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Lipscomb County Creeks

Source: The Handbook of Texas Online

BUFFALO CREEK
CANYON CREEK
CAMP CREEK
CAT CREEK
EAST BUFFALO CREEK
FIFTH CREEK
MAMMOTH CREEK
COTTONWOOD CREEK
SAND CREEK
PLUM CREEK
SECOND CREEK
THIRD CREEK
FOURTH CREEK
HORSE CREEK
SKUNK CREEK
BIG TIMBER CREEK
IVANHOE CREEK
WILLOW CREEK
FIRST CREEK
WOLF CREEK
GIBSON CREEK
KIOWA CREEK
GILHULA CREEK

BUFFALO CREEK

Buffalo Creek rises twenty miles south of Booker in southwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°07' N, 100°32' W) and runs north for about six miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, eleven miles west of Lipscomb (at 36°14' N, 100°28' W). The Jones and Plummer Trail followed the course of the stream to its mouth, near where the Barton brothers first settled in 1878, an area later included in the Cresswell and Seven K ranchq ranges. Buffalo Creek traverses terrain that varies from flat to rolling, with local escarpments. Native vegetation comprises mesquite brush and grasses in deep, fine sandy loam.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: A History of Lipscomb County, Texas, 1876-1976 (Lipscomb, Texas: Lipscomb County Historical Survey Committee, 1976). Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



CANYON CREEK

Canyon Creek rises ten miles northeast of Higgins in southeastern Lipscomb County (at 36°05' N, 100°09' W) and runs north for nine miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, seven miles east of Lipscomb (at 35°15' N, 100°07' W). The stream traverses terrain that varies from flat to rolling, with some local escarpments. Native vegetation consists primarily of mesquite and grasses growing in deep, fine sandy loams.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: A History of Lipscomb County, Texas, 1876-1976 (Lipscomb, Texas: Lipscomb County Historical Survey Committee, 1976).



CAMP CREEK

Camp Creek, fed by Camp Springs, rises five miles east of Higgins in southeastern Lipscomb County (at 36°07' N, 100°04' W) and runs north for ten miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, fifteen miles east of Lipscomb (at 36°15' N, 100°05' W). The stream was on Elga Page's ranch and probably was an Indian campsite. The eastern branch of the Jones and Plummer Trail crossed it, and the headquarters of the Box T Ranch was established on it in 1885. The terrain varies from flat to rolling, with some local escarpments, and is surfaced by deep, fine sandy loam that supports mesquite and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: A History of Lipscomb County, Texas, 1876-1976 (Lipscomb, Texas: Lipscomb County Historical Survey Committee, 1976). Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



CAT CREEK

Cat Creek rises five miles northeast of Lipscomb in central Lipscomb County (at 36°14' N, 100°15' W) and runs south for four miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, two miles east of Lipscomb (at 36°14' N, 100°14' W). It crosses flat to rolling terrain with some local escarpments, surfaced by deep, fine sandy loams that support mesquite and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



EAST BUFFALO CREEK

East Buffalo Creek rises in southwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°10' N, 100°27' W) and runs north for seven miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek (at 36°14' N, 100°25' W). East Buffalo Creek was near the Jones and Plummer Trail and was part of the Seven K Ranch range. The area is flat with local shallow depressions; water-tolerant hardwoods, conifers, and grasses grow from clay and sandy loam soils.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: A History of Lipscomb County, Texas, 1876-1976 (Lipscomb, Texas: Lipscomb County Historical Survey Committee, 1976). Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941). Pauline D. and R. L. Robertson, Cowman's Country: Fifty Frontier Ranches in the Texas Panhandle, 1876-1887 (Amarillo: Paramount, 1981).



FIFTH CREEK

Fifth Creek rises eight miles south of Darrouzett in central Lipscomb County (at 36°22' N, 100°20' W) and runs south for seven miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, three miles west of Lipscomb (at 36°14' N, 100°19' W). It was once within the Seven K Ranch range. The stream traverses flat to rolling terrain with some local escarpments, surfaced by thick, fine sandy loams that support mesquite and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



MAMMOTH CREEK

Mammoth Creek rises in northern Lipscomb County (at 36°27' N, 100°12' W) and flows southeast for fifteen miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, just across the state line in Ellis County, Oklahoma (at 36°16' N, 99°59' W). The creek was spring fed and flowed constantly until 1952. It was named by J. C. Studer in the late 1880s after fossilized mammoth bones were discovered on its banks. A rural post office, known first as Mammoth and then as Shadeland, was located near the stream south of Follett and remained in operation until 1916. The creek begins in flat to rolling terrain with local escarpments, where hardwood forest, brush, and grasses grow in fine sandy loam, and moves into a flat to rolling, locally active dune area characterized by sand and bunch grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: A History of Lipscomb County, Texas, 1876-1976 (Lipscomb, Texas: Lipscomb County Historical Survey Committee, 1976). Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941). Pauline D. and R. L. Robertson, Cowman's Country: Fifty Frontier Ranches in the Texas Panhandle, 1876-1887 (Amarillo: Paramount, 1981).



