CITRUSGROVE  NEWS  ARTICLES
 


 Citrus Grove Article - Handbook of Texas

Citrus Grove Business Ads

Citrus Grove History

Citrus Grove Newspaper Articles

Citrus Grove Community Thanksgiving Dinners 1909 - 1977
 


CITRUSGROVE

The new Shires house north of Citrus is completed. It helps the looks of things out that way.

Mr. Henry Delaplain and son Carl left for Florida a few days ago. They go from Galveston by water.

Glen Miller has been plowing on his orchard near Citrusgrove, expecting to plant orange trees.

The second season of the Citrusgrove Sunday school was held last Sunday. There was quite an increase in attendance over the first Sunday.

F. E. Benedict of Bay City is here having some work done on his farm.

The Helping Hand Society held a social at the home of Clyde Hibbs last Wednesday evening. There were forty present and all seemed to have a pleasant time. Oranges and cake were served and music was rendered by Mr. and Mrs. Linn Yeamans and Mrs. Keeley. They sold one dozen oranges at auction and made quite a bit, the oranges selling for $2.60.

Mr. Burns is improving his farm in the way of some nice little evergreen trees and a good fence.

The Citrus farmers are all expected to be present at the school house on Friday evening. Cotton and watermelons will be the subjects for discussion.

Plowing seems to be the job for nearly everybody now.

Mr. John Cutter of Iowa came in Friday and located on his 385-acre tract near the Booze farm.

Mr. Rose also came last week and will live down close to Mr. Booze.

George Braden and Will Shuey went up north of Midfield and got a load of cotton seed. They also tried to learn all they could of those cotton farmers up there.

Lisle Delaplain is riding a new bicycle now.

Mr. Corporon got word a few days ago of the death of his brother at Portis, Kans.

The Matagorda County Tribune, January 13, 1911
 


Citrusgrove

The new Shires house north of Citrus is completed. It helps the looks of things out that way.

Mr. Henry Delaplain and son Carl left for Florida a few days ago. They go from Galveston by water.

Glen Miller has been plowing on his orchard near Citrusgrove, expecting to plant orange trees.

The second season of the Citrusgrove Sunday school was held last Sunday. There was quite an increase in attendance over the first Sunday.

P. E. Benedict of Bay City is here having some work done on his farm.

The Helping Hand Society held a social at the home of Clyde Hibbs last Wednesday evening. There were forty present and all seemed to have a pleasant time. Oranges and cake were served and music was rendered by Mr. and Mrs. Linn Yeamans and Mrs. Keeley. They sold one dozen oranges at auction and made quite a bit, the oranges selling for $2.60.

Mr. Burns is improving his farm in the way of some nice little evergreen trees and a good fence.

The Citrus farmers are all expected to be present at the school house on Friday evening. Cotton and watermelons will be the subjects for discussion.

Plowing seems to be the job for nearly everybody now.

Mr. John Cutter of Iowa came in Friday and located on his 385-acre tract near the Booze farm.

Mr. Rose also came last week and will down close to Mr. Booze.

George Braden and Will Shuey went up north of Midfield and got a load of cotton seed. They also tried to learn all they could of those cotton farmers up there.

Matagorda County Tribune, January 20, 1911
 


CITRUSGROVE

Another norther is on but not so severe as the last one. The rain Monday morning was a fine shower and welcomed by all.

J. J. Gillespie shipped out a carload of grading tools to Houston last week. Also his sorrel pair of horses.

Frank Cobb of Blessing was over with his father a day or so last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Loyd Saxton made a business trip to Blessing on Saturday. On the way home the buggy broke and if the horse hadn't been very gentle they might have had a serious accident.

Mr. Ranch is over from Palacios to go goose hunting with his son-in-law, Mr. Lynn Yeamans.

Contractor Lake of Collegeport took a bunch of carpenters out to the Cutter farm today to build a good house for Mr. Cutter.

