BASTROP ADVERTISER EXTRACTS


Last Updated: Tuesday, August 4, 2009


Bastrop Advertiser, June 1913

PURELY PERSONAL

When you have a visitor, or contemplate making a visit, or know something of local

interest, please ring No. 136 and give it to the Advertiser. We'll appreciate it.

Miss Eunice Moore, of Temple, is visiting her cousin, Mrs. D. H. Bell.

Constable Smith from Smithville was in town Tuesday.

From Elgin on Tuesday the following gentlemen were in attendance upon the meeting of

Commissioners Court: Capt. F. S. Wade, Judge C. W. Webb; J. D. King, Rex

Stewart, Chas. Gillaspie, John Puckett, Dock Christian.

Mesdames Lundell and LeSueur of Hill's Prairie, were guests of Bastrop friends Tuesday.

Mrs. Chas. Watterson and Katie Lee, from Red Rock were in town Tuesday.

Jay C. Powers of the firm of Jay C. Powers & Co, colonizers and town promoters,

was in Bastrop Monday.

John and Hugh Barton, in their fine new car, were in Bastrop Tuesday.

Miss Adelia Kesselus left this week on a visit to Holland.

C. C. Cunningham, with the Union National Bank at Houston, is visiting at the old

home for a few days.

Messrs. A. T. Morris, W. E. Goodman, T. E. Lynch and T. W. Cain have returned from the

meeting of the Imperial Counsel of the Mystic Shrine at Dallas this week. The attendance was estimated at over 100,000

Shriners. Perfect order prevailed and

not an accident occurred during the four days meeting. One of the four was

offered the position of Chief of Police of Dallas, but we refrain from being

personal in the matter.

Mr. Fred Schuelke is visiting his brothers, Olive and Frank Schuelke at Smithville

this week.

Mrs. Don G. Petty, Don G. Petty, Jr, Miss Ella Petty, Sherman Petty and Frank Petty,

of Mansfield, LA; Mr. And Mrs. Cates Ford, of Orange; Mr. And Mrs. C. F. Petty,

Gibsland, LA; Mr. And Mrs. V. A. Petty, V. A. Petty, Jr, Dabney and Olive Petty

and Petty McDonald, of San Antonio; J. E. McDonald, East Texas; H. K. McDonald,

of Shreveport, LA; Matt Reynolds of Mansfield, :A; A. O. McLain of Orange; Miss

Parie Nabors of Mansfield, LA; S. H. McDonald, of Austin; H. K. McDonald Jr, of

Warren, and Frank McDonald, of Bon Weir, were in Bastrop Wednesday to attend

the funeral of Mr. Don G. Petty.

Mrs. A. C. Boethe and little son are visiting in Smithville.

Mrs. F. G. Woehl and Mrs. R. Gemeinert attended the funeral of their brother, Mr. C.

Wolf, at Austin, Wednesday.

Buy your Rubber Hose from The Home Hardware Company. They have several kinds to

select from and their prices are right.

NOTICE:

The Mothers Club will meet at the Library Room Wednesday, May 21st, at 5

o'clock. MRS. FANNIE CUNNINGHAM.

1913 patterns of Linoleums just received at Rabb & McCollum's.

BASTROP LOSES.

In the game of base ball in which Bastrop lost to Smithville by the score of 6 to 3,

in the later city, Thursday. Captain Tom Haynie and Luke Robinson had the

misfortune to sprain their ankles.

Captain Haynie's was quite seriously sprained and it is feared he will

be out of the game for some time.

Refrigerators for looks, but Ice Boxes for service.

Come and look at our box in the store, filled with 200 dozen eggs, 100

pounds creamery butter, mince meat, ham, sweet and sour pickles by the barrels.

ELZNER MERCANTILE CO.

THE INVITATION

Is extended to all to view the marvels of the Goldsmith's art as depicted in the

window of the "Palace". Even Boston, New York and Chicago have

contributed their numbers this week.

Don't fail to see a display of LaValierres, etc, never before seen in

Bastrop, and second to no other city of the state. L. R. ERHARD, PROP.

PURELY PERSONAL

Mrs. H. D. Orgain has returned from a several days visit to Austin.

Mrs. John Middleton of Smithville, visited her parents Mr. And Mrs. Sam Higgins.

Mr. A. C. Harvey, a prominent merchant of McDade and President of Guaranty State Bank

of that thriving little city, was a Wednesday visitor in Bastrop.

Mrs. James Moore, of Texas City, is visiting her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Alf Jung.

Mr. E. O. Randle, of Cedar Creek, was in Bastrop, Saturday, en route on a visit to his

boyhood home and other points in Tennessee.

The Advertiser and many friends wish for him a pleasant visit and a safe

return home. He was joined at Bartlett by his son, Prof. Coy Randle.

Mrs. Ben P. Templeton was among his many friends in Bastrop several days this week.

Mr. And Mrs. Jim Smith, of Houston, are on a two weeks visit to Mr. And Mrs. Richard

Starke.

Mr. J. M. Carroll and son, of Hubbard City, are visiting Mr. And Mrs. W. T. Higgins.

Mrs. D. E. Roe has returned home from a visit to Taylor.

Mr. Elbert S. Orgain was a visitor to Austin this week.

Judge Paul D. Page visited Smithville the first of the week.

Mr. And Mrs. A. J. Robinson and fine little son, of Galveston, are visiting Mrs.

Robinson's parents, Mr. And Mrs. Theo Griesenbeck.

Mrs. Mary Hasler left the past week on an extended visit to Lentzberg, Switzerland.

Mr. And Mrs. Cleveland Chumley and little son, Gerald, left Sunday last for the reunion

at Chattanooga, TN, and will also visit relatives in Alabama, Mississippi and

New Orleans.

Mr. And Mrs. T. M. Rector visited Austin the past week. Mr. Rector returning home Monday. Mrs. Rector will remain in the Capital City for a while under the

treatment of a ear specialist and we are pleased to note is improving.

Mr. And Mrs. Shelton Adrian of Austin, are visiting Mrs. Adrain's parents, Mr. And Mrs.

T. M. Rector. Mr. Adrian will shortly begin the erection of a new residence for

Mr. Rector.

Miss Vesia Craft left Monday night on a visit to Mineral Wells.

Mr. W. A. Hasler and family and prof. L. A. Koenig and family are spending the week

visiting on the Colorado.

Mr. Jay C. Powers of San Antonio, promoter of the sale of the Bastrop Town tract, was

to the city this week, accompanied by the following parties who bought nine

tracts of the land. H. Galtney, of Fort

Sam Houston, S. C. Burbridge of Peoria, Il, Dr. C. L. H. Hutchinson of San

Drift; Ezra Estes, of New Bransfels and Ed Crowley of Crystal City.

Mr. And Mrs. Olive Schulke, Mr. And Mrs. Frank Schuke, of Smithville, Mr. Henry

Schuelke of Austin, Mr. A. C. Botbe, of Fort Worth; Mr. And Mrs. B. J. Schulke

and family of San Benito, and Mr. E. Prokop of San Antonio were in Bastrop this

week to attend the funeral of Mr. E. E. Schulke.

Misses Mabel Keiser and Kate Fitzwilliam of Smithville are visiting Misses Nellie and

Grace Fitzwilliam.

Mrs. Chas. Schauerhammer, of Bellville and Mrs. James Dunnway, of Smithville, were

guests this week of Mrs. A. A. Elzner and Mrs. P. Haynie

Miss Mattie Chalmers, who has been attending Radner College, Nashville, TN, is

expected home next week. Miss Mattie is

with the Radnor party on a trip through Colorado and other points of interest

in the United States.

CITATION BY PUBLICATION

The State of Texas

To the Sheriff or any Constable of Bastrop County, Greeting:

You are herby commanded, that by making publication of this Citation, in same newspaper

published in Bastrop County for eight successive weeks previous to the return

day hereof, you summon R. B. Shipp, and the unknown heirs of said R. B. Shipp;

E. Billingsley, and the unknown heirs of the said E. Billingsley; E. H. Miller;

Thos. Cochran, and the unknown heirs of said Thos. Cochran; Mrs. Betsy P.

Cochran, and the unknown heirs of the said Mrs. Betsy P. Cochran, whose

residence is unknown, to be and appear before the Honorable District Court, at

the next regular term thereof, to be holden in the County of Bastrop, at the

Court House thereof, in Bastrop, Texas on the 16th day of June, A. D. 1913,

then and there to answer the petition of Claude T. Wynn, tried in said court on

the 16th day of April, A. D. 1913. file

Number of said suit being No. 5779.

Plaintiff alleges in substance, as follows, to wit: That on the first day of April, A. D.

1913, he was the owner in fee simple of the following described property;

situated in the State of Texas and County of Bastrop, and being more

particularly known and described as follows, to wit:

A tract of 160 acres out of Abstract No. 143, originally granted to Thos. Cochran,

lying on the waters of the West Yegua, in said Bastrop County, "Beginning

at the SW corner of the J. W. Alen Survey....

LIST OF LAND, LOTS OR PARTS OF LOTS TO THE CITY OF BASTROP FOR THE TAX..

Anderson, Josephine fraction of farm lot 36

east...

Adams, Isabelle estate fraction block 47 east main..

Barnett, C. L. fraction block 45 east main..

Buchanan, Mrs. M. S. fraction block 9 east main

Brooks, Jennie fraction block 26 east main

Brady, Ellen fraction block 88 east main

Bedford, Margaret fraction block 101 east main

Bryant, Pyrmias fraction block 13 east main

Batts, Mrs. H. F. fraction block 16 east main

Buchanan, G. W. fraction farm lot 5 east main

Byers, Mrs. Albert discontinued territory 300

Crumplin, Calvin fraction block 61 east main

Craft, Anthony fraction block 58 east main

Colter, Tom fraction block 69 east main

Do fraction block 9 east main

Davis, Sarah estate fraction block 136 east main

Do fraction block 165 east main

Davie, Andrew Bastrop town tract 37 east

Do Bastrop town tract 37 east

Edwards, Green fraction block 116 east main

Flemings, Mark estate fraction block 165 east main

Do fraction block 142 east main

Fittger, Mrs. E. estate fraction farm lot 18 east.

February 1910

Smithville Times

Mrs. Kate Brenan from Orange is visiting her sister Mrs. M. E. Maney.

Miss Della Boehm is taking sewing lessons from Mrs. Y. D. Taylor.

Mrs. Joe H. Riley will leave Monday for several weeks visit in Oklahoma City.

Miss Shepard of Brenham is in the city visiting her sister, Mrs. E. G. Winston.

R. J. Saunders attended the district meeting of the banker's association in Austin

this week.

Tom Spear has disposed of his interest in the Smithville Grocery Co., to his

partner, D. A. Payne.

Mrs. Bert Smith and children left Monday for an extended visit to their old home in

Zanesville, Ohio.

Moore Bros, will occupy one side and the moving picture show the other side of the

Racket old stand.

Mrs. Mattie Jenkins left Monday for a short visit to her daughter, Mrs. Harvey Snow,

at Bartlett, Texas.

Hugh Lee Smyer, at one time engineer on the Katy at this point, but now of North

Texas, is here visiting old friends.

Mr. And Mrs. J. M. Perry went to La Grange last Saturday to attend the funeral of their

grandson, Selden Perry Maxwell.

Miss Della Boehm, sister of Mrs. Benno Hoppe, is here taking lessons in vocal and

instrumental music.

If the citizens of Smithville do not "get rich quick" it will be because

they are slow to take advantage of the many alluring prospects held out to them

by solicitors for schemes of all kinds.

A.C. Rice of Mt. Sterling, KY, is here on a visit to Mr. And Mrs. M. S. Hudnall, Mr.

Rice brought along a sample of Old Kentucky tobacco, which was a treat to some

of the Old Ken Tucks.

The "norther" now rampaging around these diggings has put several

hydrants out of commission. It also put

Walter Moore's gasoline engine, at the gravel bank, out of service, the

cylinder froze and burst.

The Progressive Club gave a dance Wednesday evening, that was well attended and at

which every one had a good time, although the 'norther' made nome going in

"the wee, small hours a cold deal."

A team belonging to Moore Bros, Livery Stable ran away from in front of the Jackson

house, Thursday afternoon and dashed into the front of the stable, breaking a

window and wrecking the vehicle.

Although the boy who was driving the team was in the hack he escaped

uninjured.

Dr. Adams reported a suspicious case in the Negro section of town Thursday and Dr.

Guy Jones was sent to investigate but the case was not sufficiently developed

to show if it was small pox. The patient was promptly isolated and no chance

will be taken.

Mr. L. R. Taber, who has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. And Mrs. A. R.

Taber returned from a short trip to...

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March 1910 Smithville Times

Rev. A. M. Lumpkin lectured at the M. M. E. Church Wednesday night on "Strange

Sights in Foreign Lands." The gentleman wore the different costumes of the

foreign lands and spoke most entertainingly; There was a good attendance.

Mr. Virg Croft, aged 90 years, died at his home near Winchester, Wednesday morning

at 4 o'clock and was buried in Winchester cemetery at 5 pm. Deceased was one of the wealthy and

prominent men of that vicinity.

Hon Roger Byrne is in receipt of information to the effect that a strong company

has been formed in Chicago to build the Aransas Pass-Smithville railroad. So, it seems that our new railroad

proposition is not dead, yet.

Wm. K. Smith, aged 88 years, a confederate veteran and one of the pioneer veteran and

one of the pioneer citizens of this county, died Wednesday morning at the home

of his son-in-law, Contable W. C. Walker, of this Hills Prairie, neighborhood,

and was buried in the Oliver Hill Cemetery.

Mrs. Walker is his only surviving child.

