Family of
William Walter Bouldin
 

 

William Walter Bouldin
 

William Walter Bouldin, M. D., of Bay City was not only one of the highly skilled physicians and surgeons of Matagorda County, but he also owned and operated a drug store, and owned considerable farm land which he inherited and which he developed after taking charge of the land. He was proud of being descended from honorable ancestors, tracing an unbroken line back to Thomas Bouldin of Shelborne, England, born in 1523, whose grandson, Thomas III, came to Virginia in 1610, being captain of the good ship Swan which brought the first settlers to Jamestown. They were numbered among the eminent families of Virginia, and have furnished judges, congressmen and educators to the public service of the state. His immediate one traces back in this country to Col. Thomas Bouldin and his wife Nancy Clarke. Their eldest son, Thomas, born in the early part of the eighteenth century, married Martha Moseley, and their son, Green, born in 1831, married in 1858, Alwilda Compton, and they were the parents of Doctor Bouldin. On his mother's side, Doctor Bouldin was descended from the Comptons of Nashville, Tennessee. This pride of birth was natural and admirable. Money cannot purchase gentle blood, not give honorable achievements to those already dead. Both the Bouldins and the Comptons were people of integrity, upright in their dealings connected with much of historic value in their several communities, and responsible for advancement along professional and cultural lines.
 

Bouldin was born in Austin County, Texas, March 25, 1866. His father, Green Bouldin, was born in Huntsville, Alabama, and during the war between the states he served in Company K, Terry's Texas Rangers of the Confederate Army. During the battle of Perryville he was wounded in action, but recovered sufficiently to return to his company, and he was discharged in June, 1865. Returning to civilian life, he bravely took up the struggles of the reconstruction period, and was engaged in farming until his death, which occurred on his ranch in Austin County, Texas, January 1, 1874. His wife was born July 2, 1841, a daughter of Thomas D. M. Compton and his wife Eliza Doxey, of Nashville, Tennessee. Seven children were born to Green Bouldin and his wife.


Following his attendance of the public schools of Washington County and Soule University, Chappell Hill, Texas, Doctor Bouldin took his medial training in Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, and was graduated there from in 1891, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For three years thereafter he was engaged in the practice of his profession at Chappell Hill, and then, in 1894, came to Bay City, where he assumed control of his landed interests and established himself in a general practice, in which he has since continued, building up a wide and valuable connection.

In political faith he was a Democrat, but he never had either the time or inclination to enter public life. He belonged to the Matagorda County Medical Society, the Texas State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Long a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, he served as commander of the Ninth Brigade, Texas Division, from 1925 to 1928, and assistant surgeon on the staff of the division commander.


Bouldin died on March 14, 1929, at the age of sixty-two, as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted on February 19 by a hired hand while at Bouldin's farm on Caney Creek. At the time Bouldin was one of the wealthiest men in Matagorda County. He was buried at Chappell Hill, Texas. His sister, Florence, survived him and lived until September 11, 1945. She was active in many civic organizations, especially the Bay City Public Library.


Texas Under Many Flags, Clarence W. Wharton, American Historical Society, 1930

Matagorda County Genealogical Society Publication, Oak Leaves, Vol. 8 #3, May 1989

 

Photo courtesy of Amy the Spirit Seeker
 


Dr. W. W. Bouldin


Dr. William Walter Bouldin (25 Mar 1866 - 14 Mar 1929), the son of Green Bouldin (17 Aug 1831-01 Jan 1874) and Minerva Alwilda Compton (02 Jul 1841-03 Aug 1911), came to Matagorda County in the 1890s from Alabama?. He had three sisters: Elizabeth, Susan and Florence; and two brothers: Hammond and Eugene. On January 1, 1894, the year Bay City was founded, the Bouldin family bought considerable acreage in Matagorda County.
 

W. W. Bouldin began his career working in the employment of Captain J. W. White who owned Bay City’s first drugstore. Dr. Bouldin later became the owner and was one of the prominent physicians in early Bay City.
 

Bouldin died on March 14, 1929, at the age of sixty-two, as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted on February 19 by a hired hand while at Bouldin’s farm  on Caney Creek. At the time, Bouldin was one of the wealthiest men in Matagorda County. He was buried at Chappel Hill, Texas. His sister, Florence, survived him and lived until September 11, 1945. She was active in many civic organizations—especially the Bay City Public Library.
 