Mrs. L. G. Cobb is visiting her son, Frank, in Blessing over Sunday.

Mrs. Braden was sitting in her buggy holding a saddle horse by the bridle while the rider sorted some mail. The pony caught the bridle on the buggy, pulled back and upset the buggy. Mrs. Braden was thrown out but was not hurt.

Several of the farmers will finish plowing in a few days.

Mrs. Yeamans is fencing the vacant lots north of the store and west of the railroad.

There is another large party of homeseekers in now--three carloads.

The school teacher, Miss Mills, is unable to be at school for a few days.

There was quite a bunch of the farmers met at the Citrusgrove Growers Association last Friday evening. The Association will meet in two weeks again.

Mr. Corporon is hauling some trees for Prof. Travis of the Gulf Coast University.

The Shueys have built a large poultry pen.

Mr. Vern Batchelder was sick a few days last week.

Several of the young people met at George Braden's last night to practice singing for Sunday school.

L. G. Cobb is having a second floor put in a part of his warehouse.

I guess Citrus folks wish the post-master-to-be would get a hustle on himself. It seems as though no one goes to Collegeport this kind of weather and so we don't get any mail.

I. P. Miller is breaking his young mules.

Quite an interest is being taken in the Sunday school. There was a good attendance last Sunday, if it was a bad day.

Clarence Booze is boarding Mr. C__ton's carpenters this week.

L. G. Cobb unloaded a car of feed a few days ago.

Bert Kelley shipped a car of corn in recently.

Nearly all the farmers went up to the Dane settlement North of Midfield and bought cotton seed this week.                                                    

The Matagorda County Tribune, January 27, 1911
 


CITRUSGROVE

This is excellent weather we are having.

J. J. Gillespie returned home to Houston Friday.

Mrs. J. W. Shuey, Mrs. Cobb and Mrs. Sexton called on Mrs. Stanfield Friday afternoon.

Lloyd Saxton bought a pair of the Pierce mules last week.

The Shueys and Hibbs are planting grapes and figs on their farms.

Mr. R. Knight, the section foreman, has an electric car and does a lot of going now.

The Helping Hand Society met at Mrs. Kelley's on Friday.

Mr. Ryon on the Robbins ranch bought two big loads of corn from Mr. Cobb on Friday.

Bert Hunt's baby fell off the bed and broke her collar bone a few days ago.

The Citrus Sunday School is still on the increase.

A few people met at the home of Roy Keeley Sunday evening to practice singing.

A number of the neighbors held a social dance at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Pete Johnston Saturday evening.

Roy C. Keeley is going to Palacios today with twelve big fat hogs.

Citrus folks expect a postoffice this week some time. Hope they won't be disappointed this time.

The Matagorda County Tribune, February 3, 1911
 


CITRUSGROVE

Still we are having lovely spring weather. It is a bit too early to all we folks that have been used to snow and cold winters.

The Citrus Sunday school is still increasing in attendance. Everyone seems to be getting interested.

Mr. Roy Keeley's hogs sold at about 8 cents per pound. He said he made a good profit on them.

They all said that they had a fine time down at Pete Johnston's and are going to have it over again at George Braden's on February 4.

A few neighbors met with Will and Pearl Shuey on Thursday evening. The evening was spent in singing. Mrs. Shuey served chocolate fudge.

Nearly all the Citrus farmers are planting orange trees this week. It would be much easier to tell of those who didn't plant trees than those who did.

Bert Smith has his new set of blacksmith tools ready.

Lumber has been hauled from the Theo. Smith yard to the Rose farm to build a new barn.

There was quite an attendance at the Citrusgrove Growers Association on Friday night. Orders were taken for watermelon seed and fertilizer.

Lloyd Saxton has bought a new cotton and corn planter getting ready for the planting season which will be here before we know it.

Mr. Corporon has been doing some ditching on his farm with his traction engine.