Marshal Carmichael arrested Henry Cephus, colored, Tuesday, wanted at Waelder. Contable Jeff Tomlinson came over Wednesday

and got him. Mr. Tomlinson serves under the oldest justice of the piece in

Texas, Justice Zeke Walker, age 86, who has filled this office so long that the

"memory of man runneth not to the contrary" as the lawyers say. Mr. Tomlinson has been constable for 14

years.

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July 23, 1913 Bastrop Advertiser

PURLEY PERSONAL

Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Combs, of San Marcos, are visiting their son, Dr. H. B. Combs and

wife.

Messrs W. B. Bryant and Will Schanhals, of the West Side, were visitors in Bastrop this

week.

Mrs. A. J. Reynolds, of Temple, is spending the week in Bastrop.

Mr. And Mrs. W. E. Maynard are spending the week in Galveston.

Mrs. L. M. Hood and daughter, Miss Myrtle, were Elgin visitors this week.

Mrs. J. P. Fowler has returned from a visit to Lometa.

Mrs. T. J. Trigg returned the past week from a several weeks visit to relatives at

Haskell.

Mrs. Joe Jung is visiting her sons, George W. and Joe F. Jung at Galveston.

The clever Gus Jung was in town from Red Rock this week.

Miss Annie Prause left this week on a visit to Waco, and will be with Pearcy &

Booth in dressmaking department August 15th.

Messrs. G. W. Davis, Earnest Hasler, C. P. Luckett, O. B. Johnson, Lee D. Olive and

Robert Davis were auto visitors to Austin this week.

Mrs. Frank Prokop and son, Merl Arnold, are expected home from a visit to Fort

Worth, today, Friday.

Mrs. S. J. C. Higgins is visiting in Galveston this week.

Mr. H. G. Haynie, of Dallas, was a Bastrop visitor during the past week.

Miss Ella Duval, of Hubbard City, is visiting at the home of Mr. And Mrs. W. T.

Higgins, Sr.

Mrs. W. J. Schewe is visiting friends at Granger this week.

Mr and Mrs J. T. Kellum, of Taylor, were guests of Bastrop relatives since last issue.

Mrs. C. Gels, of Denison, is visiting her daughter, Mrs. A. L. Hoppe.

Miss Olivia Schuelke, of Denison, is visiting her cousin, Miss Lillian Hoppe.

Mrs. Mollie Porter and Miss Marguerite Staack are visiting in Taylor.

Miss Bertha Staack spent Sunday in Taylor.

Mrs. J. W. Pledger and baby girl and little Miss Ruth Craft have returned from a visit

to Brownwood.

Mrs. A. G. Bean, with her little daughter, little Miss Ruth Johnson of Giddings, are

welcome guests of her many Bastrop relatives and friends.

Mrs. J. H. Comer, of Jarrell, is visiting Mr. And Mrs. Hartford Jenkins and Mrs. S. L.

Brannon.

Mr. Ross Ruthland, of Bartlett, is in town for a few days.

Miss Leray Alexander, of Bastrop, is visiting friends in Georgetown.

Louis Eilers, Jr, of San Antonio, is guest of Worth Burleson and other Bastrop

friends.

It is matter of sincere regret of many friends to know that Mrs. Powell Perkins and

sweet little daughter, Ruth, are both quite sick, and all unite in wishing for

them a speedy recovery.

Miss Ivor Humphreys resumed studies in the Bastrop Normal Monday morning.

His many friends rejoice to know that Master Ralph Price is up and well after a

recent attack of sickness.

Miss Myrtle Pledger is home from a visit to Manor.

Mr. And Mrs. B. Pledger, of Manor, visited Mr. And Mrs. J. W. Pledger this week enroute

to Galveston in their car.

Mrs. Gus Wallace and children and Mrs. H. N. Bell and son, Master Henry, left

Thursday on a visit to San Angelo.

Mr. And Mrs. Alf Jung left for Galveston Thursday.

Mrs. J. R. Carpenter and children, of Austin, are visiting their parents, Mr. And Mrs.

S. W. Wood.

Ride comfortable and look pleasant in one of our John Deere Buggies, Elzner Merc.

Co.

Just received big line of Men and Boys Saddles, Bridles and Blankets. Get our prices

before you buy. Rabb & McCollum.

The Fort Smith Wagon is guaranteed wagon. Elzner Merc. Co.

Mr. K. M. Trigg made the homecoming of his wife and daughter, Miss Annie Mae, an

exceedingly pleasant one, by having two valuable presents awaiting their

arrival; A fine new auto, seven passenger Caddilac and a magnificent piano, a

Baby Grande.

Two cars of Wagons. For sale by Elzner

Mercantile Co.

At the pleasant party given by Miss Luella Craft to her friends Friday evening last,

Price O. Jenkins gave his friends the first opportunity of hearing him sing

since his season's tour in south western states and it caused them to

understand more fully the most excellent write ups of the ovations he

received. All present were enthusiastic

in complimentary expressions.

Sick room Sundries at New Drug Store.

Buy your Cotton Sacking from J. M. Holt & Co, 12 1-2cent per yard.

Eat cream with the ladies Friday of next week.

M.K.&T. Special Rates

Cincinnati, Ohio, Grand Lodge Loyal Order of Moose, July 28 to August 1. Rate $35.45

Dallas, Texas, State Convention Knights and Ladies of Honor, August 11 to 14. Rate

$7.50 Fort Worth, Meeting of the County Officials Association, August 7 to 9. Rate $7.10

Fort Worth, District Couference and Epworth League Conventions and West Texas

Conference of M. E. Church, Aug 5 to 10. Rate &7.85

Corpus Christi, Encampment State Epworth League, Aug. 4th and 5th, final limit Aug 20.

Fare $8.35. Lampasas, Baptist Encampment, selling dates July 29 and 30 final limit Aug. 30, fare

$5.35 Galveston.

Cotton Carnival, tickets sell daily, July 23 to .....

PICTURE OF CHIEF IRON TAIL (Sioux Indian) whose profile appears on the nickel, with 101

Ranch Real Wild West, in Bastrop Thursday October 23rd.

11/1913 Bastrop Advertiser

E. J. Smith, Practical, Watchmaker, Jeweler, Optician. Eyes carefully tested and

glasses fitted. Work guaranteed. Located at the "Palace"

Special.

"In the Bishop's Carriage' at the Quality Theatre Monday night, Nov. 17th.

You should see it.

"The Soul Kiss" a musical comedy at the Arion Opera House, Wednesday, Nov.

19th.

For Sale One Oxford Phonograph, with 75 records, for $40.00 - Gus Keil

Just Arrived, Roll Top Desks and Office Chairs.

Rabb & McCollum

Store to Close. Our store will be closed Thursday, Nov. 27th, for the entire

day. J. M. Holt & Co.

Do not buy that Cooking Stove until you see a "Jewel" at The Home Hardware

Company.

A. T. Morris added several new rigs to his already well equipped livery this week.

Bring your Prescriptions to S. L. Brannon.

For Sale

- One Champion Riding Planter, used just one year, will sell real cheap, come

and see for yourself. Gus Keil.

Big shipment to Mattings. Rabb McCollum.

Work has progressed rapidly this week in putting in the concrete gutters on three

blocks of Main street and when completed we will doubtless have one of the best

thoroughfares of any little city in the state.

The pretty home of Mr. And Mrs. W. A. Hasler on Chestnut street is nearing

completion, and workmen are busily engaged in the erection of the handsome two

story residence of Mr. And Mrs. J. C. Orgain on North Pecan street.

The finest motor car in the county a "Winton Six" has just been received

by Mr. W. A. McCord. For beauty of

color and gracefulness of lines this car is certainly a premier in the motor

car line. The car was delivered by Mr.

Gunsalus, the traveling representative of The Winton Motor Car Co, of

Cleveland, Ohio, through the local agents, The Home Hardware Co. Look for it on

our streets, for you will not be able to hear it.

See the Home Hardware Company for Keen Kutter and Blue Grass Axes which are guaranteed.

Bastrop is very prosperous this year than at any time within the history of the old

town. Our banks show by their heavy deposits the excellent condition of our

people financially, while the increased trade received by Bastrop merchants, as

well as all other lines of business, proves beyond doubt that our little city

is on the map as the best trading point in this section.

Mr. John Allen was in the city from the West Side, Wednesday. On the road from town

to Nash..

Mr. Eugene F. Brieger and the formerly Miss Nell Chambliss of Fresno, Cal, are

visiting relatives in Bastrop. It has

been ten years since Eugene left Bastrop and there are many changes in the old

town. Advertiser wishes for the newly

wed couple health, happiness and prosperity through life.

Mrs. Shelton Adrian, of Austin is visiting her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Rector.

By Eva Hill Lesueur Karling

Looking back into the past we sometimes thrill to the sublime sactrifices and purposes

of lives that perhaps at the time seem ordinary and common place. Look back with me now for a little while to

a faraway time when Hills Prairie lay in primeval beauty passing luxuriously

from season to season, from year to year.

To the east the Colorado wound its swift southward course. Cedar Creek with it's tributaries of Sandy,

Walnut and the Spring Branch, fertilized and refreshed the land. Cool springs bubbled up here and there,

furnishing pure, clear water for all its wild inhabitants. Herds of buffalo and deer drank

unafraid. Flocks of wild turkey roamed

through its under growth. Droves of

wild mustang led by a wary leader grazed upon its abundant pasture. Wild bees stores their nectar in the

cavities of trees and rocks. Wild

pigeons, quails and doves were here for there where none here then who called

it sport to kill God's creatures. There

were many native fruits, vegetables and nuts.

And just as wild and free as any of these roamed the Red Man through its

fertile bounds.

The Tonkaway tribe of Indians claimed this as their own Magnificent specimens of

physical brawn and build, they held it through many hard fought battles with

other tribes, for this section was coveted by Cherokees, Chickasaws, comanches,

Karankoways and others. They all made

pilgrimages here at intervals. From the

plentiful supply of flint rock which lay along the creeks and river they

prepared for warfare and hunting by making arrow heads; hickory and bois d'arc

supplied wood for their bows, the skins of deer, beaver, fox, bear, squirrel,

and buffalo furnished their robes and bedding.

In this way the centuries passed.

There are still many evidences of their camps to be found and many arrow

heads from the tiniest to the largest have gone from here to museums, schools

and colleges.

Then the white men came - saw its beauty and desirability and adventurous and

courageous ones staid and built their log cabins on land allotted to them by

the Mexican Government. The first we

have any knowledge of who built their stronghold in this prairie were Elisha M.

Barton and Edwards Jenkins. Authorities

seem to differ as to which plowed the first furrows in the valley. Barton's league of land included the Clif

Hubbard farm. His cabin is where their

home now is. Edward Jenkins built his

cabin near the Spring Branch and with his family cleared a patch for cotton,

corn and potatoes. Two years later in

the spring of 1833, John Gilmer McGehee with his brother Thomas G. McGehee, prospected

through Texas. They were so enthused

with the beauty and fertility of this section that they returned home and John

G. McGehee organized a colony of 140 Georgians and Alabamians and they started

at once for Mina, reaching San Augustine in October, 1834 and Mina in January,

1835. Mrs. John G. McGehee was Sarah

Hill before her marriage. When they

reached their destination they at once began to build houses and forts for

protection against Indian depredations.

Life for them was full of interest and excitement. Indian raids became more frequent and

many times women and children for miles around were housed for days at a time in the

strong stockade while the men went out to regain their stolen horses and

cattle. Several times they recovered

captured women and children.

Thomas

B. J. Hill and Middleton Hill, brothers of Mrs. Sarah Hill McGehee bought land

east of Mina, which was later known as Lower Hills Prairie. After a few months they returned

to Georgia. Their younger brother, Wylie

Hill was so thoroughly infatuated with life in this new land that he determined

to cast his lot with these other adventurous souls. He bought 2220 acres of land from Mrs.

Sarah Jenkins, widow of Edward Jenkins. The date of the transaction

as recorded is July 7, 1835, State of Coahuila, Dept. of Brazos, Jurisdiction

of Mina, in the Colony of Stephen F. Austin.

Then came the Massacre of Goliad and the Fall of the Alamo. Quoting from early settlers

written by the Hon. George T. McGehee of San Marcos.

"The storm was gathering in the land of the Montezumas. The mutterings could be heard; the

Butcher, Santa Anna was marshalling his hosts to sweep these brave pioneers from the

face of Texas soil. His emissaries were

among the Indians, exciting them to plunder and murder. Every full moon witnessed their

forays in the valleys of the Colorado, Brazos and Guadalupe. Early in 1836 it was known

that the armies of Mexico were on their march to the Texas border. Organizations were formed

and hastened to meet them. John T. McGehee had been severely

wounded in the battle of Concepcion in October 1835, and had not fully

recovered. He was the only mature man

left in Mina. Wild consternation seized

the people who had concentrated in the strong stockade. Not able to go out to

meet the invaders, John McGehee bent all his energies to getting what

transportation there was in shape to move these helpless women and children to

a place of safety. With only a few

hours to prepare and pack what few belongings they could take with them, the memorable

"Runaway Scrape commenced. Through

rain, mud and cold he hurried these panic stricken people east. Couriers rushed along the

road each day with information that the Mexicans were in hot pursuit. Despair and fright

seized the people, but the cool head and the indomitable energy of this man who had induced

so many of these people to cast their lot in this distant land, triumphed, and the whole

caravan reached the Trinity River where they were in comparative safety."

