Texas Landmarks - Presidio County

TXGenWeb Project

Presidio County - TXGenWeb County Index

Presidio County, Texas - Index of Landmarks & Vanished Communities

Tips on using this index:

1.     Scroll or use your browser "find" function to search this Index for a particular feature name or location.

2.     Copy the Latitude and Longitude of your selected feature on a piece of paper for later reference. ( 311613N is 31° 16’ 13”  and 0953747W is 95° 37’ 47” – drop the leading 0  )

3.     Click on the name of the feature to view a map of the county. (Features submitted by other than USGS will appear immediately and no more action on you part to locate your feature.)

4.     Note that as you move the cursor across the map that the latitude and longitude of the cursor is given in boxes on the left side of the page.

5.     Move the cursor to display the latitude and longitude you recorded in step 2, and then left click. This click will center your selected feature in the center of the map. This is the location of your selected feature. If the copied lat & long is given in decimal degrees (31.78923) select DD.DD in the coordinates box directly under the Lat & long boxes.

6.     Note that you can Zoom In or out by clicking on the Zoom  + or at the bottom of the map, and that clicking on the red corner markers move the entire map.

7.     Items submitted by sources other than the USGS show approximate locations only. They have not been surveyed but usually are given to editor as verbal or written descriptions.

  1. Locations of creeks & streams are given at the mouth of the creek or stream, i.e. where it joins a larger stream.

     How to Add Landmarks or Features to These Pages or Submit Corrections.

 

 

Feature Name

St

County Name

Type

Latitude
Longitude

Description

Submitters Name
E-mail address

Adobe Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

294715N
1043433W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobe Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

300946N
1043613W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobes

TX

Presidio

populated place

294550N
1043318W

Located on Farm Road 170 and beside the Rio Grande, near Arroyo Borracho and six miles southeast of Chinati, Texas, in southwestern Presidio County. It developed as a farming community in the 1870s. Antonio Madrid came to Adobes, Texas, from Mexico in 1882 when he was eleven years old. He herded sheep and grew to adulthood there. He married Paufilia Estrade De Anda and their family of eight children grew up in the community. By 1914 agriculture at Adobes was revolutionized with the introduction of irrigation and cotton growing. In 1930 the village had 750 acres of irrigated cotton under cultivation. By 1939 a public school was in session at Adobes as part of the Presidio school district. In 1998 Adobes remained a small farming community on the river. No population figure was available, according to 1998-1999 Texas Almanac. Adobes Cemetery is near the village. Sources: USGS, GNIS; Adobes Quadrangle, Texas-Chihuahua, USGS Topographical Map, 1979; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 127,133-134; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:183; 2:map between pp. 304 and 305, 455; 1998-1999 Texas Almanac, 297.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobes Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

294543N
1043310W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agua Adentro Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

292747N
1040145W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agua Chano Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294853N
1042619W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aguja

TX

Presidio

summit

295721N
1042414W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alamito

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located on Farm Road 169 three miles north of Plata, Texas, on Alamito Creek in east central Presidio County. It developed as an irrigated farming settlement in 1870 when John Davis and several Mexican-descent families who worked for him settled at that point on Alamito Creek. Fearing Indian attack, Davis and his workers built a large adobe house with a corral at the back to protect the horses and mules. A chapel was erected for use when the priest visited. By using the open range, Davis raised cattle and horses and cultivated a peach orchard. The workers grew corn, wheat, beans, and other vegetables that Davis hauled to Fort Stockton for sale. With ample supplies of food and water, Alamito became a stop on the Chihuahua Trail. A post office operated there from 1884 until 1892. As early as 1908 the settlement had a school and that year Selena Hord was the teacher. In 1911 fifty-seven students from a total population of 392 were recorded at Alamito. The community was listed on the state highway map for Presidio County as late as 1986, but 1998-1999 Texas Almanac listed no population for Alamito, Texas. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 17; John Ernest Gregg, History of Presidio County, M. A. Thesis, Univ. Of Tex., 1933, pp. 56-57; Carlysle Graham Raht, The Romance of Davis Mountains and Big Bend Country (Odessa: The Rahtbooks Co., 1963), 162, 169, 231;Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 69; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 42, 85.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alamito Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

293115N
1041729W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alamito Dam

TX

Presidio

dam

292520N
1040037W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alamo Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294100N
1040948W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alazan Hills

TX

Presidio

summit

293133N
1035459W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alazan Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

293236N
1035607W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allison Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

300128N
1041555W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alta Vista Ranch Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

300853N
1035334W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antelope Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

295807N
1035438W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aqua Adentro Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292937N
1040608W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aragon

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located at a point on the Southern Pacific railroad and U. S. Highway 90, ten miles west of Marfa, Texas, in northern Presidio County. In 1882 when the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad reached the area with its tracks, Aragon became a loading station. The station was also a settlement for the section crew of the railroad. Early on the morning of 12 July 1909, a westbound passenger train was derailed at the Aragon station. There was evidence of tampering with a switch rod and a block had been placed between the rails. No injuries were sustained in the wreck and no indictments were made. By the 1980s the station and settlement at Aragon were gone. Sources: Hugh B. Wilson, “Southern Pacific Lines: The G.H.&S.A.R.R., A Brief History of El Paso Division 1881-1925,” in Terrell County, Texas—Its Past, Its People, ed. Alice Evans Downie (San Angelo: Anchor Pub. Co., 1978), 111; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 19; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 59, map between pp. 304 and 305; S. G. Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941), 197; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 6; Writer’s Observation.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arenoso Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295717N
1043544W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arenoso, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293224N
1041830W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arroyos Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294110N
1041704W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auras Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

292512N
1041036W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295106N
1042615W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baviza, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295256N
1043843W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benavides Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

300038N
1043337W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bennett Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

303636N
1045441W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Bend Ranch Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

292810N
1035611W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Shanon Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

300522N
1043118W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Trestle Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301135N
1040520W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Hills

TX

Presidio

summit

293719N
1040807W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Hills

TX

Presidio

summit

300029N
1041445W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Hills Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

293209N
1041531W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Peaks

TX

Presidio

summit

301840N
1035013W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blanca, Loma

TX

Presidio

summit

300641N
1043452W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bofecillos Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

292844N
1041207W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bofecillos Mountains

TX

Presidio

range

292656N
1040520W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bofecillos Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

292816N
1040530W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bogel

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural village, was located on Alamito Creek, thirteen miles South of Marfa, Texas, in East central Presidio County. It was shown on a geological map in 1895. In 1904 it was listed in A Gazetteer of Texas. Sources: Marfa, Tex. Sheet, U.S. Dept. of the Interior Geological Survey Map, 1:125000 scale, 1895; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 30.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boludo, Cerro

TX

Presidio

summit

294749N
1035707W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boquilla, La

TX

Presidio

valley

294351N
1041744W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Borracha Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

303029N
1043808W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Borrachio

TX

Presidio

pop place

294352N
1043236W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Borracho, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

294431N
1043305W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boulder Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

295919N
1043139W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bracks Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

302829N
1044444W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brite Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

301944N
1043156W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bueyes Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295545N
1043714W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bull Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

295557N
1042705W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burney Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

295404N
1043043W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burnt Camp

TX

Presidio

locale

292653N
1035025W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burras, Cerro de las

TX

Presidio

summit

292434N
1040633W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burro Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

302544N
1041109W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burro, Cuesta del

TX

Presidio

range

300649N
1042315W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caballo, Cañon de

TX

Presidio

valley

295804N
1043322W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cadelaria

TX

Presidio

pop place

300818N
1044057W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camp Holland

TX

Presidio

abandoned military post

303252N
1044045W

Was located 12 miles west of Valentine, Texas, at Vieja Pass in western Presidio County. The post was built in 1918 to defend American lives and property after Mexican bandits raided the Brite and Nevill ranches. Named for Holland Ranch where it was situated, the camp served as a base for pack trains that supplied the Eighth Cavalry as it patrolled the Mexican border under the command of Colonel George T. Langhorne. Troop B of the Second Squadron was assigned to the camp on 9 September 1919. Camp Holland consisted of stone and wood buildings and its construction costs exceeded $16,000. Its buildings included two barracks, four officer’s houses, a mess hall, and a guard house. To meet the needs of its personnel, the camp had a bakery, a corral, a blacksmith shop, and a quartermaster store. Good spring water was in abundant supply, allowing the use of a shower house and a sewer system. The army ceased its border patrols in Presidio County by 1921 and Camp Holland closed. In January 1922, the camp was leased to civilians and later it sold at auction to C. O. Finley. In the late 1960s some of the deserted military buildings were still standing. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Kim Thornsburg, “Camp Holland,” in The Junior Historian of Texas 28:3 (December 1967), 30-31; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 139-140, 151, 179, 216, 229-230; Ray Miller, Texas Forts: A History and Guide (Houston: Gulf Pub. Co., 1985), 194.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campo Santo Estrada

