 7 years the 25th instant is by the Court here bound to William Willett of Prince George's County Planter and his assignes untill he arrive to the age of 21 years and the said William Willett in his Proper person in Court here Promises during the term aforesaid to Learn the said John Grimes to read Distinctly in the Bible and at the Expiration of his time of Servitude to give him a Decent Suit of Apparel".

William Willett wrote his will on July 10, 1772 and it was probated on August 27, 1772. His will reads:

In the Name of God Amen. July the Seventh day one Thousand seven hundred and Seventy two I WILLIAM WILLETT Senior of Prince George's County, Maryland, Pewterer, Being in perfect Mind and Memory thanks be to God, do make and ordain this my last will and Testament in Manner and Form following (That is to say: First I commend my Soul into the house of the Mighty God who gavest and my Body to be decetnly Buried at the discretion of my Executors hereafter Named And as for my worldly Estate I give and dispose of in manner following First my will is that all my just Debts and Funeral Charges be well and truly satisfied and paid Item I give and Devise to my son Edward Willett all that Tract or parcel of Land Lying in the County aforesaid called Beall's Craft containing forth three acres more or less and part of the Tract of Land called "Beallington" containing Eighty sever Acres more or less with part of a Tract of Land called "Restons Addition: containing Eight acres more or less together with the Improvements conveniences and Advantages to the same belonging or any wise Appertaining (Except as herein after excepted) to him the said Edward Willett his Heirs and Assigns and also my whole set of Pewterer's Tools and Moulds upon Conditions his making the rest of my Children Pewter up for the use of their own houses without any Cost or charge they finding metal for the same The above conditions is that the said Edward Willett upon receiving the abouve Lands and Tracts shall pay unto my four youngest Sons namely Samuel Willett George Willett John Willett and James Willett the Sum of Eighty Pounds Sterling to be equally divided amongst them Mentioned children then living also my will is that the above Land and Tools shall remain in the possession of my beloved wife Mary Willett during her Natural Life for her Maintenance support and conveniences or if in case my beloved Wift Mary Willett should think it good to alter her conditions in the honorable State of Matrimony then the Land and Tools shall be disinherited & delivered up upon the day of Marriage into the Possession of the aforesaid Edward Willett as his right and Property and I also give unto my Son Edward Willett the Sum of the Shillings Mentioned to be given to him out of my personal Estate and in full-Satisfaction of his filial part or claim to any further divisions or demands upon my Estate I Give and Devise to my Son William Willett all that parcell or Tract of Land called Bealington which Bought of William Harper of the County aforesaid, bricklayer containing sixty acres more or less also three Acres taken out of the Land I of Susannah Magruder lying on the North end side adjoining the aforesaid Tract of Land Lying between the said William Willett's dwelling house and his brother Griffin Willett's dwelling house with the Improvements, conveniences and advantages the same belonging or my wife Appertaining thereto to him the said William Willet, his Heirs and Assigns also the sum of five shillings Sterling to be paid him out of my Personal Estate and in full satisfaction of his filial part or claim to any further Dividend or Demand upon my Estate and also my will is that if the said Griffin Willett shourld die without Issue then the said lands I will to Samuel Willett the next Heir and if the said Samuel Willett should die without Issue then the said land to be given to John Willett the next Heir and if the said John Willett should die without Issue then the said land to be given to James Willett my youngest son to him or them their Heirs and Assigns. All the rest of my Goods and Chattles to be equally divided among all my other Children (the three above mentioned only Excepted) as they severally arrive at age or upon the day of their Marriage. And I make and ordain my loving wife Mary Willett sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament. In witness thereof I the said William Willett Senior have this my last will and Testiment set my hand and seal the day and year above written.

Mrs Mary Willett gave the final distribution of the estate of William Willett on November 27, 1773 which amounted to ~L321:16:01. This amount was distributed to eleven of his children equally: Elizabeth, Verlinda, Jemina, Tabitha, Ann, Samuel, George, John, Rachel, Mary, and James. His sons Edward, William, and Griffith had already received their estates.

 

After the death of her husband Mary Griffith Willett, placed an advertisement in the Maryland Gazette on February 10, 1773, March 4, 1773, and March 25, 1773 which read: "The Pewter's Business is still carried on at the subscriber's House in the same manner and at the same Rates as were in my deceased Husband's Life."

In Upper Marlborough on March 7, 1779 Mary Griffith Willett married secondly Richard Simmons, a widower. At the time of her marriage all the land, the pewterer tools and molds became the property of her oldest son Edward Willett.

The first wife of Richard Simmons was Susanna Pottinger, the daughter of Samuel Pottinger and Elizabeth Tyler. Four of their children married children of William Willett and Mary Griffith. So Richard Simmons was the stepfather and father-in-law of four of the Willett children. Richard Simmons died in Prince George's County in 1784 leaving a will.

