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Welcome to the American Samoa website which is hosted by Trails To The Past.

My name is Charlie Vines and I am the temporary host for American Samoa. If you would be interested in adopting American Samoa  or one of the other U.S. Territories, please contact me.  If you would be interested in joining our group in an area other than the U. S. Territories, you can contact me or  contact the District Coordinator for the area you would be interested in by visiting our District Map.

If you find any errors on this site or if you would like to contribute to this project, please contact me.


Although I do host this site, I do not live in this territory; therefore, my ability to assist with any research will be extremely limited.  I will be adding a volunteer page in the future.  This will provide everyone researching this county to help each other.


American Samoa consist of five islands and two atolls (A coral island or series of coral islands forming a ring that nearly or entirely encloses a shallow lagoon. Atolls are surrounded by deep ocean water and range in diameter from about 1 km (0.62 mi) to over 100 km (62 mi). They are especially common in the western and central Pacific Ocean and are believed to form along the fringes of underwater volcanoes (source: www.dictionary.com)).

Aunu`u - The smallest of the inhabited American Samoan islands.  Its size is approximately 0.6 square miles.  The is only one village on the island with an approximate population of 476 according to the 2000 U. S. Census Bureau.

The Manua Island group - A collection of communally owned islands that are said to be the birthplace of Samoa and its people.  The Manua Island group consist of Ofu, Olosega, and Tau.
Ofu is a volcanic island that has a population of about 289 people according to the 2000 U. S. Census Bureau.  Most of the people make their living through agriculture.  The island is about 2.9 square miles of sloping mountains, rainforests, coral reefs and sandy beaches.

Olosega is about 2 square miles according to the 2000 U. S. Census Bureau and has a population of 216 people.  It is connected to Ofu by a underwater land bridge.

Ta`u is the largest of the Manua Island group islands having 17.6 square miles of landmass.  The population fo Ta`u is 380 people who subsist primarily on coconut exports.  

Rose Atoll consist of two small islands. Rose, which is covered with cocunut and other trees, and Sand which has not vegitation.  Rose Atoll is uninhabited.  A reef of pink coral surrounds the atoll which measures to 3km by 3km with a pass into a lagoon.  The atoll is 125 km east of Ta`u.

Swains Island is 340 km nortwest of Tutuila.  It is a circular coral atoll about 2 km in diameter.  There is large lagoon that is not connected to the sea.  Swains Island is closer to Tokelau (a territory of New Zealand that consist of three tropical coral atolls).  In 1856, a New England whaling captain, Eli Jennings, arrived to set up a cocunut plantation with the help of Polynesian labor.  His descendants still run it as a private estate today.  Less that two dozen people currently live on Swains Island.

Tutuila is the largest of the American Samoan Islands with a landmass of just under 55 square miles.  Tutuila is the most eco-diverse  of the islands with mangrove (
any tropical evergreen tree or shrub of the genus Rhizophora,  having stiltlike intertwining aerial roots and growing below the highest tide levels in estuaries and along coasts, forming dense thickets: family Rhizophoraceae)  forest, mangrove lagoons, swamps, various streams, junifer, willow, mahogany and persimmon trees, lowland rain forest, a unique species of flowers and plants (such as syzygium and Elatostema Tutuilense.  The 2000 U. S Census list the population of Tutuila as 55.876.  The primary occupations are fishing and agriculture.

Sources:
  1. http://www.dictionary.com - definition of atoll
  2. http://www.distionary.com - definition of mangrove
  3. The Islands of American Samoa at www.ehow.com
  4. The coral atolls of American Samoa at http://www.americansamoa.southpacific.org
  5. Article on Tokelau at www.wikpedia.com


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