TX

Presidio

locale

293104N
1041550W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campo Santo Hernandez

TX

Presidio

other

293420N
1042311W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campo Santo Rodriguez

TX

Presidio

other

293507N
1042352W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candelaria

TX

Presidio

pop place

300818N
1044106W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capote Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

301003N
1044113W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capote Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301828N
1042855W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capote Falls

TX

Presidio

falls

301251N
1043333W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capote Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

301645N
1043300W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capote Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

301301N
1043710W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casa Blanca Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

293216N
1041817W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casa Piedra

TX

Presidio

pop place

294418N
1040313W

An unincorporated community, is located on Alamito Creek and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad, ten miles south of Plata, Texas, in southeastern Presidio County. In 1883 Domenicio Mata settled there on preemption land and late in the 1890s constructed a stone house. His house gave the community its Spanish name, meaning rock house. By 1900 more than fifty farm families lived in the close-knit community, consisting mostly of kinsmen. Many of them were members of the Russell and Vasquez families. The people were hard-working farmers who raised large crops of cotton, corn, beans, and hay. The families observed holidays with music, dancing, feasting, and horse racing. A one-room school opened in the community in 1906 through the work of Lucia Hernandez Russell. From 1929 through 1933 Willie Mae Harper taught grades 1 through 7. Later a two-room building was constructed to accommodate the growing number of children. In 1912 the community acquired a post office and the Vasquez family opened a store. The tracks of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient of Texas railroad reached Casa Piedra in 1930 and a depot was built. Conrado Vasquez served as the first depot agent. When drought and the Great Depression hit the nation in 1930, prosperity at Casa Piedra also slowed. However, as late as 1939 the public school remained and the Ted Harper Ranch shipped its livestock from the station in the 1940s. In the 1950s both the post office and the store closed. In 1984 residents of Casa Piedra received mail from Marfa. The community reported a population of 21 from the 1960s through the 1990s, but its early days of larger population were behind it. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), Vol. 1:197, 214, 275, 326, 347; Vol. 2:25, 51, 91, map between pp. 304 and 305, 333, 348, 454-455, 498; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 82; Charles P. Zlatkovich, Texas Railroads: A Record of Construction and Abandonment (Austin: UT and TSHA, 1981), 76; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 23; John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas (Dallas: Clements Research, Inc., 1984), 367; 1933 Texas Almanac, 56; 1939-1940 Texas Almanac, 104; 1961-1962 Texas Almanac, 207; 1970-1971 Texas Almanac, 170; 1980-1981 Texas Almanac, 196; 1990-1991 Tex

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cat Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

301123N
1042845W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cathedral Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

300005N
1042958W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catto Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302147N
1035932W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cement Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295210N
1042501W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chaffin Place

TX

Presidio

pop place

295851N
1042726W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chalk Gap

TX

Presidio

gap

303415N
1044858W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chalk Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

303252N
1044944W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chalk Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

303435N
1044755W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chambers Draw

TX

Presidio

arroyo

301120N
1035817W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chambers Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302023N
1044137W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chilicote Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

302002N
1043928W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chillon, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293627N
1042712W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chimney Rock

TX

Presidio

pillar

292259N
1034945W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinati

TX

Presidio

locale

294927N
1043617W

On the Rio Grande and Farm Road 170 about 6 miles northwest of Adobes, Texas, in southwestern Presidio County. It developed as a river farming settlement, probably after 1904. Its name reportedly came from an Indian chief, Chinati, who lived in the area in the 1840s and 1850s. In 1914 after irrigation became a part of farm communities along the river, Chinati farmers grew cotton and anticipated a prosperous future with a good cash crop. In 1922 a post office opened. By 1930 the community irrigated 600 acres of crops and in 1931 a store opened. Mexican bandits raided the community in January 1933. By 1939, the post office closed. The population of Chinati remained at ten from 1933 until 1943, when World War II stimulated activity at the military bases in Presidio County and increased the population of Chinati to 250. After the war, the military bases closed and Chinati declined in population. In 1947 the store closed. At the end of the 1980s, Chinati remained an unincorporated community that received mail from the Presidio post office. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Adobes Quadrangle, Tex.-Presidio County, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1979; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 25; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico, 1958), 105; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 83; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 133-134; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), map between pp. 304 and 305, 380, 496-497, 544-545; Barry Wade Hutcheson, The Trans-Pecos: A Historical Survey and Guide to Historic Sites, M. A. Thesis, Texas Technological College, 1969, 157; 1933 Texas Almanac, 56; 1936 Texas Almanac, 149; 1939-1940 Texas Almanac, 105; 1941-1942 Texas Almanac, 119; 1943-1944 Texas Almanac, 73; 1945-1946 Texas Almanac, 115; 1947-1948 Texas Almanac, 136; John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas (Dallas: Clements Research, Inc., 1984), 367.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinati Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

294926N
1043555W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinati Mountains

TX

Presidio

range

295417N
1042748W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinati Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

295711N
1042838W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chino, Cerro

TX

Presidio

summit

300440N
1043549W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chiticote Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302821N
1043742W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chorro Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

292226N
1035224W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chupadera Pila

TX

Presidio

spring

300443N
1043909W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chupaderos, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

300559N
1044056W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Church Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

294953N
1034934W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cibolo Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

293405N
1042346W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cibolo Creek Ranch Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

295334N
1041541W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega Basin

TX

Presidio

basin

301429N
1043232W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294017N
1041156W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega Mountains

TX

Presidio

summit

294634N
1040939W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295104N
1043727W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega, La

TX

Presidio

swamp

300020N
1043838W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cienega, La

TX

Presidio

stream

300644N
1044032W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cieneguita

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural village, was located on Cibolo Creek, nine miles northwest of Shafter, Texas, in the Chinati Mountains of south central Presidio County. It was shown on a USGS map in 1896. In 1904 it was listed in A Gazetteer of Texas. It may have been the headquarters of a ranch. Sources: Shafter, Tex. Sheet, USGS map, 1896; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 44.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cinco de Mayo, Cañon

TX

Presidio

valley

295419N
1042921W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clenega Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

301446N
1043210W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cleveland Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

300506N
1043053W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closed Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291914N
1040215W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cnangas, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293616N
1042627W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coal Mine Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302558N
1044411W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cold Water Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

301928N
1044432W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colorado, Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291749N
1035814W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colquitt Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301130N
1035800W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colquitt Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301450N
1035628W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comedor Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

301635N
1044538W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conejo

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Vanished community located at a point on the Southern Pacific railroad and U. S. Highway 90, midway between Ryan, Texas, and Aragon, Texas, in northern Presidio County. When the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad laid its tracks to the area in early 1882, a section house and depot were built at Conejo. The railroad named the depot the Spanish word for rabbit. Conejo may have operated as a depot for several decades, but the railroad abandoned the site by 1936. Any community that had developed around Conejo depot then disappeared. Sources: Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), map between pp. 304 and 305; S. G. Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941), 197; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 27.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conring Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

303020N
1043658W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contrabando Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291715N
1035021W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contrabando Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

291645N
1035035W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contrabando Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

291832N
1034741W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contrabando Waterhole

TX

Presidio

lake

291849N
1034814W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copeland Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302301N
1034800W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cottonwood Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303258N
1044010W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crenshaw Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

302149N
1034904W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crenshaw Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302123N
1034957W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cruz Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

301502N
1043040W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cruz, Cerro de la

TX

Presidio

summit

295932N
1043227W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuervo Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301926N
1040032W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuesta Del Burro

TX

Presidio

ridge

300649N
1042315W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Damn It Well

TX

Presidio

well

302815N
1043144W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deck Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

295353N
1042656W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doll Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

295619N
1041931W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domingo

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural village, may have been a river settlement in the nineteenth century or earlier. A Gazetter of Texas, 1904, stated that the place was shown on the USGS Polvo Sheet, Presidio County, but it was not found by the writer. Source: Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 58.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donahue Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

