HISTORICAL MARKERS

J.M. Borden House   Built in 1908 of lumber hauled 75 miles. Boren was first county judge, a rancher, bank director, civic leader. Hospitality of home was well known to area pioneers and cowboys visiting town. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967.

Close City School   Built 1908 as a commissary school in colony of C. W. Post, cereal magnate. Named for his son-in-law, E. B. Close. In 1910, moved to this site. Became a common school district, 1916; independent district, 1918. First story was built 1919; second, 1921. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1968.

Dry Land Farming   This low rainfall area, limited usually to grazing, was colonized in 1907 by C. W. Post, creator of Post Foods and a philanthropist. By introducing new agricultural techniques, he was able to make farming profitable for colonists. Cotton, milo maize, Indian corn, and oats were grown here. Post also experimented with several types of fruits and vegetables. Men of small means could buy farms on easy terms from Post. He provided good houses, fences, windmills, and electricity. Also built Post Textile Mill to provide supplemental work and income for the colonists. 1967

Duffy's Peak   Height so prominent it was Garza County's earliest bench mark, designated by peg-legged surveyor Jasper Hays, who in 1877-1878 was marking bounds of Llano Ranch, first property to be occupied by settlers in county. Hays began at a corner established for the Houston and Great Northern Railroad Company near the White River in Crosby County, and shot west toward this peak. Tradition has it that a member of Hays' crew died and was buried near this peak, which was afterward named for him. Local heights named for natural wonders include "The Ice Cream Cones," "Cow Head Mesa," "Indian Head Point," and "The Chimneys," Other interesting uplands are "Two Bush Hill," "The Devil's Breakfast Table," "Needlepoint Peak," and "Buffalo Point." Two balanced rocks known to early settler have now disappeared because of wind and weather erosion. Duffy's Peak, like most of the scenic formations, is sandstone, clay and sand. It still figures in local land transactions, as Hays' original notes (unearthed from Mason jars he buried on the peak) formed basis for later surveys-- including those of A. L. Marhoff in 1906, establishing boundaries for the farm colony of "Cereal King" C. W. Post. 1969

Faith Lutheran Church - Post     Height so prominent it was Garza County's earliest bench mark, designated by peg-legged surveyor Jasper Hays, who in 1877-1878 was marking bounds of Llano Ranch, first property to be occupied by settlers in county. Hays began at a corner established for the Houston and Great Northern Railroad Company near the White River in Crosby County, and shot west toward this peak. Tradition has it that a member of Hays' crew died and was buried near this peak, which was afterward named for him. Local heights named for natural wonders include "The Ice Cream Cones," "Cow Head Mesa," "Indian Head Point," and "The Chimneys," Other interesting uplands are "Two Bush Hill," "The Devil's Breakfast Table," "Needlepoint Peak," and "Buffalo Point." Two balanced rocks known to early settler have now disappeared because of wind and weather erosion. Duffy's Peak, like most of the scenic formations, is sandstone, clay and sand. It still figures in local land transactions, as Hays' original notes (unearthed from Mason jars he buried on the peak) formed basis for later surveys-- including those of A. L. Marhoff in 1906, establishing boundaries for the farm colony of "Cereal King" C. W. Post. 1969

Garza County Courthouse - Post    After Garza County's creation in 1876, it was not until 1907, at the initiative of cereal producer C. W. Post, that the county was formally organized. In 1922, when the population had grown to about 4500 and the cotton industry had spurred economic growth, citizens approved the sale of bonds to finance a new courthouse. The commissioners court selected prominent regional architect Guy Carlander of Amarillo to design the courthouse, and awarded the construction bid to the Fred T. Bone Company, also of Amarillo. Built in 1923 of reinforced concrete with brick exterior and cast stone details, the Garza County courthouse is a late, but fine, example of Prairie School architecture. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2000

Garza Points - Post   Chin, triangular arrow points 2 to 4 centimeters long. Of fine workmanship, with central basal notch and deeply serrated edges, discovered and named here, site 41GR40, an archeological highway salvage dug in 1959 by South Plains Archeological Society. With these fine, thin arrow points, left near 6 hearths for cooking, were found 238 stone and bone artifacts: awls, wolf teeth pendants, tubular bone beads, chipped stone knives, scrapers, drills, choppers and 3 types of arrow points. The Garza people, roving hunters, lived here before 1500 A. D. 1965