COTTONWOOD CREEK

Cottonwood Creek rises eleven miles southeast of Higgins in southern Lipscomb County (at 36°05' N, 100°16' W) and runs northeast for ten miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, four miles east of Lipscomb (at 36°15' N, 100°12' W). It traverses flat to rolling terrain with local escarpments, surfaced by deep, fine sandy loams that support native vegetation including mesquite shrubs and grasses.



SAND CREEK

Sand Creek rises in southwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°06' N, 100°26' W) and flows northeast for twelve miles, through flat to rolling terrain characterized by deep, fine sandy loams, to its mouth on Wolf Creek, near Lipscomb (at 36 14' N, 100 17' W). The surrounding vegetation is primarily brush and grasses. The spring-fed creek once flowed constantly but is now mostly dry. It was in the heart of the old Seven K range.



PLUM CREEK

Plum Creek rises in south central Lipscomb County (at 36°04' N, 100°19' W) twenty miles southwest of Higgins and runs north for nine miles to its mouth (at 36°14' N, 100°15' W) on Wolf Creek, two miles east of Lipscomb. The first headquarters of what became the Box T Ranch was established on Plum Creek in 1878. The creek traverses terrain that varies from flat to rolling, with some local escarpments. Native vegetation consists of mesquite and grasses in deep, fine, sandy loams.



SECOND CREEK

Second Creek rises eight miles southwest of Darrouzett in northwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°22' N, 100°26' W) and runs south for seven miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, fifteen miles west of Lipscomb (at 36°15' N, 100°26' W). Second Creek is on the route of the Jones and Plummer Trail, and much of the creek was included in the old Seven K range. The creek flows through an area where the terrain varies from flat to rolling, with some local escarpments. Native vegetation consists of mesquite, sandsage, and grasses in soil composed of deep, fine sandy loam.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



THIRD CREEK

Third Creek rises ten miles southwest of Darrouzett in northwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°21' N, 100°24' W) and runs south for six miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, seven miles south of Lipscomb (at 36°15' N, 100°24' W). The creek flows through terrain that varies from flat to rolling, with local escarpments. Native vegetation consists of mesquite, sand sage, and shin oak brush in deep, fine sandy loams.



FOURTH CREEK

Fourth Creek rises sixteen miles southwest of Darrouzett in north central Lipscomb County (at 36°21' N, 100°22' W) and runs south for seven miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek, seven miles west of Lipscomb (at 36°14' N, 100°21' W). It traverses flat to rolling terrain with some local escarpments, surfaced by deep, fine sandy loams that support mesquite, brush, and grasses. The creek's lower portion was within the Seven K Ranch range.



HORSE CREEK

Horse Creek rises in two branches in southwestern Lipscomb County (at 36°07' N, 100°27' W) and runs south for twelve miles, through flat to rolling terrain surfaced by deep fine sandy loams, before reaching its mouth on the Canadian River, in northwestern Hemphill County (at 35°57' N, 100°27' W). Local vegetation includes brush and grasses. The stream was part of the Cresswell



SKUNK CREEK

Skunk Creek rises seven miles southwest of Darrouzett in north central Lipscomb County (at 36°23' N, 100°16' W) and flows southeast for ten miles until it reaches its mouth on Wolf Creek, nine miles northeast of Lipscomb (at 36°15' N, 100°10' W). The creek flows through an area once leased and operated by the S Bar T Ranch. The terrain there varies from flat to rolling with some local escarpments. Native vegetation consists of mesquite and various grasses in soil composed of deep, fine sandy loams.



BIG TIMBER CREEK

Big Timber Creek rises in two forks thirteen miles southwest of Lipscomb in southern Lipscomb County (at 36°06' N, 100°24' W) and flows south for twenty miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, three miles northwest of Canadian in northwestern Hemphill County (at 35°56' N, 100°25' W). It was once part of the Cresswell (Bar CC) Ranch properties. The stream crosses flat to rolling country with moderate relief and local escarpments, surfaced with sand and sandy loam that support mesquite brush and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Pauline D. and R. L. Robertson, Cowman's Country: Fifty Frontier Ranches in the Texas Panhandle, 1876-1887 (Amarillo: Paramount, 1981).



IVANHOE CREEK

Ivanhoe Creek rises in the Follett oilfield just north of Follett in extreme northeastern Lipscomb County (at 36°27' N, 100°11' W) and runs fourteen miles southeast before reaching the Oklahoma state line; its mouth is on Wolf Creek in Ellis County, Oklahoma (at 36°17' N, 99°57' W). The stream traverses flat to rolling terrain characterized by deep, fine, sandy loam soils. Local vegetation is primarily brush and grasses. Ivanhoe Creek was part of the old YL Ranch properties.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Clinton Leon Paine, The History of Lipscomb County (M.A. thesis, West Texas State College, 1941).



