ANDERSON H. AKERS- son of Howard and Susan (Garnand) Akers, was born in Montgomery county, on the 28th of March, 1846. His father came to this county in 1803, his mother in 1833. Although not twenty years of age when the war between the States was ended, Anderson H. Akers was a soldier of that war in the Army of Virginia. He had one brother, Jacob, in the service also. Mr. Akers follows the profession of teaching in Montgomery county with that success which marks it as his vocation. His address is Riner, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

EDWARD BAKER- son of Thompson and Elizabeth (Blaylock) Baker, now both deceased, was born in Halifax county, Virginia, July 23, 1820. He was one of four brothers who were soldiers of Virginia in the war between the States, Edward, John, Henry and Thompson Baker. Edward was a member of the 14th Virginia Cavalry, and afterward served in Wharton’s division of the Cavalry corps. His residence has been in Montgomery county since 1847, and in this county he married Catharine Lucas, who was born in Montgomery county, and was a daughter of Charles B. and Catharine (Davis) Lucas. Her mother is no longer living. Edward Baker is a carpenter by occupation, and is now filling the office of magistrate. His postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMPSON BAKER- came with his parents , Thompson and Elizabeth Baker, to Montgomery county in 1847, and was then about twelve years old. He was born in Halifax county, Virginia, November 13, 1835. In Montgomery county, December 20, 1860, he was joined in wedlock with Nancy E. Walters, and in the home their union established are eight children, born; Annie E., November 6, 1861; William T., November 6, 1863; Lucy B., August 2, 1866; Rosa E., January 8, 1869; Tosh E., August 7, 1872; Walters K, August 16, 1874; Wellar H., January 24, 1877; John E., September 30, 1879. Jacob and Rachel Walters, born in Montgomery county, are the parents of Mrs. Baker, and she was born in this county December 4, 1838. The subject of this sketch has an honorable record for services in the Southern army during the war between the States. It is elsewhere given in this work. His occupation is carpenter, and his address is Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES H. BARNETT- born in Montgomery county, August 14, 1813, is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Harrison)Barnett. His father was born in this county in 1786, a son of John and Hannah (Stapleton) Barnett, and his mother was born in Botetourt county in 1783. John Barnett, the grandfather of Charles H., came from Maryland to Virginia in 1753, and settled at Allegheny Springs. The nearest mill from the place where he reared his pioneer cabin was twenty-seven miles distant. Fort Voss was the nearest place of refuge from the Indians who still lurked with hostile intent around the frontier homes of the settlers. Charles H. Barnett married for is first wife Elizabeth Ann Ledbetter, in Botetourt county, Virginia, November 17, 1836. She was a daughter of Jeremiah and Jane (Crawford) Ledbetter, who made their home in Botetourt county about 1750, and she was born in that county August 16, 1819. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Barnett were ten: James R., born November 16, 1838, died January 15, 1860, in Wisconsin; Sarah J., born September 24, 1840, died March 4, 1873, in Texas; Elizabeth, born November 6, 1842, died September 29, 1853; Samuel C., born November 11, 1844, lives at Allegheny Springs; Lura E., February 25, 1847, lives at Allamossa, Colorado; Ann E., June 1, 1850, and Fannie g., June 13, 1852, live at Allegheny Springs; Mary V., December 5, 1854, died December 13, 1856; Victoria J., October 4, 1856, lives at Allegheny Springs, and Dewitt C., December 20, 1858, in Colorado. Samuel C. enlisted in October, 1862, at the age of seventeen years, and is now sheriff of Montgomery county. February 9, 1863, Charles H. Barnett married a second time, Mrs. John Spessard of Craig county becoming his wife. Mr. Barnett has been twelve years a magistrate of Allegheny district, 1854-65, and seven years postmaster, 1873-81. He has one of the best farms in the county, three miles south of Shawsville, and one-half mile north of Allegheny Springs. His farm of 400 acres is well stocked and choice land for farming. His address is, Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