303341N
1045342W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunman Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

295250N
1040120W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Durazno Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302518N
1043425W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dysart

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

a rural village in Presidio County, operated a post office from 1899 through 1902 when it closed. A Gazetter of Texas (1904) listed Dysart, Texas, but gave no USGS sheet on which to find it. Sources: Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 92; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904),61.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

El Calabazar Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

292541N
1041034W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

El Campo De Laventana

TX

Presidio

locale

301640N
1044528W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

El Macho

TX

Presidio

summit

301007N
1043340W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enmedio, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

302652N
1045154W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Escondido, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295818N
1044052W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estrada Creek

TX

Presidio

locale

293125N
1041602W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fishtail Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

294440N
1035345W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fort Leaton State Historic Site

TX

Presidio

park

293238N
1041939W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourmile Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301439N
1040242W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Franks Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

302553N
1035121W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frenchman Hills

TX

Presidio

summit

300129N
1040711W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291712N
1035110W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

291653N
1035119W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

292038N
1034850W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

292537N
1035012W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Galgo

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A vanished rural community located at a point halfway between Marfa, Texas, and Aragon, Texas, on U. S. Highway 90 and the Southern Pacific railroad in northern Presidio County. When the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad reached the point early in 1882, it established a station and gave it a Spanish name, meaning greyhound. The railroad, which may have been its only focus, later abandoned Galgo and any community there disappeared. By the 1980s it was a clean site. Sources: Hugh B. Wilson, "Southern Pacific Lines: The G.H.&S.A.R.R., A Brief History of El Paso Division 1881-1926," in Terrell County, Texas--Its Past, Is People, ed. by Alice Evans Downie (San Angelo: Anchor Pub.Co., 1978), 111,116; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), map between pp. 304 and 305; S. G. Reed, A History of Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941),197; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982),40; Writer's Observation.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Galindo, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293158N
1041800W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gato Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295702N
1043627W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gemelo Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

295850N
1035218W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gettysburg Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

302834N
1044355W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goat Herd Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302949N
1044423W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

301952N
1034801W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Tank Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301929N
1034700W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenlee Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301811N
1040041W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haciendito

TX

Presidio

locale

293641N
1042721W

On the Rio Grande and Farm Road 170 six miles northwest of Presidio, Texas, in southwestern Presidio County. With a Spanish name meaning small farm, Haciendito was known as “Haciendita” from its beginning to the end of the 1950s and its cemetery still has that name. The community had a school by 1904 when H. H. Lovett taught there. D. Chesser was hired as the teacher in 1908. Haciendita became a cotton-growing community in 1917 when Bartello Garcia built a gravity irrigation system to bring river water to crops. The community had 1,500 acres of irrigated land devoted to cotton crops in the 1920s. Garcia sold his irrigation rights to J. P. Fortner, a local farmer, in 1921. By 1948 the community reported a population of twenty and received mail from Presidio. The state highway map of the county labeled the community as “Haciendito” in 1986. It was listed by the same name in 1998-1999 Texas Almanac without a population figure. The name may have been changed to a masculine form after the 1950s; or, both names always may have been used in reference to the community. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Presidio West Quadrangle, Texas-Chihuahua, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1979; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 135-137; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946, 2 Vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 2:42-43, 86, 455; The Handbook of Texas, Vol. 1 (Austin: TSHA, 1952), 751; 1998-1999 Texas Almanac, 305.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haciendita Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

293641N
1042721W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hat Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

295830N
1035051W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haymond

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located at an unknown point in eastern Presidio County, but it was later made a part of Buchel County and finally a part of Brewster County. The community was first called McLeary and a post office operated there from 30 October 1883 to 23 January 1884 when its name was changed to Haymond. The post office continued at Haymond from 1884 until an unknown date after 1930. Over the years, the post office was located in three counties. It was created in Presidio County and operated in that county more than three years. On 15 March 1887 the part of Presidio County that included Haymond became Buchel County until the state legislature attached that county to Brewster County on 22 March 1889. On 09 April 1897 Buchel County was dissolved and Haymond became a part of Brewster County. Sources: Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 104, 117; Martin Donell Kohout, "Buchel County," in The New Handbook of Texas, Vol.1 (Austin: TSHA, 1996), 800; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 81.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

303108N
1044407W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

High Lonesome Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

301304N
1043113W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hog Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303627N
1045415W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holguin Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

293850N
1040550W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holquin Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294032N
1040226W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horseshoe Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

302538N
1044358W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horseshoe Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

302533N
1044217W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horsetrap Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292741N
1035741W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hot Spring

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural village in the first quarter of the twentieth century or earlier, was located on Hot Spring Creek at a point 2.5 miles east of Brooks Spring and seven miles north of the Rio Grande in western Presidio County. Sources: San Carlos Sheet,USGS map, 1929.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hot Springs Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

300031N
1043952W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hot Springs Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300148N
1044205W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housetop Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

295907N
1035035W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howard Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

302817N
1043730W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hoya Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302025N
1043514W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humphries

TX

Presidio

vanished communtiy

unknown

A rural village in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, was located fifteen miles southwest of Marfa on Saucita Creek in central Presidio County. Saucita Creek, in 1919, was an intermittent stream, rising in northern Presidio County and flowing easterly sixteen miles into Long Draw and then into Alamita Creek [now Alamito Creek] one mile west of Bogel, Texas. Sources: Marfa Sheet, USGS map, 1895; Henry Gannett, A Gazetter of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 87; Glenn A. Gray, Gazetteer of Streams of Texas, Water-Supply Paper 448 (Washington: Govenment Printing Office, 1919), 218; State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Map of Presidio County, revised 1986.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

301316N
1040311W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

295326N
1043340W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indio

TX

Presidio

pop place

294303N
1043214W

On Spencer Creek, the Rio Grande and Farm Road 170 twelve miles northwest of Presidio, Texas, in southwestern Presidio County. Called at different times Paloma Ranch, Spencer’s Rancho, and Indio Ranch, the community began after 1854 on the ranch of John W. Spencer. Spencer raised horses in the beginning and added cattle and vegetable farming later. A school was in session by 1908 when B. T. Briggs was hired as the teacher. In 1911 Juan de la Cruz Machuca, the first Hispanic graduate of Marfa High School, received a teaching certificate and came to teach in the community. In 1917 Esteban Ochoa directed an irrigation project at Indio and farmers began raising cotton. They were so successful that a gin was built by 1924 to process the cotton. The U. S. Army stationed an infantry platoon at Indio during a time of border unrest brought on by the Mexican Revolution. Mexican bandits fired on the platoon from across the river on 3 December 1917 and a soldier was wounded. U. S. soldiers immediately crossed the river and killed twelve of the bandits. The army continued to patrol the border at Indio as late as 1928. From 1939 until 1963 Indio consisted of 40 residents, two businesses, and a school, but the businesses closed in 1963. In the late 1980s Indio was an unincorporated village that received mail from Presidio. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 89; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 126-128, 134-137; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946, 2 Vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:55, 68, 78, 79; 2:43, 85, 86, 319; 455; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of NM Press, 1958), 115; Don M. Coerver and Linda B. Hall, Texas and the Mexican Revolution: A Study in State and National Border Policy 1910-1920 (San Antonio: Trinity Univ. Press, 1984), 123; 1939-1940 Texas Almanac, 109; 1941-1942 Texas Almanac, 123; 1943-1944 Texas Almanac, 77; 1945-1946 Texas Almanac, 119; 1947-1948 Texas Almanac, 141; 1949-1950 Texas Almanac, 114; 1952-1953 Texas Almanac, 89; 1954-1955 Texas Almanac, 115; 1956-1957 Texas Almanac, 147; 1958-1959 Texas Almanac, 121; 1961-1962 Texas Almanac, 210; 1964-1965 Texas Almanac, 145; 1966-1967 Texas Almanac, 147; John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas (Dallas: Clements Research, Inc., 1984), 367.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joho Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303334N
1044641W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joho Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

303318N
1044445W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joho Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

303335N
1044352W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jordan Gap

TX

Presidio

gap

295717N
1035504W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julio Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300916N
1040541W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirby Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294916N
1040259W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knox Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303204N
1043904W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Junta

TX

Presidio

pop place

293537N
1042438W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Junta de los Rios

