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Matagorda County Recorded
Texas Historic Landmark
 

Matagorda
 

Dale-Rugeley-Sisk Home

751 Catalpa Street
284132.71N      955752.54W


DALE-RUGELEY-SISK HOME CA.1830
RECORDED TEXAS HISTORIC LANDMARK-1964

HAS WITHSTOOD MANY HURRICANES.
A CULTURAL, SOCIAL, POLITICAL
CENTER. HOME OF: A. C. HORTON, 1ST
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF TEXAS
AND GOVERNOR 7 MONTHS; REV.
CALEB IVES, 1ST RECTOR OF 1ST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN TEXAS; W.
L. SARTWELL, PARTNER IN IVES-
SARTWELL-ACADEMY; A LEADING
CHURCH WOMAN, MRS S. M. DALE; F. L.
RUGELEY, SON OF A CONFEDERATE
LEADER; ROBT. J. SISK, PIONEER IN
RICE, OIL AND LAND DEVELOPMENT.

 


Albert Clinton Horton         Caleb Smith Ives           W. L. Sartwelle          F. L. Rugeley           Robert J. Sisk
 
 
"The Rugeley home was a large, comfortable, old house that had been built in the 1830's by Ira Ingram, who was the first secretary of Matagorda and the first Speaker of the House of Representatives. From 1837 until 1841, Colonel Albert C. Horton, who was to become the first Lieutenant Governor of Texas, lived in the house. A Joshua Denest next lived in the house for one year until 1842 when the Reverend Caleb S. Ives, the first Episcopal minister in Texas who organized the first Episcopal Church in the State at Matagorda, turned the house into an academy. W. L. Sartwelle taught in the Ives Academy before purchasing it in 1851. He lived there until 1859. Mrs. S. M. Dale was the next owner of the house, and it was her home from 1859 until 1887 when she sold it to Francis L. Rugeley. His widow, Miss Carrie, sold the house to Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Sisk in 1942, and it was owned in 1984 by Mrs. Allie Lee Sisk and Dr. and Mrs. William H. Parham. In 1964, the distinguished old house received a Texas Historical Medallion designation it as a historic building in the State."

From the family history of Francis Lewis and Sarah Caroline Robbins Rugeley
 


Photo submitted with the 1964 historical marker application.
 


Dale-Rugeley-Sisk House

Although the original house has been added on to and probably changed during the many years of existence because of hurricane and water damage, the abstract records show that the property has had several distinguished owners and much history connected with it.

The property upon which the house is located was first owned by Ira Ingram, the first Alcalde of the Matagorda Municipality in 1843, Member of Congress of the Republic and first speaker of the House of Representatives, 1836. He was also a pioneer patron of the public schools, signer of the Declaration of Independence at Goliad, 1835. In 1837 Ira Ingram sold Block 12 of the Municipality of Matagorda to Albert C. Horton.

In 1841, Albert C. Horton and Clements sold lot 6, Block 12 to Joshua Denest. The house is located on lot 6. Albert C. Horton was a soldier in the Texas Revolution, the first Lieutenant Governor of Texas, elected to the first Congress, helped frame the Constitution of the Republic, and Trustee and President of Baylor University.

In 1842, Denest sold the lot to Reverend Caleb S. Ives. Rev. Ives was the first minister to the first Episcopal Church in Texas, located at Matagorda and organized there on January 27, 1839. He was rector until 1849. Rev. and Mrs. Ives established an Academy which they conducted in Matagorda for eight years, possibly in the original house on this lot.

In 1851, Ives sold to W. L. Sartwelle. Mr. Sartwelle was a teacher in the Ives Academy. "Mr. Sartwelle is an alumnus of one of the most respectable colleges of  the Northern States, and an experienced and an accomplished teacher." (Colorado Herald, 1847)

In 1859, Sartwelle sold to Isabella M. Dale. Mrs. Dale gave the first endowment to the Episcopal Church at Matagorda and was a prominent citizen.

In 1887, Mrs. S. M. (Isabella) Dale sold to Frank L. Rugeley. Mr. Frank Rugeley was a son of Captain Edward Salmon Rugeley, captain of a company organized by him called the "Caney Mounted Rifles" during the Civil War and composed of Matagorda County men. Captain Rugeley visited and lived in this house at various times.

In 1942, Sarah Carrie Robbins Rugeley, second wife of Frank L. Rugeley, sold the house to Mr. R. J. Sisk of Bay City. Mr. Robert J. Sisk came to Bay City in 1894, at its very beginning, and pioneered along many lines, including rice and oil. He operated the American Express System between Wharton & Bay City and later became a merchant. He played an important part in the development of Bay City and Matagorda County. His wife and daughter now own the house.

In conclusion, we might say that this historic home has been occupied by families who helped make the history of Matagorda County. The present owners keep it in excellent repair and are furnishing it with period furniture and pictures of the former owners.

The present structure of the house is much as it was in the early 1900s, when the upstairs porch was added. Although its exact age is not known, we believe that Rev. Ives occupied the original part of the house, as the original Episcopal Church was located on the adjoining property.
 




 
Marker wording typed by Faye Cunningham.

 

Copyright 2011 - Present by Carol Sue Gibbs
All rights reserved

Created
Sep. 5, 2011
Updated
Sep. 5, 2011
   

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