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Hardeman, Matagorda County, Texas
 



A. H. Elmore Plantation Supplies
Matagorda County Tribune, December 2, 1899
 


Bailey Hardeman Family Cemetery               Samuel Wilson Hardeman Family Cemetery
 


Hardeman Newspaper Columns
 


HARDEMAN HUMMINGS

 Hardeman is the business center on Caney creek. We have two first-rate stores, two gin houses, two blacksmith shops, one saw mill and a large ... suspension bridge of beautiful architecture, that adds much to the appearance of the place. Also two resident physicians, three carpenters and one machinist.

Cotton picking is progressing rapidly.

Worms have destroyed considerable cotton on Caney.

Mr. Gregory says that he has cotton on his plantation that has over a bale to the acre open on it now; notwithstanding the rain and worms.

Dr. Brown resumed work at his brickyard last week. he has discovered a kind of prairie soil that makes a superior article of brick.

Mr. J. A. Elmore has completed his residence on his plantation, and expects to move his family from Matagorda soon.

Several herds of horses and mules passed through here last week.

The public bridge, across Hardeman creek, has been completed.

Mr. Frank Rugeley went to Wharton to attend court.

Col. J. T. Harrington is recovering from an attack of slow fever.

Bay City Breeze, September 13, 1894
 


HARDEMAN HUMMINGS.

 Mr. Irvin Rugeley, of Culver, has moved to Hardeman.

Cotton is coming in fast, the crop is turning out better than expected.

Mr. J. B. Ford, representing the Victor Safe and Lock Co., passed through Hardeman Saturday.

Mr. Gregory and family, J. L. Thornton, Henry Williams and Mr. White spent Sunday in Bay City .

With a possible exception, there has not been a case of slow fever at Hardeman this year, while at other places in the county it has been very prevalent.

Nestled in the heart of the richest portion of Matagorda county, surrounded by the grand old plantations, whose fertile acres extend for miles, each having a history of its own, dating from Anti Bellum times, is situated the neighborhood of Hardeman, which is fast assuming the proportions of a town.  Come one, come all, to the land of plenty and health

Bay City Breeze, October 11, 1894
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Farmers generally are busy preparing for another corp. The ground is getting a little hard to plow to do good work.

Dr. Brown has his saw mill in fine running order and will saw lumber for his new gin house from our forest timber. We have fine ash and other timber which makes a good quality of lumber for building and farm purposes. The doctor will saw stocks on shares for anyone who wishes him.

Dr. Rugeley was up from Matagorda. He is feeding beeves and experimenting with a corn crusher and is very much pleased with it. He thinks it will save feed and fatten faster than to feed the corn whole and if he is successful will buy all the surplus corn here next fall and fatten beeves on a much larger scale.

Bay City Breeze, January 24, 1895
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS.

Mr. Frank Hawkins of Lake Austin, was up visiting Dr. Rugeley.

The doctor has purchased a dick break plow, which is the best thing we have ever seen in the plow line, and think it is bound in the near future to revolutionize our present mode of breaking land.

Some good work has been done on the public roads the past week, no excuses now about tools.

Capt. White, our efficient mechanic and contractor, has about completed Dr. Brown's gin house and is now waiting on the gin stands and different parts of the running gear, hurry up Capt. cotton will soon be crowding you, hope you will put off that trip to Rackensack till you get the gins running.

J. Elmore is putting up a large crib preparatory to housing his corn crop.

A little rain would help things, still nothing is suffering.

Dr. Brown we are sorry to say is on the sick list.

Bay City Breeze, August 15, 1895
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Cotton picking has begun on several places and the oldest cotton will turn out good picking in this month. This year should teach farmers the importance of sweeping the cotton land up as soon as possible after planting, not wait for the cotton to come up as most have done this year which was the principal cause of the weeds and grass getting the start. We admit this has been a hard year for cotton, but crops could have been very different from what they are on some places, in every instance where the land was swept up the cotton is much better than last year.

Mr. Frank Hawkins of Lake Austin, was up visiting Dr. Rugeley.

The doctor has purchased a dick break plow, which is the best thing we have ever seen in the plow line, and think it is bound in the near future to revolutionize our present mode of breaking land.

Some good work has been done on the public roads the past week, no excuses now about tools.

Capt. White, our efficient mechanic and contractor, has about completed Dr. Brown's gin house and is now waiting on the gin stands and different parts of the running gear, hurry up Capt., cotton will soon be crowding you, hope you will put off that trip to Rackensack till you get the gins running.

J. Elmore is putting up a large crib preparatory to housing his corn crop.

A little rain would help things, still nothing is suffering.

Dr. Brown we are sorry to say is on the sick list.

Bay City Breeze, August 15, 1895
 


Hardeman Happenings.

A fine rain a few days ago and a good many are rustling for fall gardens.

Dr. Brown's gins are in fine running order now, the machinery is all of the latest improved conveniences and the best in the county, makes an excellent sample and will gin 25 bales every 12 hours. The Doctor is highly pleased with ihs investment. Ginning was somewhat delayed the past week on account of water, but our rustling, Capt. White, is sinking the well deeper with piping and says he will strike water or oil before he stops. By hard persuasion the Captain was induced to put off his trip to Rackensack until everything gets more fully under headway.

J. Elmore has finished gathering his corn crop, which turned out about forty bushels per acre.

Henry Rugeley is gathering his corn and says it is turning out from 45 to 55 bushels per acre.

G. M. Magill and J. W. White of Bay City made a flying trip over last Saturday.

Miss Addie Nichols and Mrs. J. Rainey were visiting friends on Caney last Sunday.

Bay City Breeze, September 9, 1895
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS.

Another fine rain and crops are booming. Considerable wind but no damage.

Ed Wadsworth, from near Pledger, passed through a few days ago and reported crops as some better there than here.

Dr. Boulden was over one day last week. The Doctor left his saddle horse at his plantation and went back in his buggy, may-be there is something in the wind, young men don't like to ride in buggies alone. The Doctor has an excellent crop on his plantation, which is managed by J. A. Elmore.

Capt. Frank Rugeley is interested in about 1200 acres cotton and is highly pleased with the outlook.

Capt. White our rustling mechanic has been somewhat under the weather, the effects of a collision with another player in a base ball game, but is improving rapidly and contemplates another trip to Rackensack soon.

Everybody here seems highly pleased  with our new court house and officers hear of no grumbling about high taxes among the farming class.

Walter Brown and Henry Rugeley left for N. Orleans with their beeves.

Bay City Breeze, May 7, 1896
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Frank Ray died on Wednesday of last week, was taken with a violent form of malaria, and the Dr. had little hope for his recovery from the first. He was between 15 and 16 years of age. The neighborhood join in sympathy with the bereaved parents.

The prices of cotton going up, provisions and everything else very low, a dollar will buy more now than at any time since the war. Farmers that can't live comfortably and get out of debt under these conditions it is plain that they never will.

Up to last Saturday 140 bales of cotton ginned here, the ginning was considerably held back on account of scarcity of water to run on .

J. Denis has taken charge of the mercantile business at E. Rugeley's plantation.

Walter Brown returned from Pledger and reports every thing on a rush.