HENRY C. BARNETT- of Blacksburg district, was born at Big Spring, Montgomery county, Virginia, February 25, 1843. Virginia B. Micron was born in Roanoke county, near Big Lick(now Roanoke City), November 3, 1842, and July 9, 1868, at the residence of Mrs. Jones in Montgomery county, she was married to Henry C. Barnett. The family consists of the following named children: Fannie, born April 26, 1869; Edward Hunter, November 18, 1870, and Thomas Roy, February 28, 1877. Mr. Barnett’s parents, James and Mary A. (Wade) Barnett, were natives of Montgomery county. Mrs. Barnett’s father, Thomas W. Micon, was born in Essex county, settled in Roanoke in 1839, and her mother, Fannie (McClanahan) Micon, was born in Roanoke county in 1820. Mrs. Barnett is the great grand niece of General Andrew Lewis, and a granddaughter of Colonel McClanahan of Roanoke county. At the beginning of the war Henry C. Barnett was a student at Washington College, Lexington, Virginia, and he left his studies to become a member of the "Stonewall Brigade." He afterwards joined the Fourteenth Virginia Cavalry, Stewart’s division, General Beal’s brigade, and remained in the service till the close of the war. Mr. Barnett is engaged in farming. His postoffice address Vicars Switch, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

SAMUEL C. BARNETT-high sheriff of Montgomery county from 1883-1887, and Farmer of Alleghany district, was born in this county November 11, 1844. He entered the Confederate army, a member of Company G, 14th Virginia Cavalry, Beal’s brigade, Lee’s division, and served three years and six months. He was captured at the battle of Five Forks, near Petersburg, was held three months at Point Lookout, then released on parole after the surrender. His grandfather was Joseph Barnett, one of the pioneers of Montgomery county, and his father is C. H. Barnett, still living in Montgomery county. The mother of Samuel C.,whose maiden name was Ann E. Ledbetter, is now deceased. The wife of Samuel C. Barnett, J.C., was daughter of E.P. and Mary Ann Givens, of this county, was born in Craig county, Virginia, in 1850. They were married in Montgomery county; November 14, 1871,and their children are seven, all at home: Margie W., Warren L., Emma B., R, Montague, Roscoe W., Pearl, and Bozely. Samuel C. Barnett’s postoffice address is Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

HARVEY BLACK, M.D.-born in Blacksburg, August 27, 1827, son of Alexander and Elizabeth (McDonald) Black, was united in marriage with Mary Irby Kent, at Blacksburg, on the 15th of September, 1852. Her birth was in Rockford, Illinois, April 27, 1836, being the first child born in that place. Germanicus and Arabella (Amiss) Kent her parents. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Black are Kent, Elizabeth A., Alexander and Charles White Black. Harvey Black is a veteran of two wars. In the Mexican war he was a member of Captain James F. Preston’s company of Virginia Volunteers, and after the first three months was hospital steward. In the war between the States, he was eighteen months surgeon of the 4th Virginia Infantry, "Stonewall Brigade," then surgeon in charge of the Field Hospital, 2d Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. From January 1, 1876, to March 10, 1882, Harvey Black was superintendent of the Eastern Lunatic Asylum at Williamsburg, ad on the last named date was honored with removal for refusing to accept the "Bossism" of Mahone. He is now engaged in the practice of medicine, with postoffice address at Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