TX

Presidio

historic farming and trading area

unknown

La Junta de los Rios, the historic farming and trading area at the junction of the Rio Grande (called Rio Norte by the Spaniards) and the Rio Conchos, centered around present Presidio, Texas, on the north bank of the Rio Grande, and Ojinaga, Chihuahua, on the south bank. The limits of the district ran 35 miles up the river to present Ruidosa, 18 miles down the river to present Redford, and 18 miles north of the river to present Shafter. The southern boundary reached Cuchillo Parado in Chihuahua. La Junta is traditionally accepted as the oldest continuously farmed area in Texas. Corn farmers of the Cochise culture settled there about 1500 B.C. to make use of the plentiful water, fertile land, and abundant game. Mountains on the northern and southern edges of the area and several hot springs helped to make winters mild. An ancient north-south trade route ran through La Junta, allowing settlers to exchange ideas as well as commodities with passersby. The Mogollon culture, consisting of farmers, potters, weavers, and carvers, replaced the Cochise about 900 A.D. The Mogollon adopted ideas from the Anasazi, forming the Mogollon-Anasazi culture, which was replaced by a number of new tribes that were unlike the older cultures. Before the first Spaniard appeared at La Junta in December 1535, the new tribes were replaced by the Patarabueye (later called Julime) and the Jumano. The first Spaniard to arrive was Cabeza de Vaca on his unplanned escape across Texas. He erected a cross on the mountainside and named the place La Junta Pueblo de las Cruces. Cabeza de Vaca was impressed with the Julime and Jumano, who lived in permanent houses and raised large crops of corn, beans, squash, pumpkins, and melons. Both the Julime and the Jumano succumbed to Spanish influence. The Julime vanished in an attempt to remain aloof and the Jumano people lost their identity and self-sufficiency by becoming good subjects of the Spanish crown. On 6 July 1581 Fray Augustine Rodriguez, two other friars, and ten soldiers celebrated the first mass at La Junta. On 8 December 1582 the entrada of Antonio de Espejo passed through La Junta. In 1683-1684 the Juan Dominguez de Mendoza expedition explored La Junta by mapping trails and water sources and by naming the area La Navidad de las Cruces. Seven missions were established at La Junta by the expedition. Spanish slavers raided La Junta from 1563 until 1760, resulting in Indian protests and periodic closing of the missions. On 22 July 1760 a fort, called Presidio del Norte de la Junta de los Rios, was completed for protection of the missionaries and the name of La Junta was changed to Presidio del Norte. By 1810 the missions and forts were abandoned. In 1839 Dr. Henry Connelly opened the Chihuahua Trail and traders hauled goods in carts between Independence, Missouri, and Chihuahua by way of La Junta. After the Mexican War and in the late 1840s, Anglos settled on the north side of the Rio Grande and became traders, farmers, and ranchers. Their descendants remain there today. Sources: Howard G. Applegate and Calvin Wayne Hanselka, La Junta De Los Rios Del Norte y Conchos (El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974), 3-5, 7-10, 13-32, 51-57; William H. Emory, Report on the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey, Vol. 1 (Austin: TSHA, 1987), Part 2, p. 50; Daniel E. Fox, Traces of Texas History: Archeological Evidence of the Past 450 Years (San Antonio: Corona Pub. Co., 1983), 59; Jesse D. Jennings, Prehistory of North America (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1974), 371; Barry Wade Hutcheson, The Trans-Pecos: A Historical Survey and Guide to Historic Sites, M. A. Thesis, Texas Tech Univ., 1969), 16, 60-61; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? Place Names in the Big Bend County (Albuquerque: Univ. of NM Press, 1958), 108; Carlysle Graham Raht, The Romance of Davis Mountains and Big Bend Country (Odessa: The Rahtbooks Co., 1963), 22-24; 45-47; Carlos E. Castaneda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, 1519-1936, Vol. 2 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1936), 316-319, 326.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Navidad en las Cruces

TX

Presidio

vanished mission

unknown

La Navidad en las Cruces, a vanished Spanish mission, was one of seven missions formally established in the La Junta area on 12 June 1684 by the Juan Dominguez de Mendoza expedition. The exact location of the mission is now unknown, but it is known that it was on the Rio Grande seven leagues from El Apostol Santiago and near the present city of Presidio in southern Presidio County. The mission was named for a fanciful story of a flaming cross in the sky told to the Spaniards by Juan Sabeata, a Jumano Indian, who hoped to enlist the aid of the Spanish military against the Apache. The Dominguez expedition first arrived at La Navidad en las Cruces on 29 December 1683. The original mission structure was a temporary one built from reeds and straw thatch by the people of the pueblo, who promised to replace it with an adobe one when the missionaries came. Since no later survey or census made by the Spanish government mentioned a mission at La Navidad en las Cruces, it was probably abandoned before 1715. Sources: Carlos E. Castaneda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, 1519-1936 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1936), 1:270-273; 2:311-318, 326; 3:198-203; Herbert Eugene Bolton, Spanish Exploration in the Southwest, 1542-1706 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1916), 325; Howard G. Applegate and Calvin Wayne Hanselka, La Junta De Los Rios Del Norte y Conchos (El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974), 14-23, 52-53; J. W. Williams, Old Texas Trails (Burnet: Eakin Press, 1979), 185; Robert E. Wright, O.M.I., “Catholic Church,” in The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 1 (Austin: TSHA, 1996), 1026-1028.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Presa Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

295307N
1043853W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Las Burras Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

292332N
1040830W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Las Corrientes Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294346N
1042922W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Las Lulas

TX

Presidio

pop place

300133N
1044143W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Chance Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

294910N
1042311W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lava Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

293035N
1035953W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lava Escondido Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292912N
1035752W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Shannon Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

300752N
1043104W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loma Pelona

TX

Presidio

pop place

293207N
1041813W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loma Plata Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

300629N
1043357W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lomas de Arena Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

303512N
1045507W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301135N
1040520W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

302141N
1035138W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Hollow Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

300930N
1043052W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Fresnos Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

302200N
1044900W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loveless Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302051N
1043829W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Los Fresnos Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

302048N
1044908W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Shutup

TX

Presidio

valley

292253N
1034909W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucky Strike Well

TX

Presidio

well

301943N
1043236W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madera, Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291745N
1035511W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madrid Falls

TX

Presidio

falls

292247N
1035300W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madrid Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

292227N
1035220W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madrid Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292520N
1035339W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marfa

TX

Presidio

pop place

301828N
1040107W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marfa Municipal Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

302213N
1040100W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marfa Municipal Golf Course

TX

Presidio

locale

301947N
1035931W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matonoso Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

295522N
1040041W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maurita Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

302950N
1044137W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McComb Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

301906N
1044025W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McComb Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

301811N
1044552W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McComb Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

301958N
1043923W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McCuthen Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

301842N
1044554W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McGuirks Tanks

TX

Presidio

reservoir

292831N
1034858W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McKinney Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

294958N
1034725W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

McLeary

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located at an unknown point in eastern Presidio County by 1883. A post office operated in the community from 30 October 1883 to 23 January 1884 when its name was changed to Haymond, Texas. Haymond continued the post office from 1884 until an unknown date after 1930. Haymond, Texas, was located in three counties over those years--Presidio, Buchel (which existed from 15 March 1887 until the state legislature attached it to Brewster County on 22 March 1889 and dissolved it on 09 April 1897), and Brewster. Sources: Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 104,117; Martin Donell Kohout, "Buchel County," in The New Handbook of Texas, Vol.1 (Austin: TSHA, 1996), 800.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melado, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293725N
1042827W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesa Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295327N
1042720W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesa, La

TX

Presidio

summit

295626N
1042251W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesquite Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294854N
1042944W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexican Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

301055N
1043455W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

294217N
1035139W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295127N
1042530W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miller Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

303307N
1043846W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mimbroso, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293430N
1042319W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monias, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293835N
1042027W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morita Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294428N
1041715W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mota Mountain, La

TX

Presidio

summit

293140N
1035855W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muerto Arroyo, El

TX

Presidio

valley

300536N
1044058W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mulato Dam

TX

Presidio

dam

292850N
1041337W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Musgrave Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

301932N
1043830W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naegele Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300210N
1044151W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naegele Springs

TX

Presidio

spring

300217N
1043853W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Anne Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302828N
1043146W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navajo Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

293336N
1035745W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Needle Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294240N
1034519W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Needle Peak

TX

Presidio

summit

292541N
1034835W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newman Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

302536N
1044414W

A rural village, was located 3.5 miles south of Gettysburg Peak in western Presidio County in 1904 and was in existence in 1929. It may have been located at the spring by the same name. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetter of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904),120; San Carlos Sheet, USGS topo map, 1929.

