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Dickens County Biographies

In Remembrance of

Mr and Mrs William Ballard
Mary and William Ballard
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Service

U.S.Flag     Civil War Veteran
Rank: Major
5th, Missouri Infantry Marmaduke´s Brigade Prices Corps Army Trans Mississippi Department.
Side: Confederate
Regiment State/Origin: Missouri
Regiment Name: 5 Regiment Infantry, 1 Division, Missouri State Guard
Regiment Name Expanded: 5th Regiment, Missouri Infantry State Guard (1st Division)
Company: C
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Private
Rank Out Expanded: Private
Film Number: M380 roll 1

Biography

William Curtis Ballard, more familiarly known as "Judge" Ballard departed this life Monday, April 14, 1913, after a short illness. He had attained the ripe old age of 78 years and had been instrumental in accomplishing much good in this world. He was among the oldest settlers in this county, having come here in 1890 to assist in the organization of Dickens County. He helped establish the county site, and took an active part in all movements for the betterment of country and the human family. He also helped lay out the town site of Dickens City, and sold many lots for Crow and Montgomery. Probably every citizen in this portion of the state was acquainted with this good man and was lasting friends. He was noted for his kindness, his staunch and unwavering character and his benevolence toward the poor and needy.

He became a member of the Christian Church at the age of 21, and was a consistent member until his death. He donated the first church building in Dickens to the Church. Members had church in it until 1929, when it was demolished for a better one.

Mr. Ballard was born in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, January 13, 1935, and was married to Artemissie M. Boyd, May 1st, 1856, to which union eight children were born; Mary, Sarah, Martha, Tom, Cora, John, Rachel and Essie.

On September 7, 1892, Rachael Ballard and Henry Post were the 9th couple to obtain marriage license to be married in Dickens County. They were married by Rev. Minor Wilson who helped organize Dickens County and was the first Justice of the Peace here. Rachael and Essie attended school here. In 1893 Essie returned to Haskell, Texas to live with her sister, Mrs. Cora Draper, until her marriage to James Hugh Meadors.

He was a gallant soldier through the Civil War; fought for his principal for what he considered justice and right. He moved to Hood County, Texas, in 1883, then later to Haskell County where his first wife died. He was later married to Mary F. Patterson of St. Genevive County, Missouri, who survives him. To this union, two children were born. From Haskell he came to Dickens County and engaged in the mercantile business for a number of years. He was elected County Judge which office he faithfully filled for six years. After retiring from this office he never actively engaged in any public business, but attended to his private investments and personal business affairs to the time of his death.

Serving through the Civil War, he became Major William C. Ballard, 5th, Missouri Infantry Marmaduke´s Brigade Prices Corps Army Trans Mississippi Department.

While living in Missouri, he was Justice of the Peace and did lots of legal work in that state.

He was the father of ten children and had 51 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He was buried in Dickens Cemetery, the place where he helped select for a cemetery many years before, on a beautiful part of the town that called him "Father"

Mary F. Patterson was born November 13, 1852, in Missouri. She married W. C. Ballard on January 4, 1887, in St. Genevive County, Missouri. Two children were born to this union, Willie E., and a son who died in infancy. She and her husband came to Dickens City from Haskell in 1890. They first lived in a dugout, and later moved a house from Haskell and the house is still standing in Dickens. Grandma Ballard was a faithful Christian and never missed services as long as her health would permit. She died January 25, 1929, and is buried in the Dickens Cemetery.

Source: History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, Fred Arrington, ©1971

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Obituary

William Curtis Ballard, more familiarly known as "Judge" Ballard, departed this life Monday, April 14th, after a short illness. He had attained the ripe old age of 78 years and had been instrumental in accomplishing much good in this world. he was one among the oldest settlers in this county, having come here in 1890 to assist in the organization of Dickens County. He helped establish the county site, and took an active part in all movements for the betterment of country and the human family. Probably every citizen in this portion of the state was acquainted with this good man and was his friend. His disposition was such that draws close, lasting friends. He was noted for his kindness, his staunch and unwavering character and his benevolence toward the poor and needy.

He became a member of the Christian Church at the age of 21 and was a consistent member of that organization until his death. He donated the first church building in Dickens to the Christian denomination.

Mr. Ballard was born in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, January 13, 1835, and was married to Artemissie M. Boyd, May 1st, 1856, to which union eight children were born. He was a gallant soldier throughout the Civil war; fought for his principal---for what he considered justice and the right. He moved to Hood county, Texas, in 1883, then to Haskell County where his first wife died. He was later married to Mary F. Patterson, of St. Genieve County, Missouri, who survives him. To this union two children were born. From Haskell he came to Dickens and engaged in the mercantile business for a number of years. He was then elected County Judge, which office he faithfully filled six years. After retiring from this office he never actively engaged in any public business, but attended to his private investments and personal business affairs up to the time of his death.

He was the father of ten children and had 51 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He is survived by his widow and eight children, T.E. Ballard, Mrs. W.F. Draper, Mrs. H.S. Post, of Haskell, Texas; Mrs. J.H. Meadors and Miss Willie Ballard, of this city, J.J. Ballard of Esborn, Oklahoma; Mrs. J.L. LaBriere, Kenton, Oklahoma, and Mrs. W.T. Patterson, Coffman, Missouri.

Funeral services were conducted at the Dickens cemetery Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Young, where interment occurred. A number of the old soldiers and a host of friends were present to pay the last tribute of respect to this good man.

©Dickens Item, Dickens, Texas; April 14, 1913

Mrs. W. C. Ballard, wife of Judge Ballard deceased, and one among the oldest residents of Dickens county, died at her home in Dickens during the night Sunday night, January 21, her remains being interred Monday in the Dickens cemetery.

Grandma Ballard lived here in the very early days of the settlement of the country and before the organization of Dickens county in 1891. Her deceased husband, Judge Ballard, was active in the organization of the county, served as County Judge and possibly held other official positions later, and was among those who dramatically "purloined" the county official records and removed them from the county site at Espuela to Dickens following the historical county site fights in the early days.

Grandma Ballard was among those good pioneer women who made sacrifices in the opening of a new country to settlement and in paving the way for present day development and civilization. To these women, as well as men we owe much, and our debt of gratitude can never be repaid nor fully appreciated.

Grandma Ballard leaves a daughter, Mrs. Willie Scott, with whom she lived, and several step children, as well as friends and acquaintances throughout the country, who mourn and regret her passing on to an unknown but spiritually greater and wider field of activity, service and enjoyment.

©The Texas Spur, January 25, 1929


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