The Cantzon gin is being put in repair and will start up in a few days, I. N. Denis of Columbus has it in charge.

Mrs. J. B. Hawkins is visiting Mrs. F. M. Gregory.

Bay City Breeze, August 27, 1896
 


Hardeman Happenings

The weather is as fine for cotton picking as one could wish, and still plenty in the fields to last several months.

Up to last Saturday 669 bales had been ginned here and 108 at the Cantzon gin.

Droves of mules and horses are passing through almost daily.

Judge F. E. Jones, of Velasco. has been up for several days shaking hands with his many friends. The Judge is a strong Bryan man, is also a favor of the removal of the county seat of Brazoria county to Angleton which is near the center of the county.

Capt. White will have lots of work to do as soon as the lumber arrives.

Irvin Rugeley left last Monday for Houston where his family now reside. Judge Jones accompanied him as far as Columbia.

Bay City Breeze, October 15, 1896
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Everybody has settled down and gone to work again since the election, and we "silver bugs" all willing to take our medicine.

We heartily agree with the Breeze in its suggestions to amendments to the constitution of our White Man's Union. Let our primaries come off not later than the middle of July, when most everyone is idle, and if the Australian system of balloting will stop so much electioneering by all means lets have it.

The weather has hindered cotton picking so much it looks as if there will be some to pick after Christmas.

Up to last Saturday 951 bales had been ginned here and 150 bales at the Cantzon gin.

Henry Rugeley and Jno. Elmore have rented Dr. Rugeley's plantation. They expect to work it with share hands and plant considerable cotton next year.

Irvin Rugeley is in charge Dr. Bouldin's plantation.

Bay City Breeze, November 19, 1896
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS.

 Farmers are pushing things all they can now trying to make up for so much  lost time. Corn is very scarce and the work stock, generally, are very much drawn and need weatherboarding very bad; while we are later and not in as good shape as we were at this time last year, let us hope that a bad beginning makes a good ending. In '84 there was very little plowing done on Caney before the 19th of February, still every body made an abundance of corn and a fine cotton crop and with half a show from now on we will do so again.

Dr. Brown has been planting considerable clover and bermuda grass which makes the best pasture of anything that has ever been tried here.

Capt. White and old "Jug" has left us for a while and have took up their abode at Dr. Rugeley's plantation where he has been doing considerable carpenter work and thinks he will put up a gin house for Henry Rugeley this summer.

We hope the BREEZE will keep the good road movement before the people. A ten cent tax would be very reasonable but think we had better go to the limit and make it 15 cents; some are going to kick any how, and let them have as much to kick about as possible. Our present system of working roads is very unfair and unjust and a complete failure. Those that work the roads are the laboring class and depending on their day's work for support, but whenever he is called on the road he must go or hire a substitute, regardless of the condition of his crop, which is five days equal to $5, much more than the tax would be on the majority, and sometimes it causes considerable loss to crops and no gain to the roads. Keep the ball rolling.

ENTERPRISE.

Bay City Breeze, February 11, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

We had a light rain last week but not enough to bring up the crops. All the early planted corn is up to a good stand and large enough to be worked out. A great many are waiting for rain, kicking about ____ luck and the weather, and 'cussin the lawyers, merchants, politicians, and looking like the banks are busted, and all their friends were dead and buried. Now, isn't it strange that some free-born Americans will live in a country and cuss it, when the world is so large. Now brother farmers when you realize the fact that you can't make ___ here in the summer time, and quit whittling boxes a little earlier, go to work and plant your corn, you will find there is no such thing as failure. Don't trust too much to Providence, for he has already done too much for this country now, and may get tired of it some day and expect you to use a little exertion yourself.

Dr. Brown's gin ran regularly nearly every day last week, lacking only a few bales now of being 1300 of last year's crop and at least 30 bales more yet to gin.

We don't hear much talk now about the good road movement, guess we are like the Arkansaw traveler was by his house, as dry as anybody's house when it don't rain.

The weather will soon be warm enough for the cattle and horses to get in their $30,000 shade and fight mosquitoes and flies.

Mr. Howe informs us that Capt. Frank Rugeley will put another steamboat on the Colorado river sometime before next fall. Capt. Frank is a believer in competition which is the life of trade.

Walter Brown's arm is getting so he can break cord string again.

We hear that Henry Rugeley and Jno. Elmore will open up another store here soon.

We are glad to learn that Prof. Ladd will remain in the county. We certainly ought to try and keep all such citizens with us.

Bay City Breeze, March 25, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

G. B. Culver, our popular tax assessor, has been around and says that crops in the lower part of the county all look well but need work badly.

Walter Brown is the busiest man in Hardeman. He is acting in the capacity of merchant, farmer, stockman, engineer, and fireman and if keeping up high ____ is any sign of a good fireman, he is one, and must either have his life well insured or has strong faith in the strength of the better, but Walter is all pluck and energy and goes at every thing he undertakes with a determination to win.

Dr. Brown has been quick sick but is up again.

Mr. Barrett has returned from a visit to his sick daughter in Colorado county. He found her much better than he feared she was. Mrs. Barnett remained with her.

We hope every one will vote for the amendments permitting our county to issue bonds to construct a railroad.

We hear that crops are better in the upper part of the county than they are here, so if no disaster happens Matagorda county she will be in the swim again.

Bay City Breeze, May 6, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

We are having too much rain and crops are getting in a bad fix and unless we have good weather soon and the "Clod-hoppers" hop pretty lively "Old Gen. Green" will take possession of some of the cotton.

Steve Hill was around taking down names on the special road tax petition for an election and said he had no trouble in getting signers.

Henry Rugeley expects to take a car load of beeves to Rosenberg soon.

Walter Brown and Irvin Rugeley went to Bay City Sunday to attend church.

Mr. Barnett has gone to Columbus after his family.

Dr. Brown has just returned from a trip to Columbia on railroad business.

Mrs. Stapp, from Cedar Lake, is visiting her daughter, Mrs. J. Rainey.

Bay City Breeze, May 20, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

A few days more of good weather and crops will all be in good shape, the corn crop is almost an assured fact.

The railroad surveyors crossed Caney a few yards below the public bridge at his place.

N. M. Vogelsang was over a few days and seemed well pleased with crop prospects.

Miss Tenie Hardeman has gone on a visit to her brother near Velasco where she will spend the summer months.

Capt. White is on the sick list.

Bay City Breeze, May 27, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Watermelons and roasting ears are plentiful.

We had a light rain last Friday which cooled of the air and freshened up the crops very much, but not enough for a season.

Dr. Brown has been very unwell for several days and troubled a great deal with his eyes caused from the effects of poison oak.

Jim Rainey has gone to San Antonio to consult Dr. Hurg, as to what he thinks might be a cancer on his neck.

The horse-flies are worse than for several years and some of the work stock have died from their effects.

There is very little attention paid to the game law, deer are killed here all times of the year and very often done by some who are supposed would uphold the law. Hardly a week passes that you can't see fresh venison somewhere. Think we ought to follow the example of Richmond.

The Breeze has been untiring in working for the good and advancement of the county and has accomplished a vast amount of good and but for it our county seat would still be in the marsh grasses of Matagorda bay, but it has been met with a cold shoulder in many things that if were carried out would accomplish a great deal towards the development of our resources.