Thomas

G. McGehee (whose wife was Minerva Hunt, of the family for whom Huntsville,

Alabama, was named, joined Capt. Jesse Billingsley's company and was put in

charge of a company near where New Braunfels now is. It was his duty to notify the settlers

of approaching danger. When the sound of the first cannon came booming over the hills, he

sent couriers to warn them. Then he and other companies were ordered... ...he sent couriers

to warn them. Then he and other companies were ordered to concentrate on the Brazos, so

asa to form as large a defensive force as possible. Mrs. Minerva Hunt McGehee in relating

her experience of the "Runaway Scrape" said:

"One evening in camp, I was weary and heartsick - my husband perhaps in mortal

danger, far from home, most of our provisions and all of our money gone - I

felt that only death or worse than death, capture by the hated Comanches,

awaited me. As I sat thus with my two helpless infants and a slave, apart from the other

campers, I heard horses' hoofs, and looking up saw a splendid specimen of young manhood

approaching. He stopped as he reached

me and asked if I were the wife of Thomas G. McGehee. On hearing that I was he sprang from

his horse, saying that his name was Wylie Hill, a cousin, and he was hurrying to join Sam

Houstons army. This meeting and his kind, encouraging words were as the balm of Golead to my

heart.

He divided his purse with me and hastened on."

(In the battle of San Jacinto a bullet passed through his cap) Gen. John R. Baylor and

Gen. Buck Hardeman, who were with him at San Jacinto, said of him in after years,

that no braver soldier ever went into battle.

When

the news of the capture of Santa Anna reached those refugees on the Trinity, we

can imagine what shouts of thanksgiving and praise ascended from their camps

and with what joy they turned their faces homeward. But many found their homes and

possessions destroyed. And life in this wilderness had to be started almost anew.

Miss Ann Jenkins of Bastrop says that she remembers hearing her father, John

Jenkins, say that they all lived for a time on peas left in the pea patch of

Mr. And Mrs. McGehee.

In the winter of 1836 Wylie Hill returned to Georgia and on February 10, 1837, married

his sweetheart, Evaline Hubbard, the eldest daughter of the Hon. Robert Hubbard

of Lexington, a member of the Georgia Legislature and former Captain of Militia

in that state. With a good number of slaves given them by both his and her

families, they embarked for far away Texas on Feb. 16, 1837, he just 21 and she

19. A gentle slip of a girl, she had

known no hardships or privation, I marvel when I consider what courage and love

must have animated her heart.

Some writers and sculptors have depicted the pioneer Texas women as hardy, brawny,

and rough. There were some of this type of course. But the pioneer women

mentioned here where in this, or any other period could there be found more

refined, cultured women, higher types of Christian womanhood than the Hill,

McGehee, Hubbard, Pope, and Caldwell women, Dr .Thrall, the historian says of

Mrs. T. B. J. Hill, Mrs. Wiley Hill, Mrs. Middleton Hill and Mrs. John

Caldwell, "They are elect ladies."

It took them nine days to cross the gulf from New Orleans, La., to Columbia,

Texas. There the entire company

remained in camp two months, waiting for water courses to subside. Then the slow, toilsome

trip by ox team to Mina, and it was the middle of May before they reached the home of Mr. Hill's

sister, Mrs. McGehee at Hills Prairie.

How foreign was life for her in this new land and how she must have

longed for her home in Georgia! But building and planning absorbed the days and

the country threw its glamour over her, too, for in spite of anxious days and

sometimes nights of terror, she wrote glowing accounts of the country to her

relatives. She was a wonderful manager. Among the slaves given her by

Mr. Hill's mother was a little six year old girl, with the admonition that she

was to be brought up in the house and trained as a maid and seamstress and Mary

Ann did credit to her old mistress's foresight and interest and to her young

mistress's instruction. She was taken

back to Georgia on several trips during the years and attained a dignity and

poise that was remarkable. She lived to a good old age, will be remembers by many Mrs.

Hill told of a time when all alone except for some of her slaves and her two year old

daughter, the frightened Negroes ran in with the startling information that Indians were

coming. She was sure they were friendly

Indians but they were Indians! And so they barred the doors and window

shutters, but she sent a Negro through the brush at the back of the house for

Mr. Jesse Holderman, and then to calm the frightened Negroes she sat down and

took up her sewing. One Indian called to her asking for whisky. She told him

she had none. He said, "Maybe you

lie." Just at this time Mr. Holderman galloped up with his gun and told

them to "vamoose" which they did.

When they were gone it was discovered that they had taken every bright

colored garment from the clothes line in the yard and she found that in her

excitement instead of sewing, she had ripped out every hand run tuck she had so

carefully put in her little daughter's dress.

(This Mr. Holderman had married Miss Harriet Creaft and lived where the Cliff Hubbard

home now is. Mrs. Holderman after her husband's death married Mr. Campbell

Taylor and was the mother of Mrs. R. B. Wilkes and grandmother of T. P. Haynie

and Mrs. Lizzie Owens)

(In 1838 John G. McGehee died in the prime of a most useful manhood)

The first religious services held in Hills Prairie were those by Rev. John Haynie,

Dr. Thrall and Dr. Ruter in the Hill and McGehee homes. In the spring of 1835 a Methodist

church was organized in Mina. Mrs. Sarah Hill

McGehee and Mrs. Minerva Hunt McGehee were charter members. In 1842 Bishop Morris drove up

to the Hill home bringing with him Rev. Josiah Whipple, a young minister sent from Illinois

to Texas as a missionary. Bishop Morris

left him with this family and told him one of the big trees which surrounded

the house would make a fine place for him to study. He must have employed his time well, for

no man who has come

after him has exceeded him in wisdom and knowledge and zeal. When he was an old man I heard

people lament that his knowledge would have to die with him.

A wonderful man, gentle and courtly, full of wisdom in the service of

his Master, walking unharmed where a less consecrated man would have been

ensnared. He traveled the Austin

Circuit two years, swimming swollen streams through Indian infested country,

enduring hardships and privations with undaunted spirit. "He was a great gospel preacher and

it was said that when he prayed the very portals of Heaven seemed to open

up." In 1845 he married Mrs. Sarah McGehee. Perhaps there was never a more congenial couple,

but only five years of companionship were allowed them as she died in 1850. Her grave was

made under the big tree where he had loved so much to mediate and study - the first grave in

the "yard of the dead" by the Hill homestead.

In 1853 their only child Wilber, was drowned in the Colorado River at

Camp Ground Ford and was laid by the side of his mother. The Texas Annual Conference was in

session

at the time in Bastrop and it adjourned and attended the funeral in a body.

Bishop Paine conducted the service. (These items I take from Thrall's History

of Methodism and Phelan's History of Methodism). Phelan's History gives an account of the

dedication of the new church in Bastrop in 1851. "Quiet

and unobserved in the congregation sat the man to whom more than to any other

perhaps than to all others - we are indebted for this beautiful temple, I mean

our energetic and talented Elder Whipple." He asked to take no part in the public service as

his beloved wife had passed away a short time before.

She had willed him a large part of her land holdings and he ever used

his means and talents for the good of humanity. He occupied every important pulpit in the

Conference, was presiding elder for many years, was elected to General Conference many times

and died at his home at Austin when eighty years of age. An old faded note written by him in

1846 to Mr. And Mrs. Wylie Hill gives them many expressions of thanks and love for all

they and their home had meant to him through the years.

In 1845

and addition was built to the log cabin of the Wylie Hill home of real lumber,

sealed and painted, and Mrs. Hill said that she was proud of that addition than

she was of the big house which was built in 1856 and 1857. There are many interesting

innocents connected with the building of this old colonial home. Mr. Adolf Jung who came

to Bastrop in 1855 was the brick mason who built the four tall chimneys at each

end of the house with fireplaces upstairs and down. While he was at work on these chimneys

his twin boys, Alf and Gus, were born. In 1885 one of the

chimneys was repaired by those twins, and Mr. Gus Jung said that they tried to

do it as nearly like their father's work as possible. The bricks for these chimneys were

burnt on the place. Mr. Hancke, of Lockhart, who was born in

Bastrop, said his father with Mr. George Orts and others were at work for

eighteen months on the house. Every

piece of lumber and timber put into the house was inspected and hand

dressed. One cabinet maker made all the

blinds, stair railing, doors, mantles and window frames. He afterwards became a

great Methodist preacher and editor o the New Orleans Advocate.

Between 1845 and 1850 Mrs. Hill's mother, Mrs. Nancy Hubbard, and her three brothers,

Miller, Gus and Robert, and her sister, Damarius, who later married John W.

Pope of Austin, came to Texas and settled at Hills Prairie. With the coming of these and

other families,

such as Major A. W. Moore, Mr. R. J. Price, Marsh and Lance Trigg, H. K.

McDonald, the neighborhood developed into a cultured and aristocratic

community, known far and wide for its hospitality, wealth and refinement - a

reputation that endured for many years after the close of the civil war.

In 1845

Texas came into the Union and everything was bright and prosperous. The small patches of corn and cotton had

spread to wide acres of beautiful cultivated fields, and such yields as they

produced! For the land had been storing

for ages the elements for their production.

No weeds were allowed to grow even in the fence corners, for slaves big

and little, were kept busy and while they worked their voices floated over the

fields in song and chants. In 1843 Mr.

Hill installed the first cotton gin.

The best school advantages obtainable were given the children. First among the outstanding

teachers was Prof. Morgan and woe to the child who did not know how to spell every word in

the "blue back speller.", multiplication tables and the capitals of

the states. The school house was built

near the Spring Branch and children came from miles around. Tom Anderson Hill, son of T. B.

J. Hill, and Jim Oliver, nephew stayed in the home of Mr. Wylie Hill and attended this

school. Prof. Wise was one of the teachers highly spoken of.

Mary Parks Hill, the eldest daughter, graduated from Georgia Female College at

Madison, GA., in 1855. She returned to

Texas with her sister Sallie who had also attended college in Penfield. In 1856 Mary Parks

Hill was married to Dr.

John Watson of South Caroling, whom she had met while in college. The "Old South" was now

in its heyday. Parties, dinners, infairs, was the custom. Relatives and friends came from

miles and there was always room for every one. In 1859 Sallie Hill was married

to W. C. Powell from Holly Springs, Miss. Mr. Hill gave these daughters large farms and

slaves as bridal presents,

besides mules, horses, cows, etc. How little did they dream that the dark days

of strife were drawing near and nearer and that these glamorous and prosperous

times were to be only memory!

Dr. and Mrs. Watson's children were Eva, L. W., and Robert Watson; Mr. And Mrs. Powell

had but the one daughter, Sallie, who married Mr. W. A. McCord.

RobertTheus Hill, eldest son was a student of the Bastrop Military Institute and of

Rutersville College. When the first call was sounded for the southern soldiers, he enlisted

at the age of 20 years

in Co. D. Terry's Texas Rangers, and was Second Sergeant. Bob Hill as he was called, was

captured in battle and was exchanged. The captured

again and confined in the prison of Rock Hill, Ill. There he suffered every discomfort of

cold and hunger that can be imagined. After the war was over and

the other men returned home he was given up as dead by all but his mother. She said, "No,

Bobby is not dead, I feel that he is alive." Then a

rumor reached them that he was not dead.

Mr. Wylie Hill rode up to the John Caldwell home to tell his son't

sweetheart, Lou Caldwell, what they had heard, for he knew that her heart was

aching over her lover's absence. But

the months lengthened into almost a year and he had not returned. One day the

family were at dinner and Mrs. Hill jumped up suddenly from the table

exclaiming, "Bobby has come!" And it was so. Her mother heart and ears had heard his

quick step on the walk before anyone else had heard anything. He had been released from

prison, sick and

weak, and with no money and it had taken him months to make his way home.

He and

Lou Caldwell were married in October 1865.

He was a steward of the Methodist Church in Austin for many years. A farmer and stock man

on a large scale. He died in 1896, his wife in 1924. Their children are Charles W. Hill of

Austin, who married Miss Tinnie Burleson, Walter Hubbard Hill of Dallas and

Mrs. Annie Hill Snyder and Dr. John C. Hill, deceased.

The

second son of Mr. And Mrs. Wylie Hill was Augustus Middleton Hill. When the war

broke out he was only 14 years of age.

He continued his studies for two years in the Bastrop Military

Academy. When the call was so urgent he

enlisted at the age of 16 years in Walker's Division, De Bray's Regiment, and

was later transferred to Terry's Texas Rangers. In the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant

Hill he had two horses

shot under him and he was sent with other wounded soldiers to the plantation

home of John Holmes of De Soto Parish La., to recuperate. There he found a welcome indeed,

for the Holmes, Hill, and Pope families were related.

There one of the war time romances had its beginning. He fell in love with the eldest

daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Holmes. After the war

was over, through six busy years, they kept up a correspondence, while he

attended Baylor University at Waco, the University of Virginia and took his

medical degree at the University of New York, serving a few months as interne

in Belview Hospital. She was a student

at Mansfield College when the war came on. The school was closed and used as a

hospital after the Battle of Mansfield.

After the war was over and the school was opened again, she returned to

Manasfield, graduating there with honors.

On 1870, October 27th., they were married in her father's home amid

festivities to which were invited all the neighbors near and far, including

also the employees of his lumber mills and store. A sumptuous banquet was served to all.

From Shreveport they sailed down the Red River and the

Mississippi to New Orleans on their wedding journey to Texas. From New Orleans to Galveston

on the Gulf

and from Galveston to Bastrop by rail and stage coach. After a three months visit to Dr.

Hill's

parents they returned to Louisiana and settled at Keichei where they lived two

years. In 1873, her father having

passed away, they returned to Texas and resided at Hill's Prairie until the

spring of 1908. Dr. "Gus"

Hill endeared himself to hundreds of families scattered through the sparsely

settled communities and isolated settlements, riding horseback in response to

calls of sick and wounded at all hours of the day and night and in all kinds of

weather, often swimming the swollen streams, carrying in his saddlebags not

only the instruments with which to perform every variety of emergency operation,

but also the medicines with which to fill his own prescriptions - for drug

stores in those days were few and service had not so much as been born far

between and modern delivery in anyone's imagination. "Much obliged to you, 'Doc', until you

are better paid," was the usual reward for services, though this was frequently

supplemented by a load of wood, of which there was abundance on every hand.