After the death of her second husband, Mary Griffith Willett Simmons moved to Nelson County, Kentucky which at that time was still part of the State of Virginina. In Nelson County Virginia on December 5, 1788 Mary wrote her will. This area became the State of Kentucky in 1792. In Nelson County, Kentucky on August 12, 1794 Mary's will was probated. She named all her living children in her will; Elizabeth, Ann and John had pre-deceased her. James Willett, her youngest son was named as her executor. Mary's will read as follows:

In the name of God, Amen. I, Mary Simmons, of the County of Nelson, State of Virginia, being weak in Body, but of sound mind and memory, thanks be to God for the same, do make this my last will and testament, in the name and form following that is to say after all my lawful debts and funeral expenses are discharged. First, I give and bequeath to each of my children herein after mentioned the sum of one shilling sterling, to be paid in twelve months after my decease, viz Edward, William, Jeminy, Verlinda, Griffith, Tabitha, Samuel, George, Rachel, and Mary. Item: I give and bequeath to my son James Willett, one Negro man named Jeremiah with all my goods and chattels of what nature soever, whom I also constitute and appoint sole executor of this my last will and testament revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made. In witness whereof I have interchangeably affixed my hand and seal this fifth day of December, 1788.

Notes for MARY GRIFFITH:

Mary Griffith was the sister of George Griffith.

 

Children of WILLIAM WILLETT and MARY GRIFFITH are:

4. i. GEORGE E4 WILLETT, b. 1756, Prince George's County, Maryland.

ii. ELIZABETH WILLETT, b. January 04, 1737/38.

iii. EDWARD WILLETT, b. 1740.

iv. VERLINDA WILLETT, b. 1746.

v. JEMINA WILLETT, b. 1748.

vi. GRIFFITH WILLETT, b. December 23, 1750.

vii. TABITHA WILLETT, b. 1752.

viii. ANN WILLETT, b. 1753.

ix. SAMUEL WILLETT, b. 1754.

x. JOHN WILLETT, b. 1759.

xi. RACHEL WILLETT, b. November 17, 1762.

xii. MARY WILLETT, b. August 21, 1764.

xiii. JAMES WILLETT, b. April 26, 1765.

 

Generation No. 4

 

4. GEORGE E4 WILLETT (WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born 1756 in Prince George's County, Maryland. He married ELIZABETH SANDERS, daughter of SAMUEL SANDERS and ANNA GORDON.

Notes for GEORGE E WILLETT:

George E Willett was born on land called Bealington, Prince George's County, Maryland. He was a sergeant in Colonel Cox's militia that served under George Rogers Clark of Ft Nelson, Virginia. This area was later Louisville, Kentucky. His brother, Samuel, was a private in the same regiment. They fought against the Indians who had been incited by the British. They were engaged in many bloody battles from 1782 until 1794. The Indians were defeated at the battle of "Fallen Timber" in northwestern Ohio before Kentucky was freed of the threat from Indian attacks.

George E Willett received a Virginia land grant that reads as follows:

Beverly Randolph, Esquire, goverenor of the Commonwealth of
Virginia To all to whom these presents shalt come Greetings:
Know ye that by virtue and in consideration of a certificate granted
by the County Court of Jefferson, under the Act of the General Assembly
for the relief of certain poor persons now resident on the Western
Frontier, there is granted by the said Commonwealth unto GEORGE
WILLETT assignee of Richard Simmons a certain tract or parcel of
land containing four hundred acres by Survey, bearing date the 13th
day of October, 1783, lying and being in the County of Jefferson on
the north side of the Rolling Fork, and on the Main fork of 's Creek
and bounded as follows... To have and to hold the said tract of land
with it's appurtenances to the said GEORGE WILLETT and his HEIRS
forever. In witness whereof the said Beverley Randolph Esquire,
Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia here unto set his hand and
caused lesser seal of the said commonwealth to be affixed at Richmond
on the twenty fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord, one
thousand seven hundred & Eighty nine and of the commonwealth the
fourteenth.

George E Willett married Elizabeth Sanders, the daughter of Samuel Sanders and Anna Gordon. They built their home on the Virginia Land Grant, that George E Willett had received in what eventually became Nelson County, Kentucky. Elizabeth Sanders had three brothers: Samuel, Joseph, and Joshua Sanders, and a sister - Nancy. Her brothers first lived in Pottinger's Fort and then moved to Green County, Kentucky.

George E Willett, with his younger brothers and sister, in 1778, received from their mother a slave named Minta. Minta is mentioned as a tithable of George E Willett in the 1785 and 1788 tax lists of Nelson County, Virginia. George E Willett was listed as living on Pottinger's Creek and his brothers Samuel Willett and James Willett were residing nearby. In the 1810 census George E Willett has in his household his wife, five sons, 2 daughters, and nine slaves. He wrote his will on July 1, 1811 and it was probated in Nelson County, on August 19, 1811. He named his wife and all his children except his two oldest daughters in his will, the oldest daughters having received their inheritance at the time of their marriages. Elizabeth, the widow of George E Willett, died of the cold plague on March 23, 1815. They are both buried in the old orchard on their property in unmarked graves.