It remains to be seen whether a public gin will be put up in Bay City this fall--it will be done sometime and why not by some one in the county.

Matagorda is the only of her sister counties that is making no effort to raise a bonus for a railroad. Those who ae most able to contribute don't seem to care much about a road.

Enterprise.

Bay City Breeze, July 1, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

The hot dry weather is playing havoc with the cotton, leaves are shedding very bad and premature bolls opening rapidly. The late cotton is doing better than the first planted; some cotton on the Dr. Brown place has been poisoned.

The sweet potatoe crop will be short, most of the last planted have died.

T. L. Smith and Dance from Columbia were here to see additions to the Cantzen gin house were necessary to put in improved gin equipments.

Several cases of charbon in the neighborhood which readily yielded to the remedy printed in The Breeze; two cases reported cured with kerosene oil, turpentine and salt mixed together and the parts thoroughly rubbed.

Bay City Breeze, August 9, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

It has rained all around near us but we have had only light showers, still every thing looks fresh.

Cotton is growing and making nicely, there is no land in the state that will beat Caney lands in dry weather.

Up to last Saturday 60 bales of cotton were ginned, a good lot is picked out that will not be ginned while the weather is suitable for picking.

Our little town has a lively appearance now every Saturday, cotton pickers setting up and getting supplys for the next week, unless the force is largely recruited we will not be able to gather the crop before late in December.

Every body is too busy to discuss politics.

What is the matter with the Breeze? Sometimes we get it on Thursday and sometimes on Saturday, but last week we failed to get it at all. The weather has been so warm, perhaps the Breeze man is down by the seashore enjoying the surf baths. We all like the Breeze and like to get it regularly but of course will have to make allowances while the weather is so warm.

J. Emore has poisoned 25 acres of his cotton, the worms appeared about in spots.

Judge Rugeley was over latter part of last week in behalf of a school for this community.

Frank Ray is very sick, Dr. Simons is attending him and thinks his recovery very doubtful.

Bay City Breeze, August 20, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

In some parts of the county rains have been plentiful while in others they have been very light.

Cotton is coming in to the gin very slow on account of the good weather to pick. Only 20 bales had been ginned up to last Saturday.

Ed. Wadsworth, of Pledger, passed through en route to Matagorda and reports good rains in that neighborhood.

Our beef market opened last Saturday.

A shooting scrape took place on Dr. Bouldin's plantation but no body hurt.

Mr. Roseberry, of Wharton, has taken charge of Dr. Brown's woodshop.

Bay City Breeze, August 21, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

We had a light rain last Saturday and Sunday.

Walter Brown made a business trip to Wharton last week.

If the weather continues good cotton will all be ready for market earlier than for a good many years.

Up to last Saturday 97 bales were ginned at the Brown gin.

Several droves of mules and horses have been here the past week.

Caney creek is a failure here for stock water.

Caney creek is a failure here for stock water.

Prospects for more rain are favorable.

Bay City Breeze, September 4, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

We have had light rains nearly every day for the past week which has prevented cotton picking a great deal.

Capt. Harris, of Galveston, in company with N. M. Vogelsang, was over last week talking railroad.

Capt. E. S. Rugeley is down from Wharton and will remain with us a week. He is doing all he can towards a railroad and feels in high hopes of our getting one if everybody will do his part. The Captain expected to attend the camp meeting on Peyton's creek but learned that it had been postponed.

Up to last Saturday 132 bales had been ginned at the brown gin and 8 bales at the Cantzon gin.

Bay City Breeze, September 11, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings

Weather is and has been for the past week fine for cotton picking.

Up to last Saturday 212 bales had been ginned at the Brown gin and 46 at the Cantzon gin.

Cotton is growing and blooming but will be too late to mature another crop, and besides, what is now open will be as much as we will be able to gather.

Mrs. Dr. Rugeley and Mrs. Elmore were over last week shopping.

B. Harris from Columbia gave us a call, suppose his business was buying cotton. He reports cotton crops fine in Brazoria county.

Dr. Brown went to Wharton last Sunday.

Cotton worms have made their appearance on several places but no talk of poisoning them.

A few have gathered corn and the crop will be a great deal larger than last year.

Gardens are doing well.

Our school started last Monday with Miss Tenie Hardeman as teacher. We only have funds enough for three months.

Bay City Breeze, September 25, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

We have certainly been favored lately with nice weather, but cotton picking seems to progress very slowly. We have not labor enough and what we have seems very indifferent about working more than one third of the time.

Up to last Saturday 300 bales had been ginned at the Brown gin and 72 at the Cantzon.

Dick Serrill was here last Saturday with some very fine oysters, which found ready sale.

A great many cotton seed are being hauled to Columbia and sold for $7.50 per ton.

Several cases of charbon reported but seems to be easily controlled.

Ned Wadsworth came down from Pledger last Sunday.

Bay City Breeze, October 2, 1897
 


Hardeman Happenings.

Weather is and has been for the past week fine for cotton picking.

Up to last Saturday 212 bales had been ginned at the Brown gin and 46 at the Cantzon gin.

Cotton is growing and blooming but will be too late to mature another crop, and besides, what is now open will be as much as we will be able to gather.

Mrs. Dr. Rugeley and Mrs. Elmore were over last week shopping.

B. Harris from Columbia gave us a call, suppose his business was buying cotton. He reports cotton crops fine in Brazoria County.

Dr. Brown went to Wharton last Sunday.

Cotton worms have made their appearance on several places but no talk of poisoning them.

A few had gathered corn and the crop will be a great deal larger than last year.

Gardens are doing well.

Our school started last Monday with Miss Tenie Hardeman as teacher. We only have funds for three months.

Bay City Breeze, October 29, 1898
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

Deputy sheriff Keller is around collecting taxes.

Capt. Frank and Irvin Rugeley were in our city on Monday.

Mr. Gregory and daughter, Miss Sally, attended church in Bay City on Sunday.

Messrs. Cash and Bondurant were out prospecting on Saturday and paid us a pleasant call.

J. A. Barnett sent four wagons up, Friday, to get corn he has on the Kate Rugeley place.

Jim Pridgen, proprietor of the Wharton Wholesale Co., was talking business to our merchants on Wednesday.

We had two drummers here on Tuesday--one selling Grove's Chill Tonic, and the other Lucy Hinton's tobacco.

Ned Wadsworth is gathering his cattle at Pledger. He has sold them to Kemp & Rugeley. They will be delivered in Bay City.

John, Will, Alex and Marshall Elmore went to the beach on Friday and returned Sunday evening. They report having had a fine time and got an abundance of fine oysters.

T. H. Brown has about six acres of sugar cane planted on the new place which he and his father leased of Dr. Brown. It is coming up nicely. They will increase their acreage next year.

Jim Rainey is trying to raise money for a school house at this place. We can buy the house of Mr. Thompson's near A. I. Rugeley's, for $125. Mr. Rainey has already over half of the amount subscribed and has not been all over the community yet. We need a house for school, church and Sunday school, and we hope Mr. R. will succeed.

Matagorda County Tribune, January 8, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

L. A. Luck is planting three acres in navy beans.

Alex and Marshall Elmore went to Wharton on Monday.

