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  Van Alstyne Cemetery
McKinney Block

 


David W. Fulton
PVT 
6 TEXAS CAV C.S.A.


 
Van Alstyne Leader
Sept. 11, 1924
Funeral Services for D.W. Fulton
by W.J. White

Funeral services for D.W. Fulton, pioneer citizen of this community, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mattie Emerson, on Wednesday morning, September 3, were held at the Methodist church on Thursday morning, Rev. R.C. Hicks, the pastor, Rev. Virgil M. Hailey, pastor of the Baptist church, and Rev. Leo Johnston, pastor of the Christian church, officiated.  The services included the prayer by Rev. Hailey, and addresses by Revs. Hicks and Johnston.  It was a most impressive occasion.  Gathered at the church were the old and the young, men who had stood by the side of the departed friend and comrade on the battlefield; others who had striven with him in the making of an empire out of a wilderness; and still others who had come to know him through other channels - all of whom loved and respected him for his sterling worth, and who shared, in spirit, in the eulogies so eloquently expressed by men of God.  By Mr. Fulton's special request, J.D.L. McKinney, then whom no one was better acquainted with him, spoke of his life and character, expressing sentiments that found ready response in the hearts of those who were present.
The musical numbers included the quartette, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere", sung by Mrs. S.S. Boutwell, Mrs. A.R. Hill, Joe M. Parish and Emmett Day, with Miss Nannie Cave at the piano.
Interment was had at the local cemetery according to the rites of the Masonic Order, the services being conducted by Mantua Lodge, No. 209, with Roscoe Garver acting as worshipful master.
The newly made mound was carpeted with flowers in an abundance of beautiful profusion, the silent evidences of the love and esteem of a host of friends from all sections of the community.
The pallbearers were as follows:
Active (consisting of his grandsons) - W.D. Benton, H.H. Benton, R.S. Benton, Harold Fulton, J.D. Fulton, Jr., Zac Emerson, Taylor Emerson, Fulton Emerson, Clifford Fulton, Milam Fulton, David Fulton, Conrad Schweighofer.
Honorary pallbearers - (consisting of the older members of the Masons, Confederate veterans, associates of pioneer days and personal friends) - N.M. Drye, R.M. Cannon, J.R. Cannon, O.M. Cannon, E.H. Cannon, J.W. Mauldin, S.D. Yeury, Tom McSpadden, R. Cipher, F.R. Slaughter, S.S. Huckaby, C.E. Carter, J.W. Cartwright, Dr. S.D. Moore, S.L. McKinney, Captain G.W. Kidd, Y.S. Creager, Taylor Creager, Jim Creager, N.M. Davis, J.H. Arnspiger, Dr. J.N. McKinney, John Savage, C.M. Taylor, I.H. Mount, J.P. Barron, B.F. Thompson, John W. Thompson, J.T. Sheridan, W.H. Douglas, John W. McKinney, J.D.L. McKinney, J.H. Jones, W.T. Evatt, A.T. Leslie, W.J. White, John Umphress, J.M. Neathery.
Mr. Fulton was born at Clarkesville, Arkansas, on February 14, 1838.  His childhood and boyhood were spent at that place.  His parents dying while he was yet a child, he was thrown upon his own resources to make his way through life.  In every respect he was a self-made man.  In 1849, he moved to Texas, settling in Lamar county, where he resided for several years, coming to this section of Grayson county in 1854, and making his home here continuously since that time, save for four years spent in the Confederate army during the war between the States.
On October 27, 1857, Mr. Fulton was married to Miss Margaret Elizabeth McKinney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Younger Scott McKinney, and a granddaughter of Collin McKinney, one of the founders of the Republic of Texas, and for whom Collin county and the city of McKinney was named.  To this union were born eight children, seven of whom survive, as follows: Dr. J.S. Fulton, Atoka, Oklahoma; Scott Fulton, Van Alstyne, V.M. Fulton, Indianola, Oklahoma; H.P. Fulton, Brownsville, Texas; J.D. Fulton, Muskogee, Oklahoma; Mrs. Z.D. Emerson, and Mrs. H.M. Benton, Van Alstyne.  In addition, there are a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  Mrs. Fulton passed into rest on June 10, 1898.
He is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Mattie Taylor of Calvert, Texas.
Mr. Fulton was married the second time on March 5, 1901, to Mrs. Sarah Sullivan, who passed into rest on January 27, 1916.  To this marriage there were no children born.
On September 24, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, and served until early in 1865, when he came back to Texas on a furlough.  He often spoke of the fact that he had "never surrendered" to the "devilish Yankees," as he called them.  He was a member of the Sixth Texas Cavalry, and participated in 85 major and minor battles while serving in the commands of General Joseph E. Johnston and General J.B. Hood.  In the engagements at Lovejoy Station, Ga., and Union Station, Gal., both taking place during the campaign around Atlanta, Ga., in 1864, he was wounded, returning to active duty in each instance as soon as he had recovered.  After the evacuation of Atlanta by the Confederate forces, the command to which Mr. Fulton was attached, was moved into Tennessee as a part of the division commanded by General W.H. Jackson, where it surrendered to the Union forces under General George H. Thomas, at Murfreesboro, in 1865. At the time of the surrender, Mr. Fulton was absent on furlough, and did not return after news of the surrender reached him.
Joining the Mantua Lodge, No. 209 A.F. & A.M., in September, 1865, as an Entered Apprentice, Mr. Fulton was initiated into the Fellowcraft degree on November 4 of the same year, and on December 10, 1865, he became a Master Mason.  When the Centennial Lodge was organized at Cannon, he became one of its charter members, retaining this membership until the Cannon Lodge was dissolved, after which he again became a member of Mantua Lodge.  At the time of his death, he was in years the oldest member and in membership the second oldest member of Mantua Lodge, R.M. Cannon being his senior in the latter respect.
In September 1866, he united with the Methodist church, retaining his membership in the body until his death.  As long as his health permitted, he was faithful in attendance upon the services and zealous in the performance of all of the duties and obligations of a professing Christian.  In all of the walks of life, he was true to his religion, in that his attitude at all times toward his fellow-man was exemplified in the teachings of the Golden Rule.  In the family circle, as a man of affairs and in every other way, he was the model husband, and father, and of the highest type as a citizen.  As he entered the evening of his life, his devotion to his great-grandchild, Marjorie Kelly Emerson, was most beautiful.  She was his especial favorite, and when the end came the grief of the little girl was touching in the extreme.
After the close of the war and at the beginning of the development of this section, in the days before there were railroads, or the telegraph, or any other of the modern conveniences, Mr. Fulton engaged in freighting, bringing from Jefferson, which was then the outlet for commercial purposes, building material, food-stuff and other supplies needed for the building up of this community.  In all of the initial growth of this section, he took a prominent part, and was one of the main factors in the laying of the foundation of the splendid civilization which we enjoy today.
After the coming of the railroad made possible the bringing of the necessities to the doors of the people of Van Alstyne, Mr. Fulton engaged in farming, following his until his removal to Van Alstyne several years ago.  Following the death of his second wife, he gave up keeping a home and lived in the home of his daughter, Mrs. Z.D. Emerson, until his death.
To Mrs. Emerson, Mrs. Ward Emerson and one of his grandsons, Zac Emerson, was committed the care of Mr. Fulton in his declining days.  And in its performance every energy possible was exerted with the purpose that nothing that love and affection and constant attention could do would be lacking in the effort to sustain his health and strength and to make his last days most comfortable.
Until a few months ago, Mr. Fulton was a familiar figure on the streets of Van Alstyne.  Known to practically everybody in this community, and held in the highest possible regard by all who knew him, he was warmly greeted wherever he went and always had a word of cheer for those whom he met.  After his physical condition became such as to force him to remain indoors, hardly a day passed but that many of his friends called to see him and to talk with him.  He was always glad to have them call, and it was always a pleasure for him to talk with them.  Thoroughly conscious until the end came, he passed into rest as a child to sleep, calmly, and at peace with all of mankind and with his God - leaving as a worldly heritage
"A life's race well run,
A life's work well done."
and entering into the rest promised those who do well the tasks committed to their hands on earth with the promise that in the land beyond the vale there shall come the realization of the hope that inspires all of those whose talents are utilized in meriting and deserving the benediction coming to those who are faithful until the end.
To his family and to his relatives, the most sincere sympathy of the entire community is...(CLIPPING ENDS HERE)