Figs and grapes are starting out very nicely now and the gardens are looking fine. We sure hope there will not be another hard freeze this year.

Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Smith of Collegeport were at Citrus one day this week.

Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Cobb left late Saturday evening for Blessing to stay over Sunday.

George Braden dug a well for stock use a few days ago.

There will be a social at the Perry school house on the evening of February 14. There will be a good program and lots of boxes to sell. We hope all will go and have a good time.

Shire's big new house north of town has a coat of paint now.

Tom Gideon has rented a tract of rice land across the canal north of the Station ranch.

The Braden and Shuey families went to Roy Nelson's at Collegeport on Sunday.

Mrs. Stanfield entertained the Crabill family on last Sunday.

Omar Crabill has left the Gulf Coast University of Collegeport and is helping his father on the farm at Citrus.

The Helping Hand Society will sew for Mrs. F. B. Moore next Thursday. The same society will have a taffy pulling at I. P. Miller's on Wednesday evening.

The Matagorda County Tribune, February 10, 1911
 


CITRUSGROVE

The rain so long expected has come at last and all are glad to see it.

Another large party of homeseekers arrived today. There were three carloads of them.

Theo. Smith and son got in a car of lumber this week. Someone must be buying lumber.

The taffy pulling at Miller's caused a lot of pleasure and excitement to those present and it seemed as tho nearly all were there. Most all would like to go again.

The box social is next Tuesday evening at the Perry school house. All are invited to attend. Ladies will bring the boxes and the gents the cash.

A number of farmers are planting corn now. There will be quite an acreage put to corn in this section this spring.

Shires came in Saturday with two immigrant cars and expects to go to farming at once.

Mr. Anderson also came Saturday with a car and Mr. Johnson and son came Friday. That makes four cars to Citrus this week.

The Sunday school met with Mr. Harran on Sunday evening to practice singing.

Shueys and Hibbs each have 10 acres of corn planted and Reeves Bros. have commenced. Several others are nearly ready.                 

The Matagorda County Tribune, February 17, 1911
 


CITRUSGROVE

Mr. L. G. Cobb returned from Ft. Worth Friday where he went to dispose of a carload of hogs.

Mrs. Will Shuey returned from Houston Monday where she had been visiting friends.

Mr. and Mrs. I. P. Miller and little son Gerald returned from Kansas last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Shuey held their tenth wedding anniversary on Wednesday evening and a most enjoyable time was had by all present.

Mr. James and family from North Texas have just moved into Simpsonville where Mr. James intends to raise cotton.

Miss Mann of Simpsonville is visiting relatives at Iago.

School started at Simpsonville a week ago Monday. Miss Smith of Bay City is teacher.

Mr. Willis Reeves, who has been confined to his home by illness for the past three weeks, is reported to be much improved.

Mr. Johnson and daughter, Miss Clara, returned from Galveston Saturday. Mr. Johnson resides in Nebraska and is spending the winter here with his children.

Mr. Lloyd Saxton has been in Bay City the past few days attending court.

Owing to the last few days dry weather the farmers of this vicinity are very busy plowing, getting ready for their spring crop.                    

The Matagorda County Tribune, January 17, 1912
 


CITRUSGROVE

Mr. and Mrs. Stoller of Doland, S. Dakota, are guests of Mr. Stollar's niece, Mrs. Saxton. Mr. and Mrs. Stoller have come to Texas in search of health for Mrs. Stoller and should this coast country prove beneficial, they expect to make Texas their future home.

Mr. Edward Glering has accepted a position on a cotton and corn plantation near Meridian, Miss., and expects to leave with his family in a few days. Both Mr. and Mrs. Glering will be greatly missed in Citrusgrove where they have made many warm friends.

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Reeves left for Palestine last week where Mrs. Reeves will remain until after the holidays.

Mrs. Fred Bagby spent Saturday in Bay City.

Mr. and Mrs. Hibbs are talking of leaving soon for California to make it their future home.