Capt. W. C. White is going extensively into the chicken business.

J. H. Hardeman left on Wednesday for his old home in Caldwell county.

Miss Sallie Gregory and Dr. Brown attended church in Bay City on Sunday.

We are sorry to learn that Mr. Rainey failed to get up the money for our school house.

Dr. Mynatt, of Tenn., was out with Dr. Bouldin on Thursday, looking at the country with a view of locating.

J. A. Elmore had to plant most of his corn over on account of the drouth. All that he had to plant over was jumped in as the farmes say.

Mr. Shoultz came up from Matagorda on Monday night and brought the sad news of Mrs. W. B. Wadsworth's death. Ned Wadsworth went to Matagorda on Tuesday to attend the funeral.

Matagorda County Tribune, January 15, 1899
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS

By Merchant

Cotton crops are looking fine.

We had a nice rain on Thursday.

Business is dull in town this week.

J. H. Rainey visited Bay City on Wednesday.

F. M. Gregory went over to the county capital on Thursday.

Capt. W. C. White has been on the sick list for several days.

Will Andrus, of Richmond, was in town, last week, on business.

J. A. and W. A. Elmore made a flying trip to Bay City on Saturday.

John Elmore began picking cotton, Monday morning. He will market some in a few days.

Mr. Lemmons, representing P. J. Willis Bros., of Galveston, was talking to our merchants, last week.

Capt. White found his hatchet in W. A. Elmore's cotton patch, where he did some work on the White & Gatson planter, last March.

Mr. Davis living on Dr. Bouldin's plantation, lost a new-born babe on Wednesday night. It was buried at the Bay City cemetery.

Dr. Simons and A. J. McMahan were in our town, last week, talking insurance. Come again Mr. Mack. I think you will catch John Elmore next time.

Edgar Rugeley spent the day with us last Saturday, and had a nice little game of high five, and invited some of us over to see a certain young lady friend of his. Says she is mighty pretty and lively. Think we will have to give her a call, before long.

The Matagorda County Tribune, January 28, 1899
 


HARDEMAN DOTS

Mr. Davis who has charge of Dr. Bouldin's plantation reports having fine weather for killing hogs.

There has been very little plowing done and a great many have not finished clearing off the old stalks.

Our successful young merchant, A. H. Elmore left for Galveston Sunday to lay in his spring stock of general merchandise.

Farmers are badly behind on account of so much bad weather. Some say they will not have time to break their corn land.

Our wide-awake farmer, F. M. Gregory, is looking long-faced on account of so much bad weather which has retarded farming.

Mr. Ned Wadsworth has received his opening bill of general merchandise, and started up in his new store on Dr. Rugeley's plantation.

On last Thursday two Mexicans on Dr. Bouldin's plantation became involved in a difficulty which resulted in one being badly cut with a brush ax. One thumb was entirely severed from his hand, and one foot badly cut. Up to this writing there has been no complaint made.

L. W. B.

The Matagorda County Tribune, February 11, 1899
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS

By Clod Hopper

Lee Riffle is on the sick list this week.

Dr. Brown is having the roof of his residence painted.

Mr. Hines, of Chance's Prairie, was in our city last week.

J. A. Elmore and son Marshall visited Wharton last week.

Mrs. Gregory has been quite sick, but we learn she is some better now.

Dr. Brown has had an attack of lagrippe, and hasn't entirely recovered yet.

Irvin Rugeley was in our city this week, looking after Capt. Frank's business.

Capt. W. C. White is expecting congressman Hawley out to see him next week.

Ned Wadsworth spent most of last week at his old stamping grounds at Pledger.

Our criterian farmer, E. S. Berkley, is getting the Dr. Rugeley place in fine condition.

The Rainey school has closed. Oar Lee wonders why this school can't run all the year.

Most of the farmers have finished planting. They are now complaining of dry weather.

Col. O. W. Ford, who is an old land mark on Caney, is now clerking for Wadsworth & Berkley.

J. P. Foster, of Winfield, Kansas, has been in our county several weeks, prospecting. He is pleased with our county.

The planters say they expect to do very little credit business this year. And most of them are toeing the line, so far.

Charlie Mensing, representing Mensing Bros. & Co., of Galveston, was talking business to our Hardeman merchants on Tuesday.

The Matagorda County Tribune, March 25, 1899
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS

By Clod Hopper

Everybody complaining of la grippe.

John Lee, of Bay City, was over here on Saturday.

Mr. Shelton of Lynville, was in our city, Monday.

Ned Wadsworth returned from Matagorda on Saturday.

Alex and Marshall Elmore visited Bay City on Sunday.

W. P. Johnson is hauling cotton to Wharton for Dr. Bouldin.

Mr. Gregory and daughter, Miss Sallie, visited Bay City on Saturday.

Mr. Lords, of Bay City, was over Saturday after a load of cotton seed.

Mr. Davis reports everything moving along nicely on Dr. Bouldin's place.

Mr. Gill, representing P. J. Willis & Bro., of Galveston, was in our city on Friday.

Mrs. Carrington and daughter, Mrs. Montgomery, were visitors at Mr. Gregory's on Friday.

Mr. Bates, one of the proprietors of the Wharton Commission Co., was a guest at Dr. Brown's on Tuesday night. Mr. Bates is out rustling for business.

The light frost on Tuesday night did very little damage. Most of the gardens were covered up. It did not hurt corn, and did but little damage to cotton.

Last Sunday Jim Rainey was whipping his dog for not staying at home, when the dog got tired of the castigation and turned on his master and bit him on the hand.

Mr. Felder, of Chance's Prairie, was over last week and purchased three tons of cotton seed from Dr. Brown, for planting. Mr. Felder is on the Francis Smith Loan Co.'s place.

Octave Herman has Mexicans clearing land and chopping wood on the two hundred acres which he bought of Mr. O'Connell. He has now about fifty or sixty acres cleared up. Octave is the best rustling black man in our community.

The Matagorda County Tribune, April 1, 1899
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS

By Clod Hopper

Deputy sheriff Keller is around collecting taxes.

Capt. Frank and Irvin Rugeley were in our city on Monday.

Mr. Gregory and daughter, Miss Sallie, attended church in Bay City on Sunday.

Messrs. Cash and Bondurant were out prospecting on Saturday and paid us a pleasant call.

J. A. Barnett sent four wagons up Friday to get corn he has on the Kate Rugeley place.

Jim Pridgen, proprietor of Wharton Wholesale Co., was talking business to our merchants on Wednesday.

We had two drummers here on Tuesday--one selling Grove's Chili Tonic, and the other Lucy Hinton's Tobacco.

Ned Wadsworth is gathering his cattle at Pledger. He has sold them to Kemp & Rugeley. They will be delivered in Bay City.

John, Will, Alex and Marshall Elmore went to the beach on Friday and returned Sunday evening. They report having had a fine time and got an abundance of fine oysters.

T. H. Brown has about six acres of sugar cane planted on the new place which he and his father leased of Dr. Brown. It is coming up nicely. They will increase their acreage next year.