WILLOW CREEK

Willow Creek rises nine miles west of Higgins in southeastern Lipscomb County (at 36°08' N, 100°12' W) and flows north for seven miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek (at 36°14' N, 100°09' W). The creek was on J. R. Wheat's ranch and, fed by Willow Spring, flowed constantly until the drought of 1950. It was part of the old Box T range. Willow Creek flows through flat to rolling terrain composed of mostly deep, fine, sandy loams that support brush and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Pauline D. and R. L. Robertson, Cowman's Country: Fifty Frontier Ranches in the Texas Panhandle, 1876-1887 (Amarillo: Paramount, 1981).



FIRST CREEK

First Creek rises a mile from the Ochiltree-Lipscomb county line in southeastern Ochiltree County (at 36°21' N, 100°34' W) and runs southeast for eight miles to its mouth on Wolf Creek in Lipscomb County (at 36°15' N, 100°27' W). The stream was on the route of the Jones and Plummer Trail and on the range of the Seven K Ranch. First Creek traverses flat to rolling terrain with some local escarpments, surfaced by thick, fine sandy loam that supports mesquite brush and grasses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Pauline D. and R. L. Robertson, Cowman's Country: Fifty Frontier Ranches in the Texas Panhandle, 1876-1887 (Amarillo: Paramount, 1981).



WOLF CREEK

Wolf Creek rises at the junction of its main and south forks in central Ochiltree County (at 36°18' N, 100°56' W) and flows east seventy miles across Lipscomb County, Texas, and central Ellis and northwestern Woodward counties, Oklahoma, to its mouth on the Canadian River (at 36°35' N, 99°30' W). The surrounding terrain is typically flat with local escarpments. Brush and grasses grow in the mostly deep, fine sandy loam along its banks. Evidences of pre-Columbian Indian habitation on Wolf Creek were discovered with the excavations of the "Buried City" in Ochiltree County.

The Coronado expedition is thought to have come by the stream on its way to Quivira in 1541, and Juan de Oñate's expedition reportedly camped there in 1601. Hide hunters from Dodge City frequented the stream during the height of the great buffalo slaughter of the 1870s. Some of the Panhandle's first Anglo pioneers, including Charles Dietrich, Ed Jones, Joseph Plummer, Dee Eubanks, Tom Connell, and the Barton brothers, settled along its banks.

Among the early ranching outfits that established their headquarters on or near Wolf Creek were the Cresswell (Bar CC), Seven K, and Box T. Lipscomb was founded near the stream in 1887. The Wolf Creek Dam and Lake, which were washed away by floodwaters in 1947, were replaced by Lake Fryer in eastern Ochiltree County.



GIBSON CREEK

Gibson Creek rises in southeastern Ochiltree County (at 36°05' N, 100°39' W) and runs northeast for ten miles to join Wolf Creek in western Lipscomb County (at 36°12' N, 100°32' W). It traverses flat to rolling terrain with local escarpments, surfaced by deep, fine, sandy loams that support hardwood forests, brush, and grasses. The great Panhandle drift fence crossed the upper portion of the creek, which once was part of the Bar CC and Seven K Ranch ranges.



KIOWA CREEK

Kiowa Creek rises southwest of Huntoon in northeastern Ochiltree County (at 36°25' N, 100°41' W) and runs northeast for nine miles into Lipscomb County, then continues for another eight miles through Darrouzett into Beaver County, Oklahoma, where it drains into the Beaver River (at 36°46' N, 99°54' W). During its course the stream is fed by several tributaries. It traverses a low-lying area surfaced with loose sand that supports scrub brush and grasses. Kiowa Creek was named for the Indian tribe that once roamed this area. It was part of the Bar CC and Seven K ranch ranges. The Jones and Plummer Trail crossed its upper portion in eastern Ochiltree County.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Wheatheart of the Plains: An Early History of Ochiltree County (Perryton, Texas: Ochiltree County Historical Survey Committee, 1969).



GILHULA CREEK

Gilhula (Gilaloo) Creek rises in eastern Ochiltree County (at 36°19' N, 100°38' W) and runs southeast for twelve miles to join Wolf Creek in western Lipscomb County (at 36°14' N, 100°28' W). It traverses flat to rolling terrain with local escarpments and mostly deep, fine, sandy loam soils that support hardwood forests, brush, and grasses. The area was at one time used by Pueblo Indians. In early settlement days, before its springs dried up, the creek was a favorite location for swimming, fishing, and baptizing. The name Gilhula is probably of Indian origin. The stream was once on the Seven K Ranch.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Gunnar Brune, Springs of Texas, Vol. 1 (Fort Worth: Branch-Smith, 1981). Wheatheart of the Plains: An Early History of Ochiltree County (Perryton, Texas: Ochiltree County Historical Survey Committee, 1969).

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This page was last updated January 9, 2014.