Rice threshing will be finished here this week.

The Matagorda County Tribune, December 6, 1912
 


Citrus Grove.

Mr. L. G. Cobb returned from Houston Tuesday where he had been to sell a carload of hogs.

The Ladies' Aid Society met Thursday with Mrs. George Braden. After the regular monthly business was disposed of ice cream and cake were served. Mrs. Braden and Mrs. F. M. Bagby were the hostesses.

Mrs. Catlin, who has been visiting her son, Leonard Barker, left Tuesday for Markham.

Mr. Paul LeCompte resigned his position at the Citrus Grove gin to accept a position in Galveston.

Mr. N. Sparks, the regular conductor of the Collegeport train, has resumed his run. Owing to serious illness in his family he was off for several days. His many friends are glad to see him back again.

T. L. Jones, who has been in Citrus Grove looking after his rice farm, known as the Inquest farm, has departed for his home in the north, where he has accepted a Government position.

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Bagby spent Sunday afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Isham at their home at Beadle.

Mr. Booze, a former resident of Citrus Grove, has returned and expects to spend some time here.

Owing to the fine weather of the past few days, rice threshing has been resumed, and the farmers are again seen hauling cotton to the Citrus Grove gin.

Mr. Willis Reeves returned from Markham Monday, where he has been harvesting rice.

The McKissick Bros. rice threshing outfit moved into this community yesterday and are now running full blast.

Three carloads of rice left Citrus Grove yesterday for the market.

Matagorda County Tribune, October 10, 1913
 


CITRUSGROVE

M. A. Nelson is threshing for I. P. Miller with the Farmers' Company machine.

A Quilting Bee was held at Mrs. L. G. Cobb's Tuesday, at which about twelve ladies were present.

The gin turned out 9 bales of cotton Tuesday. The manager, Mr. W. L. Green, was assisted by Mr. Frances.

A little excitement was created at Citrusgrove Monday by Mr. C. S. Douglas' single driving horse becoming frightened and excited and breaking loose and running away, which resulted in some damages to harness and buggy but otherwise no harm was done.

Matagorda News and Midcoast Farmer, November 28, 1913
 


CITRUSGROVE

Mr. and Mrs. Wicoff left for Iowa on Tuesday where they expect to reside in the future. Mr. Wicoff has been rice farming in Citrus Grove for the past year.

Mr. Paul LeCompte, who has been assisting Mr. Johnson in the store of Theo. Smith & Son for the past month, has returned to Collegeport to resume his duties with the same firm at that place.

Miss Grace Shuey spent Tuesday in Bay City.

Mr. L. G. Cobb has just received his first shipment of wood for the wood yard he intends to run in connection with his feed store.

Mr. Jean Yeamans, a fireman on the St. L. B. & M., is spending a few days with his parents at this place.

Mr. Vern Batchelder, who has been in Collegeport for the past month returned to Citrus Grove Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. Smith and daughter, Miss Grace, who have been on an extended trip, through the north and east, returned to their home in Collegeport last week.

Mr. Charles Burns, a St. L. B. & M. employee, was in town for a few days last week to see his children who are staying with their grand-mother, Mrs. Wilson.

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Batchelder were in Bay City last week on business.

The Matagorda County Tribune, December 13, 1912
 


A TRIP TO COLLEGEPORT
[Citrus Grove portion]

W. L. Green, manager of the gin at Citrus Grove, says that while the cotton crop is short this year, the grade is good, and of the 200 bales ginned so far, the most of it runs 41 per cent lint, which is above the average. As soon as the ginning season is over, Mr. Green will go to Costa Rica to spend the winter, and this paper will follow him there with the county's news.

A. F. Johnson, manager of the Smith & Sons' lumber business; and L. G. Cobb, feed merchant, both are added to our list. In addition to selling feed, Mr. Cobb is manufacturing it into pork with the aid of swine, he having shipped one car to Fort Worth and five to Houston.