Jim Rainey is trying to raise money for a school house at his place. We can buy the house of Mr. Thompson's near A. I. Rugeley's for $125. Mr. Rainey has already over half of the amount subscribed and has not been all over the community yet. We need a house for school, church and Sunday school and we hope Mr. R. will succeed.

The Matagorda County Tribune, April 8, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

John Berg was in our city on Saturday.

Col. O. W. Ford was in our city on Tuesday.

Irvin Rugeley was in our city on Tuesday.

Lee Riffle spent Sunday afternoon at Mr. Rainey's.

Clod Hopper has been on the sick list, this week.

Ned Wadsworth returned from Matagorda on Monday.

Miss Sallie Gregory visited at Mr. Rainey's on Sunday.

We had a fine rain on Saturday evening and Sunday night.

Jim Rainey and Dan O'Connell went to Houston on Monday.

Alex Elmore attended a ball on Lower Caney, Thursday night.

F. M. Gregory is looking as happy as a big sunflower since the rain.

Miss Francis, who taught the Rainey school, is now teaching a private school.

Capt. W. E. White has his natural hen incubator in operation. It is a grand success.

Matagorda County Tribune, April 22, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings
By Clod Hopper

Crops are growing nicely.

H. F. Brown was in our city on Monday.

Jim Rainey was in our city on Tuesday.

Everybody is busy fighting weeds and grass.

Commissioner G. R. Brown spent Thursday night at Dr. Brown's.

Chas. Christ, Dr. Brown's old cook, left on Tuesday for San Antonio, where he formerly lived.

Mr. McAllister has been around gathering up machines for the Singer Sewing Machine Co.

Farmers here have planted several new varieties of cotton. The seed was imported from the I. T. and Tenn.

Mr. Gregory's family, Alex Elmore, and Clod Hopper attended the show and ball in Bay City, Tuesday night.

Wadsworth & Berkley had to plant some of their cotton three times, on account of the dry, cold weather. On examining the cotton they found it green above ground but the roots would be dry and black.

Matagorda County Tribune, April 29, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

Irvin Rugeley was in our city on Tuesday.

Ned Wadsworth visited Bay City on Tuesday.

John and Alex Elmore visited Bay City on Sunday.

Everybody is rushing. With a few days of good weather, crops will be in fine shape.

Mr. Holland, representing the Houston Post, and Mr. Mechaux, representing Jas. Bute, were in our city on Friday.

Will Elmore carried Marshall and Archie to Wharton, Tuesday. They have been spending several days with their father, Jno. A. Elmore.

While the O'Connell residence was near completion, and before putting in the partition between the two east rooms, Dan O'Connell gave a dance, which was largely attended by the young people of Caney and Bay City, on Friday night. Music was furnished by F. M. Gregory and O. E. Hatchett--violin and guitar. Everybody had an enjoyable time. Refreshments were served at twelve. The crowd remained until about five a. m., Saturday.

Matagorda County Tribune, May 6, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings
By Clod Hopper

John Elmore went to Bay City on Monday.

Will Prell, one of Columbia's machinists, was here on Thursday.

Capt. Frank Rugeley, Cash Schnider, and Irvin Rugeley were in our city on Sunday.

Will Elmore was stove up several days from the effect of the ball game in Bay City, last week.

Mr. Franzen, of North Galveston who is out prospecting, spent Thursday night at Dr. Brown's.

Mr. Page, with Gifford Mercantile Co., of Wharton, was in our neighborhood on business, Monday.

A Mexican on Dr. Brown's place killed two large rattle snakes--one eight and the other nine rattles.

Crops are considerably behind what they were this time last year. However, they are growing rapidly now.

J. H. Stewart, representing the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., was doing business with our merchants on Friday.

We have had most favorable weather for the past few weeks. We are needing rain now. (LATER. We have got it.)

Edmund Thomas, an old darkey living on the Vincent place, has had a very sore finger. The flesh decayed and left the bone exposed so that amputation was necessary. Dr. Brown performed the work on Saturday.

Matagorda County Tribune, May 13, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings
By Clod Hopper

John Wendell was seen on our streets on Tuesday.

Crops are doing fine, although we need more rain.

John, Will, and Alex Elmore visited Bay City, Sunday.

Commissioner G. R. Brown was in our city on Thursday.

Miss Mamie Lou Rugeley is visiting Miss Sallie Gregory, this week.

Mr. Davis, of Dr. Bouldin's place, complains of being short of labor.

Dr. Brown and Miss Sallie Gregory attended church at Caney on Sunday.

Messrs. Scinscheimer and McLelan were talking business to our merchants on Thursday.

J. W. Gibson, of the Angleton Nursery, and Mr. Farmer, of Damon's Mound, were at Dr. Brown's on Sunday. They were en route to Bay City.

John Elmore brought in several stalks of cotton on Monday that measured sixteen inches and had several squares on them. Mr. Elmore has the best crop in our neighborhood.

County Surveyor Carrington has made a survey of the public road between this place and the Bell farm. Mr. O'Connell's fence was found to be several feet over the line, and road overseer T. H. Brown has notified him to move it back.

Matagorda County Tribune, May 20, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings
By Clod Hopper.

Crops are needing rain again.

Dozier Brown was on the sick list, this week.

Sheriff Moore was in our city on Thursday.

J. A. Elmore made a business trip to Bay City, Saturday.

Mr. Dreyfus, a Galveston drummer, was here on Tuesday.

Mr. Gregory and daughter, Miss Sallie, visited Bay City on Saturday.

J. J. Pridgen and Chas. Bently, of Wharton, were in our city on Friday.

Ned Wadsworth has been spending a few days at his old stamping grounds at Pledger.

Mr. Patterson and son and W. J. Shelton, of Chance's Prairie, were guests of Dr. Brown on Wednesday.

Lee Riffle says he is afraid he can't have his health here this summer--thinks he will have to go to La.

Miss Francis's private school at Rainey's closed last Friday. She will leave in a few days for Monroe, La., where she has relatives. Miss Francis is quite an accomplished young lady and a competent teacher. Her new-made friends and patrons regret very much to see her leave.

Matagorda County Tribune, May 27, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

John Rugeley is visiting John Elmore.

Mr. Gregory is on the sick list, this week.

Brick maker Mullen was in our city on Friday.

Miss May Francis left, Monday for Monroe, La.

Corn is suffering for rain; in fact all crops need rain.

Will and Alex Elmore visited Bay City on Monday.

Lee Riffle is looking bad; seems to be troubled about something.

Miss Ada Rugeley and brother, Lee, were in our city on Friday.

Miss Sallie Gregory attended Sunday school at Caney on Sunday.

A. Currie and John Hanks spent Sunday night at Mr. Gregory's.

Mr. Barekolamaie, the Garrett Snuff man, was here on Thursday.

Ned Wadsworth was in our city on Monday. He reports cotton blooming and crops in fine condition.

R. O. Russell, on the old Hardeman place, cut two bee trees last week. He found 58 swarms, last year.

Matagorda County Tribune, June 3, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Clod Hopper.

We are still needing rain.

No news. Will have to borrow some from Rustler, I suppose.

Our ever rustling Jas. H. Rainey was in our city on Tuesday.

Rev. E. P. Rugeley was shaking hands with friends in our city on Monday. Dozier Brown was in our city, Tuesday. He says cane is beginning to suffer for rain.