Graham Chapel Methodist Church - Graham    Organized 1915. Pastor, the Rev. T. C. Willett, rode bicycle from Tahoka to preach here. Church met for two years in Graham School building, then in Gossett School building, which it bought in 1930. Moved here, structure has been enlarged. 1969

Graham Church of Christ - Graham   In 1908, Settler J. I. Wilbourn, aided by church in Fluvanna, arranged for earliest Church of Christ services in Graham. Organized September 21, 1908, with Elders J. F. Maxey and Wilbourn, Graham Church is now ministering to fourth generation of membership. 1969

Graham School - Graham    Second school in the county. Established in 1904 as Graham Chapel School; named for local settler Newt Graham. A school was built on land given by Joe McMahon. Early trustees: McMahon, J. F. Maxey, and J. I. Wilburn. Second building was erected 1915. Upon consolidation with Gossett School in 1930, a brick building was constructed here and named Graham School. It had first gymnasium in the county. It consolidated 1957 with Post School. The building was used as a community center 1959-1963, and was then razed; the present building was erected in 1964. 1969

Llano Estacado - Post    Stretching across the horizon as a range of flat topped mountains is the Cap Rock Escarpment, eastern boundary of the vast Llano Estacado or "Staked Plains." The Llano, one of the world's most perfect plains regions, is an elongated oval extending from north to south. Some three quarters of it, 20 million acres, are in Texas. The remainder is in eastern New Mexico. Its naturally treeless surface, unbroken except for several canyons, slopes gradually from an altitude of 2,700 feet at its eastern edge to more than 4,000 feet along the New Mexico border. The Cap Rock Escarpment is the result of surface erosion that began in the early pleistocene period some 750,000 years ago. Composed of tough caliche, the Cap Rock has protected the softer materials underlying it, thus resisting the erosive factors with varying success. The escarpment begins in Borden County 25 miles south of this point and extends northward in a sweeping arc 170 miles into the Texas Panhandle. It rises from 300 feet to 1,000 feet above the lower plains at its base, giving the impression of having been thrust upward out of the surrounding land. First white man to visit the Great Plains was the Spanish Conquistador Francisco de Coronado who crossed them in 1541 on his search for the fabled Seven Cities of Cibola. He was especially impressed by the sea of grass which covered the soil so completely that the tracks of his expedition left no permanent mark. The Spaniards, it is said, staked their route so they would be guided on the return-trip-- hence the term "staked" plains.

The Llano Ranch - Post    The Llano Ranch containing 192 sections of land was established in 1880. Known as the "Curry Comb" from their cattle brand, two bars over the letter T. The first dwelling was a half dugout covered with buffalo hides. The first frame house in the area, a two story, built in 1883, was the center of social activities. Here in 1884, a baby girl was born to Jim and Della Browning McCommis. The infant's grave is nearby. This was the first birth and first death recorded in Garza County.

Mason Memorial Building - Post  Dedicated to the people of Garza County in memory of Marshall and Gladys Mason, Garza County pioneers. Donated by the families of a son and a daughter, Marshall Mason, Jr., and Mrs. James L. Minor, for use as a museum. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967.

Kate McCommis - Post  A victim of frontier privations. Died in Feb. 1884 on day of birth -- attended only by her young cowboy father. Recorded -1968.

Old Algerita Hotel - Post    Post, the county seat of Garza County, is located in the northwest section of Texas some three miles east of the Cap Rock, the rock-like section of Texas some three miles east of the Cap Rock, the rock-like layer which underlies the High Plains region, the Llano Estacado. Named for C. W. Post, the town's founder and benefactor, the town was designed by Post to be the center of a community of farmers who owned their own land and homes. A large number of homes for settlers were quickly built in the town and on farms laid out around it. Scottie Samson and Jimmy Napier, Scottish stonemasons who had answered Post's advertisement for town builders in 1907, constructed most of the cut stone buildings with stone quarried at the edge of the Cap Rock. Construction of the Algerita Hotel was begun shortly after the town was founded in 1907 and the building was already underway when Samson and Napier were hired to do the stonework.