Mr. H. M. Yeamans, postmaster and general merchant, does business in a large and imposing two story building which would do credit to Bay City. Mr. Yeamans is one of the county's oldest merchants. He and his son are harvesting 75 acres of rice and count on at least 12 bags per acre.

At the gin we met two young Canadian farmers, whom are thoroughly in love with this country and climate. They live southwest of Citrus. R. E. Jacobs, has thirty acres of cotton and feed crops. He is not making a fortune the first year, but it is his first year with cotton, and he sees the opportunity, and begins by taking the NEWS to help learn the country.

A. A. Johnson, the other young Canadian, is boyish looking but says he has the first white-face cattle in that section, Herefords, one male and three cows, and also the first silo in his neighborhood, and has it full. He has as good corn and cotton crops as he could expect this year.

W. H. Serrill, of the Simpsonville community, was buying lumber. He is from Johnson county where he has cultivated 114 acres in cotton; but arriving here late in December, then with the unfavorable spring, his cotton is about as poor as any. Seed planted in April were dry last month. Had to irrigate his corn from his well to get it up, and from 50 acres he will get 20 to 25 bushels per acre, and from the balance less. But he is reminded of the optimism of the Kansan who replied: "Discouraged? What, over two or three failures? Why in grand old Kansas, we have had ten or eleven crop failures, and still won out."

T. C. Morris has charge of the livery stable and takes care of drummers and prospectors with good teams. Mr. Morris is another northern man well pleased with the coast country. He is from Wisconsin.                                         

Matagorda News and Midcoast Farmer, September 12, 1913
 


CITRUSGROVE
 

M. A. Nelson is threshing for I. P. Miller with the Farmers' Company machine.

 

A Quilting Bee was held at Mrs. L. G. Cobb's Tuesday, at which about twelve ladies were present.

 

The gin turned out 9 bales of cotton Tuesday. The manager, Mrs. W. L. Green, was assisted by Mr. Frances.

 

A little excitement was created at Citrusgrove Monday by Mr. C. S. Douglas' single driving horse becoming frightened and excited and breaking loose and running away, which resulted in some damages to harness and buggy, but otherwise no harm was done.
 

The Matagorda News & Midcoast Farmer, Matagorda, Texas, November 28, 1913
 


Messrs. Joe Peltier and G. W. Corporon, prominent farmers of the Citrus Grove community, and members of the committee looking after the survey and incorporation of the community into a drainage district were in town Wednesday, conferring with Civil Engineer Gustafson about the survey. They will submit their report of the survey to the commissioners' court on Monday, when, on approval, an election will be ordered for drainage bonds. The one thing this country needs is drainage. That secured we have the garden spot of the universe. By the say, both these Citrus Grove gentlemen added their names to the subscription list of the best country paper in the county.

Matagorda County News and Midcoast Farmer, May 8, 1914
 


CITRUSGROVE DEPARTMENT Collegeport New Era, October 15, 1914

CITRUSGROVE DEPARTMENT Collegeport New Era, October 29, 1914

CITRUSGROVE DEPARTMENT Collegeport New Era, November 26, 1914
 


Thanksgiving Day at Citrus Grove

The Eighteenth Annual Thanksgiving Dinner at Citrus Grove attended by about 200 people, was indeed a grand success. The old timers flocked in from all over Matagorda County, besides many, many new settlers, hereabouts, whom we are so happy to welcome. Citrus Grove Community boasts one of the best Sunday Schools in the Mid-Coast Country. Come and see at 2:30 Sunday P. M.
 

Palacios Beacon, December 1, 1927
 


Postmaster Named at Citrus Grove

Washington, D. C., April 20.--Henry S. Crabill, acting postmaster at Citrus Grove, Matagorda County, has been appointed permanently to fill the postmaster's post made vacant by the resignation of Amos F. Johnson, it was announced at the post office department.

