Matagorda County Recorded Texas Historic Landmark
 

D. P. and Louise Moore Home
 

2404 Avenue E, Bay City, Texas             28°58’45.92”N       95°58’17.58”W

 

Moore Family Pictures
 



 


 

D. P. AND LOUISE MOORE HOUSE

DOLPH PHENIAS (D.P.) MOORE (1852-1928) MOVED TO MATAGORDA COUNTY IN 1869. HE MARRIED LOUISE WENDEL IN 1879 AND TOGETHER THEY REARED TEN CHILDREN. A SUCCESSFUL MERCHANT, RANCHER, AND LANDOWNER, MOORE SOLD THE LAND ON WHICH THE TOWN OF BAY CITY WAS PLATTED IN 1894. HE MOVED HIS FAMILY TO BAY CITY THAT YEAR. LOCAL CONTRACTORS HATCHETT & LARGE BUILT THIS 15-ROOM QUEEN ANNE STYLE HOUSE FOR THE MOORES IN 1902. A PROMINENT CIVIC LEADER, MOORE WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING RAILROADS TO BAY CITY AND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AREA’S RICE INDUSTRY. HE DONATED LAND FOR CEDARVALE CEMETERY AND PARK.

RECORDED TEXAS HISTORIC LANDMARK- (1995)

Inscription typed by Faye Cunningham

 

D. P. and Louise Moore Home

2404 Avenue E, Bay City, Texas 77414

 

The D. P. and Louise Moore home was built on block 60 in 1902 by builders Hatchett and Large. The land was purchased from David Swickheimer on November 20, 1894. Lots 4 - 9 were for the homesite, and the other half was used for pasture. It is a late Victorian two-story, four-bay wood-frame residence, with columned and ballustraded front porch and gallery, projecting gable roofed section with bay, and small Palladian window in gable. The house has two fireplaces, grill work inside the music and dining rooms, drop ceilings downstairs, front and back stairs, porches up and down. Also, leaded glass windows in the living room, frosted and etched glass front door. Downstairs are a bed, living music, dining and breakfast rooms, two kitchens, and a bath. Upstairs are five bedrooms, parlor and a bath. A closed stairway leads to the attic, with a ladder extending to the "widow's walk." Elegant proportioning and good quality detail make this well-designed structure one of the finest late Victorian residences in Bay City.


The first cement sidewalk in the city extends from the house to the street. A picket fence enclosed the six lots. Originally, an attached building held the acetylene gas plant, as gas was used until the house was wired for electricity in 1903. Above the gas house, was an octagon-shaped structure holding a cyprus cistern that was fed from gutters on the roof. In the yard was a windmill and tank, large two story barn with stall for horses, corn crib, hay storage, and a room for the carriage. Other buildings were chicken house, brick sweet potato house, pens for the livestock and a one-room servant's house.


Dolph Phenias Moore was born in Indianola, Texas, October 6, 1852, to Robert Baxter Moore and Mary Layton Moore - both being citizens of the Republic of Texas, and of Revolutionary War descendants.


Receiving his education in the private schools of historic old Indianola, Dolph left early to locate in Matagorda County to engage in the mercantile business. At the age of seventeen, he moved to "Rancho Grande" and became a clerk at the Pierce Brother's General Store in Deming's Bridge (later named Hawley, Texas). By age twenty-two, in June of 1875, he had built a store, and opened a general mercantile business on the east side of the Colorado River near Elliot's Ferry. Across from the store, he also built a cotton gin and home.


D. P. acquired his first 30 acres of land on December 9, 1875 (this land was to later develop into 1500 acres and qualified for recognition in the 1975 Family Land Heritage Program). In 1885 Elliot's Post Office was opened in Moore's store, and he was appointed Postmaster on December 2, 1885, where he served until 1894 when the post office was moved to the new county set in Bay City. In 1891, D. P. Moore moved his family to Matagorda to open another general store. There, he was appointed to fill out the unexpired term as county Treasurer and at the next regular election, was returned to office. On September 18, 1894, an election was held for the movement of the county seat from Matagorda to a site in the center of the county on the Bay Prairie - they called it Bay City. Many landowners in the area were not interested in selling land for the new town, but D. P. Moore saw the need for a centrally located county seat. He sold 320 acres of his holdings for $1.00 an acre. Another 320 acres were purchased from the Mensing brothers at $5.00 an acre, but since the Mensing pasture was under lease and a barbed wire fence separated the two pastures, the town was surveyed and the courthouse was built in the Moore pasture. Today, Avenue G in Bay City, which runs on the east side of the courthouse, was the fence line at the time. With the county seat being moved to Bay City, Mr. Moore returned to Bay City from Matagorda to continue his businesses of mercantile, cotton farming, and ranching.