George E Willett and his wife Elizabeth had no church affiliation. In the Gethsemane Monastery baptismal records when George W Willett, their son was baptized in 1865, his parents were given with the word "infidel's", a term then used to denote they were not practicing members of any church.

The names of their children have been taken from his will, a Guardian Account in Nelson County, dated August 15, 1814, which names his six minor children, and an account written by their son George E Willett when they had a suit against his nephew John Willett who had been the guardian of his youngest daughter, and one of his executors. Most of his heirs were named: Mary Slaughter, formerly Mary Willett; Jacob Grafft and Nancy, his wife, formerly Willett; David Grafft and his wife, Susan, formerly Willett; John Willett, Samuel Willett, Richard Willett, George W Willett, William R Price and Elizabeth, his wife, formerly

Willett. His son Griffith Willett, and daughter Mary Eliza were not named in the suit.

 

 

Children of GEORGE WILLETT and ELIZABETH SANDERS are:

5. i. RICHARD5 WILLETT, b. December 28, 1800, Nelson County, Kentucky; d. Aft. 1886, Waverly, Union County, Kentucky.

ii. NANCY WILLETT, b. Abt. 1788.

iii. SUSAN WILLETT, b. March 14, 1792.

iv. JOHN S WILLETT, b. 1794.

v. SAMUEL WILLETT WILLETT, b. September 08, 1796.

vi. GRIFFITH WILLETT, b. October 05, 1798.

vii. JAMES WILLETT, b. 1802.

Notes for JAMES WILLETT:

James Willett died young and is buried in an old orchard on Bealington

viii. GEORGE WASHINGTON WILLETT, b. October 08, 1804.

ix. ELIZABETH WILLETT, b. Abt. 1806; m. WILLIAM PRICE.

x. MARY ELIZA WILLETT, b. Abt. 1808; d. November 1895; m. ANDREW H SLAUGHTER, April 03, 1833.

More About ANDREW H SLAUGHTER:

Occupation: Doctor

xi. MARY WILLETT, b. Abt. 1788.

Notes for MARY WILLETT:

Mary Willett died young and is buried in an old orchard on Bealington

 

Generation No. 5

 

5. RICHARD5 WILLETT (GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born December 28, 1800 in Nelson County, Kentucky, and died Aft. 1886 in Waverly, Union County, Kentucky. He married TERESA "TREASY" HILL June 22, 1821 in Nelson County, Kentucky, daughter of JOHN HILL and MARY JARBOE. She was born 1799, and died 1862.

Notes for RICHARD WILLETT:

There are deeds in Nelson County, Kentucky showing Richard Willett selling the land he had inherited from his father, and the land his wife, Treasy, had inherited from her father.

After their marriage, Richard and Treasy Willett moved to Union County, Kentucky and resided near Waverly, Kentucky. According to "The History of Union County, Kentucky" written in 1886, Richard Willett was a 'retired farmer', and one of the oldest men in the county. The author further stated:

"... our subject was doubly orphaned at the age of fourteen and knows but little of his history except that his maternal grandfather was Samuel Sanders. In 1822, the year after Mr Willett married, he removed to Union County, Kentucky and secured 200 acres of land, all of which he afterward cleared. He was a true pioneer of wiry, tough constitution and a great lover of hunting and fishing. Mrs Byrne, his daughter, saw him shoot five deer once, before breakfast... Mrs Byrne said that many times her father's dogs caught deer. Also, in those early days, Mr Willett cradled wheat on the Academy grounds (St Vincent's Academy) and the good Sisters (Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Kentucky, who ran St Vincent's Academy) bound it for him.

Mr Willett has always lived in Union County, Kentucky, but has made trips to New Orleans on flat-boats. In politics, he is a Democrat and was elected Magistrate, served one court and resigned. He has lived at Caseyville, then on Tradewater awhile, and afterward at Waverly... His strength is still great for a man of his age, and he frequently puts to shame young people by his feats in word and pedestrianism. If some accident does not happen to him he is very apt to live many years yet."

 

Children of RICHARD WILLETT and TERESA HILL are:

6. i. JOHN BAPTIST6 WILLETT, b. 1822, Union County, Kentucky.

ii. GEORGE RICHARD WILLETT, b. July 02, 1824.

Notes for GEORGE RICHARD WILLETT:

George Willett wrote his will in Union County, Kentucky, leaving everything to his sisters and brothers (he was single) with the exception of Andrew Jackson Willett.

iii. CATHERINE ELLEN WILLETT, b. 1826.

iv. MARY ELIZABETH WILLETT, b. November 24, 1828.

v. ANDREW JACKSON WILLETT, b. 1831.

vi. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WILLETT, b. March 30, 1833.

vii. FRANCIS MARION WILLETT, b. May 02, 1835; m. LYDIA ANN WILLETT.

viii. LEWIS CLARK WILLETT, b. March 29, 1837.

ix. RICHARD D WILLETT, b. March 25, 1839.

