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Confederate Soldier Biographies

Joel W. Blackwell
Confederate, CO.E 19th Regiment
Civil War
Deceased October 26, 1940
Submitted by: Royce Karr, Granddaughter

J. N. Buchanan
John N. Buchanan was born February 7, 1846 in Lincoln County, TN. At the age of seventeen he came with his parents to Texas and settled in Navarro County. In 1863, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving as a private under Brig. Gen. Horn in the Trans Mississippi Calvary Dept. In 1864, he was given a furlough, and while at home he married Miss Lizzie Morris, her death occurred in 1900. Eleven children were born to them. In 1904 he married Miss Ola Hooks of Navarro County, they moved to Dickens County in 1916 living in Spur most of the time. In 1935 he moved back to Navarro County.
Side: Confederate
Regiment State/Origin: Tennesee
Regiment Name: 7 Tennessee Infantry.
Regiment Name Expanded: 7th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry
Company: K
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Private
Rank Out Expanded: Private
Alternate Name: J.N./Buchanan
Film Number: M231 roll 6
History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, by Fred Arrington, 1971

Jonas Carlisle
Jonas Carlisle was born in Talbert County, Georgia in August 19, 1845. In 1864, he enlisted in the Confederate Army. Co. C 17th Alabama Regiment and scouted under General Joe Wheeler throughout the war.

On the first day of May, 1865, he reached home, he had served most of the time during the war in Georgia. On the 18th day of June, 1867, Mr. Carlisle was married to Miss Martha Hughes and early in the fall of the same year, they moved to Texas in Collin County, and in 1890 they moved to Dickens County, settling in the Duck Creek community where they lived until his death the 21st day of July, 1928.

There were 14 children born to this union, and he is buried in the Spur Cemetery.
History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, by Fred Arrington, 1971

L. T. Cochran
L. T. Cochran was born the 6th day of March, in Pontocah County, Mississippi. When he was 17 years of age in 1862, he joined the Confederate Army serving in Co. H, 2nd Mississippi Regiment (Infantry), Joe Davis Brigade Heath's Division, A.P. Hill's Corps. R. E. Lee's Army.

At the battle of Gettysburg on the 3rd day of July, 1863, Mr. Cochran was wounded and captured. He was held prisoner on David's Island for four months, then given a furlough. He was at home at the time of the surrender.

In 1866, he was married to Miss S. R. Proctor in Pontocah County. Fifteen years later they moved to Texas and settled in Roberson County. In 1897 they came to Dickens County, where he bought land. He died in 1919 and was buried in the Spur Cemetery.
History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, by Fred Arrington, 1971

Elihu Luce
Elihu Luce was born in Tennessee in 1842. While still a baby his parents moved to Mississippi.

At age 19 he enlisted in the Confederate Army and served throughout the Civil War as a private in Co. A 10th Mississippi Regiment; seven months of this time he spent in a Union Prison Camp in Chicago, Illinois. In 1866, Mr. Luce was married to Miss Georgia V. Dodds of DeSota County, Mississippi. To this union were born five children, two sons, and three daughters.

Mr. and Mrs. Luce with their five children came to Texas in 1887 and settled in Dickens County, where he lived until his death on August 21, 1920. His life was of great service. At the time of his death he was chaplain and Commander of the Local Camp U.C.V. He is buried in the Spur Cemetery.
History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, by Fred Arrington, 1971

A. L. McClellan
A L. McClellan was born at La Grange, Texas, in February, 1850. His parents were married in the Republic of Texas in 1844. At the age of 28 years, Mr. McClellan was married to Miss Maggie Burns, on October 13, 1878. Eight children were born to this union.

Rev. McClellan, who did not enlist in the army for the simple reason that he was the youngest boy, and had to stay at home to do what his older brothers had done, before serving in the Army. He was an ordained Minister of the Presbyterian Church.

In 1909, he moved to Dickens County. He died on the 21st day of February, 1912 in Spur, Texas.

Rev. A. L. McClellan, was Chaplain of the Colonel John A. Green Camp, No. 1461.
History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, by Fred Arrington, 1971

Jesse P. Morrison
Name: Jesse P. Morrison
Side: Confederate
Regiment State/Origin: Texas
Regiment Name: 15 Texas Cavalry
Regiment Name Expanded: 15th Regiment, Texas Cavalry
Company: D,C
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Private
Rank Out Expanded: Private
Film Number: M227 roll 26

Jesse was my father's maternal grandfather, Lloyd Earl Canfil having married Jesse's daughter, Minerva Morrison. My father, Arthur Jesse Canfil, Sr., Jesse P. Morrison from the times they were both in Tempe, AZ. To this day, my father says he could walk right to Jesse's grave, just southwest of Tempe.

Jesse P. Morrison was born near Booneville, Scott County, AR on 5 July 1843. In the fall of 1856, Jesse moved to what was then Johnson County, TX. He enlisted in Co. C., 15th Texas (dismounted) Cavalry Regiment at Thorp Springs, now located in Hood County, TX, on 3 January 1862. For most of the war, those in his unit were consolidated into Co. D. 10th Texas Infantry. His two older brothers, James Preston Morrison, and William Monroe Morrison served along with him.

Jesse and his brothers fought in defense of Arkansas Post and were captured at its fall on 11 January 1863. The brothers were imprisoned as POWs at Camp Douglas, now in the south side of Chicago. James Preston Morrison sickened of smallpox and died in that camp on 14 April 1863. Jesse and William were paroled on 1 April 1863 and soon rejoined CSA forces. Jesse and William participated in the Atlanta campaign, desperately trying to stop Sherman's march on Atlanta. William was wounded in the right eye at the battle of Pickett's Mill, but was soon back in action.

Jesse and his remaining brother fought throughout the Nashville campaign, being once again captured and released. The brothers then fought through the Carolina campaign, until the war was over. William Monroe Morrison died in Parker County, TX, on 5 November 1876. Jesse died 13 February 1939 in Tempe, AZ and is buried there.

Jesse was my father's maternal grandfather, Lloyd Earl Canfil having married Jesse's daughter, Minerva Morrison. My father, Arthur Jesse Canfil, Sr., Jesse P. Morrison from the times they were both in Tempe, AZ. To this day, my father says he could walk right to Jesse's grave, just southwest of Tempe.

I have been much aided by Scott McKay (SMcKay1234@aol.com) and Missy Wilson (DixeeGal@aol.com) in my research on Jesse and the Morrisons. Any errors in my above information are my fault, not theirs.

I would be delighted to share the material I have on Jesse, to anyone who might be interested.

(submitted by Arthur "Art" Jesse Canfil, Jr.)

J. W. Peters
J. W. Peters was born in Jackson County, Alabama, July 5, 1841. When he was 14 years of age he moved with his parents to Titus County, Texas. In 1856, the family moved to Palo Pinto County and engaged in farming and livestock raising.

In 1862, Mr. Peters joined the confederate forces and served as private under Brig. Gen. Cooper's command. He served throughout the remainder of the War, and as he often said, "Shot as many Yankees as I could." He served his cause zealously and was true to every trust. He received an honorable discharge and returned home to his parents in 1865. After he came home he was an Indian Fighter known as "Minute Men", the same as the Texas Rangers.

Three years after leaving the Army he was married to Miss N. C. Lasater; four boys and four girls were born to this union.

In 1909 the family moved to Dickens County where he resided until his death.

He was a member of the John A. Green Camp of Ex-Confederate Soldiers, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. W. Garner, Spur, Texas on December 29, 1928, he was 86 years old.

Source: History of Dickens County; Ranches and Rolling Plains, Fred Arrington, ©1971

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