News after the service;

Van Alstyne Library family history files

Funeral Services for D.W. Fulton
by W.J. White

Funeral services for D.W. Fulton, pioneer citizen of this community, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mattie Emerson, on Wednesday morning, September 3, were held at the Methodist church on Thursday morning, Rev. R.C. Hicks, the pastor, Rev. Virgil M. Hailey, pastor of the Baptist church, and Rev. Leo Johnston, pastor of the Christian church, officiated.  The services included the prayer by Rev. Hailey, and addresses by Revs. Hicks and Johnston.  It was a most impressive occasion.  Gathered at the church were the old and the young, men who had stood by the side of the departed friend and comrade on the battlefield; others who had striven with him in the making of an empire out of a wilderness; and still others who had come to know him through other channels - all of whom loved and respected him for his sterling worth, and who shared, in spirit, in the eulogies so eloquently expressed by men of God.  By Mr. Fulton's special request, J.D.L. McKinney, then whom no one was better acquainted with him, spoke of his life and character, expressing sentiments that found ready response in the hearts of those who were present.
The musical numbers included the quartette, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere", sung by Mrs. S.S. Boutwell, Mrs. A.R. Hill, Joe M. Parish and Emmett Day, with Miss Nannie Cave at the piano.
Interment was had at the local cemetery according to the rites of the Masonic Order, the services being conducted by Mantua Lodge, No. 209, with Roscoe Garver acting as worshipful master.
The newly made mound was carpeted with flowers in an abundance of beautiful profusion, the silent evidences of the love and esteem of a host of friends from all sections of the community.
The pallbearers were as follows:
Active (consisting of his grandsons) - W.D. Benton, H.H. Benton, R.S. Benton, Harold Fulton, J.D. Fulton, Jr., Zac Emerson, Taylor Emerson, Fulton Emerson, Clifford Fulton, Milam Fulton, David Fulton, Conrad Schweighofer.
Honorary pallbearers - (consisting of the older members of the Masons, Confederate veterans, associates of pioneer days and personal friends) - N.M. Drye, R.M. Cannon, J.R. Cannon, O.M. Cannon, E.H. Cannon, J.W. Mauldin, S.D. Yeury, Tom McSpadden, R. Cipher, F.R. Slaughter, S.S. Huckaby, C.E. Carter, J.W. Cartwright, Dr. S.D. Moore, S.L. McKinney, Captain G.W. Kidd, Y.S. Creager, Taylor Creager, Jim Creager, N.M. Davis, J.H. Arnspiger, Dr. J.N. McKinney, John Savage, C.M. Taylor, I.H. Mount, J.P. Barron, B.F. Thompson, John W. Thompson, J.T. Sheridan, W.H. Douglas, John W. McKinney, J.D.L. McKinney, J.H. Jones, W.T. Evatt, A.T. Leslie, W.J. White, John Umphress, J.M. Neathery.
 


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