 

Generation No. 6

 

6. JOHN BAPTIST6 WILLETT (RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born 1822 in Union County, Kentucky. He married (1) NANCY BYRNE. She was born 1836 in Kentucky, and died 1871 in Union County, Kentucky. He married (2) MALINDA Abt. 1873. She was born February 1860.

Notes for JOHN BAPTIST WILLETT:

The Willett children were baptized at Sacred Heart in St Vincent, Kentucky.

In 1880 the John Baptist Willett family was residing in Daviess County, Kentucky on 125 acres of land in an area that later became Stanley, Kentucky. His oldest son, William Scott Willett, had fifty acres adjacent to his. Malinda was a widow in the 1900 census.

John Baptist Willett was named after his maternal grandfather, John Baptist Hill.

In 1860, John B Willett and family were listed in the Union County, Kentucky census, dwelling #848, as follows:

Willett John B 40 KY farmer 5000

Nancy 24 KY

Scott 8 KY

Pierce 6 KY

Robert B 2 KY

In 1870, John Willett and family were listed in the Waller Precinct, Union County, Kentucky Census, dwelling house #848, as follows:

Willett John B 48 KY farmer 100 - 500

Nancy 38 KY housekeeper

William S 17 KY farm hand

Robert B 10 KY farm hand

Mary E 7 KY

Richard S 6 KY

George H 2 KY

John Baptist married secondly, Malinda in about 1873. In 1880, John B Willett and family were listed in the Oakford, Daviess County, Kentucky census, as follows:

Willett John B 57 KY

Malinda 22 KY wife (sic: age 22)

Scoop 28 KY son

Robert 21 KY son

Richard 16 KY son

George 12 KY son

Nannie 5 KY daughter

Mary 1 KY daughter

John E 29 KY boarder

 

Children of JOHN WILLETT and NANCY BYRNE are:

7. i. ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7 WILLETT, b. January 06, 1858, Union County, Kentucky; d. October 08, 1942, Scott County, Missouri.

ii. WILLIAM SCOTT WILLETT, b. 1852, Union County, Kentucky.

iii. FRANKLIN PIERCE "SCOOP" WILLETT, b. February 28, 1854, Union County, Kentucky.

iv. MARY ANN WILLETT, b. October 21, 1861, Union County, Kentucky.

v. RICHARD MICHAEL WILLETT, b. March 23, 1864, Union County, Kentucky.

vi. GEORGE HERBERT WILLETT, b. February 10, 1868, Union County, Kentucky.

 

Children of JOHN WILLETT and MALINDA are:

vii. NANCY "NANNIE"7 WILLETT, b. 1875.

MARY WILLETT, b. 1879.

 

Generation No. 7

 

7. ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7 WILLETT (JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born January 06, 1858 in Union County, Kentucky, and died October 08, 1942 in Scott County, Missouri. He married MATHILDA CATHERINE BIDWELL Abt. 1882, daughter of HILLSBERRY BIDWELL and NANCY CALDWELL. She was born July 02, 1862 in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky, and died May 06, 1948 in Scott County, Missouri.

Notes for ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP" WILLETT:

In 1900, Bump Willett and family are listed in the Daviess County, Kentucky census, as follows:

Willett Bump head Jan 1858 KY

Matilda wife July 1860 KY

Mary B daughter Mar 1886 KY

Effie daughter Feb 1889 KY

Noble son Apr 1894 KY

Nadine daughter May 1898 KY

 

More About ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP" WILLETT:

Burial: Guardian Angel Cemetery, Oran, Missouri

More About MATHILDA CATHERINE BIDWELL:

Burial: Guardian Angel Cemetery, Oran, Missouri

 

Children of ROBERT WILLETT and MATHILDA BIDWELL are:

8. i. MARY BLANCH8 WILLETT, b. March 23, 1885; d. January 03, 1978, Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky.

9. ii. MARY JOSEPHINE WILLETT, b. Abt. 1883; d. Abt. 1970, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

iii. ROBERT CLAUDE WILLETT, b. August 14, 1884, Stanley Station, Daviess County, Kentucky; m. (1) STELLA BRAY; m. (2) VERSA REED; b. 1883, Advance, Scott County, Missouri; m. (3) GERTRUDE STURGEON EVANS CARR; b. February 23, 1895, Wayne County, Missouri; d. January 21, 1965, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, Missouri; m. (4) SUSAN FRANCES "FANNY" WOLFF, June 20, 1903, Benton, Scott County, Missouri; b. March 14, 1883, Leora Stoddard County, Missouri; d. June 14, 1912, Perkins, Scott County, Missouri; m. (5) PEARL C SMITH, January 31, 1913, Bernie, Scott County, Missouri.