He established a store on the west side of the square October 11, 1894, only one month after the election to begin the town. The first newspaper of the town, the Bay City Breeze was printed above the Elliot's Ferry store. The town grew from 25 in 1894 to 2000 in 1902 due in part by Moore's assistance of donating 200 acres to entice the Cane Belt, Southern Pacific, and Brownsville railroads into town. He was the first president of the Matagorda County Rice and Irrigation Company, organized in 1899, and lived to see his faith in this section as a great rice growing belt. He also served as vice-president of the First National Bank of Bay City, being one of the directors until the time of his death on November 7, 1928. Donations to the city were numerous including the Cedarvale Cemetery and Park.


D. P. Moore married Louise Wendel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Wendel, on December 17, 1879. They had ten children - six girls - Mary Edna, Ella Adell, Thelma, Lois Myrtle, Grace and Martha Louise, and four boys - Robert Eric, Grover, Layton and William Jerome.


In the Bay City Tribune obituary of D. P. Moore, it states:

"In the passing of D. P. Moore, we see a pioneer ranchman and merchant, a spirit clean, sturdy, and fine, possessing the unqualified esteem of every man who knew him and a high sense of responsibility for the welfare of his family and his fellow man. Of quiet dignity, straightforward and sincere, his life stands out as a distinct part in the development of Bay City and Matagorda County."


After his death, the home was occupied by his widow, Louise. After her death in 1939, the home was occupied by their youngest daughter, Martha Louise until her death in 1993. It is now owned by a great-grandson.

 

The Texas Historical Marker dedication for the D. P. and Louise Moore Home was held December 30, 1995.
 


D. P. and LOUISE MOORE HOUSE

 

Dolph Phenias (D. P.) Moore (1852-1928) moved to Matagorda County in 1869. He married Louise Wendel in 1879 and together they reared ten children. A successful merchant, rancher, and landowner, Moore sold the land on which the town of Bay City was platted in 1894. He moved his family to Bay City that year. Local contractors Hatchett & Large built this 15-room Queen Anne style house for the Moores in 1902. A prominent civic leader, Moore was instrumental in bringing railroads to Bay City and in the development of the area’s rice industry. He donated land for Cedarvale Cemetery and Park. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1995
 


DOLPH PHINEAS MOORE

 

By Brian Tomlinson

 

Dolph Phineas Moore, born in Indianola, TX, October 6, 1852, of sturdy Revolutionary War stock, was the son of Robert Baxter Moore and Mary Layton Moore, of Newark, New Jersey. He died November 7, 1928, and was buried in Cedarvale Cemetery. On December 17, 1879, he married Louise Wendel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Wendel. They had six daughters: Mary Edna, Ella Adele, Lois Myrtle, Thelma, and Martha Louise; and four sons: Robert Eric, Grover, Layton, and William Jerome.


Receiving his education in the private schools of historic old Indianola, he early left that point to locate in Matagorda county, coming at an early date and engaging in the mercantile business at what was then known as Red Bluff, later Elliott Post Office, just west of present day Bay City. Catching the vision of the possibilities in Matagorda county for an aggressive business man, Mr. Moore branched out into farming and stock raising. In addition to his mercantile business, he acquired large holdings over the county.


Moore established a store at Red Bluff on the Colorado River in 1875 which later became known as Elliott Post Office. He acquired his first land on the east bank of the Colorado in 1875 and continued on eastward to include the area to be known as Bay City. Moore served as County Treasurer in 1892-1902. He served as postmaster for Elliott post office from 1885-1902.


In 1894, Mr. Moore was a distinct factor in the founding of the town of Bay City, giving of his time, his means, his lands that from out of the prairie should come a town emphasizing the dual aims of its citizenry—success of the cattle business and the launching of the rice industry.


After the election held to relocate the county seat, D. P. Moore furnished 360 acres of land for $1.00 an acre for the developers of Bay City. This comprised land west of what is now Avenue G to Moore Street. In assisting in the founding, Moore gave rights of way, unlimited time and much money to the end that it should become a really happy place to live. He was always interested in anything that touched the civic life and welfare of Bay City.