The Algerita Hotel is a two-story masonry building 40 by 160 feet. White sandstone quarried from the edge of the Cap Rock was used in the simple vernacular stone construction. The principle (north) facade has a three bay arrangement. The first floor contains a central door flanked by large display windows with transoms on each side. The most decorative feature of the building is the arched main entrance framed by carved stone pilasters, narrow entablature, smooth round stone arch and a small fanlight. Above this level are three sets of coupled windows. Crowning the roofline is a narrow cornice line broken by a central pediment with a parapet on each side.

The east facade facing the street contains five large display windows and adjacent doorways on the first floor, while twelve wide segmental arched windows open up the second floor. A series of seven battlements project along the roofline visually organizing the long facade into seven bays. Originally a one-story gallery extended across the north and east facades, evident from the series of exposed notches which once supported gallery joists.

The building is devoid of fine architectural detail, for the foreman Mr. Bob Pugh constructed the major portion of the sandstone building. When the stonemasons Samson and Napier arrived they located some fine building stone at the quarry and had quarried huge stone slabs of uniform thickness from which the building stones were cut. They used the fine stone on the front of the hotel and for the trim. The lumber used in the structure was hauled by mule train from Big Spring 80 miles to the south as were the furnishings after the building was completed

Mr. Post was specific in his requirements concerning the construction, furnishing, and operation of the hotel as he considered it a practical advertisement of the new town. Prospective land purchasers arrived daily as did those seeking business location, visitors, and others. Although the hotel was elegantly furnished by the standards of the area, Post urged the hotel manager to run the hotel and restaurant in a simple and unpretentious manner. Concerning he food served at the hotel Mr. Post wrote, "When you have roast beef with juice, say so, and don't say `aux jus'... Let the hotel be run as a practical, good, old-fashioned, common-sense place, and don't try to make the cowpunchers out in that country think we are a lot of frog-eating French."

The hotel contained thirty rooms with baths, a dining room and barber-shop. The second floor continued in its original use as hotel rooms and later for apartments. However, the first floor was converted into office spaces and a large portion of the front was rented to the First State Bank in 1917. In 1932 the bank merged with the First National Bank of Post and moved from the building. The Corner Grocery moved into the large portion at the front of the building and remained in operation there until 1958. The back part of the first floor was used for offices of various kinds including the electric power company and doctors' offices. Dr. D. C. Williams and Dr. A. C. Surman, who began their careers in the Post Sanitarium, occupied the building for 40 years. The building has been vacant for several years and due to a roof leak, continued to deteriorate. The city of Post is responsible for the building and the Garza County Historical Survey Committee is trying to raise funds to restore the building to its original use as a hotel.

The old Algerita Hotel is historically significant to the city of Post as one of the first buildings constructed in the town and is perhaps the earliest tangible reminder of the city's heritage. Built in the first year of settlement in 1907, the Algerita Hotel became the center for most social and business activities of the area. Not only does the hotel represent an important historical link with the settlement of Post, it reflects the visions and ambitions of the town's creator and promoter, C. W. Post.

Born in Springfield, Illinois, in 1854, Charles William Post became a successful businessman and inventor before he was thirty years old. However, in 1885, Post suffered from a severe stomach disorder and nervous breakdown. He resigned his position as head of the Illinois Agricultural workers in August of 1886 and when his health improved he made his first trip to Texas. Seeking opportunities in the western frontier and a suitable climate for his health, Post traveled to Fort Worth in September, 1886, and became associated with a real estate firm. From his many hunting trips in the Texas Panhandle, Post began envisioning the development of western real estate. After two more nervous breakdowns, Post moved his family in 1891 to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he could receive better medical attention. While a patient in a Battle Creek sanitarium in 1891, he was served the various health foods which had been developed there and began to study foods and their relationship to health. During this period he developed his own theory of dietetics. Impatient to be cured, he left the sanitarium to cure himself.

