Collegeport Columns and Articles

1916
 


FARMER'S SHORT COURSE AT COLLEGEPORT

(By H. A. Clapp)

Collegeport , Texas , January 26.--A Farmers' Conference or Short Course will be held here Thursday of this week. The course was arranged by Prof. R. W. Persons, county demonstrator, with the co-operation of the Collegeport Industrial League. Among the speakers will be the following:

Miss Cornelia Simpson, of the extension department, A. and M. College, Home Economics.

Dr. Jones from the bureau of animal industry, Washington ; subject, Charbon, Hog Cholera and other animal diseases.

T. O. Walton, district manager county demonstration work, Good Farming, Drainage, Silos.

Mr. Bagby, Wharton County agent; Wide Row Corn Planting.

There will be three sessions, beginning at 10 a.m. and continuing until 10 p.m. At noon a free barbecue will be served.

A little daughter came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Jones, nee Miss Grace Smith, her name being Grace Kinsdale Jones.

About 3000 acres will be planted to rice this season and most of the ground is already prepared. Probably 100 acres will cover the cotton planting.

Quite a number of Northern people are here spending a few weeks in a desire to escape the cold weather of their homes.

Matagorda County Tribune, January 28, 1916  


TOURING
BRAZORIA COUNTY
.

H. A. Clapp of Collegeport at Alvin for the Texas Industrial Congress.

Alvin , Texas , March 3.--H. A. Clapp, secretary Mid-Coast Industrial Congress, at present making a tour of Brazoria County in the interest of the Texas Industrial Congress, gave a lecture Wednesday at the United Daughters of Confederacy Hall to a small but interested crowd, on intensive and diversified farming also on dairying. The principal object of this trip is to get the boys and girls interested in these subjects. It is expected the older people will learn by what the children accomplish. Mr. Clapp's main work on this tour has been in the public schools lecturing to the children.

Matagorda County Tribune, March 10, 1916
 


H. A. CLAPP SPOKE AT U. D. C. HALL

Many Cash Prizes Offered by Texas Industrial Congress for Best Results in Farm Products.

H. A. Clapp was in Alvin this week and addressed the school children Wednesday afternoon and spoke Wednesday night to a gathering in the interests of the various clubs being organized over the State by the Texas Industrial Congress. Prizes are offered to contestants in peanut, corn, cotton, baby beef, pig raising and gardening clubs, and anyone may enter either of the various clubs and be given a fair showing at a portion of the $10,000 in cash to be given by the congress.

Mr. Clapp is gratified to see the interest as manifested by the school children of this county and says he expects over a hundred contestants from this county. He addressed practically every school in the county, and was greatly assisted by County Superintendent Sebring.

Matagorda County Tribune, March 10, 1916
 


SPLENDID SUCCESS IN BRAZORIA COUNTY

H. A. Clapp, of Collegeport, who is working in twelve counties in the Mid-Coast in behalf of the Texas Industrial Congress, returned today from a week's tour of Brazoria County where he met with the most signal success and the greatest enthusiasm.

He lectured in all the towns in Brazoria County and traveled on an average of 40 miles a day. His efforts were awarded by the enrolment of 46 boys and girls who joined the pig, baby beef, gardens, corn and peanut clubs. One joined the cotton club.

Mr. Clapp's next work will be in Calhoun County . He is highly gratified with the results of his campaign. He has another month to work this season.

Matagorda County Tribune, March 10, 1916
 


DAIRYING PROFITABLE AT COLLEGEPORT
Enormous Increase in Cream Sales During Year.

For the past several months the farmers of Collegeport, according to Prof. Laslie, principal of the Collegeport schools, have been gradually increasing their dairy products and have brought the industry up from a "side issue" to a permanent and stable business undertaking.

Prof. Laslie informs us that the proceeds from the sale of cream by the farmers at Collegeport in February, 1915, amounted to $60.00 and that they received in February, 1916, over $600.00, or an increase of 1000 per cent.

The Collegeport farmers have found the pay streak in coast farming and all of them are enthusiastically developing the dairying industry with a wonderful success, for it is making them money, paying their debts and incidentally giving them good homes, good farms and contentment.

The cow does her part every time the farmer does his.

Matagorda County Tribune, Friday, April 15, 1916  


COLLEGEPORT FORGING TO THE FRONT

Dairy in Great Favor and Growing Rapidly.

Collegeport , Texas , April 27, -- Not more than 25 per cent of the rice ground is planted at this date. The dry weather has prevented planting but now that the canals are full of water many farmers are preparing to plant and water the ground for germination.

Very little cotton will be planted, but instead a large acreage will be used for feedstuffs.

During the month of March butterfat to the amount of $600 was sold from this station. It is estimated that the April production will amount to more than $700. Some farmers produce as much as $60 each month. This is done mostly on pasture. Very few are feeding. When our farmers learn the value of the balanced ration for dairy cows the production will increase as well as the profits.

The Collegeport Industrial League holds two general meetings each month. These meetings are well attended and are producing results.

Monday evening Dr. Sloane, rector of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, held two services in Grace Chapel of St. Mark's Mission . The first service was for the christening of little Grace Hinsdals Jones and the baptizing of Mr. C. W. Goodman of Houston . Later in the evening the regular Even Song service was read followed by preaching. The regular Easter services was held on Sunday being conducted by the Lay Reader.

The First Church Federated observed Easter with proper services during the day and evening.

The Collegeport Hotel, now vacant, offers an opportunity for some good hotel man. This can easily be made an attractive place for summer vacations. The building may be obtained on unusual terms.

This district needs rain in common with the balance of the Mid-Coast country.

Increased interest in dairying is found all over the district and many men are beginning to see the benefits of keeping good cows. There are now two pure bred Holstein bulls in the Collegeport district. Fees for their use have been made low and the farmers are using them.