Moore established a store on the west side of the square October 11, 1894 only one month after the election to begin the town.


In 1896, he furnished land for the cemetery known today as Cedarvale Cemetery. In September 1897, he furnished 200 acres of land as a bonus to obtain the first railway into Bay City.


Moore helped to organize the First National Bank on November 18, 1901. He was elected a director and vice president in 1901 and served until his death in 1928.


He organized the first irrigation company in 1899. In the Matagorda County Tribune, February 2, 1900, an ad showed an increase in the capital stock from $10,000 to $25,000.


Moore’s name is on the cornerstone of the First United Methodist Church building erected in 1909.


In 1913, Moore was chairman of the site committee for the Bay City Library. His name appears in the incorporation of the library and on the charter dated in 1915. He served as a director and officer in the earlier years of the library.


In 1916, an oil well was drilled on land that is part of the Moore Park addition. It was a dry hole and located between 4th and 5th street between Sims and LeTulle Street.


Among a collection of Mr. Moore’s stock certificates with beautiful headings in shades of greens and browns dating back to the early part of the century, Mr. Moore showed his support and confidence of businesses in Bay City and Matagorda County. In 1902 he had stock in the Bay City Rice Milling Company, the Wee-See Oil Company in 1915; the Palacios Shell Co., Bay City Oil & Refining Co., Matagorda Gin Co., and the Phoenix Laundry Company all in 1919.


After his death in 1928, Carey Smith, Sr., editor of the Daily Tribune, wrote these words under an article entitled “Finis”:


Moore’s beginning was near to the place of his ending and for three quarters of a century and more that intervened were useful, helpful, sincere, honorable.


Can any human do more? Can the world expect more? Is it entitled to more?
 

He gave his all and his all was best—best for family, for friends, for his neighbors, business associates, his town, his county and his state.


He met misfortune stoically and good fortune appreciatively. He gave of his means that others might be happy; his efforts that his town could grow brighter.


He sought no glory except the glory that service brings; no honor except the honor that comes of integrity; no riches other that those of truth and virtue.
 


D. P. Moore
 

After an illness of some weeks, D. P. Moore, who for nearly fifty years has been one of the outstanding figures in the commercial life and community upbuilding of this section of Texas, passed away at John Sealy Hospital in Galveston on November 7 [1928] and was laid to rest in Cedarvale Cemetery on November 9.


Born in Indianola, Texas, October 6, 1852, of sturdy Revolutionary War stock, Dolph Phineas Moore was the son of Robert Baxter Moore and Mary Layton Moore, of Newark, New Jersey.


Receiving his education in the private schools of historic old Indianola, he early left that point to locate in Matagorda county, coming at an early date and engaging in the mercantile business at what was then known as Elliott's Postoffice, just west of the present site of Bay City. Catching the vision of the possibilities in Matagorda county for an aggressive business man, Mr. Moore branched out into farming and stock raising, in addition to his mercantile business, and acquired large holdings over the county.


Having by his simplicity of manner and clean cut methods of business firmly established himself in the mercantile circles of the time. Mr. Moore removed from Elliott's Postoffice to the old town of Matagorda, the then county seat, in 1891, there operating an exclusive mercantile business. He was definitely interested in the development of Matagorda and did everything possible to promote the community life there.


At this point in his life, Mrs. Moore came into public service, being appointed by the court to serve out the unexpired term of the then county treasurer, resigned, and at the next regular election in 1892 was returned to office, filling important posts until November 14, 1902. Such tenure of service in one capacity speaks eloquently of his ability and fidelity to public trust.


In 1894 Mr. Moore was a distinct factor in the founding of the present town of Bay City, giving of his time, his means, his lands that from out of the prairie should come a town emphasizing the dual aims of its citizenry--the success of the cattle business and the launching of the rice industry which have opened our doors to the markets of the nation. He was the first president of the Matagorda County Rice and Irrigation Company, organized in 1899 and lived to see his faith in this section as a great rice growing belt, vindicated.


The town of Bay City, from the middle of Avenue G west lies on the lands of D. P. Moore. In assisting in the founding of Bay City, Mr. Moore gave rights of way, unlimited time and much money to the end that it should become a really happy place to live, and was a leading spirit in the matter of getting the Cane Belt, Southern Pacific and Brownsville railroads into the town. He was active in getting bonuses, sites, etc., and gave liberally to the cause himself.