DANIEL BLAIN- is a son of Rev. Samuel Wilson Blain and Susan Isham (Harrison) Blain, now residents in Louisville, Kentucky. He was born in Cumberland county, Virginia, November 20, 1838, was educated at Washington College and at Union Theological Seminary, Virginia, and his marriage was solemnized at Williamsburg, Virginia, January 3, 1867. His wife is Mary Louisa, daughter of Dr. John C. an Mary C. (Waller) Mercer, her parents residents in Williamsburg. She was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, June 12, 1839. The children of Daniel Blain and wife were born: John Mercer, April 30, 1869; Randolph Harrison, January 12, 1871; Samuel Stuart, October 18, 1872; Hugh Mercer, December 26,1874; Daniel, November 23, 1877, died October 28, 1879; Robert Waller, June 19, 1879; Cary Randolph, March 11, 1882. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch was Rev. Daniel Blain, professor of languages and mathematics in Washington College (now Washington and Lee University), Lexington, Virginia. He was a native of South Carolina, and married Mary Hanna, daughter of Matthew Hanna, Esq., of Lexington, Virginia. The maternal grandfather of the present Daniel Blain was Randolph Harrison of Clifton, Cumberland county, Virginia, who married Mary Randolph, daughter of Thomas Randolph of Dungenness, Goochland county, Virginia. Mary Louisa, wife of Rev. Daniel Blain, is a granddaughter of Colonel Hugh Mercer, of Fredericksburg, who was a son of General Hugh Mercer, who fell at the battle of Princeton. Her maternal grandfather was Dr. Robert Page Waller, of Williamsburg. The subject of this sketch entered the Confederate army as a private in the Rockbridge Artillery; he was made ordnance sergeant on staff of General William N. Pendleton, chief of artillery for the Army of Northern Virginia. He served from May, 1861, till April, 1865, and surrendered with Lee at Appomattox. Randolph Harrison Blain, attorney-at-law, Louisville, Kentucky, his only brother, enlisted as a private in the Richmond Howitzers, was commissioned first lieutenant in the State Line troops, and then first lieutenant of Jackson’s horse artillery, which company he was commanding at close of the war. Both brothers were wounded in the service. Rev. Daniel Blain was pastor at Collierstown, Rockbridge county, 1867-71, since which time he has filled his present pastorate at Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

JOHN H. CARBAUGH- born in Campbell county Virginia, January 27, 1857, was a son of Hervey M. and Lucy (Summers) Carbaugh. His father was a soldier of the Confederate army; serving in Otey’s battery and killed at Fayette C.H., in 1862. In 1865, John H. Carbaugh came to Montgomery county, and here on the 21st of January, 1869, he married Susan J. Carbaugh. She is a daughter of John and Hannah (Perfater) Carbaugh, and was born in Montgomery county, May 19, 1856. The children of John H. Carbaugh and wife were four: Hervey G., born December 24, 1871; Lelia N., February 23, 1874; Sarah Jane, June 10, 1876; died May 9, 1877; Mollie, August 29, 1880. Mr. Carbaugh has a blacksmithing establishment in Blacksburg district, with postoffice address at Vicars Switch, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JAMES S. CHILDRESS- was born in Montgomery county on the 20th of March, 1856, and was married in this county, where he is now engaged in farming. His parents are living in this county, Thomas D. and Fannie D. (James) Childress. His wife is a native of Montgomery county, Jennie B. daughter of Floyd and Catharine (Deal) Smith, her parents also living in the county. One child makes sunshine in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Childress, a daughter whom they have named Mary. His postoffice address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CROCKETT CHRISMAN- was a son of Abraham Chrisman, who was an early settler in Montgomery county, and is now deceased, and Margaret (Yearout) Chrisman, who is living in this county. His birth was in Montgomery county, January 29, 1831, and in this county, January 11, 1854, he married Cynthia M. Charlton. She was born in Montgomery county, in 1832, a daughter of John R. and Betsy (Simpkins) Charlton. Her father is still a resident in this county, her mother is dead. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Chrisman are eight living, three deceased: Elizabeth A., Henry H., Waddy, John L., Charles, William G., Mandy M., and Mary L., all in Montgomery county: Margaret J., Laura E., and Tosh, deceased. The farm which Mr. Chrisman owns and cultivates lies in Christiansburg district, and he receives his mail at Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOSEPH H. CHRISMAN- grandson of one of the pioneers of Montgomery county, and son of Abraham and Margaret (Yearout) Chrisman, was born in Montgomery county, January 20 , 1844. He married Mary S. Einstein, who was born in this county in 1848, a daughter of Moses and Sallie (Barger) Einstein. Their marriage was solemnized in Montgomery county, in October, 1866, and their children are four living, one deceased. Charles G., first-born, is no longer living. Ida W., Abraham W., Clara B., and George A.M., are at home. The father of Mr. Chrisman is deceased, his mother a resident in this county, living with her son, the subject of this sketch; his wife’s parents now make their home in Pulaski county, this State. Joseph H. Chrisman was eight months in the Confederate army, and took part in the battle of Princeton. He owns and carries on a farm in Christiansburg district, with postoffice address at Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS NELSON CONRAD- president of Blacksburg College, has been a resident of Montgomery county since 1872. He is a son of Nelson Conrad of Leesburg, Virginia, and his mother was Lavinia M. (Thomas) Conrad, now deceased. The birth of Thomas N. Conrad was in Fairfax county, Virginia, August 1, 1837, and in the war between the States he was a soldier of Fitz Lee’s division, serving in the 3d Virginia Cavalry. His brother John S. was surgeon in Longstreet’s corps, and now president of a lunatic asylum near Baltimore. In King George county, Virginia, October 4, 1866, Thomas N. Conrad was united in marriage with Emma, daughter of William Broomefield Ball and Fannie (Rawlins) Ball. She was born in King George county, July 23, 1845, and her parents are no longer living. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad were born: Thomas N., Jr., August 26, 1868; R. Heath, March 26, 1870; Emma L., November 4, 1871; Percy Ruggles, August 5, 1876; Lillie Wharton, October 8, 1878; Fairfax, April 2, 1880; Fannie B., March 10, 1883. Percy R. is deceased, the others still with their parents.