P. B. Caldwell, with the Rosenfield Notion Co., of Galveston, was here on Monday.

Mr. Markowitz, the Galveston shoe and hat drummer, spent Monday night at Dr. Brown's.

Dr. Rugeley was called, on Tuesday, to see Venie Pettit, a colored woman on Mr. Elmore's place, who was quite sick.

Revs. Hotchkiss and Murray spent Tuesday night at Dr. Brown's. They were from Matagorda en route to Wharton.

Well, Rustler, I took your advice, last Sunday, and if I can so arrange my business will try to be with you regularly in the future.

Dr. Rugeley was called, on Tuesday, to see Venie Pettit, a colored woman on Mr. Elmore's place, who was quite sick.

Revs. Hotchkiss and Murray spent Tuesday night at Dr. Brown's. They were from Matagorda en route to Wharton.

Well, Rustler, I took your advice, last Sunday, and if I can so arrange my business with try to be with you regularly in the future.

Dr. Rugeley was called to Mr. Gregory's on Thursday, to the sick bed of his little boy, Kennan, and also Miss Tennie Hardeman. Mr. Gregory says they are improving but the rest of his family are now unwell.

Wadsworth & Berkeley have a fine crop on the Dr. Rugeley place. They have good cotton growing on spots which have been taken for several years by Johnson grass. They have succeeded in keeping the grass down, so far, and will not have so much trouble with it in the future as the cotton now has the start and will soon shade the ground.

Matagorda County Tribune, June 10, 1899
 


HARDEMAN WIT

It rains in this section nearly every day and sometimes twice.

Hardeman is strictly in it for mosquitoes and weeds.

John Elmore returned last Friday from a trip around the world. Our friend Walter Brown who left with him hasn't quite got around yet.

Alex Elmore returned last Friday from Waverly, where he has been visiting his mother. Mr. Ross accompanied him home.

L. E. Beadle and J. D. Featherstone passed through here Tuesday en route to Galveston. Mr. Beadle is the gentleman who surveyed the line through here about two years ago for the Galveston, Brazos & Southwestern Ry. Co.

Dr. Brown and Mr. Payne went over last Sunday to examine the Bernard bridge and found it in very bad condition.

Ed Wadsworth, of the firm of Wadsworth & Berkley, passed through here Monday on his way to Mr. Holt's.

J. H. Rainey, the big fat man, was pressing mud here Tuesday.

Robt. Bishop, employed by Mr. Davis, left Monday for Bay City to spend a few days for his health.

Capt. W. C. White lost his favorite hatchet the other day and everyone is trying to consol him.

T. H. Brown is turning out some very fine shingles at his saw mill.

Jno. Serrill and Alex Benge paid Hardeman a flying visit Saturday.

Say, Mr. Editor! What has become of the "Diamond Cutter?" Probably you don't know him by that title; he is that ex-soldier you have over here. [He is still here and doing business at the same old stand.--Ed]

G. M. Magill and wife visited Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Monday.

The colored children of the Free System School are preparing for a grand turn out on the 28th. The principal of this school has given general satisfaction.

Mr. Pinton, the rustling seed man of D. M. Ferry, was doing business with the Hardeman merchants Wednesday.

Ramus Brown, of Pledger, spent Tuesday night in the burg.

JUNIPER

Weekly Visitor, July 21, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant.

Edgar Rugeley visited our city on Tuesday.

J. W. Rugeley was in town Tuesday on business.

A. H. and W. A. Elmore visited Bay City Monday.

L. W. Brown has been on the sick list for several days.

Everybody is going to plant corn and raise hogs next year.

Cotton is opening very fast; will all be picked by the 1st of Dec.

Ned Wadsworth passed through town Tuesday en route to his old home.

Heidenheimer was in town last week, talking groceries to our merchants.

The boll weevil are still working on the cotton; we never get to see a bloom now.

John Elmore ginned six bales of cotton this week; will gin several more next week.

Matagorda County Tribune, July 26, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant.

Cotton crops are looking fine.

We had a nice rain on Thursday.

Business is dull in town this week.

J. H. Rainey visited Bay City on Wednesday.

F. M. Gregory went over to the county capital on Thursday.

Capt. W. C. White has been on the sick list for several days.

Will Andrus, of Richmond, was in town, last week, on business.

J. A. and W. A. Elmore made a flying trip to Bay City on Saturday.

John Elmore began picking cotton, Monday morning. He will market some in a few days.

Mr. Lemmons, representing P. J. Willis Bros. of Galveston, was talking to our merchants, last week.

Capt. White found his hatchet in W. A. Elmore's cotton patch, where he did some work on the White & Gaston planter, last week.

Mr. Davis is living on Dr. Bouldin's plantation, lost a new-born babe on Wednesday night. It was buried at the Bay City Cemetery.

Dr. Simons and A. J. McMahan were in our town last week talking insurance. Come again Mr. Mack; I think you will catch John Elmore next time.

Edgar Rugeley spent the day with us last Saturday, and had a nice little game of high five, and invited some of us over to see a certain young lady friend of his. Says she is mighty pretty and lively. Think we will have to give her a call, before long.

Matagorda County Tribune, August 5, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant.

No cotton worms yet.

Business is good this week.

Irvin Rugeley visited our city, Sunday.

J. W. Rugeley spent  the day with us, Tuesday.

J. A. Elmore ginned his first bale of cotton, Saturday.

Dr. J. W. Brown is sawing lumber again this week.

John Elmore says he has plenty of boll weevil in his cotton.

Capt. White is doing some work on Octave Herman's gin, this week.

Mr. Davis's little boy was very sick, Monday--had to have the doctor with him.

Mrs. M. E. Rugeley and son, Johnie passed through town last week, en route to their home in Wharton.

John Petitt, on John Elmore's place, raffled off a 42 pound watermelon, Saturday, for 50 cents; R. O. Russell was the lucky winner.

Matagorda County Tribune, August 12, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings
By Merchant.

Everybody is picking cotton.

Marshall Elmore was in our town Tuesday on business.

John Elmore says he will gin several bales of cotton this week.

John Elmore is doing some work on the Columbia road, this week.

Ned Wadsworth passed through town Monday, en route to Bay City.

Hon. Geo. R. Brown visited us on his way to the county capital, Monday.

W. E. Harris, representing Gust Heye & Co., was doing our merchants, last week.

The spot cash drummer was in town Saturday, talking tobacco to our merchants.

Capt. White says he will have Octave Herman's gin in good running order by Monday.

Edgar Rugeley says he will be over before long and have another good old game of high five. Come soon Uncle Edgar; we are glad to have you play with us.

Matagorda County Tribune, August 19, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant

Ned Wadsworth was in town Saturday.

W. A. Elmore visited Bay City on Friday.

J. H. Rainey was seen on our streets Tuesday.

Dr. J. W. Brown ginned his first bale of cotton on Saturday.

W. E. Harris was in town on Tuesday rustling the grocery business.

Mr. Lemons was in town last week talking groceries to our merchants.

The boll weevil have let up on the cotton some; we saw a bloom this morning.