[He] was always interested in anything that touched the civic life and welfare of Bay City, giving generously to all demands upon his sympathy and interest. Numerous donations of lands have been made by Mr. Moore to the city among which is Cedarvale Cemetery and its park.


In addition to his mercantile business at Bay City, Palacios and Gulf, Mr. Moore was heavily interested in many of the business enterprises of the town and county, at one time serving as vice-president of the First National Bank of Bay City, being one of its directors at the time of his death.


December 17, 1879, Mr. Moore married Miss Louise Wendel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Wendel, now deceased. Surviving Mr. Moore are his wife, his daughters, Mrs. John R. Reynolds of Bay City, Mrs. Bennett Harvey, of Oklahoma City; Mrs. A. M. Jackson, of Galveston; Mrs. C. M. O'Brien of Gulf; Miss Grace Moore of Ketchikan, Alaska, and Miss Martha Moore of Bay City; his sons, Grover, Layton and Jerome, all of Bay City; two brothers, H. E. Moore of Wharton and Dan Moore of Bay City, and one sister, Miss Eudora I. Moore of Buda, Texas; four grandchildren, Dolph Beadle Moore, William Grover Moore, Marjorie Moore Harvey and Phyllis Moore O'Brien.


In the passing of D. P. Moore, we see a pioneer ranchman and merchant, a spirit clean, sturdy and fine, possessing the unqualified esteem of every man who knew him and a high sense of responsibility for the welfare of his family and his fellowman. Of quiet dignity straightforward and sincere, his life stands out as a distinct part in the development of Bay City and Matagorda county.


Active pallbearers were: J. C. Lewis, John Bond, Amos Lee, Jesse Matthews, W. C. Lloyd, Oscar Barber.


Honorary pallbearers were: Franz Huebner, A. D. Hensley, J. C. Carrington, John Sutherland, Geo. Culver, T. J. Poole, Sr., W. A. Furber, Markham; A. S. Collins, Dr. Scott, Tom Castleton, P. G. Huston, E. M. Bell, Carey Smith, R. F. Anderson, J. H. McCroskey, Henry Rugeley, Oscar Barber, Dr. Loos, Dr. Morton, Fred Robbins, Chas. Burkhart, Will McNabb, Judge Carpenter, Goodwin Sterne, E. N. Gustafson, E. O. Taulbee, Abel Pierce, Wm. Cash, Geo. Serrill, W. E. Austin, O. J. Doubek, A. J. Harty, C. E. Matchett, Dr. Storey, J. P. Keller, Wm. Walker, Judge Jones, Dr. Gaedcke, Bob Baker, Bob Sisk, J. Bachman, Chas. Langham, Geo. Burke, Joe Mangum, P. S. Hightower, A. H. Wadsworth, Roland Rugeley, G. A. Moore, Will Devant, J. A. Phillips, R. A. Kleska, Ed Kilbride, Paris Smith, W. C. Lloyd, Angus Williams, Jim Logan, G. M. Magill, N. M. Vogelsang, W. S. Holman, Esker McDonald, Jim Castleton, Frank Bates, P. R. Hamill, Arthur Harris, V. H. Doubek, R. O. Kiser, Dr. S. R. Sholars, J. C. Sisk, E. E. Wood, J. S. Mayfield, W. W. Doss, Louis Huebner, P. G. Secrest, Geo. Williams, Louis LeTulle, W. F. Tetts, Sims Doughtie, Merlin Vogelsang, E. M. Williamson.


Matagorda County Tribune, November 16, 1928
 


Mrs. D. P. Moore Passes Away Tues. Afternoon at 4:30

Pioneer of Matagorda County Saw Town Grow and Prosper
 

Mrs. Lou Wendell [Wendel] Moore, relict of D. P. Moore, died at her home Tuesday afternoon at 4:30, following an illness of several months duration. Mrs. Moore was 76 years, 8 months and 20 days of age. [January 27, 1863 – October 17, 1939]


The wife of the late D. P. Moore, a man who literally built the town of Bay City from its early years until his death eleven years ago, Mrs. Moore joined with him to give him the help and advice that made his success possible and his service to the community so outstanding.


Mrs. Lou Wendell Moore was born near Bay City and here she made her home for the entire lifetime, one rich in the good things of love and full and ripe in the years that were given her. She was a devoted and loving mother.