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith

Nixon Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

300800N
1043609W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nixon Spring

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural village, was located five miles east of the Rio Grande and two miles south of Mexican Spring in western Presidio County in 1904 and was in existence in 1929. It was located near the spring by the same name. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetter of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904),121; San Carlos Sheet, USGS topo map, 1929.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nopal

TX

Presidio

pop place

301717N
1035534W

Was located on the Southern Pacific railroad and U. S. Highway 90, near Twin Mountains and midway between Paisano, Texas, and Marfa, Texas, in northeastern Presidio County. In 1882 the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad established a passing track and a station at the location that the railroad named Nopal, a word that means prickly pear in Spanish. The ranchland south of Nopal was the setting for the county’s first barbed wire fence in 1886 when W. F. Mitchell, a local rancher, fenced a three-section holding trap. Two years later, Mitchell built a three-strand wire fence from San Esteban, Texas, to Nopal about ten miles in distance. He drilled two water wells to supply his cattle; one was south of Nopal. By 1894 Mitchell’s 200 sections of land supported 5,000 head of cattle. Although Nopal was the scene of innovative ranching before the turn of the century, no ruins of the station were visible in 1982. The 1998-1999 Texas Almanac, Ed Bartholomew, and the writer agreed that Nopal had no population in 1998, although GNIS called it a populated place. Sources: Hugh B. Wilson, “Southern Pacific Lines: The G.H.&S.A.R.R., A Brief History of El Paso Division 1881-1925,” in Terrell County, Texas—Its Past, Its People, ed. Alice Evans Downie (San Angelo: Anchor Pub. Co., 1978), 111, 116; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:251, 323; 2: map between pp. 304 and 305; S. G. Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941), 197; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 75; Writer’s Observation, 29 October 1988.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nopal Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

301623N
1035555W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Fork Alamito Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

302208N
1040148W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302907N
1043725W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nunez Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

295617N
1043440W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oak Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300920N
1040820W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oak Hills

TX

Presidio

range

301315N
1042013W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ochoa

TX

Presidio

pop place

294001N
1043001W

Ochoa [Ochoa Ranch], Texas, is located on the Rio Grande and Farm Road 170 ten miles northwest of Presidio, Texas, in southwestern Presidio County. It developed as a river settlement in the nineteenth century on the ranch of Esteban Ochoa, son of Isabel Leaton and Juan Ochoa and grandson of Ben Leaton. Juan Ochoa II, a tracker and scout for the Eighth Cavalry, was born at Ochoa in 1894. Seventy-five families lived in the community early in the twentieth century. A school was in session by 1911 when Jessie Head taught at Ochoa. The community became prosperous after 1914 when Esteban Ochoa hired about 100 Mexican refugees to dig an irrigation ditch to supply river water for farms in the area. By 1936 a church and a store were part of the community and the school continued as late as 1945. By the end of the 1980s Ochoa remained as a an unincorporated village that received its mail from Presidio. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Arroyo Melado Quadrangle, Tex.-Chihuahua, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1980; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 133-135, 180; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946, 2 Vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:68, 326; 2:86, 192; 454-455. 536; The Handbook of Texas, Vol. 2 (Austin: TSHA, 1952), 300; John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas (Dallas: Clements Research, Inc., 1984), 367.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ochoa Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

293952N
1042954W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ocotillo

TX

Presidio

vanished communtiy

293931N
1041139W

A rural village, was located on Alamito Creek and beside the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railroad [later acquired by Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe] when it laid its tracks through the area in 1930. The village and siding were seven miles southwest of Casa Piedra, Texas. The village was shown on an army map in 1932. The siding remained in 1998. Sources: USGS, GNIS; Ocotillo Quadrangle, Grid Zone E, Corps of Engineers U. S. Army Tactical Map, 1932; Charles P. Zlatkovich, Texas Railroads: A Record of Construction and Abandonment (Austin: UT and TSHA, 1981), 61, 76.

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

Ocotillo Siding

TX

Presidio

locale

293931N
1041139W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil Well Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

302040N
1043543W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojito Adentro

TX

Presidio

spring

292933N
1040329W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Acebuche

TX

Presidio

spring

295915N
1043126W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Agua Zarca

TX

Presidio

spring

295432N
1042535W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Alamito

TX

Presidio

spring

295631N
1043242W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Bonito

TX

Presidio

spring

295812N
1042303W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Canoa

TX

Presidio

spring

294911N
1042450W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Carrizo

TX

Presidio

spring

300458N
1043145W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Escondido Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292951N
1035540W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ojo Mexicano

TX

Presidio

spring

292503N
1035542W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Chilicote Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302504N
1043601W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Log Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292703N
1035213W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

293834N
1035558W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Ranch Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

294110N
1035855W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orona, Cerro

TX

Presidio

summit

295037N
1042607W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orphan Hill

TX

Presidio

summit

302211N
1035327W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oso Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

295249N
1042026W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oso Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

292658N
1040059W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oso Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292550N
1040217W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owls Nest Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

302813N
1041409W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painted Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

303525N
1045124W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paisano

TX

Presidio

locale

301639N
1034902W

Paisano, Texas, a vanished railroad station, was located on both the Southern Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads, twelve miles east of Marfa, Texas, and near the Brewster County line in northeastern Presidio County. Paisano became a station on the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad in early 1882 when that railroad reached the area. At the elevation of 5,074.1 feet, it was the highest railroad station in Texas. It was named for the Spanish word that means countryman. On 8 July 1921 and about 1.25 miles east of the station, the westbound freight train came to a stop. Its boiler exploded, denting the tracks. Although the train remained upright, the force of the explosion blew the cab off the engine frame and over the roadbed. Engineer E. F. Bohlman was killed. Fireman Charles F. Robinson was found 3 miles east of the accident, dazed but not seriously injured. When the G.H.& S.A. became Texas & New Orleans railroad in 1934, Paisano remained a station. By 1961 when the T.&N.O. merged with Southern Pacific, Paisano was abandoned by the railroad. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1987; Paisano Quadrangle, Texas-Presidio County, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1972; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 126; S. G. Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941), 197, 201; Hugh B. Wilson, “Southern Pacific Lines: the S.H.&S.A.R.R., A Brief History of El Paso Division 1881-1925,” in Terrell County, Texas: Its Past, Its People, ed. By Alice Evans Downie (San Angelo: Anchor Pub. Co., 1978), 116; Charles P. Zlatkovich, Texas Railroads (Austin: Univ. of Tex and TSHA, 1981), 69, 91; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1958), 98; 1952-1953 Texas Almanac, 593 shows location of Paisano; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 77.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paisano Pass

TX

Presidio

gap

301646N
1034833W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Palo Blanco, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293024N
1041514W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Palo Blanco, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

300635N
1044100W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panales Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

295612N
1043647W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panales, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

300407N
1044108W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panther Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291912N
1035826W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panther Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

291758N
1035759W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panther Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

292516N
1035857W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panther Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292304N
1035747W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papalote Colorado

TX

Presidio

pop place

292932N
1040052W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papalote Escondido

TX

Presidio

pop place

292833N
1035955W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papalote Llano

TX

Presidio

pop place

292559N
1035646W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papalote Seco

TX

Presidio

pop place

292731N
1035419W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papalote Severo

TX

Presidio

locale

292747N
1040511W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paradise Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

295425N
1034822W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paradise Valley

TX

Presidio

valley

294935N
1034911W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parda, Sierra

TX

Presidio

summit

295650N
1043149W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pardo, Cerro

TX

Presidio

summit

300508N
1043316W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pelegos

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A rural nineteenth-century village, was located on the Chihuahua Trail, near the now-vanished San Esteban, Texas, in eastern Presidio County. Sources: Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft.Davis,TX: Privately published,1982), 80.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pelillos Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

294714N
1043440W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penitas School