 

HARRISON CROCKETT- deceased- was born in Montgomery county, December 27, 1821, a son of Robert and Sarah (Harrison) Crockett, and he died in the service of the Confederacy, July 21, 1862, of brain fever, in the hospital at Louisa C.H. He was a descendant of one of the oldest families of Montgomery county, the Crockett family settling on South fork of Roanoke in 1740, without doubt the first family here. It was the grandfather of Harrison who made this settlement, and his father was born and died in this county. The wife of Harrison Crockett was Caroline, daughter of John and Nancy (Myers) Taylor. She was born in Montgomery county, December 8, 1830, and is no longer living. Their marriage was solemnized in this county, August 7, 1850, and their children were three sons and one daughter; George W., born July 23, 1851, lives in Byrne, Texas; John R., born November 28, 1852, and James H., born October 14, 1856, live in this county and Alleghany district; Mary E., born February 18, 1856, lives at Sinks Grove, Monroe county, West Virginia. This sketch is compiled for John R. Crockett, who is one of the prosperous young farmers of the county, conducting a large estate for his aunts. His address is Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES LEWIS DAMARON- was born December 12, 1840, in Greenbrier county, (now) West Virginia, a son of Joseph and Margaret (Dey) Damaron, who are no longer living. He served eighteen months in the Confederate army, a member of Company E, 69th Virginia Infantry, and was a participant in the battles of Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor and Fraziers Farm. At Port Republic, Rockingham county, Virginia, April 26, 1864, he was joined in wedlock with Sarah C.T. Allen who was born in Page county, Virginia, February 27, 1843. John and Sarah Catharine (Palmer) Allen were her parents, both now deceased. The children of Charles L. Damaron and wife were born as follows: Mattie A.B., January 17, 1865, in Bridgewater, Rockingham county; Annie A.P., October 23, 1867, in Bath county, Virginia; Ella K.G., August 15, 1871, in Botetourt county, Virginia; Carrie Allen, May 9, 1876, died July 12th following; Ida Newton, December 12, 1878, in Union, Monroe county, West Virginia; Charles Marvin, December 21, 1882, in Christiansburg, Charles Lewis Damaron joined the Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church (South) at Bridgewater, Rockingham county, March 6, 1864. He entered in 1881 on his ministry with the people of that church in Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

