UTAH — Salt Lake County

Transcript of 1869 Sloan Directory of Salt Lake City

Transcription provided by Kathy Henry.

Page001 — Title page
THE
SALT LAKE CITY
DIRECTORY
AND
BUSINESS GUIDE,
FOR 1869.
COMPILED AND ARRANGED BY E. L. SLOAN
COPYRIGHT SECURED
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH:
PUBLISHED BY E. L. SLOAN
1869
Page002 — Advertisements
Established 1855
W. S. GODBE. | J. H. LATEY.
GODBE & CO.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Drugs, Medicines,
CHEMICALS,
Perfumeries and Toilet Articles,
DYE STUFFS,
Paints, Oils, Glass, etc., etc.,
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
- Agents for -
The Celebrated Graefenberg Family Medicines,
AYER'S AND OTHER PATENT MEDICINES
Exchange Building
SALT LAKE CITY

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
NOTIONS, GLOVES, HOSIERY
WHITE GOODS,
LINENS, HOOP SKIRTS, CORSETS, Etc.
No. 49 Lake Street
CHICAGO, ILL.
Page003 (left side) — The ads are both incomplete as there is a "Presentation" label affixed over the page.
T. B. WEBER G. W. WEBER
T. B. WEBER & CO.
Manufacturers and Jobbers of
Boots and Shoes

(Overlaid Presentation Sticker)
Box, No.
ESSEX INSTITUTE
PRESENTED BY
Prof. E. S. (or G) Morse

CHAPTER V. OF THE LIBRARY

The Library Committee shall divide the books and other articles belonging to the Library into three classes, namely; (a) those which are not to be removed from the building; (b) those which may be taken from the halls only by written permission of three members of the Committee who shall take a receipt for the same and be responsible for their safe return; (c) those which may circulate under the following rules.
Members shall be allowed to take from the Library one folio or two quarto volumes or four volumes of any lesser fold, with the plates belonging to the same upon having them recorded by the Librarian, or Assistant Librarian and promising to make good any damage they sustain, while in their possession, and to replace the same f lost or pay the sum fixed by the Library Committee.
No person shall lend any book belonging to the Institute excepting to a member, under the penalty of one dollar for every such offense.
The Library Committee may allow members to take more than the allotted number of books upon a written application and may also permit other persons than members to use the Library under such conditions as they may impose.
No person shall detain any book longer than four weeks from the time of its being taken from the Library. If notified that the same is wanted by another member, under a penalty of five cents per day, and no volume shall be retained longer than three months at one time under the same penalty.
The Librarian shall have the power by order of the Library Committee to call in any volume after it has been retained by a member for ten days.
On or before the first Wednesday in May all books shall be returned to the Library, and a penalty of five cents per day shall be imposed for each volume detained.
Labels designating the class to which each book belongs shall be placed upon its cover.
No book shall be allowed to circulate until one month after its reception.

(End of Presentation Sticker)

And Dealers in
FINE KENTUCKY WHISKEYS
170 South Water Street
PRIVATE U. S. BONDED WARE HOUSE FOR IMPORTED LIQUORS.
159 Clark Street, CHICAGO
We make a specialty of old Copper distilled Whiskeys from Bourbon,
Nelson, Woodford and Anderson counties, Kentucky
(right side)
* * *
John V. Farwell & Co.,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS
AND
WOOLENS,
Nos. 42, 44 and 46 Wabash Avenue,
CHICAGO, ILL.
JOHN V. FARWELL WILLIAM D. FARWELL
CHARLES S. FARWELL JOHN K. HARMON
BENJAMIN F. RAY
EXCLUSIVELY WHOLESALE
* * *
ALBERT H. HOVEY DANIEL S. HEFFRON
HOVEY & HEFFRON,
HORTICULTURE AND
SEED WAREHOUSE
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
FIELD, GARDEN & FLOWER SEEDS,
English, French, German and Italian Ornamental Goods
For House, Garden and Lawn.
57 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL.
* * *
A. E. BISHOP J. P. PRINDLE
BISHOP & PRINDLE
Successors to A. E. BISHOP,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Farm and Freight Wagons
For the Utah Trade
On Sale By
WATT, SLEATER & CO., SALT LAKE CITY
No. 16 South Jefferson Street
Near Randolph Street, CHICAGO, ILL.
Page005 — An ornate calendar for the year 1869.
DEDICATION

To the Mayor, City Council and Business Men of Salt Lake City, this Volume is
respectfully Dedicated by

The Publishers
Page006 and Page007 — Panorama Photograph
Caption
SALT LAKE CITY in 1867. Photographed by Messrs. SAVAGE & OTTINGER,
Photographers and Artists. East Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah Territory.
Advertisements displayed horizontally across both pages:
EDWARDS'
ST. LOUIS DIRECTORY
Steam Printing & Publishing Establishment,
300 and 302 NORTH MAIN STREET
North-east Corner of Olive St. ST. LOUIS, MO.
Branch offices at Chicago, Milwaukee, Louisville and New Orleans.
PUBLISHERS OF CITY AND STATE DIRECTORIES
City Directories of all principal Cities of the United States kept for sale
and perusal of
visitors to our office. Having a most extensive
PRINTING AND BINDING ESTABLISHMENT
Conducted by first-class workmen, we offer great inducements to Publishers

SAVAGE & OTTINGER
East Temple St., Salt Lake City
PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ARTISTS
PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN
In the best style of the art. Views of the Overland Route and of all
places of interest in Utah and Montana on sale.

A. C. POTWIN. C. H. MORGAN
CHICAGO
VARNISH COMPANY
MANUFACTURERS OF
VARNISHES AND JAPANS
FINE COACH VARNISHES A SPECIALTY
Office and Factory, 194 and 196 Pine Street, near White
Richard Clough, Supt.
Fourteen years with S. P. Smith & Sons, Newark, N.J. CHICAGO, ILL.