Between Mrs. Hill and Dr. Hill's mother, who made her home with them until her death in

1894, a deep and tender attachment grew.

Into this home seven children were born. In the midst of her household duties Mrs. Hill found

the time to edit "Home Tidings", the official organ of the Texas conference

Woman's Missionary Society, to edit also special columns in two other

periodicals, and to contribute hundreds of articles on woman's suffrage,

rehabilitation of prisoners, prohibition of the liquor traffic and of the white

slave trade, and other phases of social reform. At the age of eighty-nine, Mrs. Hill resides

in Bastrop and is greatly loved by both old and young.

Of the seven children born to Dr. and Mrs. Hill, only two survived the ravages of

those malignant forms of malaria with which the low lands along our rivers and

creeks were then infested.

On August fifth, 1900, I was married to Charles N. LeSueur. In 1908 he died. Our son, Tylie

Hill LeSueur was married in July 1932 to Miss

Mabel Dawson, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. W. B. Dawson of Bastrop, and they reside

in Bastrop. In 1915 I became Mrs. David

Karling. My brother, Benjamin Ogilvie

Hill, became upon his graduation from Southwestern University in 1907 a

missionary under the General Board of the Methodist Eposcopal Church. South, in

Cuba, where he served for twenty-two years, during fifteen years of which he was

president of Pinson College at Comaguey.

In 1910 he took as his bride, Miss Ethel Star Ellis, a teacher in the

Eliza Bowman School, at Cienfuegos, one of the mission board's schools for

girls, a daughter of the Rev. H. J. Ellis of Atlanta Georgia. Since their return from Cuba

in 1929, they

have been at the Lydia Patterson Institute, of El Paso, Texas, a school under

the auspices of the Board of Missions for the training of young ministers.

And

other Christian workers, where my brother is dean of the department of

Theology. Their two daughters, Harriet and Sarah Elizabeth, are respectively

Mrs. James P Turner and Mrs. Emmett Reese, both of El Paso.

OLD FAMILIES OF HILL'S PRAIRIE

Eva H. L. Karling

(In another section of this paper there appears a complete history of Hill's

Prairie; the following is a supplement to this story, dealing principally with

the more outstanding settlers of Hills Prairie in the pioneer days fome of the

descendants of whom still reside there.)

I often wonder if there is as much interesting history in other communities as there

has been enacted at Hill's Prairie. It is impossible in the brief time and

space to do ought but touch it in high places.

During the years of 1839-40, Mr. Wylie Hill's two brothers, Middleton, and Thos. B. J.

Hill returned to Texas to live, and settled in what became known as Lower

Hill's Prairie. There were other

relatives and connections, as the Olivers, McGehees, etc., and a splendid

community was established. Mrs. Hill's

three brothers settled in Hills Prairie.

When Mr. Miller Hubbard's wife, who was a Beavers, sister of Mrs. Adolf Erhard,

died, he married Miss Mattie Price, a sister of Bob Price. His eldest son, Bennett, and his

daughter,

Mollie, who married Judge B. G. Neighbors of San Marcos, received good school

advantages and were splendid people.

Mr. A. M. Gus ubbard had four lovely daughters, and two sons. Anna, the eldest daughter, was

the second

wife of Maj. A. W. Moore. She only

lived two years after their marriage, leaving an infant, Woddie Moore, who grew

to manhood, and died in Houston in 1906.

The next daughter was Emma, who married B. F. Wamble and lived at Waco

many years until she passed away.

Lizzie was the next, known for her beauty and gentle ways. She married E. P. Robinson of

Round Rock,

and after his death, was married to W. Y. Penn of Georgetown. She is also dead. Martha, the

youngest daughter, died when about 20 years of age,

leaving two heart broken lovers. I do

not know the after life of one, but the other lived and died a bachelor, making

no secret of the fact that his heart was buried with Martha Hubbard. The eldest son was

Robert. He died in Forth Worth several years ago. Cliff Hubbard lives in the old home his

father established in 1845. This house

is one of the historic places of the neighborhood. In the Colorado River overflow of 1869,

the flood waters entered

every house in the valley except the Wylie Hill and the Woods Moore homes. Into the Hubbard

home it came, and climbed

nearly six feet on the walls. After the

overflow, Mr. Gus Hubbard came to Bastrop and bought a clock, which he put on

the high mantle. During the overflow in 1913, the flood waters again entered

the doors of the old house and climbed the high mantle and stopped the clock at

2:20 am, showing the family at what hour the water touched its pendulum.

Into

this home Clif Hubbard brought his bride, Miss Agnes Tuttle of Flatoino in

1883. Their living children are

Clarence Hubbard, who is at present in Kerrville for his health, which was

impared during the World War, and Miss Lizzie, who keeps the home for her

father, who is now nearing his eightieth year.

Harold Hubbard, whose tragic death just before Christmas left a widow

and daughter, Virginia Ray. Mildred is

Mrs. Oscar Jenkins, and has one son, Elbert.

Mr. Robert W. Hubbard's wife died in 1872, leaving him with three

children, the youngest an infant. His widowed sister, Mrs. Cynthis Lawrence,

came from Penfield, GA., to help him care for his family. She will be remembered as a pretty

old lady

with beautiful, natural wavy hair. She

never ceased to talk of Penfield, and it gave rise to the saying of the younger

members of the family that they could go to Penfield and know half the people

they met, and find their way around, from hearing her tell of it all. Mr. Hubbard's oldest

daughter, Mary, after

attending school in Bastrop spent two years at Weslyn Female College in

Staunton, Virginia, and married Khleber Trigg, living in Hill's Prairie a good

many years.

Col. Thomas

C. Moore, brother of Judge Dyer Moore, came during the first part of the

fifties with his family, and lived for several years in the Prairie, moving to

Bastrop and later to West Point. In

1851, Major A. Woods Moore moved there and lived until his death in 1888. He served the

county in the Senate for

several terms. His children, were Worth

Moore, who was for many years a business man in Galveston. Maj. Moore's second son was

Thomas K. Moore, who married Miss Olivia Grady of Hill's Prairie in 1871. Their children are

Mrs. Forrest Reed and Mrs. Mary Long of San Antonio, Mrs. Sigur Jordan of San Marcos, and Jim

Moore of Gonzales. Dan Moore, the second son,

is dead, leaving a widow and four grown children all living elsewhere. James Moore died in

Galveston in 1905.

Mr. Marsh Trigg died in 1888. His children

were Mrs. Sue Green and Mrs. Chester Erhard, Mr. Jones Trigg and Mr. Khleber

Trigg.

Mr. And Mrs. R. J. Price made a home in Hill's Prairie which for a number of years was

one of the ideal homes of the community.

Mr. Price was a member of the Legislature for two terms and was a man of

high principle, a steward in the Methodist church. His children were Mr. Bobbie Urice, who married Miss Bettie

Trigg; Tom Price, who died while a student at A & M College; Joe, who was

Judge J. B. Price and was District Judge for several terms; Charlie Price, died

in 1912; David Price was a merchant in Houston for a good many years; Worth

Price of Waco married Miss Mary Leigh Burleson of San Saba; and Col. Wright Price,

of the United States Navy.

Maj. Moore's daughters were Beatrice, who married Leigh Burleson of San Saba, and

Abbie, who married P. J. Gill. These

have all passed away.

Dr. John Watson died a few years after the close of the war between the

states. His widow with her three

childrenmade their home with her father, Wylie Hill. The daughter, Eva S. Watson, after attending Miss McKay's School

in Bastrop, spent three years in Virginia at school. She afterwards studied art in New York and Chicago, and became

one of the foremost artists of the state.

She married Maj. P. M. Woodall of Taylor. They have both passed away.

L. W. Watson and Robert Watson received their education in Bastorp,

Sweet Home and A & M College, Robert Watson married Miss Vollie Owens and

after living many years in Hill's Prairie, moved to Bastrop four years ago.

Mr. H. K. McDonald came from Mississippi to Texas.

He owned the Ferry Boat across the river for a few years while living in

Bastrop. He sold it to Sidney Green. It was he who donated the land for the

Christian Church in Bastrop. He moved to Hill's Prairie where he bought a large

farm and lived until his death in the nineties. His wife was a Gill.

Their sons were Tom, who married Miss Ella Petty, daughter of Capt.

Petty who was killed in the Battle of Plesant Hill; S. H. who, when he was a

little fellow, named himself Sam Houston. One day he was on his father's ferry

boat and General Sam Houston was crossing, and asked his name. When told, he gave him a big

silver

dollar. Hugh McDonald another son, died

in Shreveport, LA., in 1930.

In 1880 Miss Ida Holmes came out from Shrevesport, La., to visit her sister, Mrs. A. M.

Hill. She went back home after two years stay, engaged to Sam McDonald.

One year later he went ther efor her, and they were married. They lived for about 16 years

in Hill's

Prairie, adding much to the community in church, school and social life. They then moved to

Austin. They had six fine daughters, Mr. And Mrs.

McDonald are both dead.

After

Mr. Lance Trigg's death, his wife married Mr. Bill Young. Mr. Young was one of the pillars of the

Baptist Church in Hill's Prairie. He

and his wife are both dead. Their living son is John Young, who lives in the

old home. His wife was Anna Pierce, a

daughter of John Pierce, who was a gallant Confederate soldier.

Capt. Jack J. Moncure and Mr. Walter Norment, though not living actually in the

neighborhood, sent their children to school and their families attended church

in Hill's Prairie.

Capt. Dan Grady was a Captain in the Mexican War of 1845. His wife was Miss Sarah Lester, a

niece of Judge James Lester who

represented the district of Mina in the Council of San Philiipe in 1835. Capt. And Mrs.

Grady had two children: Him,

who died in the service of the Confederacy, and Olivia, who married T. K. Moore

in 1871. Capt. And Mrs. Grady made

their home in Hill's Prairie until 1885, when they moved to Bastrop, residing

there until Capt. Grady's death, after which Mrs. Grady lived with her daughter

in Hill's Prairie until her death in 1903.

In 1883, the Oldfields came from Mississippi.

There were related to the McDonalds.

There are none in Hill's Prairie now, but they were so ling identified

with the interests of the neighborhood, that a history of the community is not

complete without their names. Mrs. Anna

Oldfield who was always to be found where there was sickness or sorrow, giving

comfort and aid, lives with her son, Malcolm, in Bastrop.

Mr. And Mrs. Jim Craft, with their children, lived for several years in Hill's Prairie

before coming to Bastorp. Mrs. Craft

was Miss Della Trigg daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Lance Trigg, and a sister of Mrs.

Bettie Price and Mrs. Willie Jenkins.

Mrs. Willie Jenins and her husband, Charlie Jenkins, both are dead. Their son, Ernest,

married mrs. M. A.

Craft's daughter, Winnie. Leslie Craft

and his mother are residents of Hill's Prairie. Mr. Wallace Craft and his family live in his

father's old home.

In 1897, Mrs. Bettie LeSueur, a sister of W. C. Powell of Bastrop moved to Hills

Prairie from Mississippi with her son, Charles. Tom and Henry LeSueur, two

other sons, had been in Texas several years.

They bought the McDonald farm of 400 acrews. Mrs. LeSueur died in June 1908.

Charles LeSueur died in August of the same year. Henry died in 1915. Tom is still living.

In 1887 the MK&T railroad laid its track and ran the first trains through the

valley. Jay Gould and other notables

visited and inspected the Prairie during the construction of the road. Dr. A. M. Hill built

a store near the tract,

and secured the post office and ticket office and R. A. Watson was clerk. T. K.

Moore and P. J Gill built a cotton gin, and several small houses and a

blacksmith shop composed the village.

On Saturdays during the cotton season there were sometimes as high as

200 tickets to Bastrop sold. That was in the Nineties.

In

1905, Joe Taylor of Todedo Ohio, bought the old Moore homestead, repaired and

renovated it, and brought his bride there.

In 1910, he sold the place to J. C. Lundell and returned to Ohio. After

living there seven years, Mr. Lundell sold the place to Dave Reed, of Austin,

and he moved to Dallas.

The small store, now owned by Lee Alexander, and the gin is practically all of the

present Hill's Prairie. There is no ticket office, only a flag station, and

very few passengers from there ride on the train to Bastrop. There is no post office; the

mail is delivered on a rural route from Bastrop.

There have been other fine families who have resided in the community for short or

longer periods. After the war of the Sixties, and the slaves were freed, many

of them drifted from place to place, and the planters could not depend on them

to finish a crop they had begun. Quite

a number of white familes were brought out from Alabama, and most of these

people afterwards bought small farms in adjo8ining neighborhoods and were good

citizens.

How different now are conditions, modes of life and even the appearance of the

country from that of the past, and it brings an ache to the heart when I think

of all the splendid people and the lovely homes which are now only a

memory. And I close with this little

poem, written several years ago.

Little Granmother

By Eva Hill Lesueur Karling

Oh!

Little Grandmother - with tender eyes,

I remember your wise and quiet replies

To my childish questions about the sky,-

And earth and heaven - and why folks die!

I remember well all your gentle ways

A halo lingers about those days!

And often in memory I hear you repeat

True maxims to guide my unwary feet.

Dear little Grandmother - so fragile and frail-

How bravely you followed the pioneer...