EDWARD THOMAS DOOLEY- was born in Bedford county, Virginia, October 16, 1843, and on the 5th of December, 1844, his parents Obediah and Sarah (Francis) Dooley, made their home in Montgomery county. In this county he grew to manhood, and at the age of twenty went into the army to fight in the battles of Virginia. He enlisted in September, 1863, Company K, 21st Virginia Cavalry, McCausland’s brigade, as a private, was elected corporal, and afterward promoted to sergeant, serving till the close of the war. In Montgomery county, September 2, 1868, E.T. Dooley and May J. Showalter were united in marriage. The bride was a daughter of Philip and Mary Ann Showalter, and was born in Montgomery county, January 14, 1847. E.T. Dooley owns a farm near Alleghany Springs, and is devoting it to the raising of stock, grain and tobacco. He is also one of the proprietors of the Elliott Fleming Mills at Alleghany Springs. He receives his mail at Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ARTHUR BRUCE DUNDAS- is a native of Scotland, a son of Lieutenant Colonel Dundas, late of the British army, and now deceased, and Isabella (Moir) Dundas, whose home is still in Scotland. Lord Zetland, Lieutenant George Dundas, from Perthshire, Scotland, and formerly of the British arm, has lately settled in Montgomery county, and is a brother of Arthur Bruce Dundas. He married Miss Davidson, of Tullock Castle, Scotland. Arthur Bruce Dundas has a farm in Blacksburg district, and is the owner of Goodall and Fanny Gray, who have made their record on the turf. His postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

DAVID EDMUNDSON- was born at Pentland, on the north fork of the Roanoke, in Montgomery county, April 11, 1829. He was a son of Henry A. Edmundson, who came from Pennsylvania to Montgomery county in 1800, and Marie Antoinette (Radford) Edmundson, who came here from Richmond in 1820. At Belmont, Montgomery county, David Edmundson was united in marriage with Mary B., daughter f John R. and Mary S. (Beale) Richardson. Her birth was in Roanoke county, Virginia. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Edmundson are three: Marie Antoinette, born June 13, 1866; Granville E., December 15, 1868; Annie Beale, December 29, 1870. In 1861 David Edmundson went into the Confederate army with rank of captain, commanding Company B, 4th Virginia Infantry, Colonel James F. Preston, and the regiment a part of the famous "Stonewall Brigade". Captain Edmundson’s company in the first battle of Manassas sustained a loss of nineteen killed and wounded out of thirty-three. His nephew, James P. Logan, was killed in that battle. At the close of the war, by well-earned promotions, Captain Edmundson had been advanced in rank, and was holding commission of lieutenant-colonel of 21st Virginia Cavalry. Since the war his time has been given entirely to the cultivation of his estate in Alleghany district. Big Spring, Montgomery county, Virginia, is his address.

 

WILLIAM MUNFORD ELLIS-was born in Richmond City, October 15, 1846, a son of Powhatan Lewis Ellis and Elvira Henry (Munford) Ellis. His father died when he was very young and his mother married again, and in 1853 came to make her home in Montgomery county, bringing him with her. He grew to manhood in this county, and at the age of seventeen years was in the Confederate service, acting as adjutant of the 4th Virginia Reserves, Colonel Robert T. Preston. He took part in the battle of Cloyd Mountain, May 9, 1864, and the battle of the Salt Works, in the fall of 1864. At Walnut Grove estate, this county, October 12, 1870, he was united in marriage with Margaret Kent Langhorne, and their four children were born: Nannie Kent, November 13, 1871, lives in Lynchburg; Elvira Munford, June 10, 1874; Margaret Langhorne, September 26, 1875; William Munford, Jr., June 27, 1879–these three with their father. The wife of Mr. Ellis was born in Roanoke county, Virginia, August 16, 1853, a daughter of John Archer Langhorne and Margaret (Kent)Langhorne. She was six years old when her parents made their home in Montgomery county. She died in Lynchburg, May 12, 1882, and was brought to her home in Montgomery county for burial. William M. Ellis is one of the farmers of Alleghany district, and has his postoffice address at Shawsville, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ALLEN T. ESKRIDGE-was born April 24, 1844, in Fincastle, county seat of Botetourt county, Virginia, and accompanied his parents, Alexander P. and Juliet G. Eskridge, on their settlement in Montgomery county in 1848. He entered the Confederate army as a private, served two and one-half years, and became sergeant-major of the 25th Virginia Cavalry. April 27, 1870, he was united in marriage with Ellen M. Edmundson, who was a daughter of Hon. Henry A. and Mary Edmundson, her mother now deceased. Henry E., first child of Mr. and Mrs. Eskridge, was born April 27, 1871, and is deceased. They have three sons: Allen T., born March 15, 1873; Alex, P., October 23, 1874; S. Lewis, February 22, 1877. Allen T. Eskridge is engaged in farming, with postoffice address at Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES TRIGG ESKRIDGE- is one of the farming residents of Christiansburg district, and was born in Montgomery county. His birth was on the 22d of July, 1852, and he is a son of Alexander P. and Juliet G. (Taylor) Eskridge. His parent, many years residents in this county, are now deceased. His brother Allen served with honor in the army of Virginia during the years of the war between the States. Charles T. Eskridge may be addressed at Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