EDWARDS & CO.
DIRECTORY PUBLISHERS
73 Dearborn Street CHICAGO, ILL.
PUBLISH DIRECTORIES FOR THE FOLLOWING CITIES:
St. Louis
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Lafayette
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Charleston
Savannah
Mobile
Vicksburg
Chicago
Milwaukee
Detroit
Cleveland
Toledo
Davenport
Dubuque
Freeport
Racine
Oshkosh
Edwards' Mississippi River Gazetteer and Directory Price $6
Western States Business Directory $5
Page008 — Title Page
THE
SALT LAKE CITY
DIRECTORY
AND
BUSINESS GUIDE,
FOR 1869
COMPILED AND ARRANGED BY E. L. SLOAN.
COPY RIGHT SECURED
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH:
PUBLISHED BY E. L. SLOAN & CO.
1869
Page009 (left side)
GENERAL INDEX
Abbreviations87Hotels78
Banks78Introductory55
Baths and Springs76Literary, Scientific and Benevolent73
Business Directory153Mayors of Salt Lake City64
Camp Douglas173Ogden City Business Directory179
Cemeteries73Places of Amusement72
Central Pacific Railway187Post Office78
Chicago Directory of Patrons211Post Offices in Utah Territory81
Chicago, Its Growth and Trade189Public Buildings71
Chronological Events of Utah59Public Buildings, Halls, etc.74
Churches72Rates of Interest in the United States171
Courts76Salt Lake City69
Dedication52Salt Lake County82
Direct Route East187Secret Societies77
Distances from Salt Lake City84Sketch of Mormonism56
Educational73Territory of Utah65
General Directory of Names87Towns in the Vicinity of Salt Lake City175
Hot and Mineral Springs73Union Pacific Railroad182

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
(to be completed at a later time...)
Page009 (right side)
INTRODUCTION

In presenting the Salt Lake City Directory and Business Guide for 1869 to the public, it is necessary to briefly state the causes which have delayed its publication for several weeks beyond the time originally fixed upon for issuing it. In procuring the information contained in it much more labor was required, and longer time had to be devoted to it, than was at first believed would be necessary. The greater portion of the matter contained in it was also delayed on its transit to the printers by the heavy snow storms which impeded travel through the Rocky Mountains in February and March.

No pains have been spared to make the work a reliable one for future reference; and every change of business which has occurred from the completion of the canvas for the Business Directory, up to the work being put to press, has been carefully noted as far as information could be obtained.

The compiler begs to express his obligations for favors received in obtaining information to the Hon. George A. Smith, historian; A. W. Street, Esq., P. M., Salt Lake City; Robert Campbell, Esq., Recorder of Salt Lake City; Jesse W. Fox, Territorial Surveyor General; Hon. L. E. Harrington, American Fork; and Walter Thompson, Esq., Ogden, County Clerk of Weber County.

Respectfully,
THE PUBLISHERS
Page010 (left side)
SKETCH OF MORMONISM.
Joseph Smith, the founder of the organization, was born in Sharon, Windsor county, Vermont, December 23d, 1805. His father's name was Joseph and his mother's Lucy; and their family consisted of six sons and three daughters of whom the future prophet was the third son. When he was in his fourteenth year his father moved to Manchester, Ontario county, New York, having previously resided in Palmyra in the same county. While in Manchester, during a religious revival, he was, as he states in his autobiography, the subject of religious impressions, during which, while praying in the woods one day, he had the first vision, two glorious personages appearing to him, who communed with him. Some three and a half years afterwards, on the 21st of September, 1823, he had a second vision and received a communication relative to the plates upon which the Book of Mormon was inscribed. These plates, his history states, he obtained possession of on the 22d of September, 1827, from the place of their deposit, on the West side of a hill convenient to Manchester, the village where he resided. The plates were enclosed in a b ox, covered with a stone, and had been there for some 1400 years, having been buried by an ancient inhabitant of this continent named Moroni. The characters on them had been principally inscribed by Mormon, hence the title of the work.

Being poor and with the work of translating the records before him, in his exigencies he obtained assistance from a gentleman named Martin Harris; and in April, 1829, he made the acquaintance of Oliver Cowdery, a school teacher, who became his amanuensis, and the work of translating commenced immediately. The Book of Mormons, was put in the hands of the printers; but before it was published a church was organized on the 6th day of April, 1830, in the house of Mr. Peter Whitmer, Fayette, Seneca county, New York. Thus the Empire State not only produced the plates, from which the book was translated, but can claim the honor of the organization of that society which is the greatest problem of the century. Six members composed this church on its organization, a small beginning for the thousands into which it has grown and the power and influence it has acquired in the short space of thirty-eight years. The Book of Mormon was published, preaching and proselytizing were prosecuted with vigor, though the missionaries of the new faith were mostly uneducated, and churches were raised up in a number of places in a few months.

Early in 1831 a settlement was made at Kirtland, Ohio, and this may be called the first "gathering place" of the church - a central point to

MEN'S AND BOYS' BROGANS AT DUNFORD & SONS.
Page010 (right side)
CHILDREN'S SHOES IN GREAT VARIETIES, AT WM. SLOAN & CO.'S

SKETCH OF MORMONISM. 57

wards which all who received the faith should converge. In July of the same year a lot was selected and dedicated, for a Temple, at Independence, Jackson county, Missouri. Here a printing press was set in operation and a periodical, the Evening and Morning Star, was published by Judge W. W. Phelps. Trouble broke out in Independence between the settlers of the new faith and others inhabiting that region, and a mob tore down the printing office, tarred and feathered some of the prominent Mormons, abused others, and inflicted losses on the fraternity, in the destruction of property, to a very large amount. The Mormons were obliged to leave, and most of them fled into and settle in Clay county, in the same state. The Jackson mob influenced the citizens of Clay county, and after a time the refugees had again to leave, this time settling in unoccupied territory, which received the name of Caldwell county, as well as in Davis and other adjacent counties, in Missouri. In three years they made wonderful improvements in their new location, for industry has ever been a prominent characteristic of the organization. At this time they were viewed with suspicion by many pro-slavery citizens there, who classed them as abolitionists, many of them having come from states where the abolition theory was gaining ground. For this cause, and because their industrious habits conflicted with the dissipated customs of a class always too well known in frontier settlements, as well as for religious reasons, troubles again broke out and the entire Mormon community was compelled to leave the state. Their next settlement was at Commerce, Hancock county, Illinois, where in a short time they built the city of Nauvoo, which was duly chartered by the state Legislature. They had built a temple at Kirtland, which was an immense effort in its size and costliness for so small and poor a body of people as they then were. But in Nauvoo one was commenced on a scale proportionately greater to correspond with their increased numbers, wealth and importance. This they finished, but before it was completed, their Prophet, Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith, the Patriarch of the Church, were murdered in Carthage, where they were imprisoned on a charge of treason. The Missouri enemies of the Prophet and his followers had never ceased their efforts against him and his people, preferring charge after charge which were disposed of by the courts, he always obtained an acquittal; until this last charge, when the mob would not wait for the result of a trial, but shot him and his brother dead while in prison under guard, wounding at the same time Elder John Taylor, one of the Twelve Apostles. They held Governor Ford's pledge for their safety at the time. This was on the 27th of June, 1844.