While he had traveled in Texas, Post met several farmers' wives who had been mixing chicory with roasted wheat and other ground grains combined into a makesshift coffee. He experimented with it trying to find a coffee substitute which had much of the same taste but no ill effects upon the body. Opening his own Battle Creek sanitarium in 1892, La Vita Inn, he continued to experiment with the warm cereal drink and eventually perfected it in 1894 and called his product Postum. Through his own successful promotion, the mixture of wheat, bran and molasses, brought him his fortune. As Postum had a seasonal demand, Post quickly developed a second cereal, Grace Nuts, in 1897 and put it on the market the following year. Numerous other trade marked cereals were to follow, such as Post Toasties and Post Bran.

Post was a multi-millionaire by 1906 when he returned to Texas and purchased a quarter-million acre tract which stretched along the Cap Rock Escarpment. T. P. Stevens, a veteran rancher, assisted him in purchasing the West Texas ranchland and W. E. Alexander became the manager for his colony in January of 1907. Situated near the center of his vast lands, Post kept a close watch over this settlement for the next six years. Surrounding properties were broken up and fenced into 160 acre tracts on which he built a five or six room house on each one. These improved properties were sold at a low interest rate on a long term note to the farmer who settled there. He also founded the hotel, the cotton mill, the bank, a telephone company, and the sanitarium. He brought the Santa Fe railroad to Post, tried to establish Texas Tech in the community, became the father of West Texas irrigation, and continued to drill unsuccessfully for oil. One of his most spectacular experiments was his persistent attempts to force rain with dynamite during the West Texas droughts.

The Algerita Hotel is an integral part of the early heritage of the planned community of Post City. Construction of this massive building began in the first year of the development of this city. It was designed by an architect employed by C. W. Post at the company office in Battle Creek. The Algerita Hotel symbolizes the dream of C. W. Post for his model city becoming an urban center. During the most populated years of Post City, it served as the social and cultural center of the region. Opened to the public on July 17, 1908, it was named the "Algerita" for the algerita bush, a native shrub of the area.

The Algerita Hotel was constructed with hand cut stone from a local quarry at the edge of the Cap Rock Escarpment on the edge of the High Plains. The white sandstone was quarried and shaped by George "Scottie" Samson and his assistant Jimmy Napier. Samson and Napier immigrated to New York from Scotland in 1905. Although Napier is deceased, Samson continues to reside in Post.

Since the hotel was elegantly furnished by the standards of the era and area, guests often complained of the rates. Reflecting the wry sense of humor and the practical mind of C. W. Post, he had a sign printed behind the cashier's desk which read: "The rate of this hotel is $2.50 a day. There are plenty of good boarding houses in town and plenty of room in the mesquite. Four-flushers, kickers, and other suspicious characters find board with the sheriff. When in doubt, hit the mesquite."

Waiters in the hotel restaurant were to tell guests that Postum was available instead of coffee; and Grape Nuts was kept in a covered dish on the dining table.

The building continued to be used exclusively as a hotel until this operation became financially unprofitable. In 1917, the first floor was converted into office spaces and a large portion of the front lower floor space was rented to the First State Bank. The second floor retained its original function for an additional number of years, but increasingly evolved into rental rooms and apartments. In 1933, the banking activities moved from the lower floor and was replaced by a grocery store. In 1958, both the upper and lower floors were vacated. It is currently unoccupied.

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON FILE IN THE NATIONAL REGISTER

Old Sanitarium - Post  Post, the county seat of Garza County, is located in the northwest section of Texas some three miles east of the Cap Rock, the rock-like layer which underlies the High Plains region, the Llano Estacado. Named for C. W. Post, the town's founder and benefactor, the town was designed by Post in May, 1907, to be the center of a community of farmers who owned their own land and homes. A large number of homes for settlers were quickly built in the town and on farms laid out around it. Scottie Samson and Jimmy Napier, Scottish stonemasons who had answered Post's advertisement for town builders in 1907, constructed most of the cut stone buildings with stone quarried at the edge of the Cap Rock. Interested in providing medical services for the Post City settlers, C. W. Post contracted Samson and Napier to build a hospital in 1913.