------

6/7/1914 Deanville, Texas. Bastrop Advertiser

Sunday morning, 8 o'clock, 1863, this day just fifty-one years ago, we charged over

the breastworks at Milican's Bend, on the Mississippi river, and stormed the

enemy who were mostly Negroes and were in the ditches. We had marched hard nearly all day

and most of the night Saturday, and rested on our arms a few hours before day with

nothing for our bed except mother earth and the canopy of Heaven for our

roof. While wrapt in the sweet embrace

of silent repose and dreaming of our loved ones far away in our bright sunny

homes in Texas, and just at the dawn of day we were called to arms by the

shrill note of the bugle and muffled roll of the drum, which meant prepare for

battle, a sound which the ear of every well drilled soldier knew was onward to

the front. We had to cut our way

through a thick hedge of boisdarc which compelled us to condense our forces,

and before we had time to deploy columns and make a charge, the enemy fired

upon us. They were well drilled and

fired by file along the line. It was

not yet good day light and it was a beautiful sight, although alarming to see

the red flashes as they belched forth from the mouths of the muskets and sent

their deadly and withering mistles in our ranks. But alas, poor Negroes, when we made the charge to death or

victory, and went right over on them in their ditches the contest was of short

duration. Within less than one hour we

had killed seven hundred and fifty Negroes and blood was several inches deep in

places. There were but few that got

away, and those that did were their white pals and they saved their anatomies

by skiddooing to their gunboats.

The only men we lost were killed before we got to the breastworks, but we lost

several brave men, the names of whom I will give, especially the old Bastrop

county boys. This battle was led by the gallant Henry E. McColloch. I was a

member of the 17th TVI. RTP Allen was our Colonel and the immortal Wash Jones

our Lieutenant Colonel. Those

killed were Tom Beavers, Frank Dabney, George Smith, Louis Harris, Tom Beaty;

the wounded, Colonel Allen, O. G. Coulson, Jim Rowlett. The above were all Bastrop County boys and

perhaps there were others whom I can't call to mind just now.

Now I will tell you who I am. I am the eldest son of Judge Thomas H. Mays, who was

among the first men to settle in Bastrop on the Colorado river, about 35 miles

below the city of Austin. The savage

red man stalked abroad at night and stole horses and killed and scalped any and

all helpless victims who chanced to come in their pathway, and when the howl of

the wolf and the scream of the panther, in connection with the hoot of the owl,

sent a chill of terror to us children as we would huddle closer around mother's

knee for protection.

Now if this don't find its way into the waste basket, I may wright again to the old

Advertiser. If any of the old boys

should see this I would be pleased to hear from any of them.

T. F. Mays

******

1914 Bastrop Adversiter

Mrs. B. A. Elzner and children and Mrs. O. E. Faubion are visiting at Austin.

Mr. H. J. Eskew was among the visitors in Bastrop Friday.

Mrs. Clara Mayes is here from Santa Fe, New Mexico, visiting her nephew, Mr. T. M.

Rector and family. Mrs. Mayes is the

only surviving member of the Cope family.

She is a daughter of Mr. Samuel C. Cope and a sister of Mr. James B.

Cope. Mrs. Mayes' husband, Mr. Jon W.

Mayes, served in the Mexican war and was amoung the lucky ones who drew a white

bean. A brother of Judge Wm. Eastland

was in the war with Mr. Mayes and drew a black bean at the same time and was

shot. Mr. Mayes was kept in prison for

a period of six months. Mrs. Mayes'

son, Mr. John W. Mayes, resides at Santa Fe, New Mexico, is a prominent

attorney of that city and was recently made a 33rd degree Mason at Washington

City. Mr. Mayes is 74 years of age and

a most interesting concversationist.

Best Just received a carload of Blue Ribbon Flour.

Hasler Bros. Co.

--------

The following is a transcript of a copy of an August 6, 1910 issue of The Bastrop

Advertiser found in a trunk that had belonged to E. Roy Jones.

This copy was yellow and brittle, with parts

torn and unreadable. (Missing) is in place of torn and missing sections or holes.

Spelling errors are noticed in the paper and are left as printed:

The Bastrop Advertiser

Office-Bauhof

Building, Main Street

Thos. C. Cain, Editor and Proprietor

Entered at the Bastrop, Texas, Postoffice as Second Class Matter.

Established March 1st, 1853. Vol. 56

Bastrop, TX, Aug. 6, 1910.

Ad: T. A. Hasler & Co's Dry Goods Store.

Ad: E. Erhard & Son, Druggists

Ad: L. W. Olive & Son (grocers)

PROCEEDINGS OF DEMOCRATIC COUNTY CONVENTION OF BASTROP COUNTY, TEXAS:

The Democratic County convention of

Bastrop County convened at the County Court House, Saturday, July 30th, 1ff10,

at 2 o'clock p.m. Judge Paul D. Page,

Chairman of the Evecutive Committee, called the Convention to order.

The Hon. S. L. Staples, of Smithville,

was elected Temporary Chairman, and Van L Taylor, of McDade, Te(missing)

(missing)ary. It was approved and

seconded by the delegates from each precinct elect on of their number to act

upon each of the following Committees:

Committee of Permanent Organization, Credentials and Platform and

Resolutions. The motion was adopted and

said committees having been duly made up, retired and prepared their reports.

The Committee on Permanent Organization

made the folowing report: To Hon. S. L. Staples, Temporary Chairman: Your Committee on Permanent Organization beg

leave to report that we recommend that the Temporary Organization of the

(missing)ation be made permanent. (Signed) J. L. Wilbarger, Chairman.

Attest.

J. B. Watson, Secretary.

Upon motion said report was adopted by

the convention.

The committee on Credentials made the

following report: To Hon. S. L.

Staples, Chairman: Your committee on Credentials hereby beg leave to report

that the following named delegates are entitled to seats on the floor of the

convention: (Here follows the names of the delegates from the different

precincts with the number of votes to which each precinct is entitled which is

here omitted for lack of space.)

(Signed)

Chas. Gillespie, Chairman.

Upon motion the said report was adopted

by the convention.

The committee on Platform and Resolutions

made the following report: To Hon. S. L. Staples, chairman of the Democratic

County Convention of Bastrop County, Texas:

Your Committee on Platform and

Resolutions beg leave to submit the following:

The Democrats of Bastrop County, in

convention assembled, extend greetings to fellow Democrats to day, in

convention in every County of this

State, and congratulate them upon the splendid condition of our party in Texas

and in the Nation and rejoice that the returns from our late Primary show

conclusively that a large majority of our party are loyal to the principles of

Local Self Government.

We endorse fully the positions taken by

Senators Bailey and Culberson upon public issues rejoice that our State and

Nation are served by men of this distinguished ability.

We congratulate the Democrats of this

District upon the fact that their Representative in the congress of the United

States, the Honorable A. S. Burleson, Of Travis County, has been faithful to

every trust committed to him and we fully endorse his position in public

affairs and appreciate his zealous and earnest efforts upon behalf of his constituency.

We are gratified to note that the returns

from our late census show that our State is rapidly forging to the front in

wealth and population and that we will likely gain in the near future at least seven

additional Congressmen, all of

whom will of course be members of the Democratic Party.

We declare that as the issue as to whether

or not a Constitutional amendment shall be submitted to the people of Texas,

prohibiting the sale of liquors within this state, has been passed upon by the

people at the polls and the returns showing that a two thirds majority of the

Senatorial and Representative Districts of the State have declared in favor of

submitting said amendment, that we as Democrats and firm believers in the

doctrine of Local Self Government hereby instruct our Delegates to the State

Convention to vote for the insertion of a "Submission Plank" in the

State platform and we hereby instruct our Representatives in the Legislature to

vote for the submission of said amendment.

Having declared in favor of submission we

further declare that we oppose the calling of a Constitutional Convention at

this time and do hereby request our Senator and Representatives in the State

Legislature to oppose the calling of a Constitutional Convention and to use all

honorable means to defeat the calling of same.

Respectfully

Submitted, (Signed) Paul D. Page, Chairman.

Hon. Roger Byrne states to the Convention

that the above had been adopted by the Committee without a dissenting

vote. Upon motion the above report of

the committee was unanimously adopted by the Convention.

It was moved and seconded that the Chair

appoint a Committee of three to select delegates to the various conventions

which motion being adopted, the Chair appointed the following upon said

Committee: J. B. Price, Roger Byrne, and T. A. Moore.

The above committee made the following

report: To Hon. S. L. Staples, Chairman

of the Convention:

We your Committee appointed to select

delegates to the various Democratic Conventions beg leave to report as follows:

We have selected the following as

delegates to the State and all other Conventions:

Paul D. Page, S. S. Sayers, J. L.

Wilbarger, B. J. Hasler, W. B. Ransome, Woody Townsend, B. D. Orgain, H. H.

Alexander, Jack Jenkins, Richard Starcke, W. A. McCord, G. W. Davis, C.

Chalmers, Thos. H. Parks, T. W. Cain, Lee D. Olive, M. H. Young, H. P. Luckett,

J. S. Jones, W. P. Culp, Charles Gillespie, Max Hirsch, T. B. Taylor, G. T.

King, W. O. Straus, R. Roermer, Howard Rivers, Thos. Pfeifer, John G. Chiles,

W. L. Martin, Thomas Nairn, L. P. Gatlin, R. L. Wilson, J. W. Jackson, C. P.

Sowell, W. R. Gillum, Walter Keeble, J. B. Price, T. A. Moore, R. Byrne, S. L.

Staples, W. M. Cobb, Aaron Burleson, J. A. Hewatt, W. R. Curham, T. O. Hill, U.

M. Carmichael, E. H. Eagleston, Joe Leshikar, Joe Psencik, D. S. Shade, Sam

Standifer, C. B. Calahan, W. L. Moore, W. D. C. Jones, F. T. Chase, T. N.

Powell, T. R. Bain, E. P. Curtis, E. G. Winston, J. H. Jones, Fred Morgan Sr.,

R. A. Watson, Charley Jenkins, R. L. Williams, Otto Wamel, D. R. LeMaster, S.

L. Brannon, Van L. Taylor, Mat Zimmerhanzel, Col. Corbell, Gus Jung, W. J.

Smith, B. F. Catchings, Frank Maduna, Tom Rolston, Perry Winston, H. J. Eskew,

C. Fishbeck, Hugh Barton, J. W. Taylor.

Upon motion the report of the Committee

was adopted.

Roger Byrne, of Smithville, moved that

the delegation be instructed to vote as a unit upon all questions and that

there be further instructions to vote on any and all measures that might be

offered in the State Convention in the interests of the Hon. O. B.

Colquitt. Said motion voted by a

unanimous vote adopted.

Upon motion the Convention adjourned.

(Signed)

S. L. Staples, Chairman

Attest:

Van L. Taylor, Secretary

METHODIST CHURCH:

Preaching Sunday morning at 11 a.m. and

8:30 p.m. by Rev. C. M. Myers, of Fulshear, Texas. You are cordially invited to hear him.

The fourth quarterly conference for

Bastrop will be held August 22nd, Rev. Nat B. Read presiding.

JOE F. WEBB, PASTOR.

CHURCH NOTICE:

Sunday, August 7th, will be communion

service in the morning and service in evening.

Both services will be in German and both will be conducted by Rev. Theo.

Havekost, district Superintendent. All

that can understand the above language are cordially invited to attend.

A. D. MOEHLE, Pastor.

EPWORTH LEAGUE PROGRAM

August 7th, 6;30 p. m. Subject-God's

Unfailing Love. Leader-Mr. Joe Leath. Hymn-489:"He Leadeth Me."

Prayer of Thanksgiving-Mr. Pearcy.

Scripture Reading-Hosea XI: 1 to 9: John XIII;1. Leaders Address.

Song-My Price Jenkins. Open Meeting of Testimony and Praise, led by Miss Maude

Normant. Prayer-Committing our all to

Him. Mr. Ernest Carter. Song. Program. Benediction.

-W. M. Andrews and Alf Griensenbeck bought the lots on which the cotton yard is

located and will in a short time have erected modern residences. And still Bastrop grows.

-Watch for Miss E. Lister's advertisement next week.

-The building on the lot recently purchased by the Citizens State Bank next to the brick

hotel, has been torn down this week, and work will begin at once on the new

home of the bank, which will be one of the finest bank buildings in this part

of the state.

-Watch for Miss E. Lister's Premium Offer.

-City Secretary F. A. Orgain handed in promptly the proceedings of the regular

meeting of the City Council held Monday night, August 1, 1910, but owing to its

length we are forced to defer the publication of same until next week.

-Don't cry for Honey next winter, get it now, one hundred gallons for sale. LOUIS

EILERS

-At a recent meeting of the Farmers Union of Bastrop county in this city, the

following officers were elected; Wm. McWilliams, President; P. W. Harris,

Vice-President; Sam Floyd, Secretary and Treasurer; W. B. Taylor Lecturer; W.

F. Cruse, Chaplain; W. J. Weber, Door Keeper; W. T. Callahan, Conductor.

-Allen E. Wynn, who was arrested on the charge of assault and attempt to murder Roy

Wilkes in this city Wednesday of last week, waived examination and gave a

$1,000 bond this week. J. P. Smith, who

was arrested in connection with the shooting of Wilkes, gave a $500 bond and

was released. Wilkes is recovering

rapidly from his wounds.