More About ROBERT CLAUDE WILLETT:

Divorced: Stella Bray

More About GERTRUDE STURGEON EVANS CARR:

Burial: Memorial Park, Cape Girardeau, Missouri

iv. EFFIE WILLETT, b. February 1889; m. RICHARD ALBURN WOODWARD, Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky.

v. MABLE WILLETT, b. April 1894, Daviess County, Kentucky.

vi. NADINE WILLETT, b. May 1898, Kentucky; m. LEEMAN WOODWARD.

10. vii. AVA WILLETT, b. June 28, 1900, St Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky; d. 1965, Perkins, Scott County, Missouri.

viii. LILBURN JOSEPH WILLETT, b. March 01, 1905, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; d. November 28, 1989, McClaren Hospital, Mt Morris Township, Genesee County, Michigan; m. (1) GUSSIE LEONA HAYES, June 28, 1928, Missouri; b. May 11, 1912, Steele, Missouri; d. November 1984, Hudson, Florida; m. (2) AMANDA "MANDY" ROSE BRUNET, August 25, 1960, Mt Morris Township, Genesee County, Michigan; b. December 11, 1906; d. May 31, 1992, Flint, Genesee County, Michigan.

More About LILBURN JOSEPH WILLETT:

Burial: Calvary Cemetery, Flint, Genesee County, Michigan

 

Generation No. 8

 

8. MARY BLANCH8 WILLETT (ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born March 23, 1885, and died January 03, 1978 in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky. She married STEPHEN J COOMES 1905 in Daviess County, Kentucky, son of WILLIAM COOMES and EDMONA LAMB. He was born December 25, 1882, and died April 19, 1973 in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky.

More About MARY BLANCH WILLETT:

Burial: Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky

Notes for STEPHEN J COOMES:

Stephen and Blanche Coomes made their home on a large farm outside of Calhoun, Kentucky. The main crops were soybeans, corn, and tobacco. The old home place was a large, white three story country home with a wrap around porch. The house was complete with a servant's stairway to the attic.

 

More About STEPHEN J COOMES:

Burial: Calhoun, McLean, Kentucky

Occupation: Farmer, McLean County, Kentucky

Religion: Catholic - St Sebastian Catholic Church

 

Children of MARY WILLETT and STEPHEN COOMES are:

11. i. NETTIE MARGARET9 COOMES, b. April 30, 1909; d. November 01, 1996, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

ii. MARY LOCKIE COOMES, m. JAMES MCCANN.

12. iii. JAMES LOUIS COOMES.

9. MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT (ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born Abt. 1883, and died Abt. 1970 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She married GEORGE RUDE CLAYTON, son of GEORGE CLAYTON and CAROLINE CLEMENT.

 

Children of MARY WILLETT and GEORGE CLAYTON are:

13. i. GEORGE CLESTERN9 CLAYTON, b. June 13, 1903, St Alphonsus, St. Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky; d. January 27, 1970, Owensboro ,Daviess County, Kentucky.

ii. BUCK CLAYTON.

iii. HERMAN CLAYTON.

iv. AILENE CLAYTON.

10. AVA8 WILLETT (ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born June 28, 1900 in St Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky, and died 1965 in Perkins, Scott County, Missouri. She married (1) PIKE. She married (2) EDWARD ALLGOOD 1929 in St Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Child of AVA WILLETT and PIKE is:

i. LAWRENCE JOSEPH9 PIKE, b. 1919; d. 1962, Perkins, Scott County, Missouri.

More About LAWRENCE JOSEPH PIKE:

Burial: Guardian Angel Cemetery, Oran, Missouri

 

Generation No. 9

 

11. NETTIE MARGARET9 COOMES (MARY BLANCH8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born April 30, 1909, and died November 01, 1996 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She married (1) GEORGE CLESTERN CLAYTON, son of GEORGE CLAYTON and MARY WILLETT. He was born June 13, 1903 in St Alphonsus, St. Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky, and died January 27, 1970 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She married (2) GEORGE A. BOWMAN. He was born June 07, 1910, and died June 16, 1973 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

Notes for NETTIE MARGARET COOMES:

The Clayton and the Coomes families were against the marriage of Nettie Margaret with George Clestern. They were first cousins. George's mother, Josephine Willett Clayton was the sister of Mary Blanche Willett Coomes, mother of Nettie Margaret Coomes.

Nettie Margaret retired from the SS Kresge Company in Owensboro, Kentucky.

More About NETTIE MARGARET COOMES:

Cause of Death: She died of heart failure

Fact 1: She is buried at Rosehill Cemetery. in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Notes for GEORGE CLESTERN CLAYTON:

George Clestern Clayton had a farm in Mosleyville, Daviess County, Kentucky. He also worked nights as a watchman at Fleischmann's Distillery in Owensboro, Kentucky.