Soon after the Mormons were compelled to leave Illinois, and took up their line of march in February, 1846, for the then almost unknown west. That Fall and Winter the main body of the refugee Saints located in the neighborhood of the Missouri River, near what is now Council

PLOUGH SHOES AND BALMORAL SHOES AT DUNFORD & SONS.
Page011 (left side)
PURE EXTRACTS, AT WALLACE & EVANS'.
58 SKETCH OF MORMONISM.
Bluffs and Omaha, where temporary settlements were formed. Next Spring, President Brigham Young started westward with 143 pioneers, broke a road, forded streams and built bridges from the Missouri over the great plains and through the Rocky Mountains, arriving in Salt Lake Valley on the 21st of July, 1847. As soon after as possible the main body followed, a provisional State government was formed, gentlemen were sent to Washington to represent the new colony; and in 1849 a Territorial government was granted to them for the Territory of Utah. Since that time they have prospered exceedingly, their cities, towns and settlements number about two hundred with a population of nearly 150,000 souls. Besides these there are branches of the Church in many parts of the United States; and in Europe the communicants of the faith number nearly 20,000. Their missionary efforts have been directed to every country where religious toleration would permit them to carry and disseminate their views. Most European and some Asiatic nations, as well as Australia and several of the Pacific Islands, have given proselytes to the faith; and almost all the old members of the Church are native born citizens of the Union, which still adds largely to the believers in the latter-day dispensation.

The Church is organized with a First Presidency of three; a Council of Twelve Apostles; a Patriarch; a quorum of High Priests of indefinite number; sixty-four quorums of Seventies; and Elders' Quorum; a Presidency of three and a High Council of twelve for each Stake of Zion; a Presiding Bishop for the Church with two Counselors; a Bishop for each Ward; a Priests' quorum; a Teachers' quorum; and a Deacons quorum.
The present authorities of the Church are:
Brigham Young, President; George A. Smith his first and Daniel H. Wells his second counselor.
Orson Hyde, President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and Orson Pratt, Sr., John Taylor, Wilford Woodruff, Ezra T. Benson, Charles C. Rich, Lorenzo Snow, Erastus Snow, Franklin D. Richards, George Q. Cannon, Joseph F. Smith and Brigham Young, Jr., members.
John Smith, Patriarch.
John Young, President of the High Priests' Quorum; Edwin D. Wooley and Samuel W. Richards counselors.
Joseph Young President of the first seven Presidents of the Seventies, and Levi W. Hancock, Henry Harriman, Albert P. Rockwood, Horace S. Eldredge, Jacob Gates and John Van Cott, members of the first seven Presidents of the Seventies.
Edward Hunter, Presiding Bishop, Leonard W. Hardy and Jesse C. Little, his counselors.
George A. Smith, Historian and general Church Recorder, and Wilford Woodruff, assistant.

LADIES FINE SEASONABLE HATS AT DUNFORD & SONS.
Page011 (right side)
AN ELEGANT STOCK OF LADIES' SHOES AT WM. SLOAN & CO.'S
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS. 59
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS OF UTAH.
1847.July 24th. Pioneers, numbering 143 men, enter Salt Lake Valley, having left the Missouri River April 14th. The day of their arrival they commenced plowing and planting potatoes. A thunder shower wet the ground slightly in the afternoon.
 July 29th A portion of the Mormon Battalion, numbering about 150, under command of Captain Brown, arrive, having come from Pueblo to Fort Laramie and thence west. They were accompanied by a party of immigrants from the State of Mississippi.
 July 31st Great Salt Lake City laid out, in square blocks of ten acres each, eight lots to the block, and streets eight rods wide, running at right angles. Latitude of northern boundary of Temple block, ascertained by meridian observations of the sun by Prof. Orson Pratt, Sr., 40 deg., 45 min., 44 sec. Longitude, obtained by lunar distances, taken by the sextant and circle, 111 deg., 26 min., 34 sec., west of Greenwich. Altitude above sea level 4,300 feet.
 August 25th President Brigham Young and about seventy of the Pioneers start east for "Winter Quarters," on the Missouri river, to assist their immigration forward.
 August 26th The colonists had laid off a fort, built twenty-seven log houses, plowed and planted eighty-four acres with corn, potatoes, beans, buckwheat, turnips, etc., and had manufactured 125 bushels of salt.
1848May 31st President Brigham Young organizes the immigrants of the faith coming west, at Winter Quarters, into companies for the journey. They numbered 1,891 souls, with 623 wagons.
 August 9th Great Salt Lake City fort contains 450 buildings, with three saw mills and a flouring mill in the city, and others in the course of construction.
 August 10th Feast given in Great Salt Lake City to celebrate the first harvest gathered in the Great Basin.
 September 20 President young arrives with his company. Davis and Weber counties settled.
1849February 5th Mercury 33 deg. below zero in Great Salt Lake City.
 March 8th Memorial sent to Congress for a State Government.
 March 9th Election held under Provisional Government of the State of Deseret. Brigham Young elected governor; Willard Richards, secretary of state; N. K. Whitney, treasurer; H. C. Kimball, chief justice; John Taylor and N. K. Whitney, associate justices; Daniel H. Wells, attorney general; Horace S. Eldredge, marshall; Albert Carrington, assessor and collector of taxes; and Jo-