Six daughters and three sons survive. Mrs. J. R. Reynolds, of this city, Miss Grace Moore of San Francisco, Mrs. J. B. Harvey of Clinton, Oklahoma, Mrs. C. M. O'Brien of Fort Worth, Mrs. A. M. Jackson of Galveston, Miss Martha Moore of Bay City, her daughters; and her three sons, Grover, Layton and Jerome of Bay City. She is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. W. J. Phillips of Matagorda and Mrs. Elizabeth Reiman of this city, and one brother, Mr. John Wendel of Hamlin, Texas.


The funeral services will be held from the family residence this afternoon at 4 o'clock with Reverend Paul Engle officiating. Interment will be in Cedarvale Cemetery. Taylor Brothers are in charge of arrangements.


Active pallbearers are James Scott, J. C. Lewis, Vance Porter, W. C. Lloyd, Bob Baker, and Samuel Selkirk.


Honorary pall bearers are George Williams, Dr. A. S. Morton, Dr. H. H. Loos, E. O. Hutcheson, J. A. Cherry, F. A. Thompson, F. A. Breeden, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Wadsworth, Lewis Matchett, Norman Barkley, Eli L. McDonald, F. A. Bates, P. R. Hamill, D. M. Curtis, W. E. McNabb, J. R. Cookenboo, Rowland Rugeley, C. M. Bachman, and Franz Huebner.

Matagorda County Tribune, October 19, 1939
 


Martha Louise Moore


Funeral services for Martha Louise Moore, 87, of Bay City will be held at 2 p. m. today at St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Bay City with the Rev. Hugh B. Jones, Jr. officiating. Interment will be in Cedarvale Cemetery in Bay City.


Miss Moore was born Oct. 6, 1905 in Bay City to Dolph P. and Louise Wendel Moore and died July 9, 1993 in Bay City.


She was a graduate of Jefferson Davis High School; Texas Women's University, Denton; and Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City.


Miss Moore taught first grade in the Bay City schools for 27 years, retiring in 1954.


She attended Houston Baptist College in the summer of 1967-68 for a "Symposium on Historic Preservation."


Miss Moore was a member of the James W. Fannin Chapter, Daughters of the Republic of Texas and was the Organizing Regent of Mary Rolph Marsh Chapter, DAR in Bay City. She was also a member of the National Society of New England Women, Texas Colony #121 and a charter member in 1961; Colonial Dames of America, Chapter VIII, Houston. She was also a former member of the Comfort Wood Chapter, DAR, Wharton; State Historical Association; Stephen F. Austin Historical Society; Matagorda County Museum Association; director, Matagorda [County] Historical Society and Survey Committee; Matagorda County Federation of Women's Clubs; Washington on the Brazos State Park Assn.; Bay City Book Review Club and the National Retired Teachers Assn.


She is survived by four nieces, Phyllis O'Brian Tomlinson of Granbury, Nancy Moore Blaylock of Dallas, Marjorie Harvey Burton of Austin, Mn. and Aneita Moore Camacho of Colorado Springs; two nephews, Dolph Beadle Moore of Bay City and Jerome Moore of Jasper, Ark.; as well as 10 great nieces and nephews.


Pallbearers will be Frank Craft, Fred Walker, Jim Hicks, Jim Frankson, Frank Baker and James M. Allen. Honorary pallbearers will be John Henry [Abel Brown] Pierce, Gordon Richardson, Frank H. Lewis, Harley Savage, Burt O'Connell, Irving Moore, John Woolsey and Marshall Kuykendall.


In lieu of the usual remembrances, the family requests that contributions be made to St. Mark's Episcopal Church or to the charity of your choice.


Arrangements are with Taylor Brothers Funeral Home in Bay City.


The Daily Tribune, July 12, 1993
 


A Tribute To The Memory Of The Late Edna Moore Reynolds
By Emma Lewis Carleton

Death claimed a member of a very prominent family at the close of 1958 with the passing of Mary Edna Moore Reynolds, widow of John R. Reynolds.

Mrs. Reynolds was a descendant of Robert Baxter Moore and Mary Crowell Layton, early settlers in the Victoria area about 1845. Her father was the late D. P. Moore, pioneer Gulf Coast and Matagorda County stockman, large-scale landowner, public official and merchant.

Mrs. Reynolds passed away December 30, 1958. Funeral services were conducted from St. Mark's Episcopal Church by the rector, The Rev. F. Parke Smith December 31. Interment was in Cedarvale Cemetery for which land was donated many years ago by Mrs. Reynold's father.