Matagorda County Tribune, April 20, 1928
 


CITRUS GROVE

Community and School News

 

The Citrus Grove community celebrated Thanksgiving with a community dinner, a custom which has been observed here for many years. Before the dinner, the school gave a short Thanksgiving program, ending with a play, "The Fire Spirit." During the afternoon, games of baseball and basketball were enjoyed. Many old timers were at the dinner, taking this for a visit "back home."

 

Miss Faith Crabill arrived home Tuesday evening. She has been in Houston for some time.

 

The oil for fuel has been piped from Citrus to the gas well. Mr. Mize runs the pump.

 

The O. J. Crabill family has moved into the Percy Corporon place.

 

Jack and Earnestine Bullington left school this week. They will attend the Simpsonville school for the rest of the year. We are very sorry to lose these boys.

 

Frankie Brown has been absent from school for the last three days, suffering from asthma. We are glad to see Frankie with us again today, however.

 

The school, including the teacher, is having a good time plowing back and forth through the mud these days. Everyone was sporting new boots Monday.

 

We are beginning preparations for our Christmas program. We hope the weather will be favorable when we give it.

 

Honor Roll -- November

 

Tenth grade--June Winnow, A.

 

Seventh grade--Annette Johnson, Helen Winnow. B.

 

Fifth grade--Lottie Mae Johnson, A.

 

Fourth grade--Edward Winnow, B.; Louise Emert, B; Omar Jay Crabill, B.

 

Third grade--Norine Harney, B.

 

Second grade--Josie Vostalek, A; Robo Lee Crabill, G; Dora Mae Emert, B; Narciss Gutierrez, B.

 

First grade--Mary Winnow, A; Francis Johnson, B; Guadalupe Gonzales, B; Genevieve Gutierrez, B; Donzal Harney, B; Oneida Bullingson, B.

 

Imagine!
 

Annette without her curiosity.

Frankie without his jokes.

Jane without her smile.

Helen mad at Annette.

Robo Lee without her giggles.

Mary without her laugh.

Lottie Mae in a hurry.

Lloyd misbehaving in school.

Billie not asking, "Why?"

Omar Jay not falling in the mud.

Miss Louise missing a Spanish class.

 

The Christmas Spirit.

 

Christmas in the North and Christmas in the South is very different. In the North it would not seem like Christmas at all, if Old Mother Nature did not choose to cover the earth in a glistening white blanket of snow. But in the South there is hardly ever any snow; therefore, it would seem strange to the people of the South if it should snow at Christmas.

 

In the North, Christmas holidays are celebrated with sleigh rides and other out-door sports. In the South they celebrate with fireworks.

 

But the spirit of Christmas in the North and in the South is very much the same. The home is hung with evergreens and holly. There is almost always a tree to be decorated. The older folks talk in low voices; change the subject and grow louder or cease completely when children appear. There are always mysterious packages that cannot be accounted for.

 

From the kitchen there comes the odor of turkey, pies, cake, candy, and other food. Everyone is busy and happy, even the smallest, for each is getting ready for Santa Claus.--June Winnow.

 

The Daily Tribune, Wednesday, December 10, 1930
 


Citrus Grove
 

It has been raining, and the roads are quite muddy this week. We cannot play baseball as we did last week, so we have substituted “piggy wants a wave,” “Wolf over the river,” and other games.
 

Our school has some new pictures. Miss Louise’s room has two. One is a picture of some poppies, and the other is a picture of our state capitol building in Austin. Miss Dorothy’s room has a pretty, new picture, too.
 

Last week the county nurse visited us. She has left her impression in the form of whiter teeth, cleaner nails and carefully brushed hair. Miss Dorothy’s room has already started a health campaign, and our room is to begin one after examinations.
 

An accident, which looked quite serious for a time, occurred when Edward Winnow mistook one of his toes for a piece of stove wood, and cut a big gash in it. Edward proved himself to be a brave boy, though, for he never shed a tear.