OFFICIAL VOTE OF BASTROP COUNTY TEXAS

Table showing number of votes each candidate received at each voting box in Bastrop

County, Texas, at the Democratic Primary Election, held July 23, 1910:

(Precincts:

Bastrop, Goodman, Smithville, Jeddo, Rosanky, High Grove, Cedar Creek, Kenton,

Elgin, McDuff, Live Oak Grove, Alum Creek, McDade, Waterson, (?), (?), (?),

Upton, Kovar, Total, Plurally, Majority)

Total Vote: 234, 24, 339, 25, 80, 56, 77, 29, 393, 56, 35, 75, 179, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?,

54, 2021

GOVERNER:

William Poindexter: 27, 4, 52, 3, 2, 7, 13, 6, 80, 17, 0, 21, 43, ?, ?, ?, ?, 3, 1, 317

James Martin Jones: 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, ?, ?, ?, 0, 0, 5

O.B. Colquitt: 124, 5, 177, 14, 68, 17, 22, 13, 136, 11, 34, 31, 64, 32, ?, ?, ?, 9,

52, 981, ,36

Cone Johnson: 34, 3, 46, 1, 1, 22, 22, 4, 123, 21, 0, 7, 40, ?, ?, ?, ?, 2, 0, 372

R.V. Davidson; 41, 12, 46, 7, 7, 8, 15, 5, 34, 1, 0, 12, 16, ?, ?, ?, 10, 1, 241

LIEUT-GOVERNER,

A.B. Davidson: 145, 10, 175, 12, 59, 15, 32, 20, 165, 17, 31, 53, 53, 2, 5, ?, 161,

10, 15, 2, 994, , 132

A.S. Hawkin: 15, 3, 36, 1, 3, 26, 6, 1, 29, 12, 1, 8, 15, ?, ?, 7, 2, 0, 0, 1??

H. Bascom Thomas: 46, 8, 78, 7, 4, 10, 27, 7, 130, 33, 1, 6, 73, 1, 3, ?, 10, 2,

4, 0, 483

James T. Hammons: 4, 0, 5, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 7, 0, 0, 0, 1, ?, ?, 2, 0, 1, 0, 28

J. H. Webster: 9, 1, 21, 1, 7, 1, 0, 0, 25, 1, 1, 0, 9, 5, ?, 12, 0, 4, 52, 148

ATTORNEY GENERAL:

Jewel P Lightfoot: 230, 24, 327, 24, 78, 51, 71, 25, 37j0, 53, 35, 71, 164, 45, 98,

154, 16, 23, 54, 1872

STATE TREASURER:

Wm. Winningham:

21, 1, 35, 5, 27, 8, 9, 6, 67, 9, 1, 14, 48, 11, 10, 20, 1, 5, 0, 298

Sam Sparks: 194, 23, 274, 18, 49, 46, 61, 21, 290, 39, 33, 57, 103, 42, 90, 109,

15, 18, 54, 1536

FOR COMPTROLLER:

Bob Barker: 60, 10, 104, 9, 29, 12, 14, 15, 98, 13, 14, 27, 38, 23, 47, 57, 12, 3,

1, 591

B. F. Teague: 107, 11, 102, 11, 30, 27, 24, 1, 185, 31, 13, 30, 52, 16, 42, 42, 0,

10, 53, 787

W. P. Land: 22, 0, 25, 2, 2, 2, 25, 1, 38, 3, 0, 6, 26, 3, 2, 1, 7, 0, 168

D. C. Burkes: 10, 1, 33, 1, 3, 9, 5, 4, 25, 3,

I, 6, 12, 5, 3, 11, 0, 3, 0, 135

Edwin Waller: 19, 2, 41, 0, 12, 3, 1, 6, 97, 0, 0, 1, 10, 3, 2, 14, 3, 1, 0, 215

R. R. COMMISSIONER:

J. W. Blake: 55, 4, 68, 8, 29, 7, 15, 10, 96, 7, 19, 21, 31, 12, 26, 68, 1, 5, 3, 455

L. T.

Dashiell: 15, 4, 32, 0, 36, 12, 5, 1, 44, 5, 3, 8, 10, 4, 6, 4, 0, 3, 0, 192

Allison Mayfield: 109, 12, 162, 12, 47, 31, 41, 12, 121, 33, 10, 28, 21, 20, 59, 37,

13, 12, 0, 781

Theodore G. Thomas: 25, 2, 43, 3, 45, 3, 9, 2, 68, 3, 2, 10, 85, 2, 8, 36, 0, 3, 51, 400

R.. R. COMMISSIONER:

William D. Williams: 225, 23, 333, 25, 69, 53, 74, 25, 373, 52, 34, 72, 159, 41, 101,

158, 15, 24, 54, 1919

LAND COMMISSIONER:

J. T. Robison: 211, 24, 228, 18, 63, 50, 51, 17, 264, 45, 30, 60, 118, 35, 83, 108,

15, 17, 53, 1490, , 1161

Charles W. Geers: 7, 0, 28, 1, 4, 0, 3, 2, 21, 1, 0, 2, 7, 5, 3, 3, 1, 1, 0, 89

H. Ellis Hill: 5, 0, 47, 5, 9, 6, 10, 7, 60, 5, 3, 8, 26, 11, 10, 22, 0, 6, 1, 240

SUPT PUB INSTRUCTION:

F. M. Brally: 226, 24, 331, 24, 77, 53, 73, 27, 373, 52, 34, 73, 161, 49, 101, 153,

16, 24, 54, 1925

COM OF AGRICULTURE:

Ed R Cone: 225, 22, 330, 25, 77, 52, 71, 25, 371, 57, 34, 71, 156, 47, 101, 15, 24,

54, 1910

JUDGE COURT CR AP:

A. J. Harper: 71, 9, 150, 15, 39, 23, 21, 14, 204, 14, 29, 24, 7427, 24, ?, 6, 7, 1,

841, , 293

Felix J. McCord: 117, 13, 103, 2, 6, 10, 14, 8, 70, 26, 1, 28, 46, 18, 47, 13, 10, 6,

0, 548

P. A. Turner: 23, 2, 52, 6, 21, 20, 33, 4, 72, 12, 3, 20, 25, 7, 27, 0, 11, 53, 415

ASSOC JUSTICE SUP CT:

T. J. Brown:

230, 22, 328, 25, 78, 54, 71, 27, 369, 54, 34, 73, 161, 49, 198, 156, 15, 23,

54, 1921

CHIEF JUST CT CIV APP:

W. M. Key: 220, 24, 323, 24, 77, 55, 71, 27, 370, 54, 34, 73, 157, 48, 100, 155, 16,

24, 54, 1806

ASSOC JUS CT CIV APH:

B. H. Rice: 225, 23, 314, 24, 77, 51, 68, 27, 360, 54, 34, 71, 157, 49, 98, 15, 23,

54, 1877

ASSOC JUS CT CIV APP:

C. H. Jenkins: 219, 24, 329, 24, 76, 53, 68, 27, 365, 54, 34, 71, 156, 15, 24, 54,

1897 U. S.

SENATOR:

C. A. Culberssn: 226, 24, 329, 25, 76, 52, 71, 24, 368, 55, 34, 73, 158, 49, 101,

158, 15, 24, 54, 1916

CONGRESS 10TH DIST:

A. S. Burleson: 225, 24, 330, 25, 76, 54, 73, 28, 378, 54, 34, 74, 161, 50, 101, 158,

16, 24, 54, 1939

DISTRICT ATTORNEY:

J. S. Jones: 233, 24, 337, 25, 78, 55, 73, 27, 377, 54, 34, 70, 167, 51, 102, 159,

16, 24, 54, 1960

SENATOR 19TH DISTRICT:

Q. U. Watson: 214, 20, 307, 25, 78, 50, 68, 28, 340, 54, 34, 72, 137, 50, 102, 154,

16, 24, 54, 1877

REPRESENT. 58TH DIS.

J. E. Faires: 50, 4, 55, 3, 4, 30, 28, 7, 172, 21, 3, 8, 86, 6, 37, 37, 0, 11, 0, 558

Roger Byrne: 173, 19, 268, 21, 74, 23, 41, 21, 185, 30, 31, 60, 71, 45, 65, 103, 17,

18, 54, 1324, , 766

REPRESENT. 59TH DIS.

Miles H. Hill: 74, 16, 119, 16, 10, 37, 54, 15, 175, 33, 3, 18, 102, 30, 43, 27, ?,

13, 0, 791

Walter Keeble: 143, 8, 181, 6, 64, 15, 17, 13, 195, 20, 31, 57, 65, 22, 55, 102, 8, 8,

54, 1064, , 273

COUNTY JUDGE:

J. B. Price: 230, 24, 337, 23, 77, 51, 74, 29, 374, 55, 34, 73, 171, 48, 103, 145,

17, 23, 54, 1942

COUNTY ATTORNEY:

J. P. Fowler, Jr.: 64, 8, 77, ?, 43, 44, 15, 213, 18, 8, ? ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?,

?

Jack Jenkins: ?, 15, ?, 5, 46, 12, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, 7, ?, ?

DISTRICT CLERK:

Thos,. H. Parks: 174, 13, 180, 21, 29, 18, 19, 11, 179, 38, 19, 45, 42, 26, 44, ?, 12,

4, 51, 934, , 88

Oscar, H. Chamberlain: 52, 8, 136, 3, 47, 31, 55, 17, 181, 19, 14, 29, 116, 24, 54, ?, 3,

20, 3, 896

COUNTY CLERK:

H. H. Alexander: 100, 13, 212, 14, 74, 56, 66, 22, 213, 45, 8, 38, 106, 49, 87, 58,

10, 20, 44, 1235, , 484

W. T. Grimes: 130, 10, 116, 11, 4, 0, 11, 7, 170, 11, 27, 37, 71, 6, 18, 102, 6, 4,

10, 751

SHERIFF:

Woody Townsend: 200, 24, 336, 25, 79, 50, 72, 28, 381, 55, 35, 74, 166, 51, 99, 160,

12, 22, 54, 1923

TAX COLLECTOR:

G. W. Davis: 224, 24, 339, 25, 79, 51, 72, 29, 386, 55, 35, 72, 170, 41, 100, 160,

13, 23, 54, 1952

TAX ASSESSOR:

J. H. Jones: 226, 24, 335, 25, 79, 51, 74, 29, 385, 55, 35, 73, 174, 42, 97, 132, 17,

23, 54, 1960

COUNTY TREASURER:

J. Daniel Byers: 24, 1, 37, 3, 9, 9, 6, 0, 54, 2, 8, 10, 36, 8, 14, 64, 0, 3, 0,

288

Lee D. Olive: 79, 15, 129, 4, 54, 33, 36, 18, 107, 51, 4, 10, 41, 32, 32, 39, 16, 13,

2, 715

C. Chalmers: 129, 8, 159, 15, 16, 14, 34, 11, 224, 4, 21, 54, 95, 15, 54, 56, 1,

8, 52, 970

COUNTY SUPT:

T. N. Powell: 53, 9, 222, 24, 63, 50, 44, 18, 197, 28, 13, 30, 87, 36, 73, 78, 2, 13,

11, 1051, , 123

Hartford Jenkins: 177, 14, 112, 1, 16, 6, 33, 11, 188, 29, 22, 35, 85, 19, 29, 82, 15,

11, 43, 928

COUNTY CHAIRMAN:

Paul D. Page: 228, 24, 332, 24, 77, 49, 77, 29, 378, 57, 34, 73, 162, 53, 101, 149, 17,

24, 54, 1942

COUNTY SURVEYOR:

Sam Higgins: 87, 3, 21, 1, 48, 0, 0, 18, 0, 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 0, 0, 5, 0, 202, ,

162

C. L. Moncure: 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 3, 4, 16, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 32

J. S. Dunbar: 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0, 8

For Submission: 75, 14, 134, 11, 22, 32, 53, 12, 232, 41, 1, 34, 89, 24, 46, 34,

10, 17, 2, 883, , 82

Against Submission: 117, 6, 142, 10, 56, 14, 11, 12, 88, 4, 33, 29, 55, 16, 54, 88, 1,

3, 52, 801

Precinct Officers.

County commissioner, Precinct 1,

Bastrop:

C.L. Moncure 171, P.A. Hanson 59

Pin Oak: Moncure 16,Hanson 19

Alum Creek: Moncure 37, Hanson 38

Paige:

Moncure 50, Hanson 109

Moncure's majority, 49.

County Commissioner, Precinct 2,

Smithville:

Andy Meuth 79, F.H. Tally 252

Jeddo:

Meuth 20, Tally 5

Rosanky:

Meuth 78, Tally 1

Watterson:

Meuth 49, Tally 6

Red Rock: Meuth 76, Tally 29

Upton:

Meuth 16, Tally 7

Kovar:

Meuth 52, Tally 2

Meuth's majority 67

County Commissioner, Precinct 3

Goodman:

Ira A. Wright 15, J. D. Alexander 9

High Grove: Wright 30, Alexander 22

Cedar Creek: Wright 37, Alexander 39

Kenton:

Wright 17, Alexander 11

Hill's Prairie: Wright 13, Alexander 2

Wright's majority 29.

County Commissioner, Precinct 4

Elgin:

O. S. Snowden 91, J. W. Jackson 293

McDuff:

Snowden 12, Jackson 143

Jackson's majority 346

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 1.