TX

Presidio

vanished school

unknown

A vanished ranch school, was located on Penitas Ranch, twenty miles south of Marfa, Texas, in east central Presidio County. The county opened a school there for ranch children in 1905. Evelyn Ellison, a daughter of R.R. Ellison, was a student at the ranch school. The four daughters of Domingo Polomo grew up on the ranch. Penitas Ranch was described as a garden spot and as one of the largest and oldest ranches in the county. In 1895 when W. W. Ellison was foreman of Penitas Ranch for owners James and B. H. Normand, an annual Fourth of July celebration was begun. As part of the celebration, long tables were set up under cottonwood trees and filled with delicious food. The ranch was still owned by the Normands when T. M. Wilson, President of Marfa State Bank, bought it on 10 July 1926. The annual Independence Day observances continued. More recently, the ranch was owned by Ira Yates Blanton. Sources: Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas 1535-1946 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), I:174,337-338; II:284, 317.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perdis Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

300640N
1043141W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perdiz Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300052N
1035917W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peridiz

TX

Presidio

pop place

295936N
1035942W

Located near Alamito Creek on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad between Tinaja, Texas, and Plata, Texas, in eastern Presidio County. Perdiz was created as a station on the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient of Texas railroad when it laid its tracks from Paisano, Texas, to Presidio, Texas, in 1930. It was named for a Spanish word meaning "partridge." No post office was created at Perdiz. The 1998-1999 Texas Almanac did not list Perdiz as a populated place. Sources: USGS; State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Charles P. Zlatkovich, Texas Railroads: A Record of Construction and Abandonment (Austin: UT and TSHA, 1981), 76; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), did not list a post office at Perdiz.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pilares

TX

Presidio

locale

302610N
1045105W

Pilares, Texas, a locale, is located on the Rio Grande about 1 mile from Quinn Creek and 8 miles southwest of Gettysburg Peak in southwestern Presidio County. Named for the Spanish word for waterhole, Pilares has been the setting for a presidio [fort], a penal colony, a silver ore smeltery, and a farming community from mid-eighteenth century to the present. In 1750 the Spanish viceroy designated Pilares as a military presidio. In 1775 both a military installation and a penal colony were established at Pilares. Soldiers and convicts were marooned there to work farms. Silver ore, perhaps mined in the nearby mountains, was smelted there before the presidio was abandoned about 1872. In 1914 a gravity irrigation ditch was built and 300 acres of farm land were devoted to the growing of cotton as a cash crop. During the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) the community was raided by Mexican bandits several times. On 21 May 1915 five Texas Rangers chased a number of Mexicans, who had stolen horses and mules, from Pilares back into the Mexican mountains; however, the bandits escaped after a running gunfight two days later. On 24 May the Rangers again pursued the bandits without success. Being outnumbered and caught in a narrow canyon by Mexican gunfire, the Rangers tried to retreat. Rangers Trollingers, Cummins, and Craighead were able to escape, but rangers Sitters and Hulen were massacred by the Mexicans. No post office existed at Pilares. In 1982 Pilares was a small farming community located on an unimproved road. Sources: Pilares Texas-Chihuahua, Sheet 104, 1:25,000 Scale, USGS Color Image Map, 1982; San Carlos Quadrangle, Presidio County, Grid Zone E, 1:125,000 Scale, USGS Tactical Map, 1895; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1958), 102; Carlysle Graham Raht, The Romance of Davis Mountains and Big Bend Country (Odessa: The Rahtbooks Company, 1963), 120; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, 1535-1900, Vol. 1 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 28, 65, 72; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M. A. Thesis, Univ. of Tex., 1933, pp. 133-134.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pinto

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located in the rugged canyonlands of the Chinati Mountains and in Pinto Canyon of west central Presidio County. The community and the canyon were named for a Spanish word meaning painted. Its first settlers entered the area in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Rancher W. H. [Billy] Cleveland brought his bride, the first woman to live in the isolated canyon, to his adobe house on 9 December 1885 and they continued to raise goats and cattle there until 1897. A small mining camp, surrounding the Burney prospect, sprang up in the canyon in the late 1890s and the claim was worked through the 1950s. In 1907 J. E. and Dora Wilson brought their daughters, Millie, Mamie, and Ora, and their livestock to the lush grassland in the canyon. They lived in a one-room rock house that Cleveland had used as a goat camp. Immediately after driving his cattle into the canyon, Wilson broke his leg. His neighbor, Jose Prieto, tended the cattle until Wilson recovered. Wilson’s capable daughters, Millie and Mamie, with no help, drove their father’s 100 Angora goats, newly-purchased from Cleveland, into the canyon. In 1910 a one-room school was opened in Pinto community with Sue Woodward as the first teacher. The children of Wilson and Prieto, as well as those of Mart Sutherlin and George Sutherlin attended the school. By the 1980s the mining camp was in ruin, the prosperous ranchers had moved from the lonely canyon, and few traces of early settlement were visible. No post office or cemetery was found at Pinto. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; marked the canyon; Ruidosa Hot Springs Quadrangle, Texas-Presidio County, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1979; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come Its Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of NM Press, 1958), 105; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, 1535-1946, 2 vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:213, 229, 244; 2:22, 32, 33, 74 ; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 82; David L. Amsbury, Geology of the Pinto Canyon Area, Presidio County, Texas (Austin Bureau of Eco. Geo., Univ. of Tex., 1958), Map 22; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), did not list a post office at Pinto.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pinto Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

295419N
1042921W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pinto Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

295437N
1043959W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plata

TX

Presidio

pop place

295234N
1040102W

Plata, Texas, a locale, is located on Alamito Creek, on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad, and on Farm Road 169 about four miles south of Alamito community in east central Presidio County. Plata, earlier called La Plata, was named for the Spanish word for silver. It developed as a ranching community in the early 1880s. Robert Reed Ellison, at age 16 in March 1883, brought a herd of cattle and a chuck wagon by train to Murphysville, an earlier name for Alpine, Texas. He unloaded the cattle and drove them 40 miles to his father’s range on Alamito Creek. Later, young Ellison owned a large ranch of his own at Plata. When the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railroad laid it tracks to the community late in 1930, Plata became a station. A store operated in the community at some time and a school was in session as early as the 1933-1934 term when Verna Humphreys was the teacher. By 1939 Plata School was a part of the Marfa Independent School District. In 1988 Plata was a ranching community of indeterminate population, marked by a water tank and a railroad siding. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1987; Plata Quadrangle, Texas-Presidio County, 7.5 Minute Series, USGS Topographical Map, 1983; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 55; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), Vol. 1:192-195, 316, 339; Vol. 2:386, 454-455; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M. A. Thesis, Univ. of Tex., 1933, pp. 75-76; Charles P. Zlatkovich, Texas Railroads: A Record of Construction and Abandonment (Austin: UT and TSHA, 1981), 76; Southwestern Bell Telephone Directory, Alpine-Marfa-Alamito-Calamity Creek, 1988-89; Writer’s observation.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polvo

TX

Presidio

pop place

292606N
1041136W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polvo Crossing

TX

Presidio

locale

292611N
1041136W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ponder Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

302029N
1035733W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

292839N
1035242W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presa Chino

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295147N
1042426W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presa Llorona

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295414N
1042702W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presa Rincon

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295247N
1042600W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presa Viruelas

TX

Presidio

reservoir

295304N
1042439W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidio

TX

Presidio

pop place

293338N
1042218W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidio Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

293639N
1042111W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prietos Bar

TX

Presidio

locale

300438N
1044112W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primero, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

292205N
1035104W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pueblo Nuevo

TX

Presidio

pop place

300718N
1043937W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Puerto Potrillo

TX

Presidio

gap

294939N
1035429W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quebec

TX

Presidio

pop place

303038N
1042357W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quemado Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

302456N
1043937W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinn Camp

TX

Presidio

locale

302645N
1044710W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinn Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

302652N
1045153W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinn Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

302643N
1044501W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinn Mesa Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

302655N
1044530W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinn Windmill

TX

Presidio

locale

302827N
1044509W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ramirez Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

302401N
1034816W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancheria

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A vanished community, was located on Alamito Creek at a point 2.5 miles southeast of Rancheria Hills and 7.5 miles south of Marfa, Texas, in eastern Presidio County. The village served as the headquarters for annual cattle roundups in the 1880s. For each of the fifteen days of a roundup, cowboys gathered cattle within a fifteen-mile radius. They branded the calves and held all of the cattle together. When all of the cattle were gathered to Rancheria, the owners then cut out their own stock. Each roundup ended with a dance at Finley Ranch that included the whole family. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetter of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904),135; Marfa Sheet, USGS topo map, 1895; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas 1535-1946, Vol. 1 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985),244.

