Albert Clinton Horton

Matagorda Cemetery Road     SH 60 & S Gulf Road                           2842'0.51"N      9557'19.91"W
 

 


Moved to Texas April, 1835

Traveled back to Alabama to recruit volunteers, Mobile Greys,  for the Texas Revolution
and outfitted them at his own expense

Organized a company of cavalry from Matagorda in February 1936 and joined the
command of James Fannin  March 1936

Senator in the 1st and 2nd Congresses of the Republic of Texas  1836 - 1838

Served on Republic of Texas Capital Selection Committee   January 1839

Captain Against the Invasion of Rafael Vasquez  March 7, 1842

Delegate to the Convention of 1845

First Lieutenant Governor of the State of Texas  May 1, 1846

Acting Governor of Texas  May 19, 1946 - July 1, 1847

Original member of the board of trustees that established Baylor University
 

(Photo  Courtesy State Preservation Board, Austin, TX)

 


 

Executive Department
Austin, May 19th 1846.

To
    His Excellency
                     A. C. Horton

Sir,
         I shall this day leave the seat of Government to take command of the Texian forces raised under the requisition of Gen'l Taylor, and shall move beyond the Rio Grande into Mexico. Under these circumstances, you are required by the Constitution to act as Governor of the State by virtue of your Office of Lieutenant Governor.

I have the honor to be
Your Ob't Servant
J. Pinckney Henderson

 

 


 


ALBERT CLINTON HORTON

(1798 - 1865)

 

 
    GEORGIA NATIVE, ALBERT CLINTON HORTON, CAME TO TEXAS IN 1834 FROM ALABAMA, WHERE HE HAD SERVED IN THE STATE LEGISLATURE. HE ESTABLISHED A PLANTATION ALONG CANEY CREEK IN MATAGORDA COUNTY, PRESENT DAY WHARTON COUNTY. IN 1835, HE RETURNED TO ALABAMA TO RECRUIT VOLUNTEERS FOR THE TEXAS ARMY AND HE SERVED AS COLONEL OF A CAVALRY UNIT DURING THE TEXAS REVOLUTION.

     UPON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS IN 1836, HORTON WAS ELECTED TO CONGRESS. HE WAS THE CHAIRMAN OF A COMMISSION APPOINTED BY PRESIDENT M. B. LAMAR TO SELECT A SITE FOR A PERMANENT CAPITOL FOR THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS IN 1839.

     WHEN TEXAS BECAME A STATE IN DECEMBER, 1845, HORTON WAS ELECTED ITS FIRST LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. HE SERVED AS ACTING GOVERNOR FOR OVER A YEAR WHILE GOVERNOR HENDERSON WAS LEADING TEXAS FORCES IN THE MEXICAN WAR.

     WHEN BAYLOR UNIVERSITY WAS FOUNDED IN 1845, HORTON WAS A CHARTER TRUSTEE. BY THE 1850'S HE HAD HOMES IN BOTH WHARTON AND MATAGORDA. HE AND HIS PARTNER, ABNER CLEMENTS GAVE LAND FOR CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN TEXAS.

     HE AND HIS WIFE, ELIZA HOLLIDAY, HAD SIX CHILDREN. HORTON DIED IN MATAGORDA IN 1865, VARIOUS SOURCES LISTING THE DATE OF DEATH AS SEPTEMBER 1, OR OCTOBER 7.

 

TEXAS SESQUICENTENNIAL 1836-1986

 



 


ALBERT CLINTON HORTON

By Kathleen Tatum

 

Albert Clinton Horton was born September 4, 1798 in Hancock County, Georgia, son of William and Mary Thomas Horton. His father died when he was very young and later his mother married Colonel Samuel Dent, moving to LaGrange, Franklin County, Alabama in 1823.


Albert Horton married Eliza Holliday in 1829, daughter of General Thomas Holliday. Eliza was born in North Carolina in 1815, but was living in Alabama with her brother-in-law and guardian, W. J. Croom, father of Colonel John L. Croom of Matagorda, Texas.


Horton and his wife moved to Greensboro, Alabama where he served one term in the Alabama State Senate in 1832.