A cream station has been established at Citrus Grove and it has already a good list of patrons.

School closed Friday for the year. Public exercises, baseball, basket ball, and other games amused the children as well as the parents.

The Industrial League is making preparations for the annual observance of the opening of the townsite and expects to put up a program which will draw many people to this progressive town.

Matagorda County Tribune, Friday, May 5, 1916  


COLLEGEPORT

Mr. Burton D. Hurd was here over Sunday last and left for Houston via Frisco on a business trip to be gone several days.

Mr. W. S. Terry of Beadle was in town Tuesday on business and crossing to Palacios on the noon boat. He passed through here on his return.

R. F. Bigelow of Bay City was here on Tuesday to supply our merchants for their increasing trade.

Mr. John H. Roach of Blessing was here a few days this week attending to the State Bank in the absence of the cashier.

Mr. Bruce Hancock of El Campo, rice buyer for the Beaumont Rice Milling Company of that city, was here several days buying and loading out rice from Collegeport, Citrusgrove and Simpsonville.

Mrs. David H. Brasfield of Bay City was a visitor in Collegeport this week, arriving Tuesday evening, a guest of Mrs. Burton D. Hurd.

There was a blacksmith shop opened at DeMoss on Wednesday of this week and in charge of Mr. Humphries, the oldest son of Mr. Ben Humphries, and he will be ready for work on Thursday or Friday.

A new store, to carry a general stock of merchandise, is reported to be forthcoming for DeMoss in a few weeks. Who the parties are behind it has not yet been learned.

Mr. A. W. Jones, wife and children from Barrett , Kansas , are visiting Mr. John B. Heisey and probably will stay till spring.

Mr. Ralph Blevins of Beaumont was here this week buying and loading rice for the Beaumont Rice Milling Company, of Beaumont , Texas .

Rice buyers say that our rice that was grown near Collegeport this past season is of a high grade for this season and brings from $3.50 to $3.76 per barrel. This fact speaks much for our growers and irrigation company as the past season has been a most difficult year to plant and mature a crop of any kind.

Mr. A. C. White of Houston, agent for the Southern Rice Growers Association, has been here most of the week looking after the interest of our growers in the sale of their crop.

Claude W. Jester left Wednesday morning via Southern Pacific for Houston to be gone several days on pressing business.

J. B. McCain is serving as a juryman this week in Bay City .

About twenty-five families from Navarro County , cotton growers, are here to settle in the neighborhood of DeMoss and they will put several thousand acres to this crop beside corn, sorghum and other feed stuffs.

Two cars of Snapped Ear corn were received at this station and is selling at 85 to 92 cents per bushel.

About twenty-five or thirty teams and three traction engines are breaking the sod at Bay Park and DeMoss and getting ready for spring planting.

Mr. Matt Pierce is making some substantial improvements about his residence in the way of transplanting trees and vines and otherwise beautifying his home.

Mr. Charles L. Reeves and wife arrived at the Hotel Collegeport Tuesday evening for a short stay. Mr. Reeves will be remembered as a former citizen who just lately married a Mrs. Dr. Robinson of Kansas City .

Notice has been given the rice growers on the Collegeport Canal that the plant would not be operated the present season by the canal company. Unless it is leased to other parties it is quite probable that it will not be used this year. This would mean the loss to the community of $200,000 or $300,000.

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson are enjoying an outing at Portsmouth this week fishing, oystering and hunting.

Mr. A. Munson of Oklahoma is again spending the winter vacation at Portsmouth . He states that there is no place like it for genuine sport and a splendid outing.

Mr. H. N. Sholl has his two-story building on Central Street near the business center ready for the roof.

The new meat market begin erected by James W. Turner east of the postoffice is about ready for occupancy.

Nelson Sweet has been officiating at the suit pressing shop this week and has done a rushing business.

Mr. J. J. Gillespie of Houston arrived at Hotel Collegeport Wednesday evening on business for a few days.

Matagorda County Tribune, September 22, 1916  


Collegeport State Bank at Collegeport, Texas

At the close of business on the 17th day of November, 1916, published in The Tribune, a newspaper printed and published at Bay City, State of Teas, on the 1st day of December, 1916.

Resources
Loans and discounts, personal or collateral $22,941.64
Loans, real estate 1,021.96
Overdrafts 609.21
Real estate (banking house) 1,970.58
Furniture and fixtures 1,222.62
Due from approved reserve agents net 29,315.43
Due from other banks and bankers, subject to check net 273.56
Cash items 9.84
Currency 4,230.00
Specie 867.33
Interest in depositors guaranty fund 810.17
Other resources as follows: Assessment to guaranty fund 122.16

Total 69,394.50

Liabilities

Capital stock paid in $10,000.00
Surplus fund 592.26
Undivided profits, net 4,370.84
Due to banks and bankers, subject to check net 290.46
Individual deposits, subject to check  44,027.89
Time certificates of deposit 3,000.00
Cashier’s checks 1,104.60
Other liabilities as follows: Certified checks 8.45

Total 63,394.50

State of Texas
County of Matagorda.
We, Jas. W. Rugeley, as president, and J. B. McCain, as cashier of said bank, each of us, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the best of our knowledge and belief.
Jas. W. Rugeley, President
J. B. McCain, Cashier
Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 24th day of November, A. D. 1916.
(Seal) Linn Yeamans, Notary Public, Matagorda Co., Tex.
Correct—Attest:
Jas. W. Rugeley
T. M. Clark
J. B. McCain, Directors.

Daily Tribune, December 1, 1916
 

 

Copyright 2005 - Present by Bay City Newspapers, Inc.
All rights reserved

Created
Apr. 14, 2005
Updated
Apr. 14, 2005
   

HOME