The Post Sanitarium is a two-story stone veneer, rectangular structure with basement. A large pedimented gable supported by two story fluted concrete columns dominates the main (east) facade. The gallery formed on the second floor is somewhat smaller in proportion to the first floor gallery and contains a balustrade of wooden cross hatching. The columns support a small entablature which forms the base of the gabled pediment. The wide overhanging eaves and the exposed framing of the gable are reflective of the stick or bungalow styles. The segmental arched, central entrance contains a large double door with transom and is flanked by two segmental arched windows on each side. On the second level the central entrance is a single door with transom flanked by two windows on each side identical to the openings on the lower floor.

On the north and south facades a series of segmental arched openings are located along the first floor, while the windows on the second floor are cut across the top by the overhanging eaves of the roofline. The size of the windows on both floors vary in size and do not necessarily correspond vertically as did the openings on the main elevation. From the low pitch of the gabled roof, three wide shed dormers project.

The plan of the building has two wide central halls on each floor with rooms on either side. A stairway wide enough to accommodate a stretcher was located about midway down the hall. The sanitarium had a reputation as one of the finest and best-equipped hospitals in the area. A large coal burning furnace in the basement furnished steam heat to each room through steam heated radiators. Each private room and the two wards contained a private bath.

The operating room had a tile floor and sky light and a large sterilize and scrub room adjoined. The addition, the hospital maintained a laboratory and specimen room as well as an x-ray room and developing room. For electric power in this remote West Texas hospital, a private electric light plant was operated and powered by a gasoline engine in connection with the sanitarium, until electricity was made available through the local cotton mill. For further convenience, patients, trays and supplies were elevated from the lower floor to the upper floor by a hand-propelled dumb waiter.

The Post Sanitarium was one of the earliest hospitals in the Panhandle and South Plains region and was exceptionally well-equipped for a small Texas settlement only five years old. The sanitarium also represents a tangible link with the city's founder, C. W. Post, and his conception of the model city. Post became interested in health and dietetics while a patient in a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, in the 1890's, and his concern for health influenced the establishment of the Post Sanitarium in 1912.

Born in Springfield, Illinois, in 1854, Charles William Post became a successful businessman and inventor before he was thirty years old. However, in 1885, Post suffered from a severe stomach disorder and nervous breakdown. He resigned his position as head of the Illinois Agricultural workers in August of 1886 and when his health improved, he made his first trip to Texas. Seeking opportunities in the western frontier and a suitable climate for his health, Post traveled to Fort Worth in September, 1886, and became associated with a real estate firm. From his many hunting trips in the Texas Panhandle, Post began envisioning the development of western real estate. After two more nervous breakdowns, Post moved his family in 1891 to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he could receive better medical attention. While a patient in a Battle Creek sanitarium in 1891 he was served the various health foods which had been developed there and began to study foods and their relationship to health. During this period he developed his own theory of dietetics. Impatient to be cured, he left the sanitarium to cure himself.

While he had traveled in Texas, Post met several farmers' wives who had been mixing chicory with roasted wheat and other ground grains combined into a makeshift coffee. He experimented with it trying to find a coffee substitute which had much of the same taste but no ill effects upon the body. Opening his own Battle Creek sanitarium in 1892, La Vita Inn, he continued to experiment with the warm cereal drink and eventually perfected it in 1894 and called his product Postum. Through his own successful promotion, the mixture of wheat, bran and molasses, brought him his fortune. As Postum had a seasonal demand, Post quickly developed a second cereal, Grape Nuts, in 1897 and put it on the market the following year. Numerous other trade marked cereals were to follow, such as Post Toasties and Post Bran.

Post was a multi-millionaire by 1906 when he returned to Texas and purchased a quarter-million acre tract which stretched along the Cap Rock Escarpment. T. P. Stevens, a veteran rancher, assisted him in purchasing the West Texas ranchland and W. E. Alexander became the manager for his colony in January of 1907. Situated near the center of his vast lands, Post kept a close watch over his settlement for the next six years.