WE ARE PROUD TO SELL AT DUNFORD & SONS.
Page012 (left side)
Clothing, Wholesale and Retail, at HELLMAN & CO.'S, Salt Lake City
60 CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS
   seyh L. Heywood, surveyor of highways, etc. Magistrates were also elected.
 May 27th Parties from the east en route for the California gold mines first arrive.
 August 28th Captain H. Stansbury arrive to commence his survey.
 October 6th Perpetual emigration Company organized. Utah, Tooele and Sanpete Counties settled. First Indian war. Deseret Dramatic Association organized. Robert Campbell, president; re-organized again in 1850.
1850February 22d Earthquake shock felt in Great Salt Lake Valley.
 June 15th "Deseret News" published.
 July 4th Parley's canon opened for travel under the name of "The Golden Pass."
 August 28th Captain Stansbury completes his survey.
 September 9th Act of Congress, organizing Utah Territory, approved. Ogden City located.
 October Brigham Young appointed Governor of Utah Territory.
 December 8th "Thirty families left Salt Lake City, including 118 men, with 600 head of stock and 101 wagons, led by Elder George A. Smith, and in January following arrived at and settled the county of Iron, by building a fort at Parowan."
Council House ready for occupation this fall.
1851January 3d First criminal trial by jury held in the provisional State of Deseret.
 January 11th Great Salt Lake City incorporated, Jedediah Morgan Grant, first mayor.
Charters granted to Ogden, Provo, Manti and Parowan cities.
 October 29th Fillmore City located as the seat of government for and the capital of Utah territory.
Millard, Box Elder and Carson Counties settled.
1852January 16th Tabernacle, capable of seating nearly 3000 persons, finished.
 February 14th Territorial Legislature memorialize Congress for a Pacific railroad and telegraph line.
 July 27th Thermometer 127 deg. in the sun in Great Salt Lake City.
 September 3d First company of P. E. Fund Immigrants arrive from Europe with thirty-one wagons, A. O. Smoot, captain; met by the First Presidency, Captain Wm. Pitt's band and many leading citizens.

MISSES' FINE KID AND GOAT SHOES AT DUNFORD & SONS.
Page012 (right side)
THE FINEST FRENCH CALF BOOTS, AT WM. SLOAN & CO.'S

CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS 61
 September 4th Treaty made with the chiefs of the Utes and Shoshones in Great Salt Lake City.
Juab and Washington counties settled, the latter in the spring and the former in the fall.
Post offices established at American Fork, Springville and Payson, Utah county; Salt Creek (Nephi), Juab county; and Fillmore City, Millard county.
1853February 14th The ground for the Temple, in Temple Block, consecrated.
 April 6th Corner stones of Temple laid.
 August 29th Resolution adopted by city council, in compliance with expressed request of the inhabitants, to build a Spanish wall around Great Salt Lake City.  The wall was twelve feet high; six feet thick at base, tapering to two feet and six inches six feet from the ground; and preserving that thickness to the top.  It was about nine miles in length.  Portions of it still stand in a dilapidated condition.
 September 26th Captain J. W. Gunnison; U. S. Topographical Engineers, and seven men killed by Indians, near the swamps of the Sevier, twenty miles from the Sevier river, in revenge for killing an Indian and the wounding of two others by a company of immigrants for California.
Second Indian war.
Social Hall erected.
Summit and Green River counties settled.
1854January 7th John C. Fremont with nine whites and twelve Delaware Indians, arrived at Parowan in a state of starvation.  One man had fallen dead from his horse near the settlement, and others were nearly dead.  Animals and provisions were supplied and after resting to the 20th they departed.
 March 11th Dr. Willard Richards, second counselor to President Young and editor of the "Deseret News," died.
 May 23d Patriarch John Smith died.
 April 7th Jedediah M. Grant chosen counselor in place of Willard Richards.
 July Grasshoppers make their appearance and do much damage.
Deseret alphabet produced.
Seventies Hall built.
1855January 1st Iron made by the Deseret Iron Company.
 January 20th Walker, the celebrated Utah Chief, died at Meadow Creek.
 July 1st Molasses made from beet at the sugar factory.
 September Deseret Horticultural Society organized.
Various societies organized during the early part of the year

SMALL PROFITS AND QUICK RETURNS IS OUR MOTTO. DUNFORD & SONS.

Page013 (left side)
[62]
Gents' Furnishing Goods, cheap, at HELLMAN & CO.'S, Salt Lake City
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS
  among which and most prominent, were the "Universal Scientific Society;" the Polysophical Society;" "Deseret Philharmonic Society;" and "Deseret Typographical Association."
Grasshoppers do serious damage to crops, destroying nearly everything green in many parts of the territory.
Morgan county settled.
1856January 26th Express carrying company organized to carry express from Missouri River to California, and shares taken to stock a thousand miles of the road at a mass meeting held in Great Salt Lake City.
 March 17th Convention met in Great Salt Lake City to prepare constitution and memorial to Congress for admission as a State.
 March 27th Constitution and memorial adopted, George A. Smith and John Taylor elected Delegates to present them to Congress.
 September 26th First hand-cart companies arrive under charge of Captains Edmund Ellsworth and . D. McArthur. They were met by the First Presidency of the church, a brass band, a company of lancers, and a large concourse of influential citizens.
 December 1st Jedediah M. Grant died.
 December 8th Legislature met in Fillmore, organized and adjourned to Great Salt Lake City.
 December 18th Legislature meets in the Social Hall, Great Salt Lake City.
Beaver and Cache counties settled.
1857January 4th Daniel H. Wells chosen second counselor to Pres. B. Young, in the place of J. M. Grant.
 April 23d A company of about seventy missionaries start and cross the plains east with hand-carts, making the trip in forty-eight days.
 July 11th Alfred Cumming of Georgia appointed Governor of Utah.
 July 24th Judge Stoddard arrives without the mails, the post master at Independence having received orders not to forward them.
General Harney with two thousand infantry and a proportionate number of artillery and cavalry ordered to Utah.
 August 7th First part of the "Army of Utah," consisting of the tenth infantry and Phelphs' Battery, arrive at Fort Kearney.
1858March 21st The citizens of Great Salt Lake City, and the settlements north of it agree to abandon their homes and go south, all the information derived from eastern papers being that the approaching formidable army was sent to destroy them. Destination when starting, supposed to be Sonora.
 April 10th Governor A. Cumming and Col. T. L. Kane, with