J. N. Jenkins.

Bastrop 215, Goodman 24, Hill's Prairie 17

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 2

W. L. Moore

Smithville

333, Jeddo 25, Rosanky 77, Upton 23, Kovar 54

Justice of the peace, Precinct 3

B. P Simmons

High Grove 53, Cedar Creek 74, Kenton 29

Justice of the peace, Precinct 4

Elgin:

W. A. Livingston 8, J. E. B. Laird 143

McDuff:

Livingston 43, Laird 12

Livingston's majority 124

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 5

Perry Winston

Pin Oak 35, Alum Creek 72

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 6

Geo. Milton

McDade 167

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 7

T. R. Mobley

Watterson 53, Red Rock 100

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 8

C. E. Lindner

Paige 159

Constable Precinct 1

J. F. Nash

Bastrop 222, Goodman 24, Hill's Prairie 17

Constable, Precinct 2

O. B. Smith

Smithville 321, Jeddo 23, Rosanky 77, Upton 19, Kovar 54

Constable, Precinct 3

High Grove: J. L. Reid 12, Rives R. Johnson 41

Cedar Creek: Reid 56, Johnson 21

Kenton:

Reid 21, Johnson 7

Reid's majority 20

Constable, Precinct 4

Elgin:

John Sowell 310, H. L. Potts 68

McDuff:

Sowell 26, Pots 31

Sowell's majority 237

Constable, Precinct 5

W. C. Walker: Pin Oak 35, Alum Creek 74

Constable, Precinct 6

McDade:

S. L. Chandler 68, W. C. Rutherford 106

Rutherford's majority 38

Constable, Precinct 7

J. B. Watson: Watterson 50, Red rock 97

Constable, Precinct 8

Paige:

Chas. ?perster 49, J. C. ? 4, G. K? 23

?ter's majority 22

Public Weigher, Precinct 6

H. W. Freeman: McDade 174

Public Weigher, Precinct 7

P. W. Harris: Watterson 52, Red Rock 90

Public Weigher, Precinct 8

Paige:

P. B. ?erner 163

PRECINCT CHAIRMAN

The following Precinct Chairmen were elected in Saturday's Primaries:

Precinct 1-Tig Jones

Precinct 2-C. W. Hemphill and W. E. Goodman received one vote each

Precinct 3-E. G. Winston

Precinct 4-J. D. Hallmark

Precinct 5-M. Zimmerhanzel

Precinct 6-W. H. Ingram

Precinct 7-J. C. Randle

Precinct 8-E. G. Templeton

Precinct 9-Max Hirsch

Precinct 10-Hugh Barton

Precinct 11-John Brahm

Precinct 12-N. E. Morris

Precinct 13-Van L Taylor

Precinct 14-C. H. Wallace

Ad:

Peoples Cash Gro. Co.,

A CARD.

Bastrop, Tex., Aug. 3, 1910. To the

people of Bastrop County. I desire to

express my sincere thanks for the loyal support so generously tendered me by

any friends throughout this county in my recent campaign for the nomination for

County Clerk. That I was successful is

due to them and I desire that they may understand that their friendship is

appreciated to the uttermost. While

grateful to friends everywhere, I especially appreciate the friendship and good

will of my old neighbors and friends in the Cedar Creek and High Grove country

where I have spent my life up to this time, and I trust that the future will

show to them that I am not unmindful of the loyal and unselfish support that

they have given me since I have entered politics. Respectfully, H. H. ALEXANDER.

BASEBALL

San Angelo vs. Bastrop, Next Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.-Close of Season. The fast base ball team of San Angelo will

be in Bastrop next week for a series of three games, beginning Wednesday,

August 10th. San Angelo has defeated

every ball team in West Texas and comes to this part of the state to take the

pennant from Bastrop, Taylor and Granger.

The series of games will close the season in Bastrop and every fan

should be there to encourage the all-home team of Bastrop to a triumphant

finish of a most successful season.

PUBLIC TAKE NOTICE.

On Tuesday night, August 23, 1910, at the office of W. B. Randsome, at 9 o'clock,

the City School Board will let to the highest bidder, all the School funds for

the next two years. The successful bibder will have to execute a satisfactory

bond to the School Board. By highest

bidder means, the one who will pay the largest amount of interest on daily

balances. T. P. HAYNIE, Secretary.

LOST-At the Woodmen Barbecue in Bastrop, May 20th, a small gold chain with a heart

attached. Finder return to this office

and receive reward.

A WOLFF.

I solicit your patronage for my new and up-to-date establishment, which I have

opened in the Ransome building, next to the bank. We carry a full line of Dry Goods, Clothing Shoes and Hats. Please call and get acquainted with the new

store, the new goods. Respectfully

Yours, A. WOLFF.

THE

CIRCULAR STAIRCASE by Mary Robert? Rinehart. (Fictional Story not transcribed)

AT THE STATE CAPITAL LEGISLATIVE NEWS, WHAT IS BEING DONE:

Austin, Tex-To the accompaniment of applause from many of those who heard it, Governor

Cambell's sixth message, in which, among other things, he suggested the subject

of more restricted liquor legislation "and such other legislation relative

to the liquor traffic as the welfare of the state demands," was read to

the special session of the Texas legislature Wednesday. (message not transcribed) (subjects were

bond issue for the construction and maintenance of causeways, viaducts, bridges

and approaches across any rivers, nominations of candidates, strengthen

statutes regulating the granting of liquor license, provide agricultural and

mechanical college with funds, pure food inspection.)

Ad:

Make the Liver do its Duty. Carter's Little Liver Pills.

Ad:

Paxtine Toilet Antiseptic.

Ad:

Restored to health. Doan's back pills.

Ad:

Scratched so she could not sleep: Cuticura Remedies.

FOR SHORTER TERM. GEN. WOOD FAVORS SMALL PERIOD FOR SOLDIER'S ENLISTMENT.

New head of the United States Army Talks of Air Machines as War Craft-Prefers

Dirigible Balloons.

New York.-Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, the new chief of staff of the United States army,

thinks the term of enlistment of regulars should be cut down and favors younger

men for Uncle Sam's fighting forces.

"You know I have recommended, in

formal reports, that the term of enlistment should be cut down," said

e. "this would serve to turn back

into civil life a larger proportion of men who in emergency could be called

upon. They would constitute a

reserve. How to arrange that they would

be subject to a call to the colors for occasional maneuvers is a mere matter of

detail.

Further than this General Wood would not

comment upon what he would advocate when once he has taken up work as chief of

staff of the United States army.

His recommendations of a shorter

enlistment would send back to the population 20,000 to 30,000 men a year. the plan would cut off a greater part of the

"retired pay" and a greater part of the pensions. The United States standing army is now

practically a veteran army. It appears

to be General Wood's idea that it should not be an army of men of ten to

fifteen years' or twenty-five years' service.

Younger sinews are required for spirit, dash and efficiency, he

believes.

"We need extra officers," the

general said. "There are just

officers enough for the present army.

In time of war the army would be stripped."

Twenty officers of the army of the Argentine

republic are coming to the United States army to be trained. This is one consequence of the official

visit of General Wood to the centennial celebration of the independence of the

southernmost nation protected by the Monroe doctrine. The significance of this was not alluded to by General Wood, but

from other sources it had been learned that the circumstances was important, as

Germans, who have been frequently reported as unsympathetic toward the United

States policy regarding European ambitions in this hemisphere, are now

instructors of the Argentine army, and Germany, next to England, holds the

largest share of the Argentine trade.

"Would you, " General Wood was

asked, "go that far into army questions as to say what you think of flying

machines as an adjunct in war?"

"Yes, I will say that I think the smallest dirigible, one that can

carry the engineer and four or five men, is going to be important, especially

when we can get them with a reinforced envelope able to withstand the required

pressures. Their utility is already

assured for reconnoitering.

"Our army's front is now twenty or

thirty miles long. If we can put up men

who can swiftly skip along over that and see the enemy's lines of

communication, his field works, bridges, etc., obviously the information would

be of enormous assistance.

"I don't think the aeroplane will be

as useful as the small dirigible until it is made large enough to carry at

least one man besides the driver. They

should also have a duplicate engine.

But they are improving aeroplanes so fast that I don't predict-I only

speak of the present moment, when I say I prefer the small dirigible."

Trial by Ordeal In Japan.

Tokio-Trial by ordeal still exists in some parts of Japan.

If a theft takes place in a household, all the servants are required to

write a certain work with the same brush.

The conscience is supposed to betray its workings in the waves of the

ideographs written. Tracing an

ideograph involves such an effort of muscular directness and undivided attention

that the service often leads to the discovery of the guilty party. The test is, at all events, more humane than

the ordeal by boiling water, to which accused persons were formally submitted

in Japan.

Purchase Expensive Snuffboxes.

London-the craze which sometimes possesses the rich people to obtain curios was

exemplified in London when seven snuff boxes brought $20,000 each and the other

five averaged $10,000 each. None of the

articles was worth very much intrinsically, their value resting in their age

and associations.

Ad:

Cure your weak stomach. Hostetter's

Stomach Bitters

AD:

Bowel and liver medicine. Cascarets' 10C a box.

AD:

Hed-Lyte for headache and neuralgia.

AD:

Defiance Starch.

AD: Wintersmith's Oldest and Best Tonic; for Malaria and Debility. Contains no arsenic.

AD:

Faultless Starch.

AD:

West Texas Military Academy, San Antonio, TX, Angus McD. Crawford, M. A.

Principal.

AD:

Iced Postum relieve fatigue and sustain one. Postum Cereal Co., Ltd. Battle

Creek, Mich.

AD:

Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup. 25C a bottle.

AD: Dr.

Pierce's Pellets regulate and invigorate stomach, liver and bowels. Do not

gripe.

AD:

WALL PAPER AGENCY. I have the agency for the Western Wall Paper Co., of Kansas

City, and have a complete line of samples of the newest patterns of wall

paper. Your orders will be appreciated

with samples at any time requested. J.

H. DAVIS.

AD: MR.

CHEWER-When you want a chew, don't buy "Brand"-buy Tobacco. Ask for

Virginia Tobacco, sold by Elzner Mercantile Co., T. A. Hasler & Co.,

Peoples Cash Gro. Co., Louis Eilers.

-----

*****

Bastrop Advertiser, June 1913

PURELY PERSONAL

When you have a visitor, or contemplate making a visit, or know something of local

interest, please ring No. 136 and give it to the Advertiser. We'll appreciate it.

Miss Eunice Moore, of Temple, is visiting her cousin, Mrs. D. H. Bell.

Constable Smith from Smithville was in town Tuesday.

From Elgin on Tuesday the following gentlemen were in attendance upon the meeting of

Commissioners Court: Capt. F. S. Wade, Judge C. W. Webb; J. D. King, Rex

Stewart, Chas. Gillaspie, John Puckett, Dock Christian.

Mesdames Lundell and LeSueur of Hill's Prairie, were guests of Bastrop friends Tusday.

Mrs. Chas. Watterson and Katie Lee, from Red Rock were in town Tuesday.

Jay C. Powers of the firm of Jay C. Powers & Co, colonizers and town promoters, was in

Bastrop Monday.

John and Hugh Barton, in their fine new car, were in Bastrop Tuesday.

Miss Adelia Kesselus left this week on a visit to Holland.

C. C. Cunningham, with the Union National Bank at Houston, is visiting at the old

home for a few days.

Messrs. A. T. Morris, W. E. Goodman, T. E. Lynch and T. W. Cain have returned from the

meeting of the Imperial Counsel of the Mystic Shrine at Dallas this week. The attendance was estimated at over 100,000

Shriners. Perfect order prevailed and

not an accident occurred during the four days meeting. One of the four was

offered the position of Chief of Police of Dallas, but we refrain from being personal

in the matter.

Mr. Fred Schuelke is visiting his brothers, Olive and Frank Schuelke at Smithville

this week.

Mrs. Don G. Petty, Don G. Petty, Jr, Miss Ella Petty, Sherman Petty and Frank Petty,

of Mansfield, LA; Mr. And Mrs. Cates Ford, of Orange; Mr. And Mrs. C. F. Petty,

Gibsland, LA; Mr. And Mrs. V. A. Petty, V. A. Petty, Jr, Dabney and Olive Petty

and Petty McDonald, of San Antonio; J. E. McDonald, East Texas; H. K. McDonald,

of Shreveport, LA; Matt Reynolds of Mansfield, :A; A. O. McLain of Orange; Miss

Parie Nabors of Mansfield, LA; S. H. McDonald, of Austin; H. K. McDonald Jr, of

Warren, and Frank McDonald, of Bon Weir, were in Bastrop Wednesda to attend the

funeral of Mr. Don G. Petty.

Mrs. A. C. Boethe and little son are visiting in Smithville.

Mrs. F. G. Woehl and Mrs. R. Gemeinert attended the funeral of their brother, Mr. C.

Wolf, at Austin, Wednesday.

Buy your Rubber Hose from The Home Hardware Company. They have several kinds to

select from and their prices are right.

NOTICE:

The Mothers Club will meet at the Library Room Wednesday, May 21st, at 5

o'clock. MRS. FANNIE CUNNINGHAM.

1913 patterns of Linoleums just received at Rabb & McCollum's.

BASTROP LOSES.

In the game of base ball in which Bastrop lost to Smithville by the score of 6 to 3,

in the later city, Thursday. Captain Tom Haynie and Luke Robinson had the

misfortune to sprain their ankles.

Captain Haynie's was quite seriously sprained and it is feared he will

be out of the game for some time.

Refrigerators

for looks, but Ice Boxes for service.

Come and look at our box in the store, filled with 200 dozen eggs, 100

pounds creamery butter, mince meat, ham, sweet and sour pickles by the barrels.

ELZNER MERCANTILE CO.

THE INVITATION

Is extended to all to view the marvels of the Goldsmith's art as depicted in the

window of the "Palace". Even Boston, New York and Chicago have

contributed their numbers this week.

Don't fail to see a display of LaValierres, etc, never before seen in

Bastrop, and second to no other city of the state. L. R. ERHARD, PROP.

PURELY PERSONAL

Mrs. H. D. Orgain has returned from a several days visit to Austin.

Mrs. John Middleton of Smithville, visited her parents Mr. And Mrs. Sam Higgins.

Mr. A. C. Harvey, a prominent merchant of McDade and President of Guaranty State Bank

of that thriving little city, was a Wednesday visitor in Bastrop.

Mrs. James Moore, of Texas City, is visiting her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Alf Jung.

Mr. E. O. Randle, of Cedar Creek, was in Bastrop, Saturday, en route on a visit to his

boyhood home and other points in Tennessee.

The Advertiser and many friends wish for him a pleasant visit and a safe

return home. He was joined at Bartlett by his son, Prof. Coy Randle.

Mrs. Ben P. Templeton wa among his many friends in Bastrop several days this week.

