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Carson County Locales/Creeks

WHITE DEER CREEK. White Deer Creek rises southeast of Skellytown in eastern Carson County (at 3528' N, 10110' W) and flows north twenty-six miles to join the Canadian River in eastern Hutchinson County (at 3552' N, 10108' W). It runs through flat to rolling terrain with some steep slopes, where clay and sandy loams support cacti, brush, and grasses. The stream, once on Diamond F ranges, gave its name to the White Deer Lands Company and the town of White Deer to the south. It drains the Skellytown oilfield and a vast ranching area.



DIXON CREEK (Carson County). Dixon Creek, sometimes known as Limestone Creek, rises in north central Carson County (at 3534' N, 10121' W) at the confluence of two of its three branches; the third branch joins it a mile south of the Hutchinson county line. The creek runs north for twelve miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, northeast of Borger and Phillips in southern Hutchinson County (at 3545' N, 10121' W). Dixon Creek is in the center of the Borger oilfield, where many of the early strikes that touched off the Panhandle boom of the late 1920s were made. The stream traverses an area with deep sandy loams and was named for the frontier scout William (Billy) Dixon. The headquarters of the Dixon Creek division of the Four Sixes Ranch is located in Carson County near the middle branch of the creek.

H. Allen Anderson



HILL CREEK (Carson County). Hill Creek rises in northwestern Carson County (at 3535' N, 10128' W) and runs north for ten miles, across mostly flat rangeland, to its mouth on the Canadian River, northwest of Borger in southern Hutchinson County (at 3544' N, 10128' W). The stream, formerly on the LX Ranch, drains part of the Borger and Pantex oilfields.



ROCK CREEK (Carson County). Rock Creek rises in northern Carson County (at 3532' N, 10129' W) and flows north for twenty miles into the Canadian River northwest of Borger in southwestern Hutchinson County (at 3544' N, 10123' W). It runs through flat land and rolling to steep slopes surfaced by clay and sandy loams that support cacti, brush, and grasses and drains the center of the Pantex oilfield, on which the community of Bunavista is located.



SPRING CREEK (Carson County). Spring Creek rises in east central Carson County (at 3531' N, 10116' W) and flows northward twenty miles until it empties into the Canadian River in the east central part of Hutchinson County (at 3548' N, 10115' W). It flows through flat, rolling, and steep terrain surfaced by clay and sandy loams that support cacti, brush, and grasses. Once part of the Diamond F ranges, it drains a vast ranching and oil producing area.



BEAR CREEK (Carson County). Bear Creek rises at the junction of its east and west forks in central Carson County (at 3531' N, 10118' W) and flows to the north for seventeen miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, northeast of Borger in southern Hutchinson County (at 3546' N, 10119' W). The stream, in the Dixon Creek Division of the Four Sixes Ranch, is in the center of the vast Panhandle oilfield, a harsh, mostly flat area of sandy soils that support brush, grasses, mesquite, and cacti.



ANTELOPE CREEK (Carson County). Antelope Creek starts where its east and west forks join, northwest of Panhandle in northwestern Carson County (at 3535' N, 10132' W), and flows north through a ranching and oil area for twelve miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, east of Sanford in southwestern Hutchinson County (at 3544' N, 10129' W). The stream was once a part of the LX Ranch. It gave its name to the Antelope Creek Focus, the common term used by archeologists for sites of pre-Columbian Indian slab-house ruins in the general area. The stream crosses an area of rolling to steeply sloping terrain and loamy and clayey soils. The vegetation includes juniper, cacti, and sparse grasses.



SALT FORK OF THE RED RIVER. The Salt Fork of the Red River rises near the Carson county line in northeastern Armstrong County (at 3509' N, 10121' W) and flows southeast across central Donley and Collingsworth counties. When it crosses the 100th meridian at the eastern boundary of Collingsworth County, it enters Oklahoma and flows east across north central Harmon and southern Greer counties. Southeast of Mangum it turns south and crosses central Jackson County to its mouth on the Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River, opposite the northernmost point of Wilbarger County, Texas, sixteen miles northwest of Vernon (at 3427' N, 9921' W). The Salt Fork and its Panhandle tributaries were the scene of military activity during the Red River War in 1874. Several early ranches, including the Half Circle K, the RO, the Spade, and the Rocking Chair, owned land on or near the stream. Clarendon was established on the Salt Fork in 1878 but moved five miles south to the Fort Worth and Denver Railway nine years later; now the original site in Donley County is partially inundated by Greenbelt Lake, with the community of Howardwick on its north shore.



ANTELOPE CREEK starts where its east and west forks join, northwest of Panhandle in northwestern Carson County (at 3535' N, 10132' W), and flows north through a ranching and oil area for twelve miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, east of Sanford in southwestern Hutchinson County (at 3544' N, 10129' W). The stream was once a part of the LX Ranch. It gave its name to the Antelope Creek Focus, the common term used by archeologists for sites of pre-Columbian Indian slab-house ruins in the general area. The stream crosses an area of rolling to steeply sloping terrain and loamy and clayey soils. The vegetation includes juniper, cacti, and sparse grasses.

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