GEORGE R. EVANS- who has been a magistrate of Montgomery county for over twenty years and is still efficient incumbent of the office, was born and wedded in this county. His birth was on the 18th of July, 1811, and his parents are John and Mary (Rutledge) Evans. He married Ellen E. Wall, born in Montgomery county, a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Lore) Wall, their marriage solemnized on the 3d of May, 1840. Their children are two daughters and two sons: Mary E. and Olevia J.; James L. and George F. The parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Evans died in this county, after long and useful lives here. George R. Evans’s postoffice address is Prices Forks, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JONATHAN TOSH EVANS-practicing physician and surgeon in Montgomery county for half a century, was born in this county May 9, 1816. John Evans, his father, came from Botetourt county and settled on the North Fork of Roanoke River, about 1802, and subsequently formed the acquaintance of and married Mary, daughter of George Rutledge, her father the cousin of the Edward Rutledge of South Carolina, who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. George Rutledge, of Montgomery county, was one of the pioneers here, and defended the early settlement from the ravages of the savage foe. He was once wounded in an encounter with the Indians, and was about to be left for dead when his comrades discovered that there was hope of saving him, bore him away and cared for him till his recovery. John Evans, father of Jonathan T., was one of those sturdy pioneers to whose energy and ability in redeeming the wilderness Montgomery county owes its present greatness. He reared a family of thirteen children, bestowing upon them the best education the times afforded, and all are now filling responsible positions in society. Jonathan T. Evans married Catharine Trigg in Montgomery county, October 10, 1865, and their children are two sons: Archer P., born July 17, 1866; Allen D., July 29, 1868. The parents of Mrs. Evans were Thomas C. and Catharine (Craig) Trigg, early settlers of Montgomery county, and she was born here December 22, 1831. Dr. Evans’ postoffice address is Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