Mr. And Mrs. Jim Smith, of Houston, are on a two weeks visit to Mr. And Mrs. Richard

Starke.

Mr. J. M. Carroll and son, of Hubbard City, are visiting Mr. And Mrs. W. T. Higgins.

Mrs. D. E. Roe has returned home from a visit to Taylor.

Mr. Elbert S. Orgain was a visotor to Autin this week.

Judge Paul D. Pge visited Smithville the first of the week.

Mr. And Mrs. A. J. Robinson and fine little son, of Galveston, are viiting Mrs.

Robinson's parents, Mr. And Mrs. Theo Griesenbeck.

Mrs. Mary Hasler left the past week on an extended visit to Lentzberg, Switzerland.

Mr. And Mrs. Cleveland Chumley and little son, Gerald, left Sunday last for the reunion

at Chattanooga, TN, and will also visit relateives in Alabama, Mississippi and

New Orleans.

Mr. And Mrs. T. M. Rector visited Austin the past week. Mr. Rector returning home Monday.

Mrs. Rector will remain in the Capital City for a while under the

treatment of a ear specialist and we are pleased to note is improving.

Mr. And Mrs. Shelton Adrian of Autin, are visiting Mrs. Adrain's parents, Mr. And Mrs.

T. M. Rector. Mr. Adrian will shortly begin the erection of a new residence for

Mr. Rector.

Miss Vesia Craft left Monday night on a visit to Mineral Wells.

Mr. W. A. Hasler and family and prof. L. A. Koenig and family are spending the week

visiting on the Colorado.

Mr. Jay C. Powers of San Antonio, promoter of the sale of the Bastrop Town tract, was

to the city this week, accompanied by the following parties who bought nine

tracts of the land. H. Galtney, of Fort

Sam Houston, S. C. Burbridge of Peoria, Il, Dr. C. L. H. Hutchinson of San

Drift; Ezra Estes, of New Bransfels and Ed Crowley of Crystal City.

Mr. And Mrs. Olive Schulke, Mr. And Mrs. Frank Schuke, of Smithville, Mr. Henry

Schuelke of Autin, Mr. A. C. Botbe, of Fort Worth; Mr. And Mrs. B. J>

Schulke and family of San Benito, and Mr. E. Prokop of San Antonio were in

Bastrop this week to attend the funeral of Mr. E.

E. Schulke.

Misses Mabel Keiser and Kate Fitzwilliam of Smithville are visiting Misses Nellie and

Grace Fitzwilliam.

Mrs. Chas. Schauerhammer, of Bellville and Mrs. James Dunnway, of Smithville, were

guests this week of Mrs. A. A. Elzner and Mrs. P. Haynie

Miss Mattie Chalmers, who has been attending Radner College, Nashville, TN, is

expected home next week. Miss Mattie is

with the Radnor party on a trip through Colorado and other points of interest

in the United States.

CITATION BY PUBLICATION

The State of Texas

To the Sheriff or any Constable of Bastrop County, Greeting:

You are herby commanded, that by making publication of this Citation, in same newspaper

published in Bastrop County for eight successive weeks previous to the return

day hereof, you summon R. B. Shipp, and the unknown heirs of said R. B. Shipp;

E. Billingsley, and the unknown heirs of the said E. Billingsley; E. H. Miller;

Thos. Cochran, and the unknown heirs of said Thos. Cochran; Mrs. Betsy P.

Cochran, and the unknown heirs of the said Mrs. Betsy P. Cochran, whose

residence is unknown, to be and appear before the Honorable District Court, at

the next regular term thereof, to be holden in the County of Bastrop, at the

Court House thereof, in Bastrop, Texas on the 16th day of June, A. D. 1913,

then and there to answer the petition of Claude T. Wynn, tried in said court on

the 16th day of April, A. D. 1913. file

Number of said suit being No. 5779.

Plaintiff alleges in substance, as follows, to wit: That on the first day of April, A. D.

1913, he was the owner in fee simple of the following described property;

situated in the State of Texas and County of Bastrop, and being more

particularly known and described as follows, to wit:

A tract of 160 acres out of Abstract No. 143, originally granted to Thos. Cochran,

lying on the waters of the West Yegua, in said Bastrop County, "Beginning

at the SW sorner of the J. W. Alen Survey....

LIST OF LAND, LOTS OR PARTS OF LOTS TO THE CITY OF BASTROP FOR THE TAX..

Anderson, Josephine fraction of farm lot 36

east...

Adams, Isabelle estate fraction block 47 east main..

Barnett, C. L. fraction block 45 east main..

Buchanan, Mrs. M. S. fraction block 9 east main

Brooks, Jennie fraction block 26 east main

Brady, Ellen fraction block 88 east main

Bedford, Margaret fraction block 101 east main

Bryant, Pyrmias fraction block 13 east main

Batts, Mrs. H. F. fraction block 16 east main

Buchanan, G. W. fraction farm lot 5 east main

Byers, Mrs. Albert discontinued territory 300

Crumplin, Calvin fraction block 61 east main

Craft, Anthony fraction block 58 east main

Colter, Tom fraction block 69 east main

Do fraction block 9 east main

Davis, Sarah estate fraction block 136 east main

Do fraction block 165 east main

Davie, Andrew Bastrop town tract 37 east

Do Bastrop town tract 37 east

Edwards, Green fraction block 116 east main

Flemings, Mark estate fraction block 165 east main

Do fraction block 142 east main

Fittger, Mrs. E. estate fraction farm lot 18 east.

-----

10/14/1910 Bastrop Advertiser

DEDICATION OF CONFEDERATE MONUMENT

Friday, October, 14, 1910 was an important day in Bastrop, a day that will be kept in memory

for years and years to come, for the hoary headed and the little children together entered

most heartily into the exercises of the day.

At the appointed hour a host of friends and neighbors with many of the surviving confederates

of Jos. D. Sayers Camp and others and the members of the T. C. Cain Chapter of the Daughters

of the Confederacy gathered on our beautiful court house square, where a platform had been

erected for the speakers, and seats placed on the lawn for the veterans, the Daughters of

Confederacy and their friends. In front of the platform and to the right were two posts about

twenty feet apart, from the tip of each of these posts a rafter was extended to a middle post.

The posts and rafters were wrapped with red and white, At the tops of the outside posts were

unfurled flags of America, while at the top of the center post was a large silk Confederate

flag which was the gift of Mrs. Blanche Garwood Page to the Joseph D. Sayers Camp many years

ago, when she was the camp's sponsor.

Across the apex formed by the rafters was a banner bearing the words T. C. Cain Chapter

Daughters of the Confederacy, and beneath this sat the members of the chapter. Immediately

in front of the speakers platform, the flower girls, Margret Jones, Wilmer Page, Addie May

Murchison, Grace Robinson, Lulu Pfeiffer, Nell Rose Schaeffer, Una Craft and Catherine

Holt were seated.

Judge Paul D. Page acted as Master of Ceremonies, and did it well. He called the audience

to order and the exercises werw opened with prayer by Rev. Joe F. Webb.

The teachers and children of the public school then sang America.

The address of welcome was delivered by Mrs. E. H. Jenkins in carefully selected words,

wrought into beautiful sentences and well rounded periods. The address was well prepared

and delivered in most excellent style.

Following the address of welcome, Mesdames Garwood, S. J. Orgain, Robert Gill, Josephine

Anderson, William Grimes, Hutchison, Burger and Turner, members of the T. C. Cain Chapter

Daughters of Confederacy, accompanied by the flower girls, who were dressed in white with

red sashes over the left shoulder marched to the monument some twenty yards from the speakers

stand and there forming a circle about the monument, Mrs. Robert Gill untied the cord which

released the veil and brought to view the granit shaft which stands as a silent witness of

those years when Bastrop's valiant sons did service for their beloved Southern homes, and

when our aged fathers and mothers, young and old stayed by the old home, passing many days and

nights of anxiety and sometimes suffering, while the deadly battles were being fought and sad

news of the death of loved ones and friends were expected at any hour. After the unveiling

the flower girls above mentioned placed baskets of flfowers at the base of the monument. As

the ceremonies of unveiling were closed and the committee returned to their place, "Bonnie

Blue Flag" was sung.

At this point the Master of ceremonies in well chosen words introduced Mrs. B. D. Orgain,

President of the T C. Cain Chapter, U. D. C.

Mrs. Orgain on behalf of the Chapter presented the Monument to the citizens of Bastrop and

Bastrop County. She has been the constant inspiration of the movement from the beginning.

She sacrificed time and energy keeping up enthusiasm, when otherwise the movement might have

failed. Her address was one of deep feeling evincing her love for the South and its soldiers

of 1861-65. She paid high tribute to the soldiers who went out from Bastrop County.

It is with some pride we congratulate this noble spirited woman and her associates for the

interest they have taken in preserving the history of Joseph D. Sayers Camp of Confederate

soldiers as well as that of the whole Confederacy.

County Judge J. B. Price received the Monument for the county. He addressed the daughters of

the Confederacy, veterans and friends of the cause in the spirit of the young manhood of the

south as it is today. His message breathed the spirit of charity to all and hope for the

present and future South. He paid deserved tribute to those who lived and many of whom

suffered and died for the love of their country in 1861-65. His address echoed words of

peace to our nation, bright hopes for the future and unity in effort to make this, not only

the land of the true and the brave, but the land which through struggles victories and defeats

should stand at the front in the history we are making today. His speech was filled with

good common sense and was appreciated.

Next on the program was Bastrop's well known orator, Hon. W. E. Maynard. He received the

Monument for the city, and it was well done. His tribute to the old city at the foot of the

pine clad hills and beside the gurgling waters of the Colorado, and to its cultured, refined

people was splendid. In most eloquent words he spoke of the times of 1861-65, and how that

the sons of Bastrop and of all the South, fought for their rights. He praised the daughters

of the confederacy of Bastrop for their untiring zeal in erecting the Monument and then

discoursed on what it represented.

It words of hope and good cheer the speaker called the attention of his hearers to the fact

that old Bastrop had taken on new life and that you could hear the buz of the saw and the

sound of the hammer on every land. He was an inspiring address.

Ex-Governer Joseph D. Sayers beloved by all the people of Bastrop, and who spent most of his

life amont its people was introduced, and on behalf of the Confederate veterans of J. D.

Sayers Camp he read a resolution expressing the gratitude and appreciation of the veterans to

T. C. Cain Chapter, U. D. C. for their labor of love in erecting the Monument to their

comrades who sleep in their graves and those who are still living, many of them being present.

Gov. Sayers was orator of the day and he spoke at length of the timejust preceeding the war

and the years of 1861-65 and the days that followed. He spoke from the view point of one

who nlived in sixties and fought in the war. He grew eloquent in speaking of the sacrifice of

the Southern soldiers and of their families. With great earnestness he talked of the honesty

and integrity of the men of the South- the Old South. He said he hoped that the ruling

principles of the Old South would not be surrendered, and that modern commercialism might not

brake down the old ideas. In bitter derission he spoke of the graft of today and said you

never heard of graft in the South until the past few years. He held up the ideals of the Old

South and deprecated the fact that men were talking about a New South. He expressed deepest

sympathy for the veterans, the sufferings they endured, and commended them for preserving their

integrity through it all. In low and sad tones he spoke of the comrades of the camp who had

fought their fight and had gone to their reward. He urged his Comrades present to so live that

in the end they too, might say, "We have fought a good fight."

"Sweet By and By" was sung and the benediction was pronounced by Rev. Giles J. Leath. Thus

ended a day that will go down in the history of old Bastrop.

It is with a deep sense of appreciation the Advertiser makes this record. The T. C. Cain

Chapter having been named for the senior editor; who, if he could call back ten years, would

have written this occasion up as he only could. His enfeebled health prevents him.

We have drawn the bow at a venture, if the arrow has now and then gone astray, you may charge

it to a poor memory. If a name is left out that should have appeared, forgive us, for we

have not intentially neglected a single person on the program.

It is worthy of note that the Public School adjourned its days session at 1 pm and marched to

the courthouse square in a body and took part in the exercises.

At night a large concourse of veterans and their friends gathered at the hospitable home of

Capt. B. D. Orgain, where they spent several happy hours in coversation, smoking, telling war

time stories and having a good time generally.

The years that remain to the old veterans are few and may we appreciate the fact, and make

their days beyond the hill top and near the valley below happy as opportunity affords.

We were all glad to see Mrs. Harriet Taylor present. She is now in her 93rd year. Her husband

was a Mexican War veteran.

---

1914 Bastrop Advertiser

.....Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Tummins this week.

Mrs. W. E. Fowler and little son, of Goliad, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Fowler's

mother, Mrs. T. M. Martin.

Hon. C. C. Highsmith and wife, of Houston, were visitors at the old home during Christmas week.

Mr. and Mrs. Brown Robbins and daughter, of Austin, came down in their handsome car Saturday,

returning Tuesday.

Mrs. R. A. Wogenstahl of San Antonio, is spending the holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.

W. M. Knowls.

N. E. Morris and children, Luda Mae, Emma and Jessie Lee, were visiting Bastrop relatives

this past week.

Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Morris and two children of Texas City,....

Mr. and Mrs. Borden Highsmith, of Austin, spent a portion of the holidays with Bastrop relatives.

Mrs. Andy Townsend and daughter, Miss Kattie Watts, of Austin, visited Capt. and Mrs. W. A.

Highsmith during the holidays.

Mrs. Ben Grimes, of Cameron, was with her parents during holiday week.

Mrs. J. D. Crow and little daughter, of Uvalde, are visiting Mrs. Crow's parents, Mr. and Mrs.

J. H. Jenkins.

T. K. Moore, Jr., wife and little boy, of Texas City, and Woods Moore and wife, of Galveston,

were among Bastrop relatives the past week.

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Erhard.....