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Roberts County Rivers and Creeks

WASHITA RIVER
REYNOLDS CREEK
HORSE CREEK
PICKETT RANCH CREEK
PAT'S CREEK
BARTON CREEK
RED DEER CREEK

WASHITA RIVER

The Washita River rises in southeastern Roberts County (at 35°38' N, 100°36' W) and flows east for thirty-five miles, crossing southern Hemphill County to enter Roger Mills County, Oklahoma. From the state line the stream flows southeast for 260 miles to its junction with the Red River (at 33°55' N, 96°35' W) in Johnston County, Oklahoma.

On its course through Texas, the river flows through flat to rolling country where clay and sandy loams support brush and grasses. Since the stream was a favorite campground for nomadic tribes, the upper Washita was the scene of much military activity during the sporadic Indian wars; Col. George A. Custer's attack on Black Kettle's village, known as the battle of the Washita, occurred near present-day Cheyenne, Oklahoma, on November 27, 1868.

The Indian siege of Capt. Wyllys Lyman's wagon train took place near the Washita in Hemphill County on September 9-14, 1874. Hide hunters frequented the upper Washita, as did early ranchers, for whom the stream was a favorite place to water their herds. In recent years a series of dams and small reservoirs has been constructed along the Washita and its tributaries in Hemphill County.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Lester Fields Sheffy, The Francklyn Land & Cattle Company (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963).



REYNOLDS CREEK

Reynolds Creek, also known as Timber Creek, rises at the junction of its east and west forks (at 35°40' N, 101°01' W) in southwestern Roberts County and flows north for fourteen miles into the Canadian River (at 35°55' N, 101°04' W).

It was once part of the Francklyn Land and Cattle Company properties. The creek flows through locally depressed flat terrain surfaced with clay and sandy loams.

The area vegetation consists primarily of water-tolerant grasses and hardwoods.



HORSE CREEK

Horse Creek, once known as St. Clair Creek, rises five miles northwest of Miami in southeastern Roberts County (at 35°45' N, 100°43' W) and runs north for sixteen miles to its mouth on the Canadian River three miles east of Three Corrals Creek (at 35°58' N, 100°41' W).

Its course crosses recharge sand and wash deposits on flat to rolling terrain. Soils of the area are generally dark­brown to reddish­brown, neutral to slightly calcareous sandy loams, clay loams, and clays. Vegetation consists primarily of scrub brush, grasses, and water­tolerant hardwoods and conifers.

In 1933 an archeological excavation near Miami, Texas, discovered skeletons of five dismembered Columbian mammoths, three Clovis projectile points, and a scraper. The proximity of the bones and artifacts prove the existence of Pleistocene big­game hunters in the area of Horse Creek.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Frederick W. Rathjen, The Texas Panhandle Frontier (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1973).



PICKETT RANCH CREEK

Pickett Ranch Creek rises (at 36°06' N, 100°43' W) at the edge of the breaks in southern Ochiltree County and runs south for eight miles to its mouth (at 35°59' N, 100°43' W) on the Canadian River, in north central Roberts County.

The terrain is flat to rolling with local escarpments. Brush and grasses grow in the mostly deep, fine, sandy loams along the banks of the creek. The stream was once part of Henry W. (Hank) Cresswell's Bar CC ranges.



PAT'S CREEK

Pat's Creek rises in southwestern Ochiltree County (at 36°04' N, 101°03' W). Two branches, Pat's Creek (formerly known as Walker Creek) and the East Fork of Pat's Creek, flow together and then join the Canadian River (at 35°57' N, 100°58' W) to the south.

Most of the creek, including its two forks, lies within Roberts County. The distance from the source of each fork to the confluence with the Canadian is about six miles. The creek flows through flat to rolling terrain where sandy loams support brush and grasses. The area was once part of Henry Cresswell's Bar CC Ranch range.



BARTON CREEK

Barton Creek rises at the edge of timber brakes in southeastern Ochiltree County (at 36°05' N, 100°35' W) and flows south for eight miles to its mouth on the Canadian River, in northeastern Roberts County (at 35°59' N, 100°34' W).

The stream was formerly part of Henry Cresswell's Bar CC property and was probably named by him for his neighbors, the Barton brothers. The terrain is flat to rolling with local escarpments. The soil, mostly thick, fine, sandy loam, supports hardwood forest, brush, and grasses.



RED DEER CREEK

Red Deer Creek rises at the breaks of the Llano Estacado northeast of Pampa in northern Gray County (at 35°33' N, 100°60' W) and flows northeast for thirty-five miles, across southeastern Roberts County through Miami, to its mouth on the Canadian River, near Canadian in western Hemphill County (at 35°56' N, 100°23' W).

Robert Moody established his PO Ranch headquarters on Red Deer Creek, and the stream's upper waters were part of the Diamond F ranges. The area is flat with local shallow depressions; water-tolerant hardwoods, conifers, and grasses grow in clay and sandy loam soils.

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This page was last updated February 6, 2000.