Surrounding properties were broken up and fenced into 160 acre tracts on which he build five or six room house on each one. These improved properties were sold at a low interest rate on a long term note to the farmer who settled there. He also founded the hotel, the cotton mill, the bank, a telephone company, and the sanitarium. He brought the Santa Fe railroad to Post, tried to establish Texas Tech in the community, became the father of West Texas irrigation, and continued to drill unsuccessfully for oil. One of his most spectacular experiments was his persistent attempts to force rain with dynamite during the West Texas droughts.

Post's interest in health led to the founding of the Post Sanitarium in 1912, but the hospital also represents the man's personal conflict in the field of medicine. When medical treatment did not result in immediate recovery from his physical and mental breakdown in 1890, he joined the Church of Christian Scientist. He remained a member of this religious faith for the duration of his life. Consequently, it is ironic that he was responsible for the first hospital built in Garza County. This irony of his personality was also evident in the circumstances connected with his death in 1914. In need of an emergency appendectomy, he agreed to the operation which proved to be medically successful. However, due to his despondency caused by his acceptance of medical treatment which violated his religious principles, he committed suicide at his home in Santa Barbara, California.

The Post Sanitarium was built with hand cut stone from a local quarry at the edge of the Cap Rock Escarpment on the edge of the High Plains. The white sandstone was quarried and shaped by George "Scottie" Samson and his assistant Jimmy Napier. Samson and Napier immigrated to New York from Scotland in 1905. Although Napier is deceased, Samson continues to reside in Post.

Dr. Arvel Ponton opened the Post Sanitarium in 1913. The hospital had the very best of- medical facilities. Among numerous other modern facilities, it contained an x-ray laboratory, operating and sterilizing rooms, elaborate diet kitchen, and a nurse's training program. The sanitarium originally operated a private electric plant, which was powered by a gasoline engine. Each patient had a private bath. Steam heat was provided from a large coal burning furnace in the basement to steamheated radiators in each room.

The building served as a hospital through the period of World War I, but ceased operations in 1920. The Post Estate sold the building in 1928 and from 1928 to 1953 the structure was used as an apartment house. Vacated for 13 years, the building was finally bought in 1966 by Garza County and has since been used as a museum.

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON FILE IN THE NATIONAL REGISTER

OS Ranch - Post   Founded on open range, 1878, brand was owned in 1881 by R. H. Overall. Acquired 1901 by W. E. Connell, who had about 200 sections of land. Ranch house a community center - for barbecues, roundups, parties. In 1907 it was site of election organizing Garza County. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1966.

Pioneer's Well - Post   County's first hand-dug rock-walled well. Dug 1883 by Llano Ranch workmen. Well is 5 feet square, 40 feet deep and lined with sandstones placed without the use of mortar. Original wood curb was destroyed by fire, 1937. Present curb is replica. Well was used 45 years. 1968

Old Post High School - Post   Built 1928, incorporating in lower walls native Garza County stones from the town's first (1909) school, erected soon after the founding of city of Post. This historic preservation occurred under leadership of Supt. John E. Watson, outstanding educator, veteran of World War I service in the heroic Rainbow Division. The Parent-Teachers' Association backed Watson's stand, and bond issue passed in spite of adverse circumstances. When later growth called for a larger educational complex, to meet community needs, this became Post Junior High School. 1968

Post Picnic of 1906    After this area was freed of Indians, Garza County was created and named in 1876 for a patriotic family of early Texas. With its ranching population rising from 36 in 1880 to only 180 by 1900, Garza remained attached for judicial purposes to Borden County. In 1906 Charles William Post (1854-1914), "the cereal king" from Battle Creek, Mich., sought Texas land for development. In the month of March, he and his wife and daughter visited here at the OS Ranch, where a barbecue picnic was given in their honor. In the gathering, Post made a speech suggesting the county be organized for self-government, as he proposed to establish a model farm colony and a modern town. Cowboys from a wide area were at the OS that day working in spring roundup. Immediately they called an informal election in the bunkhouse. A boy who had won all the money gaming the previous evening now gave a dollar to each voter, to be placed in a fund to defray expenses of a future, legal election. It is said that even the horses voted in favor of the Post proposal. After a petition was filed on May 13, 1907, the election was held and the county organized on June 15, 1907. By that time Post city was being built as county seat. County and city still prosper. 1972

C.W. Post Home - Post  Home built 1912 by C. W. Post, Cereal Foods millionaire, founder of town of Post, who promoted Texas settlement and agriculture by selling land on liberal terms, founding industries. With theme, "I Want Quality", Post installed solid oak doors, woodwork, redwood' floors, leather wallpaper. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1964.