 

Julia Cauble Smith cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancheria Hills

TX

Presidio

summit

301449N
1040408W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancherias Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

291957N
1040237W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancherias Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292346N
1040105W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ranchita Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

300721N
1043957W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancho Cielo

TX

Presidio

locale

302155N
1043527W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rancho Viejo Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292946N
1040627W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rawls Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294050N
1040236W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rawls Ranch Airport

TX

Presidio

airport

293900N
1035701W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Hill

TX

Presidio

summit

294706N
1035210W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Hill

TX

Presidio

summit

294818N
1042414W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Mill Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

302305N
1043525W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Tank

TX

Presidio

reservoir

300647N
1043256W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Well

TX

Presidio

well

302343N
1043648W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redford

TX

Presidio

pop place

292659N
1041120W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redford Cemetery

TX

Presidio

cemetery

292615N
1041109W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Righthand Shutup

TX

Presidio

valley

292659N
1035139W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rincon Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

292414N
1035214W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rindosa

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A vanished community, was located at an unknown point in Presidio County in the nineteenth century. A post office was assigned to Rindosa, Texas, on 07 March 1900, but it never operated. The post office assignment was withdrawn on 21 July 1900. The writer did not find the village on a USGS map. Source: Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980),135, 222.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rodriguez Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

293555N
1042546W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roosevelt Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

303159N
1043325W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ross Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

294857N
1042313W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruidosa

TX

Presidio

pop place

295858N
1044044W

Located on the Rio Grande and Farm Road 170 about twelve miles south of Candelaria, Texas, in western Presidio County. Its name is a Spanish word that means windy or noisy and it is descriptive because the wind often blows there. About 1824 the Mexican government established a penal colony, Vado Piedra or Rocky Ford, at the site of the current Ruidosa. The Condemned Regiment, a group of convicts, was sent there to guard northern Chihuahua against Indian attack. However, the Comanche massacred the regiment and the colony was abandoned. In 1872 a small farming community developed around the irrigation ditches that William Russell constructed to bring river water to crops on his large farm. Russell also built a toll mill in that year and residents of the community and surrounding ones had access to flour milling. George Brooks was hired as the manager of Russell’s farm and mill. In 1879 the Mescalero Apache raided the Russell farm, killing four men and wounding three others. A school was in session at the community by 1902 and by 1911 students numbered 287 from a total population of 1,722. In 1914 the post office opened and cotton growing was introduced to the community. A cotton gin was built in 1923 and population declined to 300 in 1929. A Protestant evangelist unsuccessfully attempted to hold services in the Catholic community in March 1933, but too few Protestants were found. In 1933 six businesses operated there, but the Great Depression and the social effects of World War II changed the community. The gin closed in 1936 and the post office followed in 1954. By 1964 the other businesses were gone and population declined to 43 by 1968. The community received mail from Marfa in the 1980s and population continued at 43 throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 01 Nov 1986; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 142; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of NM Press, 1958), 105; John Ernest Gregg, The History of Presidio County, M.A. Thesis, The Univ. of Texas, 1933, pp. 127, 132-134; 138; 183; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946, 2 Vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:37-38, 56, 125, 140, 152, 225; 2:85-86, 388, 422; 1933 Texas Almanac, 65; 1954-1955 Texas Almanac, 120; 1964-1965 Texas Almanac, 150; 1968-1969 Texas Almanac, 188; 1988-89 Texas Almanac, 454; 1998-1999 Texas Almanac, 314; John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas (Dallas: Clements Research, Inc., 1984), 367.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruidosa Hot Springs

TX

Presidio

spring

300217N
1043553W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruidosa School

TX

Presidio

school

295919N
1044055W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan

TX

Presidio

pop place

302548N
1041754W

Reportedly a populated place, was located on the Southern Pacific railroad and U. S. Highway 90, eighteen miles northwest of Marfa, Texas, in north central Presidio County. Ryan became a cattle shipping station on the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad in 1882 when that railroad reached the area with its tracks. It was named for the land commissioner of the railroad, Black Ryan. Many loads of cattle—sometimes entire trains—were shipped from Ryan station to market at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. Former Texas Ranger James B. Gillett ranched around Ryan and shipped cattle from the station. Reportedly, the loading chutes stood until recent times. By the 1980s the station was part of Jones Ranch and the terrain gave little evidence of its former importance to Presidio County ranching. The 1998-1999 Texas Almanac gave no population for Ryan, Texas. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 143; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Texas, 1535-1946, 2 vols. (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 1:201; 2: map between pp. 304 and 305; S. G. Reed, A History of the Texas Railroads (Houston: The St. Clair Pub. Co., 1941), 197; Virginia Madison and Hallie Stillwell, How Come It’s Called That? (Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1958), 98; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 91.

 

USGS &
Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sacred Heart Church

TX

Presidio

church

295903N
1044053W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saint Teresa Church

TX

Presidio

church

300811N
1044053W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samchez Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

302640N
1045152W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Antonio Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

295011N
1043624W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Antonio Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

295340N
1042836W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Carlos

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

San Carlos, TX, a vanished community, was located one mile south of Gettysburg Peak and two miles north of Newman Spring--the community and the water source--in western Presidio County before 1904. No post office or school was found at San Carlos. Sources: Texas (Presidio County) San Carlos Sheet, 1:12500 Scale, USGS Map, reprint 1929; Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 145.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@aprx2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Carlos Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

302734N
1044233W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Carlos, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

301847N
1044643W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Cristobal

TX

Presidio

vanished Spanish Mission

unknown

One of seven missions formally established in the La Junta area on 12 June 1684 by the Juan Dominguez de Mendoza expedition. The exact location of the mission is now unknown, but historians have placed it between Cibolo and Alamito creeks and near the present city of Presidio in southern Presidio County. The Dominguez expedition first came to San Cristobal on 14 January 1684 and celebrated a mass. The Indians who lived there requested that Christian missionaries come to teach them, probably hoping that Spanish troops would also come to protect them against the Apache. The original mission structure was a temporary one built from reeds and straw by the people of the pueblo, who promised to replace it with an adobe one when the missionaries came. On 31 May 1715 Sergeant Major Trasiva Retis and his entourage reached San Cristobal and reported that the pueblo had a population of 180. Governor Pedro Rabago Teran came to the mission in December 1747 and reported that 153 people lived there and that they had no missionary. When the 1749 census of Indian missions was taken, San Cristobal had a population of 500 and Francisco Gonzales was the padre. Later in the 18th century, missions were secularized and the church at San Cristobal would have come under the care of the local diocese. There are no ruins to prove the site. Sources: Carlos E. Castaneda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, 1519-1936 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1936), 1:271-272; 2:311-318, 320-321, 327; 3:217; Herbert Eugene Bolton, Spanish Exploration in the Southwest, 1542-1706 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1916), 329; Charles Matton Brooks, Jr., Texas Missions: Their Romance and Architecture (Dallas: Dealey and Lowe, 1926), 67: Howard G. Applegate and Calvin Wayne Hanselka, La Junta De Los Rios Del Norte y Conchos (El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974), 14-15, 17-20, 23, 54-55; William C. Pool, A Historical Atlas of Texas (Austin: The Encino Press, 1975), 29; J. Charles Kelley, “Big Bend Indian Villages at La Junta de los Rios,” in Native Indian Culture in the Texas Big Bend: A Public Discussion (Alpine: Museum of the Big Bend, 1978), Appendix I; Robert E. Wright, O.M.I., “Catholic Church,” in The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 1 (Austin: TSHA, 1996), 1026-1028.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Estaban Lake

TX

Presidio

reservoir

300959N
1040141W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Jacinto Mountain

TX

Presidio

summit

294516N
1035716W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Jacinto Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

294429N
1035912W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Jose Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

295148N
1043710W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sand Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