GEORGE WASHINGTON FAGG- is a son of William and Harriet (Rock) Fagg, his mother now deceased. He was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, June 11, 1834, and made his home in Montgomery county in 1857. In 1859, in Montgomery county, on the 8th of March, Harriet Kirby became his wife. She was born in this county, October 4, 1836, and her parents, now deceased, were James and Mary (Fisher) Kirby. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Fagg are: William Kirby, James Jackson (who lives in Dallas, Texas), Charles Floyd, Ed. Stevens, Robert Lee, Mary E., George W. , Jr., deceased; Ellen E. George W. Fagg has been thirteen years sheriff of Montgomery county. He was in Arkansas at the outbreak of the civil war, and his oldest son was born in that State. Mr. Fagg at once enlisted, joining Company B, 1st Arkansas Cavalry, McCullough’s brigade, Van Dorn’s division. He was a participant in the engagement of Wilsons Creek, in Missouri, where forty-three of his company were killed and wounded, and 156 killed of the regiment. He was transferred to the 27th Virginia Cavalry, and came back to Virginia by way of Kentucky. His command was then engaged in Alabama, and again returned to Virginia. He was three times wounded in the service, at Frederick City, Maryland; at Fishers Hall, Virginia, and at Christiansburg. He was promoted to first lieutenant in 1862, and was most of the time in command of his company. He captured thirty-four Yankees by himself in Tennessee. He is now a farmer of Christiansburg district, with postoffice address at Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOHN W. FARMER, M.D.- of Montgomery county, is a graduate of University of Maryland, in 1868, and of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1875. He is a son of William and Martha W. (Melton) Farmer, and was born in Pulaski county, Virginia, December 21, 1843. His grandfather was born in what is now Auburn district, Montgomery county, and Dr. Farmer cast his fortunes in with the people here in 1876. He was a soldier of the Confederate army, enlisting in Company F., 54th Virginia Infantry, was promoted first to sergeant and afterwards to first lieutenant, and adjutant in Company K, 63d Virginia Infantry. He was prevented from serving as lieutenant by a bullet in the right shoulder, received in battle at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The wound was at first considered mortal. In Pulaski county, December 23, 1872, he married Flora E. Welch, who was born in Kanawha county, (now) West Virginia, May 22, 1849. Isaac A. and Mary (Snyder) Welch, her parents, made their home in Montgomery county in 1874. The children of Dr. and Mrs. Farmer are five: William W., born May 2, 1874; Ernest, July 19, 1876; Mary M., April 17, 1878; Raymond L., January 3, 1880; Susan E., March 1, 1882. Dr. Farmer’s postoffice address is Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS M. FRANCIS- is a son of Miles Francis, who came to Montgomery county about 1806, and here married Melvina L. Simpkins. Their son, Thomas M., was born in this county, near Christiansburg, on the 28th of February, 1846, and on the 26th of March, 1884, in Wythe county, this State, he was united in wedlock with Sallie R., daughter of John C. and Margaret E. (Sharitz) Brown, residents of Wythe county. He had five brothers who were soldiers of the Confederate army: Miles A. and S.W.H. in the 11th Virginia Infantry: Miles A. received commission of captain during his service; one brother was captain 63d Virginia Infantry; one served in an artillery company from Giles county, and the fifth was in the 14th Virginia Cavalry. Thomas M. Francis is a farmer of Christiansburg district, and his post office address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

MICHAEL GIBSON-son of John and Elizabeth (Kinser) Gibson was born in Auburn district, Montgomery county, September 5, 1837. His father was born in this county, and his mother has lived here since infancy. His grandfather was of Scotch descent and came to Montgomery county in the early days of its settlement, marrying a Miss McDowell, from Pennsylvania. Michael Gibson was in the Confederate service during the civil war, and had two brothers who served in the same army. At the residence of the bride’s parents, in this county, March 21, 1866, Michael Gibson was united in marriage with Mary C. Harmon, who was born in Christiansburg district, December 5, 1844, a daughter of John and Mary C. (Hall) Harmon. Her parents were natives of Montgomery county. Mr. Gibson is a farmer of Auburn district, and in his home are the eleven children of his marriage. Norwood, born March 26, 1867; Annettie E.L., May 8, 1868; Minnie S., June 8, 1869; Allie N., December 11, 1870; Effie Julia, April 4, 1874; Ethel Bell, May 4, 1875; Herbert M., April 10, 1877; Mary Blanche, September 23, 1878 ; Gillie K., April 14, 1880; Bleatie D., August 30, 1881; Frederick D.G., October 10, 1883. Mr. Gibson has been three years magistrate and school trustee since 1879. His postoffice address is Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS GIBSON, M.D.- son of John and Elizabeth (Kinser) Gibson, was born in Montgomery county, Virginia, December 18, 1840, and married in Campbell county, at the residence of the bride’s parents, George Creasey and Malinda (Arthur) Creasey, to Emma M. Creasey and to them have been born: Ada Lena, February 17, 1869, died February 2, 1883; Eusepius Emmet, July 27, 1871; Cela Thomas, March 14, 1875; Tinie Nestor, November 5, 1877; Piner Edgar, May 20, 1880. Dr. Gibson’s father was born in 1800m and came to this county when a child, and died in 1865; his mother was born in 1802 in Montgomery county, where she still lives. Mrs. Gibson’s parents were born in Bedford county. Thomas Gibson enlisted at the beginning of the ar in Company F, 11th Virginia Infantry, and was promoted to color bearer, but being unable to serve on account of ill health, was honorably discharged after serving two months and twenty-seven days. Dr. Gibson began the study of his profession under Dr. Sheltman, of Christiansburg, with whom he spent one year previous to the war. After leaving the army he again applied himself to his studies, this time under the tutorage of Dr. James P. Hammett, and he had the good fortune to be permitted to use the libraries of Drs. Radford and Figgat. Dr. Gibson’s postoffice address is Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS M. GIBSON- is a native of Tennessee, born July 30, 1852, a son of George W. and Nancy (McCauley) Gibson. His mother is living in Washington county, Tennessee, and his father is deceased. At Wytheville, county seat of Wythe county, Virginia, Thomas M. Gibson married Alice Reed, and they have four children: Nannie, William, Jeb S., and Sallie S. Alice , daughter of Gustavus and Nancy (Harold) Reed , was born in Wytheville, and her parents are both deceased. In 1873 Mr. Gibson made his home in Montgomery county, and he is living in Blacksburg, and is engineer at the Blacksburg College.