W. A. Elmore began picking cotton Monday morning. He has about eight bales open.

Mr. Labatt, representing J. Davis & Co., of Galveston, was doing our merchants last week.

Dyer, representing Whitney & Sloo, of New Orleans, was talking saddlery to our merchants last week.

Matagorda County Tribune, September 2, 1899
 


HARDEMAN HAPPENINGS.

By Merchant.

We had a nice rain on Monday.

J. H. Rainey was in twice this week on business.

Dr. J. W. Brown visited the county capital Tuesday.

N. M. Vogelsang was in town Monday on business.

I. W. Brown lost his noted race horse, Whiskey Jake, last week.

Cliff Yeamans of Bay City, was in town several days this week.

The boll weevils and cotton worms are having a good time on the cotton this week.

Mr. Caldwell, representing Rosenfield Notion Co. was doing our merchants on Wednesday.

J. A. Elmore is still hauling cedar to Bay City.

Matagorda County Tribune, September 9, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant.

Business seems to be improving.

R. L. Riffle visited the county capital Monday.

F. M. Gregory passed through town Monday.

Jim Bruce was in town Tuesday on business.

Edgar Rugeley visited our town on Wednesday.

Mr. Howe, of lower Caney, was in town last week.

R. L. Riffle has been on the sick list for several days.

W. A. Elmore spent several days in Bay City this week.

The colored people are going to have a big barbecue Sept. 15th and 16th. A grand time is expected.

A crowd from Wharton passed Caney last week said to be R. R. Men. If so, we will have a railroad soon because that big, fat man looked like he meant business.

Matagorda County Tribune, September 16, 1899
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant.

Cotton will soon be picked out.

T. H. Brown visited Bay City Sunday.

Clifton Yeamans was very sick last week.

W. E. Harris was doing our merchants last week.

J. W. Rugeley was in town Monday on business.

R. L. Riffle has been on the sick list for several days.

Judge Barbee passed through town en route to Bay City.

A. H. and J. A. Elmore made a flying trip to Bay City Saturday.

L. W. Brown has charge of Dr. Brown's gin this year. He is a good ginner as well as a sawyer.

Mr. Dreyfus, representing the Galveston Dry Goods Co., had the cheek to try to sell goods, knowing the cotton crop is cut short by the boll weevils.

Matagorda County Tribune, October 21, 1899
 


Hardeman Dots

Capt. W. C. White visited Bay City Monday.

Miss Sallie Gregory called on Miss Annie Elmore Monday.

Mr. Page is around collecting for the Gifford Mercantile Co.

Dan O'Connell and Zack Spooner were seen on our streets Monday.

J. A. Elmore went to Matagorda Tuesday with ten bales of cotton to be shipped to Galveston by boat.

John and Charley Mickelson and Mr. Asp spent Monday in our city. The Mickelsons lived on Dr. Brown's place in 1896.

Mr. Young, who moved to the Kate Rugeley place, got stuck in the mud in our lane Saturday night and did not get out until Sunday.

Two of the Caney Valley promoters, Judge Barbee and Ned Wadsworth, were in our city Monday. I'll bet a ginger cake we will get to see the cars before Bay City people do.

Farmers are as busy as bees clearing up their land, and some plowing. They are taking advantage of the fine weather we are having. Farming is further advanced now than it was at this time a year ago.

Marshall Elmore, Miss Annie Elmore and Miss Stella Wallace came to our city Saturday. Marshall and Miss Stella returned to Bay City Sunday and Miss Annie will spend the week, with her uncle, John Elmore and brother Alex.

Sawyer

Weekly Visitor, January 26, 1900
 


HARDEMAN DOTS

Dozia Brown was in our city Thursday.

Ned Wadsworth was in for mail Friday.

Capt. White and Dr. Brown visited Bay City Monday.

B. W. Matthews representing the Galveston Dry Goods Co. spent Sunday and Sunday night at Mr. Elmore's and sold Alex a nice bill of goods.

John Lackey, Wharton county's surveyor and Mr. Carr of Wharton, dropped in at Dr. Brown's Friday night, and on Saturday surveyed some land which Dr. Brown sold to the new town company.

Marshall Elmore and Carlisle Williams brought Misses Stella and Fannie Wallace out to see Miss Annie Elmore Saturday. Saturday night the "little four" from Bay City, Alex and Miss Annie Elmore and ye scribe spent a few pleasant hours at Mr. Gregory's. It is useless to say that all had an enjoyable time. Music was furnished on the piano and violin by our talented friends, Mr. and Mrs. Gregory, and Miss Sallie spared no means in entertaining her guests. Sunday afternoon the "little four" and Miss Annie returned to Bay City.

SAWYER

Weekly Visitor, February 2, 1900
 


Hardeman Dots.

Dan O'Connell and Mat. Johnson were in our city Wednesday.

Capt. W. C. White and Jno. Elmore visited Bay City Tuesday.

The telephone crew reached here Thursday afternoon with the wire.

Road overseer Dozia Brown put  new floor on our bridge near A. I. Rugeley's.

Most of the farmers will finish breaking land with one more week of fair weather.

The rain Sunday night was not badly needed, though it will be an advantage if it stops with that.

W. E. Harris representing Gust Heye & Co., of Galveston, and J. J. Morris, selling Lucy Hinton tobacco, were doing business in our city Friday.

Sawyer.

Weekly Visitor, February 16, 1900
 


Hardemon Dots

John Elmore visited Bay City Monday.

Dan O'Connell was on our streets Wednesday.

Dr. Brown visited in Chances prairie Sunday.

Dick Johnson was in our city hunting seed corn Wednesday.

Alex Elmore went to Taylor Bros' ranch Thursday to buy corn.

Charlie Mensing, representing Mensing Bros. & Co. of Galveston, made a flying trip through our city Monday.

Mrs. Davis returned to her home on the Bouldin place Wednesday after a ten days visit to relatives below Bay City.

Our jolly friend J. H. McClure, representing the Island City Manufacturing Co. spent Wednesday night at Dr. Brown's.

Sawyer.

Weekly Visitor, February 23, 1900
 


Hardeman Happenings.
By Merchant

Dan O'Connell was seen on our streets Tuesday.

J. A. Elmore began planting corn Thursday.

M. O'Connell was in our city Monday on business.

Capt. White is doing some work on his planter this week.

J. A. Elmore is hauling cotton seed to Bay City this week.

Dr. J. W. Brown visited Pledger, his old home, Wednesday.

Rosenfield's man was talking notions to our merchants this week.

J. A. Elmore and L. Walter Brown visited Bay City Monday.

A. H. Elmore and A. I. Rugeley made a flying trip to Bay City Wednesday.

Chas. Mensing, representing Mensing Bros. & Co., of Galveston, was talking groceries to our merchants Tuesday.

Matagorda County Tribune, February 24, 1900
 


HARDEMAN DOTS

Most of the farmers are planting corn.

Alex Elmore visited Bay City Wednesday.

Billie Franz patronized our phone Saturday.

Capt. White and Jno. Elmore visited Bay City Monday.

Dr. Brown made a business trip to Pledger on Wednesday.

Will Showaker and Dick Johnson were on our streets Sunday.

John Serrill and Geo. Williams was seen on our streets Wednesday.