Albert Horton came to Matagorda County, Texas, April, 1835, when he purchased several leagues of land in the northern part of Matagorda County, which is now part of Wharton County. In addition, he was granted a league and labor of land on January 19, 1838.


After making his family comfortable in their large, new home, in the town of Matagorda, (The S. M. Dale, F. L. Rugeley and now present [1987] Robert J. Sisk home that is still standing), he joined James W. Fannin, Jr. with his recruited cavalry of men, arriving at Goliad on March 16, 1836. March 17, Horton had a skirmish with the cavalry of General Jose Urrea. On the morning of the retreat from Goliad, Horton was sent to examine the crossing of Coleto Creek. His group decided it was impractical to attempt to rejoin Fannin's army which had been completely surrounded, for fear of losing all of his men, of which he was criticized by some.


Horton served in the Texas Army from February to May 1836. He represented Matagorda, Jackson and Victoria Counties in the Senate of the First and Second Congress, 1836 to 1838. In the election held on September 3, 1838, he was candidate for Vice-President of the Republic of Texas, but was defeated. January 1839 he was one of five commissioners appointed to select a location for the capital of Texas.


Horton represented Matagorda County in the Convention of 1845 and was elected Lieutenant Governor on December 15, 1845. He was not inaugurated until May 1, 1846, after a recount and tabulation of the votes showed that he had received more votes than Nicholas H. Darnell, whom the Legislature had declared elected. During Governor James Pinckney Henderson's leave of absence to command Texas troops during the Mexican War, Horton acted as Governor of the State of Texas from May 19, 1846 to July 1, 1847.


The Hortons were Episcopalians, where he was elected Vestryman and Warden in 1839. They joined the Baptist faith later and he was President of Baylor University. He was regarded as one of the wealthiest men in the State, but after the Civil War he lost about four hundred slaves. Cotton, sugar and other farm products dropped in price causing him to lose very heavily on his plantation.


Albert Clinton Horton died October, 1865 at his summer home in Matagorda and is buried in the Matagorda Cemetery. There were six children born to this union, but only two lived to maturity.


His daughter, Patience Louisiana Texas Horton, born 1837, married in Wharton County, January 13, 1853 to Colonel Isaac Newton Dennis who was born in Dallas County, Alabama, June 25, 1829. He was a law graduate of Cambridge, Massachusetts and admitted to the bar at Cahaba, Alabama in December, 1850. He came to Texas in 1852. He represented Wharton and Matagorda Counties in the Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Legislatures. To this union, was born one child, Patience Horton Dennis, who married Judge Wilie C. Croom. They had one child, Linda Croom who married Frank Hodges. After Patience's death, Isaac Newton Dennis married Sadie Hinton in 1865 and after her death, he married Maggie Knox in 1869, by whom he had four children. He died March 25, 1910.


Albert Clinton Horton's other child that lived to maturity was a boy, Colonel Robert John Horton who was born March 24, 1844 in Matagorda. At the age of eighteen, he entered the Confederate Army as a volunteer. On December 30, 1863 he was in Captain Rugeley's company that participated in an attack on the enemy on Matagorda Bay and was one of the men that endured the suffering of the night of the disaster when the norther blew in capsizing the boats and freezing and drowning many men.


Robert John Horton married Miss Mary Hawes, September 12, 1864 at Matagorda while he was home on furlough. Mary was the daughter of Judge Hugh Hawes. Soon after the marriage, he resumed his duties in the army and at the close of the war he established his home in Matagorda, moving from there to Saluria Island and then to Goliad. In 1886 he returned to Wharton and lived there until his death, October 2, 1904. His last request was to have his many old army buddies escort his remains to the final resting place. His widow, Mary Horton, died June 24, 1912. They were the parents of six children: Mrs. Albert (Carrie) Foote of Houston; Mrs. Jim (Mary) Davis of El Paso; Mrs. J. E. (Loula) Irvin; Mrs. Alex (Renie) Rugeley; Mrs. T. J. (Lida) Abell of Wharton and A. C. Horton, Jr. of Wharton.