Mrs. Meriweather Post - Post  Daughter of C. W. Post. Lived in Texas 1888-1891. Had part with father in locating colony here 1906; rescued local economy by aid after 1917 drought. Co-donor, site for Post Recreation Center. Donor, South Plains Council Boy Scouts Camp; books and paintings to South Plains College. A leading philanthropist in arts and humanities. Benefactress, C. W. Post College, Long Island University; founder "Music for Young America." Recipient of 30 citations for service, 3 honorary degrees, 6 foreign decorations. A woman endowed with true virtues of generosity and compassion. 1968

Post-Hundley House   Charles W. Post (1854-1914), famed cereal manufacturer who founded this community as a model town, occupied this residence during his frequent visits here. Employees of the Double U Company constructed the cottage in 1907 using native stone hand-quarried in the nearby caprock. The design was drawn by a member of Post's staff in Battle Creek, Michigan. After 1917, the J. L. Stewart and Jim Hundley families occupied and preserved the structure. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1976

Postex Cotton Mill - Post   Established 1912 by C. W. Post, creator of Post Cereals and a philanthropist. Mill was a part of Post's dream of diversified income for Garza County farmers and prosperity for town of Post. Mill--one of world's first to process cotton from raw state to finished product--had cotton gin and bleachery plus spinning, weaving and sewing rooms. At first it had 10,000 spindles and 480 broadlooms, employing about 250 workers. "Garza" brand textiles were marketed many years. Since expansion program in 1956, mill works on consignment to companies around the world. 1967

Rain Battles - CW Post - Post  Site of 1911-1914 dynamiting to produce rain, carried on by C. W. Post, Texas farm colonizer and cereal foods millionaire. After reading that rain often accompanies cannonading in war, Post planned "battles" to relieve droughts. He thought vertical air currents would condense vapor in atmosphere and cause rain. He first used dynamite airborne by kites, but soon replaced this dangerous method by setting off explosions on edge of Caprock. Post's experiments were said to have been 40% effective, and cost $50,000. He battled drought on farms until his death, 1914. 1967

Terrace Cemetery Gateway - Post  From "Double U", "Lazy S", Conneil and Currycomb Ranch canyons, round rocks were collected and made into gate piers in 1908 when cereal king C. W. Post founded Post City. George Samson designed and with fellow Scotsman James Napier built the gateway. Samson was a community leader 50 years. 1964

Twin Chimneys - Post  100 Yards North) Used as a landmark in the 19th century by surveyors sighting from Duffy's Peak, located ten miles northeast. Jasper Hays, earliest recorded surveyor of this area, used the peaks during 1877-78 for charting the Llano Ranch, later bought by C. W. Post, the cereal king. Hays established, in addition, lines from which section surveys were made. Civil engineer A. L. Marhoff, using the original field notes and book of Hays, surveyed the land bought by Post, 1906. This included the section on which the town of Post was founded, 1907, as well as other property. 1970

Verbena Community Church - Post  100 Yards North) Used as a landmark in the 19th century by surveyors sighting from Duffy's Peak, located ten miles northeast. Jasper Hays, earliest recorded surveyor of this area, used the peaks during 1877-78 for charting the Llano Ranch, later bought by C. W. Post, the cereal king. Hays established, in addition, lines from which section surveys were made. Civil engineer A. L. Marhoff, using the original field notes and book of Hays, surveyed the land bought by Post, 1906. This included the section on which the town of Post was founded, 1907, as well as other property. 1970

 [HOME]

Contact:  TXGenWeb Garza Co., TX - CC