The farm produced tobacco, soybeans, and corn. When he passed away, the farm went to his four children.

All but one of his children were born at home.

More About GEORGE CLESTERN CLAYTON:

Fact 1: He is buried at St Alphonsus Church at St. Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky

More About GEORGE A. BOWMAN:

Fact 1: He is buried at Rosehill Cemetery, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Children of NETTIE COOMES and GEORGE CLAYTON are:

i. WILLIAM " BILL" EARL10 CLAYTON, b. July 13, 1928, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky1; d. September 21, 1992, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; m. MARY; d. Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

More About WILLIAM " BILL" EARL CLAYTON:

Fact 1: Bill is buried in McLean County, Kentucky

More About MARY:

Fact 1: Mary is buried in McLean County, Kentucky

14. ii. LLOYD THOMAS "TOMMY" CLAYTON, b. February 28, 1940, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

15. iii. MARY LOIS CLAYTON, b. January 14, 1932, Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky; d. September 20, 1982, Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky.

16. iv. JOSEPH "JOE" BERNARD CLAYTON, b. February 06, 1934, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; d. May 15, 1995, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

12. JAMES LOUIS9 COOMES (MARY BLANCH8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) He married VIOLA LOUISE BROWN 1947 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Children of JAMES COOMES and VIOLA BROWN are:

i. CONNIE10 COOMES.

ii. SUE COOMES.

iii. DENNIS COOMES.

iv. VICKIE COOMES.

JIM COOMES.

 

 

13. GEORGE CLESTERN9 CLAYTON (MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born June 13, 1903 in St Alphonsus, St. Joseph, Daviess County, Kentucky, and died January 27, 1970 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He married NETTIE MARGARET COOMES, daughter of STEPHEN COOMES and MARY WILLETT. She was born April 30, 1909, and died November 01, 1996 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

Notes for GEORGE CLESTERN CLAYTON:

George Clestern Clayton had a farm in Mosleyville, Daviess County, Kentucky. He also worked nights as a watchman at Fleischmann's Distillery in Owensboro, Kentucky.

The farm produced tobacco, soybeans, and corn. When he passed away, the farm went to his four children.

All but one of his children were born at home.

More About GEORGE CLESTERN CLAYTON:

Fact 1: He is buried at St Alphonsus Church at St. Joseph Kentucky

Notes for NETTIE MARGARET COOMES:

The Clayton and the Coomes families were against the marriage of Nettie Margaret with George Clestern. They were first cousins. George's mother, Josephine Willett Clayton was the sister of Mary Blanche Willett Coomes, mother of Nettie Margaret Coomes.

Nettie Margaret retired from the SS Kresge Company in Owensboro, Kentucky.

More About NETTIE MARGARET COOMES:

Cause of Death: She died of heart failure

Fact 1: She is buried at Rosehill Cemetery, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

 

Children are listed above under (11) Nettie Margaret Coomes.

 

Generation No. 10

 

14. LLOYD THOMAS "TOMMY"10 CLAYTON (GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born February 28, 1940 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He married LOIS ANNE WHITWORTH 1965 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Children of LLOYD CLAYTON and LOIS WHITWORTH are:

17. i. LLOYD THOMAS CLAYTON11 JR., b. August 15, 1967, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

ii. CARLA SUZANNE CLAYTON, b. January 30, 1970, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

iii. CHADWICK DARREN CLAYTON, b. November 26, 1971, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; m. JENNIFER HAWKINS CARROLL, September 26, 1998.

15. MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON (GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born January 14, 1932 in Owensboro Daviess County , Kentucky, and died September 20, 1982 in Owensboro Daviess County , Kentucky. She married HOMER WILLARD FAIRCHILD October 31, 1951 in Macon, Georgia, son of WILLIAM FAIRCHILD and AMANDA EATON. He was born November 19, 1919 in Burfield, Wayne County, Kentucky, and died January 01, 1981 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

More About MARY LOIS CLAYTON:

Cause of Death: LUNG CANCER

 

More About HOMER WILLARD FAIRCHILD:

Cause of Death: PNEUMONIA

Medical Information: Homer also had cancer

Military service: Air Force (retired First Sgt.)

Veteran: World War II

 

Children of MARY CLAYTON and HOMER FAIRCHILD are:

18. i. ANNE MARGARET11 FAIRCHILD, b. April 03, 1953, Burtonwood, England.

19. ii. BRENDA KAY FAIRCHILD, b. September 13, 1956, Selma, Dallas County, Alabama.

20. iii. DONNA FAY FAIRCHILD, b. September 13, 1956, Selma, Dallas County, Alabama.