 

The Official Texas Historical Marker for Albert Clinton Horton was dedicated October 10, 1987, at the Matagorda Cemetery, Matagorda, Texas.

 

 


Albert C. Horton

Albert C. Horton, who will always have a conspicuous place in Texas history as the first lieutenant governor of the state and acting governor during a considerable part of his term, took upon himself the burdens and responsibilities of public life as a matter of duty. His inclination was always for the life of a planter, and he was one of the most successful of the planters of the old ante-bellum period in the rich and fertile region of Wharton County.

He was born in Georgia, about 1798, and went from his native state to LaGrange, Alabama, about 1822. He was thus a pioneer of that state, which had been admitted to the Union only a few years earlier. In Alabama he met and married Miss Eliza Holliday, daughter of Gen. Thomas Holliday. From LaGrange he moved to Greensboro, Alabama and served one term in the Alabama State Senate. It was in 1832 that he determined to ally himself with the American colonists in Texas, and in 1836 he established his home in the Matagorda District in what is now Wharton County.

He had a prominent part in the movement for the separation of Texas from Mexico, and in the early part of the Texas Revolution he commanded a company of cavalry under Col. Fannin at Goliad. During the era of the Republic of Texas he represented his district in Congress. At the first election after the annexation of the state he was chosen lieutenant governor. Shortly after his inauguration Governor Henderson left the state to command the Texans in the Mexican war, and Lieutenant Governor Horton therefore became acting governor, and upon him devolved the heavy responsibilities of governorship until the end of the war. After this public service he followed his inclination and devoted his energies to the management of his vast estates. He owned a wonderful plantation and was regarded as one of the wealthiest men in Southern Texas before the Civil War. As a result of the war he lost about four hundred slaves and the systematic efficiency of his plantation was demoralized. He died at his plantation in 1865, soon after the surrender of the Confederate armies.

To the marriage of Albert C. Horton and Miss Eliza Holliday were born eight children, but only two lived to maturity, a daughter, Mrs. I. N. Dennis, and Col. Robert J. Horton, who was born March 21, 1844, in the town of Matagorda. At the age of eighteen he entered the Confederate army as a volunteer. On December 30, 1863, he was a participant under Captain Rugeley in a memorable attack on the sand fort of the enemy on Matagorda Bay and was one of those who endured the sufferings of that night of disaster for the Confederate forces. Matagorda Bay was lashed with the fury of a freezing cold norther storm, accompanied with sleet, and Colonel Horton was one of the few survivors of the attack. During the last year of the war he returned home on a furlough and married Miss Mary Hawes, a daughter of Judge Hugh Hawes. Soon after his marriage he resumed his duties in the army and at the close of the war he established his home in Matagorda, moving from there to Saluria Island, and thence to Goliad. In 1886 he returned to Wharton and lived there until his death on October 2, 1904. His last request was that his old Confederate Friends escort his remains to their final resting place, and there were many of the old soldiers then living, and with strength and willingness to perform this last tribute. While a resident of Wharton, Colonel Horton held several public offices. His honest nature and integrity of purpose made him one of the most loved men in the town. He was a brave soldier, a patriotic citizen, and a man of the highest sense of honor. His widow, Mrs. Robert J. Horton, died June 24, 1912. They were the parents of six children, five daughters and one son: Mrs. Carrie Foote, of Houston; Mrs. Jim Davis, of El Paso; Mrs. J. E. Irvin, Mrs. Alex Rugeley, Mrs. T. J. Abell, of Wharton; A. C. Horton, of Wharton.

Texas Under Many Flags, Clarence W. Wharton, American Historical Society, 1930

Matagorda County Genealogical Society Publication, Oak Leaves, Vol. 9 #2, February 1990
 



 


In memory of
ALBERT C. HORTON

BORN
In Georgia in 1793

DIED
In Matagorda Oct. 1865

A soldier of the Texas
Revolution, and the
First Lieut. Governor
of Texas. A true patriot
and faithful in all the
relations of life.

 


 

Copyright 2009 - Present by Carol Sue Gibbs
All rights reserved

Created
Feb. 22, 2009
Updated
Feb. 2
7, 2013
   

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