Dr. Brown had a crew of hands working on the road above here Friday.

Col. T. H. Mullens was building some chimneys out on the burn last week.

Corn will be cheap on Caney this fall, our neighbor Jim Rainey is planting extensively

Mrs. Davis and children moved to Bay City Monday where they expect to reside in the future.

Mr. B. H. Matthews, representing the Galveston Dry Goods Co. spent Monday night at Dr. Brown's.

Mr. Allen Armstrong of Chance's prairie spent Sunday and Monday with his old friend Capt. White.

Mr. Dray, representing A. B. Frank of San Antonio, was talking Dry Goods to our merchants Friday.

M. O'Connell, Jr. was in our city Wednesday and gave Walter Brown an order for some tailor made clothing.

Miss Annie Elmore came out from Bay City Monday and spent the night with her uncle Johnie and brother Alex.

Mr. Gibson came out Friday from Bay City and carried back with him Sam Franz and Walter Williams who are working with the bridge crew on Dr. Rugeley's place.            SAWYER

Weekly Visitor, March 2, 1900
 


HARDEMAN DOTS

News is scarce.

Mr. Davis Sundayed in Bay City.

Every body is busy planting corn.

Mr. Gregory was in our city Saturday.

Ned Wadsworth was in our city Thursday. Mr. Wadsworth is bitterly against the Boers.

Henry Williams and J. W. White came out from Bay City Saturday and spent Sunday with the Franz bridge crew.

W. E. Harris representing Gust Heye & Co. of Galveston, and Schnapp's Tobacco man were here on Friday.

Alex Elmore visited Bay City Sunday and did not return until Monday night. There seems to be some attraction there for Alex.

We learn that it is reported in Bay City that the graders on the Caney Valley had packed up their plunder and gone, and that work was suspended for the present. We had news from the camps Saturday that they were progressing nicely. The grade will be completed in a few days to the old Matthews quarter on the Sadler & Brown place. How about the Cane Belt?

SAWYER

Weekly Visitor, March 9, 1900
 


Hardeman Dots

Dr. Brown attended church in Bay City Sunday.

Messrs. Selvage and Heidenhamer were here on Thursday.

A. I. Rugeley and T. F. Mullens visited Wharton last week.

Mr. Gregory marketed cotton in Wharton on Friday at 8 1/2.

Mrs. Gregory and Miss Sallie visited at Mrs. Rainey's Monday.

Col. Ned Wadsworth was swapping jokes on our streets Saturday.

Messrs. Barney and Bryan spent Thursday night at Dr. Brown's.

Mr. Barnett's wagons were hauling feed stuff to the Kate Rugeley place on Thursday.

A. I. Rugeley was called to the phone on business with a party in Wharton Saturday.

Alex Elmore and Walter Brown attended the commencement exercises in Bay City Friday night.

Sinsheimer representing Ullman, Lewis & Co., was talking groceries to our merchants on Wednesday.

Jno. Elmore visited Bay City Sunday and brought Miss Annie home with him to spend several days.

Mrs. Dr. Rugeley, Mrs. Hy. Rugeley and little Lizzie and Sister Hawkins spent Monday at Mr. Elmore's.

Mr. Berkley was in our city Thursday for the first time this year. He reports every thing flourishing on the Rugeley place.

A tenant house on the W. B. Wadsworth place was burned on Friday night. No one knows how it caught. The house was vacant.

Master Archie Elmore came down from Wharton with Mrs. Rugeley Thursday. He will spend several days with his father, Jno. Elmore.

The railroad contractor who is about to complete the 18th mile on the Caney Valley was here Sunday looking over the line. He said he would move on down the line in a few days.

Sawyer

Weekly Visitor, March 16, 1900
 


HARDEMAN DOTS

A. I. Rugeley was in our city Monday.

Well, Sawyer is able to stand at his lever again.

Ned Wadsworth spent Sunday at Tangle Wilde.

Capt. White is busy working on his boll weevil exterminator.

Mrs. J. H. Rainey and Miss Deck were in our city shopping Saturday.

Jas. Fleury came out from Bay City and spent Saturday and Sunday at Mr. Elmore's.

Farmers are very busy, most of them have finished planting cotton and are now working their corn.

No mail Monday on account of high water. The river water has not reached here in Caney yet.

T. H. Mullens is as busy as a bee, getting everything ready to start on a brick kiln on the O'Connell place.

Some of our young friends seem to have important business in Bay City. We hope for their sake, the water will run down soon.

The early bird did not catch the worm this time. All the early planters had to plant over on account of the heavy rains.

Dozia Brown is busy hauling large logs for his mill. The bottom has been so very wet for some time that he could not do any hauling.

Our grading contractor, Mr. Craig, left Friday morning for Wharton to be with his family until the flood scare is over. He left his work here in charge of Mr. Hewitt.

SAWYER

Weekly Visitor, April 20, 1900
 


Hardeman Dots

The rain Sunday was fine on the crops.

John and Alex Elmore visited Bay City Thursday.

Farmers are getting along nicely with their work.

Mr. Berkley was in our city two or three times last week.

Ed. Wadsworth was called to the phone Saturday by a Wharton party.

Miss Mamie Lou, Warren and Hellen Rugeley are attending the Rainey school.

Mesdames M. and D. O'Connell were berry hunting on Caney first of week.

Michael O'Connell has a crew of hands working his corn on Caney this week.

Chas. Mensing made a flying, or rather swimming, trip here Wednesday afternoon.

Chief Engineer Jones, of Houston, came down Monday to look over the work on our Caney Valley.

M. O'Connell and Jas. Rainey were on our streets Thursday. Mr. Rainey says his corn is flourishing.

Marshall Elmore returned to Bay City Monday after spending several days with his father, J. A. Elmore.

Miss Sallie Gregory came to patronize our phone Saturday, but was disappointed in getting up the party with whom she wished to talk.

Sawyer

Weekly Visitor, April 27, 1900
 


Hardeman Dots

Dr. Bouldin was on Caney Friday.

Alex Elmore visited Bay City Friday.

We are having fine sweet potato weather.

__o. and Alex Elmore visited Bay City Monday.

The O'Connell boys were branding here last week.

Mr. Craig went to Wharton after noon Wednesday.

John Elmore made a business trip to Wharton Friday.

Sheriff Moore was attending to business in our city Friday.

Ex Sheriff Rugeley was in chatting with our boys Saturday.

Messrs. Hensley, Traylor and Baker were in our city Wednesday.

E. H. Mullens says when we need ___ again he will start another brick ___.

Mr. Black returned from Wharton Thursday and resumed work on Van Vleck.

Hr. Hewatt, one of our grading contractors, has been on the sick list for a day or two.

Dozia Brown is furnishing the Van Vleck Co. with sawed live oak stakes. When he was delivering a load Monday one of his mules was taken sick here and came near dieing.

Dr. Rugeley was called to see a ___ on Wadsworth & Berkley's ___ Saturday who had pneumonia. They were too late in summoning a doctor, the boy died Sunday.

Sawyer.

Weekly Visitor, May 11, 1900
 

 

Copyright 2006 - Present by Carol sue Gibbs
All rights reserved

Created
Jan. 15, 2006
Updated
Jan. 3, 2013
   

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