BOOTS BY THE CASE OR PAIR AT DUNFORD & SONS

Page013 (right side)
[63]
Boys' Clothing, in any quantity, low, sold by HELLMAN & CO., Salt Lake City
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS
  a servant each, having left the "army of Utah" to proceed to Salt Lake City, arrive with an escort of Mormons whom they had accidentally met on the way.
 April 15th Governor Cumming reports having arrived and been treated everywhere "with respectful attention."
 April 19th Governor Cumming and Col. Kane visit the Utah library, where J. W. Cummings showed them the records and seal of the U. S. District Court, said to have been burnt up, which was one of the reasons why the army was ordered to Utah.
 June 7th Powell and McCullough, Peace Commissioners, arrive in Great Salt Lake City.
Kane county settled.
1860April 7th George Q. Cannon chosen one of the Twelve Apostles.
1861April 23d Two hundred wagons, with four yolk of cattle each, carrying about 15,000 lbs. of flour, started for the Missouri river to bring on the poor of the immigration.
 October 18th First telegram crosses the overland wire, from Utah, sent to President Abraham Lincoln by President Brigham Young.
 October 24th First telegram sent to San Francisco by President B. Young.
1862January 22 Constitution again adopted, with memorial for admission of Utah as a State, with the name of "Deseret."  George Q. Cannon and W. H. Hooper elected to present them to Congress.
 March 6th Salt Lake Theatre dedicated.
 May 21st Two hundred and sixty-two wagons, 293 teamsters, 2,880 oxen, carrying 143,315 lbs. of flour, sent from Utah to assist the poor of the immigration across the plains and mountains.
 December 10th Governor Harding delivers his annual message, extra copies of which the Legislature will not publish, viewing it insulting.
1863January 29th Col. P. E. Connor attacks a band of Shoshone Indians in a ravine near Bear river, and defeats them. Known as Bear river battle.
 March 22d Overland mail, with four passengers, attacked by Indians near Eight Mile Station, Tooele county. Driver killed and one passenger wounded. Judge Mott, who was I the coach, took the reins, drove for life, and escaped.
 April 5th Battle of Spanish Fork cannon, between 140 cavalry, (C. V.) under Col. G. S. Evans, and 200 Indians. Lieut. F. A. Teale was killed. The Indians were defeated.
 May 18th 384 wagons, 488 teamsters, 3,604 oxen, taking

WM. SLOAN & CO., BOOTS AND SHOES, SIGH OF THE BIG BOOT.

Page014 (left side)
[64]
OYSTERS, SARDINES AND LOBSTERS, AT WALLACE & EVANS'.
CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS
   225,969 lbs. flour, start to assist the poor of the immigration. 4,300 lbs. of Utah grown cotton sent East for sale with the teams dispatched to assist the immigration.
Rich and Wasatch counties settled.
1864July 4th Daily Telegraph issued, T. B. H. Stenhouse, proprietor and editor; semi-weekly issued October 8th, same year.
1865January Sevier and Piute counties organized.
 April 10th Proposition make to build a telegraph line in Utah.
 June 5th Treaty made by Col. O. H. Irish with the principal Chiefs in the Territory, at Spanish Fork, Reservation Farm.
 June 8th Hon. Schuyler Colfax and party arrive.
 June 11th Colfax and party address the citizens in front of the Salt Lake House.
 June 18th Governor Doty died.
 July 14th Hon. J. M. Ashley addresses an audience, in the Bowery, at the celebration on the national anniversary.
 October First issue of the Deseret News, semi-weekly.
 November First Hebrew marriage celebrated in Salt Lake City.
1866May 31st First circumcision of Hebrew child in G.S.L. City
 June 11th Indian war.  Gen. Wells and militia start for Sanpete to protect the settlements there.
1867March 21st Deseret Telegraph Company organized.
 July 19th Grasshoppers arrive in vast quantities.
 October 6th First conference held in new Tabernacle.
 November 21st Deseret Evening News issued.
1868January 29th Act approved changing the names of Great Salt Lake City and county to Salt Lake City and Salt Lake county.
  June - Union Iron Company commence operations at Pinto county.
 June 19th Ground broken on the U. P. R. R. in Weber canon.
 June 22d Heber C. Kimball, first counselor to Pres. Young, died.
Grasshoppers destroy a large portion of the crops in the Territory.
 October 6th George A. Smith chosen first counselor in place of Heber C. Kimball.

MAYORS OF SALT LAKE CITY





NameTerm Com'd.Term Expired.
Jedediah M. GrantJan 11, 1851Dec. 1, 1856
Abraham O. SmootJan 2, 1857Feb. 12, 1866
Daniel H. WellsFeb. 12, 1866Present Mayor

DUNFORD & SONS BUT FOR CASH ONLY.

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No Washing Machine equals the "HYDRAULIC," F. A. Mitchell, Sole Ag't.
TERRITORY OF UTAH

Utah occupies an area of about 65,000 square miles, which includes large tracts of wild and mountainous country. It extends from the 37th to the 42d parallels of north latitude; and from the 109th to the 114th degrees of longitude. About 130,000 acres are under cultivation; of which in 1867, over 80,000 were planted in cereals; nearly 2,000 in sugar cane, from which molasses was made; some 6,800 in root crops; nearly 200 in cotton, 900 in apple orchards; 1,000 in peaches, 75 in grapes; and 195 in currents; while 30,000 were in meadow, of this about 94,000 acres had to be irrigated, at a cost during the year, in making canals, dams for irrigation purposes, cleaning out ditches, etc., of nearly $247,000. The result of the grasshopper visitation in 1868 presents details far below the average of other years. Even in 1867, the loss to the cereals, and part of the fruit and root crops, averaged over one sixth of the whole, as compared with former years and with the promise for harvest before the insects appeared.

Correct returns of mineral operations in the Territory have not been made. Gold has been found in small quantities in various parts of the Territory, as the result of extensive prospecting, but not to an extent that pays for outlay, although during the summer of 1868 a number of men were at work in Bingham's Canon, in the Oquirrh range, on the west side of Salt Lake Valley. Silver has also been found in the Wasatch Mountains, east side of the Valley, in Cottonwood Canon, but it has not paid remuneratively for working.

Iron ore exists in vast quantities in several parts of the Territory. In Iron county, works were erected in 1852, and, a small quantity of iron was made, but the lack of proper fuel compelled a cessation of the works, which were ultimately abandoned. In Summit county, iron ore exists to a considerable extent.

On the Pinto, Iron county, the Union Iron Company commenced operations I June, 1868, with Ebinezer Hanks, president; S. M. Blair, Peter Shirts, and Robert Richey, directors, and Chapman Duncan, agent. On the first of January, 1869, they had two furnaces in operation, with another in course of erection; and had a fair prospect of being successful.