303635N
1045721W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Esteban

TX

Presidio

vanished community

300959N
1040141W

An ancient adobe settlement that centered around a water hole on a well-traveled trail near Alamito Creek and three miles west of Tinaja, Texas, in northeastern Presidio County. In the last quarter of the sixteenth century Spanish explorer, Fray Augustin Rodriguez, erected a cross at the water hole. Early in 1684 Captain Juan Mendoza, another Spanish explorer, came to the water hole, following Alamito Creek and searching for the river of pearls. About a century later, a community began to grow at the water hole on the trail that Indians and traders followed. In 1839 Henry Connelly, the Chihuahuan trader, camped at San Esteban with seven wagons and 100 men as they opened the Chihuahua Trail. By the 1870s cattlemen came into the area to graze their livestock. In 1879 the Bishop family arrived and the Jordan family came in 1885. The Bogel family raised horses around San Esteban and sold them to the army. In 1912 San Esteban Dam was built and the area was flooded. The historic water hole that had supplied Spanish explorers, Indians, and traders and its nearby community slipped quietly to the bottom of San Esteban Lake. Sources: Map of Texas and Part of New Mexico, Chiefly for Military Purposes, Bureau of Topographical Engineers, 1857; State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 1986; Ed Bartholomew, The Encyclopedia of Texas Ghost Towns (Ft. Davis: Privately published, 1982), 92; Elton Miles, Tales of the Big Bend (College Station: Texas A&M Univ. Press, 1976), 67; Carlos E. Castaneda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, 1519-1936, Vol. 1 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1936), 158-169; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, 1535-1900, Vol. 1 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 20-21, 37-38, 42-43;116; Cecilia Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, 1901-1946, Vol. 2 (Austin: Nortex Press, 1985), 71, 72, 84, 91, 325; John Ernest Gregg, History of Presidio Co., M. A. Thesis, Univ. of Tex, 1933, 72, 80; Barry Wade Hutcheson, The Trans-Pecos: A Historical Survey and Guide to Historic Sites, M.A. Thesis, Texas Tech. College, 1969, 45.

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

Sanguijuela Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

300304N
1044215W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Solomon

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

Was located, before 1879, at an unidentified point in Presidio County. A post office was created at San Solomon in 1879 and operated until its closing in 1886. The community probably vanished before 1904 since Gannett did not identify it. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), carefully identified each village in Texas, but did not list San Solomon, Texas; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 139.

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

Santa Maria la Redonna

TX

Presidio

vanished mission

unknown

Santa Maria la Redonna, a vanished Spanish mission, was one of seven missions formally established in the La Junta area on 12 June 1684 by the Juan Dominguez de Mendoza expedition. The exact location of the mission is now unknown, but historians have placed it on Cibolo Creek in the vicinity of present Shafter, Texas, in southern Presidio County. The Jumano Indians who lived there had requested that Christian missionaries come to teach them, hoping probably to gain also protection by Spanish troops against the Apache. The original mission structure was a temporary one built from reeds and straw by the people of the pueblo, who promised to replace it with an adobe one when the missionaries came. Since no later census or survey made by the Spanish government mentioned Santa Maria la Redonna mission, it was probably abandoned before 1715. Sources: Carlos E. Castaneda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, 1519-1936 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1936), 1:270-273; 2:311-318, 326; 3:198-203; 5:226; Howard G. Applegate and Calvin Wayne Hanselka, La Junta De Los Rios Del Norte y Conchos (El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974), 14-23, 52-55; William C. Pool, A Historical Atlas of Texas (Austin: The Encino Press, 1975), 29; Robert E. Wright, O.M.I., “Catholic Church,” in The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 1 (Austin: TSHA, 1996), 1026-1028.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santana Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

291805N
1035609W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santiago

TX

Presidio

vanished community

unknown

A settlement on the Rio Grande and was located in the area of Polvo [now Redford], Texas, in southeastern Presidio County. The community of Santiago may have grown up around El Apostol Santiago, a Spanish mission that was established on 12 June 1684 in the La Junta area at the junction of the Rio Grande and the Rio Conchos by the expedition of Juan Dominguez de Mendoza. The census of Indian missions in 1749 gave a population at the mission of 200 who spoke the Zuma-Cholomes language and who were ministered to by Padre Joseph Paez. In 1773 the old mission site was made a Spanish presidio. In 1904 the village still existed, but its name was gone from maps by the 1940s. No post office was found at Santiago. Sources: Henry Gannett, A Gazetteer of Texas, USGS Bulletin 224 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904), 147; Howard G. Applegate and Calvin Wayne Hanselka, La Junta De Los Rios Del Norte y Conchos (El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1974), 23-25, 55-57; 1945-1946 Texas Almanac, 492; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), did not list a post office at Santiago.

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

Sauceda Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

294710N
1040330W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sauceda Ranch

TX

Presidio

locale

292811N
1035727W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Savcito Creek

TX

Presidio

stream

300759N
1040147W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seep Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292033N
1035921W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seep Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292644N
1035225W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Segundo, Arroyo

TX

Presidio

valley

292426N
1035151W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seminole Trail

TX

Presidio

trail

294226N
1035053W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shafter

TX

Presidio

pop place

294912N
1041810W

Located on Cibolo Creek and U. S. Highway 67 at the eastern edge of the Chinati Mountains in southern Presidio County. The village developed as a silver mining town. Prospecting may have begun in the area as early as the 17th century when Spaniards searched for gold and silver. In September 1880 John W. Spencer, a freighter-turned-prospector, discovered metalliferous deposits near the place and showed an ore sample to Major William B. Shafter of 9th Cavalry at Ft. Davis. Shafter had it assayed. When small amounts of profitable silver were found, Shafter and two army friends, Lt. John L. Bullis of the 24th Infantry and Lt. Louis Wilhelmi of the 1st Infantry, formed a partnership to acquire land around the strike. After buying the land and the potential silver deposit, they lacked capital and technical expertise to mine the ore. In June 1882 they leased some of their acreage to a California mining group. By late summer 1883 the group organized Presidio Mining Company and found silver deposits worth $45 per ton. Shafter, Wilhelmi, and Spencer each sold their interests to the mining company for $1600 and 5,000 shares of company stock. Bullis spent several years in litigation only to lose in his legal battle for more money. A post office opened at Shafter in 1885. In 1887, with litigation behind it, the mining company increased operations, hiring nearly 300 men. Shafter reportedly had 4,000 inhabitants in its best days. By 1908 the population at Shafter was second only to that of Marfa in the county. A rare accident at Shafter Mine that year killed Acencion Garcia and injured Miguel Luna. In 1913 about 300 employees continued to work the mines. In the 1920s about 110 people lived at Shafter. The mines closed in the 1930s and reopened in 1939 when a population of 525 and six businesses were reported. By 1942 falling silver prices and labor problems forced the closing of Presidio Mine, which had grossed more than $18 million worth of silver and was the most productive at Shafter. By 1943 a population of 1,500 and twelve businesses were found in the community. Although several attempts were made to reopen the mines from the 1950s through the 1980s, they remained abandoned. As of January 1995 Shafter still had a post office and in 1998 its population was 31. Among the many ruins at Shafter are a church and a cemetery. Sources: State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, General Highway Map of Presidio County, revised 01 Nov 1986; Paul H. Carlson, “The Discovery of Silver in West Texas,” West Texas Historical Association Year Book 54 (1978), 55-63; Julia Cauble Smith, “The Shafter Mining District,” The Permian Historical Annual 28 (Dec 1988), 75-84; Charles Deaton, Texas Postal History Handbook (Houston: by author, 1980), 140; Henry T. Fletcher, quoted by H. Bailey Carroll, “Texas Collection,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 48:2 (Oct 1944), 296; Clyde P. Ross, Geology and Ore Deposits of the Shafter Mining District, Presidio County, Texas, USGS Bulletin 928-B (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1943), 45-50; Dick King, Ghost Towns of Texas (San Antonio: The Naylor Co., 1953), 81-82; 1998-1999 Texas Almanac, 315; Writer’s observation.

 

Julia Cauble Smith
cauble@apex2000.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shafter Mine

TX

Presidio

mine

294902N
1041922W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short Draw

TX

Presidio

valley

301710N
1035553W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Siffer Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

302413N
1044547W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sitter Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303059N
1043650W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smith House Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

292536N
1035341W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smugglers Gap

TX

Presidio

gap

293838N
1034908W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snyder Well

TX

Presidio

well

302428N
1043015W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Canyon

TX

Presidio

valley

303155N
1044717W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Mesa

TX

Presidio

summit

303006N
1044514W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Spring

TX

Presidio

spring

303134N
1044552W

 

 

USGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Windmill

TX

Presidio