The Reynolds were married at her home here May 22, 1907, with the Rev. John Sloan, celebrant.

Dolph Phineas Moore, as her father was christened, last engaged in the mercantile business with his son-in-law, Mr. Reynolds, in the operation of a dry goods store under the name of Moore & Reynolds.

Mr. Moore early bought 640 acres of land near Bay City, running from Avenue G back to the Colorado River, then known as Moore Pasture. He sold the east 320 acres of this property for $1 per acre to become part of the townsite of Bay City, the east half of the townsite being carved out of land owned by Mensing Brothers, whose holdings adjoined Moore Pasture on the West.

Edna Moore Reynolds was born October 28, 1880, at a point near Bay City, known as Elliott's Post Office. Her mother was Lou Wendel Moore. Her grandparents came to Texas from Mobile, Ala., and from New Jersey, where the family had been early pioneers.

In the early days of the Republic of Texas, Robert Baxter Moore bought large holdings at Victoria, removing from there in 1848 to the then-flourishing town of Indianola. He met death there in the violent hurricane in 1875 which destroyed that town.

These and their forebears were among the earliest colonists in America, always serving their country with distinction in colonial and Revolutionary times and the early days of the Republic of Texas.

To secure proper schooling, Edna Moore Reynolds lived with her grandmother Moore at Ashby, where she was under the tutelage of her aunt, Miss Eudora Moore, one of the early distinguished and brilliantly-educated teachers of Texas.

From 1891 to 1893 the Moore family lived in Matagorda, where Edna Reynold's education was continued under Mrs. Inglehart in music, Mrs. Morris in art, Mr. Chapman, Miss Kate Rugeley, Mr. Walker and Mr. Amos Lee. But when the county seat was moved from Matagorda to Bay City in 1895, Dolph Phineas Moore moved his family to Bay City. Mr. Moore was then county treasurer and remained in this office for many, many years.

During her life in Matagorda, Edna Moore Reynolds was an active, loyal member of Christ Church, the mother church of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. On removing to Bay City with her family she continued to witness to her faith in her varied activities with St. Mark's Church, where she served in almost every capacity. Particularly, for several years before her death she was chairman of the Book of Remembrance of St. Mark's, having to give it up later on account of failing health. For over 50 years she served the Church faithfully and well.

After her early schooling at Ashby and Matagorda, Edna Moore Reynolds attended St. Mary's Hall, in San Antonio, where she was an outstanding student.

Throughout her adult life, Edna Moore Reynolds worked with her church and community in every capacity, always understanding and mindful of the needs of others and with the utmost in charity in her attitude towards her fellowman, mindful of the duties and privileges of citizenship in Bay City. She served in various capacities in community effort in World War I and World War II. She was worthy matron of the Eastern Star (her husband at the same time being worthy patron) and was secretary of the American Legion Auxiliary when first organized in Bay City.

In patriotic organizations, she was not only a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, but a member of Comfort Wood Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.

Gentle, kind, devoted to her family and friends, a rare hostess possessimg a character of charm and dignity. Edna Moore Reynolds possessed a wide circle of friends, with respect and admiration of all who knew her. Among her hobbies were genealogical research, a love of Texas history, wherein her forebears figured, and gardening. She will long be missed by a host of friends throughout this area.

Surviving Mrs. Reynolds are her sisters, Miss Martha Moore of Bay City, long identified with the Bay City School System as one of its outstanding teachers; Mrs. J. B. Harvey of Clinton, Okla.; Mrs. G. M. O'Brian of Ft. Worth; Mrs. A. M. Jackson of Galveston; and two brothers, Jerome Moore of Houston and Layton Moore of Bay City.

Numerous nieces and nephews survive, among whom are William Grover Moore of Bay City, and Dolph Beadle Moore of Tyler. Also surviving is Mrs. Helen Beadle Moore of Bay City, widow of Grover Moore, brother of Edna Moore Reynolds. Pall bearers were Carey Smith, Raymond Cookenboo, J. C. Lewis, Albert Wadsworth Sr. and Esker McDonald.

The Daily Tribune, Tuesday, January 6, 1959
 

Photo of Dolph P. Moore and Robert and Mary Moore courtesy of Matagorda County Museum



 

Copyright 2010 - Present by Carol Sue Gibbs
All rights reserved

Created
Jun. 20, 2010
Updated
Dec. 26, 2010
   

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