Coal is found extensively, but principally in the neighborhood of Coalville, in Summit county. Fresh veins were discovered up Echo Canon during the construction of the grade for the U. P. R. R., in August of 1868. An excellent quality of coal is also obtained in Sanpete, which is used extensively for blacksmithing purposes.

MEN'S, BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S BOOTS Exceedingly Cheap, at DUNFORD & SONS.

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[66]
WALLACE & EVANS, WHOLESALE
TERRITORY OF UTAH

Copper, lead, bismuth, limestone, etc., exist in considerable quantities in the Territory.

The following, with some slight and necessary corrections, is taken from the Great West and Union Pacific Railroad Guide, published by The American News Company, New York:

"Settlements were made in Utah as early as July 1947. It originally formed part of Mexico, but by the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo, in 1848, it was ceded to the United States. the comparatively small beginning in 1847 has grown and lengthened, until now the settlements extend to a distance of three hundred miles north and south; and whatever a valley can be found that can be watered, there you will find the industrious, uncomplaining settlers, making an honest living in a way most congenial to nature and most conducive to health, by the cultivation of the soil. Not only are the ordinary vegetables and cereals produced, but in the southern part of the Territory they are raising cotton, the product of free white labor, thereby removing the objection of some of our eastern friends to the use of this necessary article. In a word the desert has been converted into the fruitful field, and the frowns of nature exchanged for smiles of gladness.

"The country for the most part is mountainous, interspersed with valleys, which can only be cultivated by irrigation.

"The melting of the snow in the mountains affords in ordinary seasons sufficient water to cultivate the valleys successfully.

"The summers are very warm and dry; the winters generally mild and open. The fall of snow is light in the valleys and heavy in the mountains. The climate may be said to be invigorating and healthful, fevers and pulmonary complaints being almost unknown.

"The soil, which, to a very great extent, is formed of the mountain washings, consists principally of gravelly loam, and is well adapted to the growth of wheat and other cereals.

"Wheat is indeed the great staple product of the Territory. In good seasons, the average yield per acre is about twenty-five bushels. Sixty to seventy bushels are not unfrequently obtained; and in some instances as high as eighty bushels have been raised from a single acre.

"Oats, barley, rye, and flax are cultivated with great success.

"All kinds of vegetables grow astonishingly large and of a superior quality.

"In Washington county, in the southern part of the Territory, large fields of cotton are cultivated, the growth of which will be sufficient in a few years to supply all the wants of the people. In 1863 quite a considerable quantity of cotton was exported to the States at remunerative prices.

"Madder, indigo, figs, grapes, and other tropical fruits are also raised in this part of the country.

INFANATS' SHOES OF AL KINDS, AT DUNFORD & SONS.

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[67]
MANUFACTURERS OF PURE CANDIES.
TERRITORY OF UTAH

"Timber is scarce, and being found only in the mountains and 'kanyons," is very difficult of access. As a consequence of this. houses are costly to build, and rents are proportionately high.

"The climate and soil of Utah are particularly adapted to the production of fruit; and her citizens, no doubt, feeling the promptings of an internal as well as external nature, have improved their opportunities for cultivation. Apples, pears, peaches, apricots, plums, grapes, currants and other fruits are produced, not only in great abundance, but of a superior quality.

In addition to flouring and other mills necessary for the support of the Territory, woolen and cotton factories are being established in different parts of the country for home supplies."

The property value of Utah, according to the Territorial Auditor's report, for 1868, was $10,533,872; and the amount of tax assessed on it, for the same year, $52,669. Of these amounts, Salt Lake county owned property assessed at $4,379,652.80; and was taxed, for Territorial purposes, $21,898.26. The Territory has no debt; but in the Treasurer's hands, at the close of the last fiscal year, was a balance of $17,000, not dawn for the purposes for which it had been appropriated.

There are in the Territory 186 school districts, having 226 schools, on the rolls of which are the names of about 13,000 pupils. The teachers number 306, who received for the year $61,839.

The population of the Territory is estimated at 130,000.

The government is vested in Executive, Judicial and Legislative departments.

The Executive consists of a Governor and Secretary; the Judicial of a Chief Justice and two Associate Justices; and the Legislative, of an Assembly composed of thirteen Councilors and twenty-six Representatives.

FEDERAL OFFICERS

Governor - Charles Durkee, of Wisconsin.
Secretary - Edwin Higgins, of Michigan.
Chief Justice - Charles C. Wilson, of Illinois.
Associate Justices - Thomas J. Drake, of Michigan, and Enos D. Hoge, of Illinois.
Clerk of Supreme Court - W. I. Appleby, of Utah.
Superintendent of Indian Affairs - F. H. Head, of Wisconsin.
Assessor of Internal Revenue - A. L. Chetlain, of Illinois.
Collector of Internal Revenue - R. T. Burton, of Utah.
Surveyor General - J. A. Clark, of Illinois.
U. S. Attorney - C. H. Hempstead, of California.
Marshall - Josiah A. Hosmer, of Utah.

LADIES' MOROCCO SHOES AND GAITERS, AT DUNFORD & SONS.

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[68]
WALLACE & EVANS, GROCERS
TERRITORY OF UTAH

TERRITORIAL OFFICERS.

Treasurer - David O Calder.
Auditor - William Clayton.
Attorney General - Zerubbabel Snow.
Surveyor General - Jesse W. Fox.
Marshall - John D. T. McAllister.
Road Commissioner - Theodore McKean.
Librarian - Wm. C. Staines.
Recorder of Marks and Brands - William Clayton.
Sealer of Weights and Measures - Nathan Davis.
Superintendent of Common Schools - Robert L. Campbell.

MEMBERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.

OFFICERS OF COUNCIL

President - George A. Smith.
Secretary - Patrick Lynch.
Assistant Secretary - Charles W. Stayner.
Sergeant-at-Arms - J. D. T. McAllister.
Messenger - Charles W. Carrington.
Foreman - Charles W. Smith.
Chaplain - Joseph Young, Sr.

MEMBERS OF COUNCIL

Salt Lake, Tooele, Summit and Green River counties - Wilford Woodruff, Albert Carrington, A. O. Smoot and Joseph A. Young.
Davis and Morgan counties - Hector C. Haight.
Weber and Box Elder Counties - Lorenzo Snow.
Cache and Rich Counties - Ezra T. Benson.
Utah and Wasatch Counties - L. E. Harringotn and Aaron Johnson.
Sanpete and Sevier Counties - Orson Hyde.
Millard and Juab Counties - George A. Smith.
Washington and Kane Counties - Erastus Snow.

OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Speaker - Orson Pratt, Sr.
Chief Clerk - Robert L. Campbell.
Assistant Clerk - Joseph C. Rich.
Sergeant-at-Arms - S. H. B. Smith.
Messenger - Abinadi Pratt.
Foreman - George W. Slade.
Chaplain -W. W. Phelps.

OUR GOODS ARE ALL NEW AND FRESH, DUNFORD AND SONS.

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BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS.
SALT LAKE CITY.

REPRESENTATIVES.

Washington and Kane Counties - William Snow
Iron County - Silas S. Smith.
Beaver and Piute Counties - John R. Murdock.
Millard County - F. M. Lyman.
Juab County - Jonathan Midgley.
Sanpete and Sevier Counties - W. S. Seely and George Taylor.
Utah County - Wm. B. Pace, David Evans and Albert K. Thurber.
Wasatch County - Abraham Hatch.
Summit County - William W. Cuff.
Salt Lake County - John Taylor, Albert P. Rockwood, Enoch Reese, Orson Pratt, Sr., Brigham Young, Jr. and Joseph F. Smith.
Tooele County - John Rowberry.
Davis and Morgan Counties - Wm. R. Smith and Willard G. Smith.
Weber County - Chauncey W. West and Lorin Farr.
Box Elder County - Jonathan C. Wright.
Cache and Rich Counties - Peter Maughan and Charles C. Rich.
SALT LAKE CITY
Salt Lake City is situated at the foot of a spur of the Wasatch mountains, its northern limits running up to the "bench," or elevated portion of the valley, which reaches to the base of the mountains. It can be approached from the east by two canons - Emigration canon, through which nearly all travel formerly passed, and which debouches in the valley between three and four miles from the city; and Parley's canon, through which the stage road runs. The mouth of the latter canon is some six miles from the city, in a southeasterly direction, and the road between them runs past a tannery, two woolen mills, and a paper mill, all worked by the water of the creek that dashes down the canon hollow. The scenery in each is bold and impressive, the mountainsides of these passes in the Wasatch range rising with abruptness from extremely narrow gorges, and covered on their summits with pine, maple, oak, and other kinds of timber, extensively used for lumbering purposes and fire wood. Nearly thirty miles to the south the mountain range juts across the valley, partially separating it from Utah valley, which contains the lake of the same name. To the west of the valley rises the Oquirrh range of mountains; and north of them, about twenty miles from the city, in a westerly direction, lies Salt Lake, with

OUR BOOTS AND OUR SHOES ARE CUSTOM MADE, DUNFORD & SONS.

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[70]
SUGAR, BUTTER AND
SALT LAKE CITY

several mountainous islands jutting out of its bed, which have been utilized for herd grounds, sheep ranges, and salt boiling. The streets in the main portions of the city are laid out at right angles, and run north and south, and east and west. They are 132 feet wide, with rivulets of water running gurgling down each street, used for irrigation, and for culinary purposes where wells are not sunk. The culture of shade trees, which have a rapid and healthy growth from these streams, is much encouraged; and as almost every lot has an orchard, when the summer foliage clothes fruit and shade trees with a full covering of green, the picture which the city presents is then exceedingly pleasant and beautiful. The blocks contain ten acre each and were originally laid out to contain eight lots to the block; but the growth of business, and other causes, have changed this design in the centre of the city, where the buildings are erected closer together. In the 20th ward, the northeast portion of the city, which is a survey of more recent date than the first settled part, the blocks contain only two and a half acres each, and the streets are proportionately narrow; and a portion of the 17th and 19th wards, in the northwest part, contains crooked and irregular streets, caused by the peculiar character and irregularities of the ground.

The city contains about 25,000 inhabitants. It has several tanneries, grist mills, the woolen factories mentioned before, the paper mill, a pail factory, steam wood working factories, furniture factories, large adobe yards, brick yards, etc., etc. Its City Hall, not long built, cost $70,000, yet the corporation is entirely free from debt.

The government is vested in a Mayor, five Aldermen, and nine Councilors.

MUNICIPAL ORGANIZATION.

Mayor - Daniel H. Wells.
Marshall - John D. T. McAllister.
Recorder - Robert Campbell.
Treasurer - Paul A. Schettler.
Aldermen - Harry W. Lawrence, Samuel W. Richards, Alonzo H. Raleigh, Jeter Clinton, Alexander C. Pyper.
Councilors - R. T. Burton, Isaac Groo, Theodore McKean, John Sharp, William S. Godbe, Peter Nebeker, Thomas Jenkins, George J. Taylor, Heber P. Kimball.

STANDING COMMITTEES

On Public Laws - Raleigh, McKean and Taylor.
On Ways and Means - Richards, McKean, Godbe, Sharp and Nebeker.
On Claims - Pyper, Burton and Sharp.
On Improvements - Lawrence, Burton, Groo, Jenkins and Taylor.
On Unfinished Business - Raleigh, Godbe, and Kimball.

GOODS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, AT DUNFORD & SONS.

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[71]
MILK CRACKERS, AT WALLACE & EVANS.
SALT LAKE CITY.
On Elections - Richards, Sharp and Kimball.
On Police - Clinton, Lawrence, Groo, Burton and Sharp.
On Public Grounds - Lawrence, Richards, Godbe, Nebeker and Pyper.
On Revision - Clinton, Burton and McKean.
On License - Richards, Groo and Lawrence.
On Public Works - Raleigh, Jenkins and Nebeker.
On Finances - Pyper, Godbe and Taylor.
On Cemetery - Groo, McKean and Taylor.
On Market House - Clinton, Groo and Lawrence.

CITY OFFICERS
City Attorney - Hosea Stout.
Chief of Police - Andrew Burt.
Chief Engineer of Fire Department - John T. D. McAllister.
City Business Agent - Isaac Groo.
Inspector of Buildings - A. H. Raleigh.
Inspector of Liquors - Robert Campbell.
Inspector of Stock - H. J. Faust.
Market Master - Andrew Burt.
Sealer of Weights and Measures - Nathan Davis.
Surveyor - Jesse W. Fox.
Quarantine Physician - Jeter Clinton
City Sexton - Joseph E. Taylor.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

THE TEMPLE.
Temple Block

COUNCIL HOUSE
Corner of S. T. and E. T.