Review has begun for those mid-term finals that we all dread.
 

We are well prepared for cold weather with plenty of kindling cut and placed in shelter and another cord of wood on hand.
 

Miss Dorothy’s room has put forth many unique creations from the modeling clay which they have. The first and second grade have some other primary helps, too, that they are enjoying.
 

The seventh grade have found a good use for their water colors. They have been making geography maps.
 

Daily Tribune, January 20, 1931
 


Citrus Grove

Care of Textbooks.

You should take care of your textbook. Your state puts them out free so you should do your part in taking good care of them. You should never throw your books around for they will get dirty. Be sure and wash your hands before you start studying your books. Never turn down the corners of a page. never mark your lessons with ink, and if you mark them with a pencil be sure and rub out the marks. To leave the marks will make the book look untidy. Be very careful not to drop your books in the mud on the way home from school. If you ruin your book you should pay for it. Every pupil should keep his book like new for the next pupil. Books are a trust from the state and we must not break that trust.--Annette Johnson, seventh grade.

School and Community News.

County meet has passed and for our little school it was quite eventful, for we came out first place winners in several events.

In the way of social events, there have been several parties in our community. First, there was a birthday party honoring Helen Winnow. Then Miss Dorothy gave a party at her home last month. Last Saturday the Junior Christian Endeavor from Collegeport and the Citrus Grove children enjoyed a lawn party and picnic at the home of Miss Dorothy. From all reports, all these parties have been greatly enjoyed, and as the spring weather arrives to stay we home for more of them.

Several pupils have been absent from school. Some of these have been sick and others have had to help at home. We miss each of them.

Citrus Grove has had the pleasure of having a minister for several Sundays. The Sunday school reports an increasing attendance each Sunday.

Our community has lost two members in the persons of Mrs. R. C. Dephew and her granddaughter, Betty Winnow. They have gone to Mississippi and to be sure we miss them here.

New automobiles are all the rage in Citrus Grove. Are you in style? During the past week four new cars have come to make their residence among us. They have chosen as their masters. Mr. and Mrs. Dick Corporon, Mr. Frank Brown, Mr. F. Floyd Mize and Mr. Ardis Harvey.

Following a trustee meeting in Collegeport last Friday night, it was decided that the high school pupils from Citrus Grove are to go to school in Collegeport next year.

Our weekly week-end rain was one day late. It came Monday.

What Would Happen If

It did not rain for a week.
Louise could not outrun everyone.
Annette did not ask questions.
Omar Jay should be in a hurry.
Helen never slipped down.
Donzel disliked Francis.
Oneida was disagreeable.
Edward should forget to be gallant.

Can You Imagine.

Lottie Mae with blue eyes and red hair.
Billie not teasing some one.
Lloyd making great speeches.
Frankie as a famous professor.
June, governor of Texas.

February Honor Roll.

A roll--June Winnow, Annette Johnson, Lottie Mae Johnson, Francis Johnson, Mary Winnow, Donzel Harvey, Robt. Lee Carroll.

B. Honor Roll--Frankie Brown, Lloyd Vostaltek, Norine Harvey, Louise Emert, Oneida Bullington, Edward Winnow, Dora Mae Emert, Josie Vostatek.

March Honor Roll.

Lottie Mae Johnson, Mary Winnow.

B. Honor roll--Lloyd Vostatek, Rubie Lee Wright, Mildred Wright, Louise Emert, Dora Mae Emert, Norine HArvey, Willie Harvey, Robt. Lee Crabill, Donzel Harvey, Josie Vostatek, Edward Winnow, Oneida Bullington, Francis Johnson.

Daily Tribune, April 2, 1931
 

 

Copyright 2007 - Present by Bay City Newspapers, Inc.
All rights reserved

Created
Apr. 27, 2007
Updated
Nov. 14, 2011
   

HOME