16. JOSEPH "JOE" BERNARD10 CLAYTON (GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born February 06, 1934 in Owensboro, Daviess County,Kentucky2, and died May 15, 1995 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He married GOLDIE FERGUSON. She was born February 19, 1931, and died June 01, 1991 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

More About JOSEPH "JOE" BERNARD CLAYTON:

Fact 1: HE is buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Fact 2: Issued in: Kentucky2

Fact 4: Last residence: Maceo

More About GOLDIE FERGUSON:

Fact 1: Goldie is buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

 

Children of JOSEPH CLAYTON and GOLDIE FERGUSON are:

21. i. BRENDA CAROL11 CLAYTON, b. March 11, 1955, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

ii. WENDELL JOSEPH CLAYTON, b. May 23, 1956, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

22. iii. BONNIE JEAN CLAYTON.

iv. GEORGE RAYMOND CLAYTON, b. September 01, 1968, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Generation No. 11

 

17. LLOYD THOMAS CLAYTON11 JR. (LLOYD THOMAS "TOMMY"10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born August 15, 1967 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He married JONELL TROUTMAN May 31, 1997 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Child of LLOYD JR. and JONELL TROUTMAN is:

i. COLTON THOMAS12 CLAYTON, b. March 14, 2000.

18. ANNE MARGARET11 FAIRCHILD (MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born April 03, 1953 in Burtonwood, England. She married (1) JAMES KENNETH CHAPPELL May 16, 1970 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky, son of CHARLES CHAPPELL and MARY LEAR. He was born April 21. She married (2) WALLACE WHALEN December 15, 1977 in West Palm Beach Florida, son of CHARLES WHALEN and SARAH HOLLER. He was born April 05, 1921 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

Notes for ANNE MARGARET FAIRCHILD:

Wally retired from the Postal Service in West Palm Beach, Florida in 1983. The family then moved to Alexandria, Tennessee, and bought a farm which they named Shiloh Acres.

More About ANNE MARGARET FAIRCHILD:

Military service: US Army - Spec 4

Occupation: October 1975, US Postal Service, Supervisor (transferred from WPB Sectional Center to Nashville PDC)

Notes for WALLACE WHALEN:

In 1983, Wally retired from the Postal Service and the Whalens moved to a farm in Alexandria, Wilson County, Tennessee. They named their farm Shiloh Acres.

After leaving the Army with an Honorable Discharge, Ann started with the Postal Service in 1976. She transferred from the West Palm Beach PO to the Nashville PO and is a supervisor there.

Wally joined the Navy when he was just 17 and went right into WW II. He was a signalman and was given the nickname "Flags". Wally was aboard the USS Yorktown on the salvage crew when the great carrier was torpedoed and sunk. He received a special commendation for his bravery. Wally was a Chief Petty Officer, Signalman Corp. He served on the following ships during WWII: USS Little Bighorn, USS Oglala; USS Charger; USS Enterprise; USS Hornet; USS Buck; USS Detroit; USS C16498; USS New Orleans; USS Wasp; USS Portland; USS St Louis; USS Vincennes; USS Hammon; USS Edsel; USS Roe; Lion III; and, the USS Yorktown.

Wally tells of the time he was "loaned" to the Coast Guard and was on patrol in Biscayne Bay, Miami, Florida. At that time, strict blackouts were enforced on the American coastlines. A US Navy 'tincan' sliced the Coast Guard cutter in half. Wally had gone to sleep on the chart table and rolled off the table into the water. He received a special pass to 'march down Biscayne Blvd in his skivvies', having lost all his uniforms when the cutter went down.

Another story he tells is of being arrested by the SPs for being in the restricted women's side of the Casbah in Africa. He was thrown in a POW camp, given a shirt with a target painted on it, and marched up and down the compound all day to marching music from a record player. Needless to say, he was happy to be released back to the Navy.

Wally received his discharge on September 9, 1945. (Navy service number 287 26 30) He returned to Kentucky, where he and his brothers, Charles and Elmo, opened Whalen Coal Company.

At a later date, Wally moved to Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He built his own home on Carpenters Lake in Daviess County. He worked as a manager at Blockers in Owensboro, Kentucky, then moved to Charles Todd Uniforms and Linen, first as a manager, then as a trouble-shooter for the company.

When Wally moved his family to Tennessee, he again remodeled and built onto the existing home himself.

More About WALLACE WHALEN:

Fact 1: 1937, Army Spec 4

Fact 2: 1945, Honorable Discharge

Rank: Chief Petty Officer

 

Children of ANNE FAIRCHILD and WALLACE WHALEN are:

i. TINA BEA12 WHALEN, b. March 20, 1970, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; Stepchild; m. MIKE PAGE, October 20, 1990, Shiloh Acres, Alexandria, Tennessee; b. June 15, 1970, Smithville, Dekalb County, Tennessee.

Notes for TINA BEA WHALEN:

Tina and Mike married at the home of her parents, Wally and Ann Whalen, Shiloh Acres, Alexandria, Tennessee. They have made their home on the farm.