CITY HALL
1st S, bet. 1st and 2d E.

COURT HOUSE
Corner of 2d W. and 2d S.

CITY PRISON
Rear of City Hall

DUNFORD & SONS HAVE THE BEST GOODS IN THE MARKET.

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[72]
FRESH BREAD EVERY DAY
SALT LAKE CITY.

SEVENTIES' HALL.
1st E. bet. 1st and 2d S.

BATH HOUSE.
Northwest of city on State road.

PENITENTIARY.
Four miles southeast of city.


PLACES OF AMUSEMENT.

THEATRE.
Corner of 1st E. and 1st S.

SOCIAL HALL.
1st E. bet. S.T. and 1st S.

MUSIC HALL.
1st S. bet. 1st and 2d W.

BILLARD HALLS.
E. T. bet. 1st and 2d S., and 2d S. bet. E. T. and 1st E.


CHURCHES.

TABERNACLES.
Temple Block

ASSEMBLY ROOMS.
Of 13th, 14th and 8th wards, and Independence Hall, 3 S. bet. E. and W.T.

WARD MEETING HOUSE.
In each ward.

CLOTH, FUR AND PLUSH CAPS, ALL SIZES, DUNFORD & SONS.

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[73]
AT WALLACE & EVANS'.
SALT LAKE CITY.

LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC AND BENBVOLENT.

Lectures are delivered on miscellaneous subjects, in various parts of the city, during the winter months. Debating clubs, organized annually, also hold regular meetings. Female relief societies are organize, one in each ward, which minister to the wants of the necessitous.


EDUCATIONAL.

UNIVERSITY OF DESERET.

Mercantile department of the University of Deseret, classes meet in Council House. Prof. J. A. Park, principal.

MORGAN'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE.

East side of E. T. bet. 2d and 3d S. John Morgan, M. A., principal.

UNION ACADEMY

Near Washington Square, 16th ward. Dr. H. I. Doremus, principal.

RAGERS' SEMINARY.

13th ward assembly rooms.
A ward school in each ward, and private schools in several.


CEMETERIES.

CITY CEMETERY.

Northeast of city.

CAMP DOUGLAS CEMETERY.

Contiguous to Camp.


HOT AND MINERAL SPRINGS.

Warm springs one mile north of city, and hot springs three miles north, on state road.

LADIES' PRUNELL GAITERS AND LACE UP SHOES, DUNFORD & SONS.

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[74]
STAPLES AND FANCY GROCERIES.
SALT LAKE CITY.

GUIDE TO THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS, ETC., IN SALT LAKE CITY.

THE TEMPLE.

Not yet completed, situated near the east centre of Temple Block. The ground was consecrated February 14th, 1853; corner stones laid April 6th following, sixteen feet below the surface of the ground. Its total length is 186 feet; width 99 feet; and covers and area of 21,850 feet.

THE TABERNACLE.

Inside Temple Block. First opened to public worship October 6th, 1867, though then unfinished. It is an oblong, 250 feet from east to west, by 150 feet from north to south. The roof is a single oval span, 80 feet high with the ceiling 65 feet above the flooring, and rests on 46 square pillars of red cut sandstone. It is capable of seating about 8,000 persons; and has an organ in course of construction, inside the building, said to be the largest in the United States. Entrances to building from S. and W. Temple streets.

OLD TABERNACLE.

Erected in 1851 of adobies, now used for public worship during winter; stands south of the New Tabernacle on the same block; its 126 feet by 64 feet, and can seat over 2,500 persons.

COUNCIL HOUSE.

Northeast corner block between S. and E. Temple streets; erected 1849, of red sandstone, two stories, 45 feet square, now occupied by University of Deseret and Commercial Bazaar.

COURT HOUSE.

Southwest corner of block between 2d W. and 2d S. streets; cost about $20,000. The U. S. Supreme Court, the U. S. and Territorial Courts, for the 3d judicial district, and the Probate Court for Salt Lake county are held here. Underneath are the cells of the county prison.

CITY HALL.

1st S. between 1st and 2d E. streets, 60 feet square, two stories; cost $70,000. Contains the Mayor's, Recorder's and City Treasurer's offices; an Alderman's and Justice Court Room; Council Chamber; Territorial Library; City Attorney's office, and that of the Adjutant General of the Nauvoo Legion - the territorial militia. The sessions of the Legislative Assembly are held in this hall.

BLACK, LIGHT AND BROWN HATS, CHEAP, AT DUNFORD & SONS.

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[75]
FOR SALE AT WALLACE & EVANS'.
SALT LAKE CITY.

CITY PRISON.

Rear of City Hall. Strongly built of cut sandstone; the blocks have an inch and a half ball laid between each two to prevent criminals cutting through the cement. Cost, over $30,000.

SEVENTIES' HALL.

1st E. between 1st and 2d S.; 50 feet by 30 feet; principally used for free public lectures.

THEATRE.

Corner of 1 E. and 1 S.; 144 feet by 80 feet, in the main building, but an addition of 28 feet to the north end makes it 172 feet in length. The auditorium is divided into parquette, first or dress circle, second and third circles, and is capable of seating nearly 1,700 persons. The circle, balconies and proscenium are tastefully finished in white and gold. The stage is 80 feet deep, and at the back are the green room, large scene room, the copyist's room, manager's office, with a number of dressing rooms up stairs. Other dressing rooms, atelier, machinist's work room, etc., are also in the rear of the main building.

The Box office is o the west side of the portico in front, which is furnished with fluted columns.

SOCIAL HALL.

1 E. bet. S. T. and 1st S. streets; 73 feet by 33 feet; built 1858; formerly used for theatrical purposes and social parties; now devoted to balls and parties.

MUSIC HALL.

1st S. bet. 1st and 2d W. streets; used for concerts, balls, parties, etc.

INDEPENDENCE HALL.

7th ward, 3 S. bet. E. and W. T.; used for lectures, meetings, parties, and school purposes. Episcopal service and other religious meetings held in it.

THIRTEENTH WARD ASSEMBLY ROOMS.

2d S. bet. 1st and 2d E.; used for ward and general meetings, concerts, etc.

Each ward in the city has a hall, or meeting-house, used for ward and general meetings.

POLITE CLERKS AT DUNFORD & SONS, TO WAIT ON YOU.

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