W. W. Bouldin of Bay City Shot in Head By Tenant
Condition Critical at Houston Hospital, While Tenant is Held in Jail

Dr. W. W. Bouldin, 60, physician and drug store owner at Bay City, was in a critical condition in St. Joseph's infirmary Tuesday night, his face shattered by a charge of buckshot which ripped out both eyes.

He was wounded late Monday afternoon on his plantation about 12 miles from Bay City, after engaging in an argument with Dace Layton, his tenant, about pasturing a horse, according to information obtained by officers.

Layton was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Harris Milner of Matagorda county and charged with assault to murder before Justice of the Peace D. E. Capes.

At a preliminary hearing Tuesday morning, Layton was bound over to await action by the Matagorda county grand jury under $3,000 bound. Layton late Monday still was in jail, unable to furnish bail.

At a preliminary hearing Tuesday morning, Layton was bound over to await action by the Matagorda county grand jury under $3000 ond. Layton late Monday still was in jail, unable to furnish bail.

Although two witnesses testified at Layton's preliminary hearing, the shooting was surrounded by mystery.

Luther Coppock, who lives on the Bouldin plantation, main witness for the state at the hearing, said he heard Dr. Bouldin and Layton engaged in an argument a short time before the physician was shot down at close range with a 12 gauge shotgun. He said Layton's wife brought the weapon part to the site? where the men were wrangling.

Layton, the witness declared, walked to his wife, took the gun and returned to where Dr. Bouldin was standing when the gun fired, he declared.

The charge struck the gray-haired physician full in the face, tearing out his eyes and disfiguring his face horribly. Persons in the vicinity rushed to his assistance and summoned an ambulance.

A race to reach Houston began and the victim was brought to St. Joseph's Infirmary there early Tuesday morning. Late Tuesday night physicians said Dr. Bouldin had but a slender chance for his life.

The only other witness at the preliminary hearing was John Walker, Negro. His testimony corroborated that of Mr. Coppock in main details.

Dr. Bouldin has been a resident of Bay City for nearly two score years. He operated a drugstore and conducted a general practice as a physician. He is widely known and has varied and professional interests.

Dace Layton was arguing with Bouldin while Layton's wife stood off to the side holding a shotgun. At one point, Layton walked over to his wife, took the shotgun then turned and shot Bouldin in the face.

This is according to testimony by Luther Coppock (another of Bouldin's tenants?) and corroborated by John Walker, Negro.

Bouldin was then rushed to St. Joseph's Infirmary in Houston where I think he arrived early Tuesday morning. By Tuesday night, doctors were saying he had but a slender chance for his life.

Houston Post Dispatch.

Palacios Beacon, February 21, 1929
 


Mortuary Reports

BOULDIN--Brenham, Tex., March 16.--(Spl.)--The body of Dr. W. W. Bouldin of Bay City, who died at a hospital in Houston Thursday, was taken to his old home in Chappell Hill and funeral services were held there Friday, with Rev. George N. Cook, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Brenham, officiating. Dr. Bouldin was a cousin of W. H. Bouldin of Brenham, and had other relatives here and in Chappell Hill. He died of wounds received in an altercation at his home near Bay City about two weeks ago, when he was shot in the face and head.

Galveston Daily News, March 17, 1929
 


Mrs. Minerva Alwilda Bouldin
 

Mrs. Minerva Alwilda Bouldin, the mother of Dr. W. W. Bouldin and Miss Florence Bouldin and grandmother of Mr. Milton Routt, of this city died at her son’s home yesterday afternoon following an illness of about a week.
 

Mrs. Bouldin was born in Nashville, Tenn., the child of T. D. M. Compton and his wife Eliza Doxey, with whom she moved to Texas in 1857. She married Green Bouldin in Waco and to them were born seven children of whom two, Dr. and Miss Florence, survive. Milton Routt, the son of her eldest daughter, is the only grandson left.

 

Decedent led a consistent and consecrated Christian life for 35 years, she was a member of the Providence Baptist church at Chapel Hill and for nearly thirty years taught the boys Sunday school class. In her old home she had strong friends where ever she was known and was  surrounded by a host of loving and devoted associates whom she had known for a life time. In Bay City she was also known and loved by a legion, all of whom were grieved to learn that the "Death Angel" had hovered nigh and transported from this life to a more glorious abode the loving spirit of a good Christian woman.


The remains were conveyed to Chapel Hill for interment accompanied by her children and Mr. Routt.
 

In peace rest the ashes of the good.
 

Matagorda County Tribune, August 14, 1911
 


 

Copyright 2007 - Present by Carol Sue Gibbs
All rights reserved

Created
Apr. 11, 2007
Updated
Mar. 23, 2013
   

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