More About TINA BEA WHALEN:

Graduated: April 2000, Volunteer St Community College

23. ii. JAMES KEVIN CHAPPELL, b. September 10, 1970, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

 

 

19. BRENDA KAY11 FAIRCHILD (MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born September 13, 1956 in Selma ,Dallas County, Alabama. She married (1) JEROME MINTON JR. October 29, 1972. He was born March 19, 1955 in Owensboro ,Daviess County, Kentucky. She married (2) JOSEPH PETE SCOTT June 23, 1978 in Owensboro Daviess County ,Kentucky, son of RUTH EARLEY. He was born July 15, 1953 in Tell City ,Perry County, Indiana.

More About BRENDA KAY FAIRCHILD:

Divorced: 1973, Jerome Minton

More About JOSEPH PETE SCOTT:

Fact 1: November 01, 1993, OPEN HIS OWN BUINESS: CUSTOM CAR STEREO

 

Children of BRENDA FAIRCHILD and JOSEPH SCOTT are:

i. CHRISTOPHER LEE12 MINTON, b. April 16, 1973, Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky; m. MICHELLE LYNN COOPER, April 11, 1992, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky; b. August 10, 1973, Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky.

ii. DAVID JEFFERSON SCOTT, b. June 23, 1974, Ocala, Marion County , Florida; Stepchild.

iii. JOSEPH BRIAN SCOTT, b. October 20, 1980, Owensboro , Daviess County, Kentucky.

iv. RICKY DALE SCOTT, b. May 15, 1982, Owensboro , Daviess County, Kentucky.

20. DONNA FAY11 FAIRCHILD (MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born September 13, 1956 in Selma, Dallas County, Alabama. She married (1) LARRY GENE WARNER December 26, 1972 in Panther, Daviess County, Kentucky. He was born September 30, 1954 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She married (2) ROBERT HOOVER July 02, 1999 in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky.

Notes for DONNA FAY FAIRCHILD:

Donna and Robert Hoover make their home in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky

 

Children of DONNA FAIRCHILD and LARRY WARNER are:

i. JASON ANTHONY12 WARNER, b. December 04, 1973, Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky; m. JENNIFER HILL, October 04, 1997, McLean County, Kentucky; b. December 26, 1975, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

More About JASON ANTHONY WARNER:

Fact 1: June 1991, McLean County High School

More About JENNIFER HILL:

Fact 1: May 1994, McLean County High School

24. ii. BILLY JOE "BJ" WARNER, b. February 18, 1977, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

21. BRENDA CAROL11 CLAYTON (JOSEPH "JOE" BERNARD10, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born March 11, 1955 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She married RANDY PAYNE in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

 

Children of BRENDA CLAYTON and RANDY PAYNE are:

i. ANGEL12 PAYNE.

ii. MISTY PAYNE.

 

22. BONNIE JEAN11 CLAYTON (JOSEPH "JOE" BERNARD10, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) She married KEN HOFFMAN.

 

Children of BONNIE CLAYTON and KEN HOFFMAN are:

i. BRADLEY12 HOFFMAN.

ii. BRIAN HOFFMAN.

 

Generation No. 12

 

23. JAMES KEVIN12 CHAPPELL (ANNE MARGARET11 FAIRCHILD, MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born September 10, 1970 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. He married CHRISTIE MICHELLE RALPH December 23, 1990 in Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky. She was born January 17, 1971 in Owensboro ,Daviess County, ,Kentucky.

More About JAMES KEVIN CHAPPELL:

Baptized: 1970

Godparents: Judy and Tommy Bittel

Honors: Soldier of the Year

Military service: US Army

Religion: Catholic

 

Child of JAMES CHAPPELL and CHRISTIE RALPH is:

i. ASHTON BLAIR13 CHAPPELL, b. April 02, 1991, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky.

24. BILLY JOE "BJ"12 WARNER (DONNA FAY11 FAIRCHILD, MARY LOIS10 CLAYTON, GEORGE CLESTERN9, MARY JOSEPHINE8 WILLETT, ROBERT BERNARD "BUMP"7, JOHN BAPTIST6, RICHARD5, GEORGE E4, WILLIAM3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1) was born February 18, 1977 in Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky. He married HANNA LEIGHA RAY BELL July 12, 1997 in Calhoun, McLean County, Kentucky, daughter of RAY BELL and DIANE. She was born October 31, 1978 in Owensboro Daviess County, Kentucky.

More About BILLY JOE "BJ" WARNER:

Fact 1: June 1996, McLean County High School

More About HANNA LEIGHA RAY BELL:

Fact 1: June 1997, McLean County High School

 

Child of BILLY WARNER and HANNA BELL is:

i. MADISON BROOKE13 WARNER, b. September 08, 1999.

 

Endnotes

 

1. Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 6, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Nov 20, 1998, Internal Ref. #1.111.6.46866.192

2. Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 6, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Nov 20, 1998, Internal Ref. #1.111.6.46840.122


Copyright 2000 by Ann Whalen
All Rights Reserved
For non-commercial use only.