 

EMMET FLETCHER GILL- son of Edward B. and Mary A. (Fraser) Gill, was born at Petersburg, Virginia, February 20, 1841. He served one year in Company I, 6th Virginia infantry, and was promoted to adjutant of the 8th Virginia battalion of infantry for gallant conduct at Seven Pines, May 31, 1862. In February, 1863, he was transferred to the navy; was in the naval engagements of James river, and surrendered with Admiral Semmes, April 26, 1865. He was shipmate of gallant Joe Gardner, of Montgomery county, and shared with him in several severe naval engagements. His brother, Edwin J. Gill, was killed at the capture of the United States steamer "Underwriter", at Newbern, North Carolina, February 2, 1864. In Petersburg, November 22, 1870, Emmet F. Gill and Mrs. Julia A. (Brown) Jackson were united in marriage. Their son, Emmet F., was born in 1871 ,. And lived only nine months. Their daughter, Emma Dora, was born August 18, 1873. The wife of Mr. Gill was born in Petersburg, September 26, 1836, a daughter of Daniel and Ann (Gill) Brown. In 1870 Mr. Gill made his home in Montgomery county, and he is master mechanic at the central shops of the N. & W.R.R. At the May election of 1883 he was elected justice of the peace, and on the 1st of July, 1883, was appointed notary public by Governor Cameron. Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia, is the postoffice address of Emmet F. Gill.

 

EPHRAIM C. GRAYSON- is a grandson of William Grayson, one of the pioneers of Montgomery county, and lives on the homestead which was once his grandfather’s residence, and has never since been out of the family. He was born in Pulaski county, Virginia, August 9, 1849, a son of Crockett and Louisa J. (Ward) Grayson. His parents are no longer living. His father was a soldier of the Confederacy, and severely wounded in the first Manassas battle, in the arm, leg and head. Ephraim C. served in the last two years of the war, and was a soldier of experience before reaching his sixteenth year. He took part in the battles of Cloyd Mountain, Frederick City, Martinsburg, North Mountain, and others. In Montgomery county, February 24, 1870, he was united in marriage with Ellie R. Epperly, and they have one son, Frank E., born July 29, 1872. She was a daughter of Philip Epperly, now deceased, and was born in Floyd county, Virginia, in 1847. Her mother, whose maiden name was Shelor, is also deceased. Ephraim C. Grayson is engaged in milling, and his postoffice address is Snowville, Pulaski county, Virginia, but his residence and his business in Auburn district, Montgomery county.

JOHN C. GRISSOM- was born in Montgomery county, and is one of the substantial farming residents of Blacksburg district. William and Mary (Robison) Grissom, now both deceased, were his parents, and he married Hannah M. Trout, who was born in Roanoke county, April 11, 1833. His birth was on the 18th of March, 1832, and their son William B.F. was born April 8, 1865. Mrs. Hannah Grissom was a daughter of George and Mary (Miller) Trout. Her parents are no longer living. John C. Grissom served four years in the Confederate army, in Company C, 54th Virginia Infantry two years, and two years in Company D, 61st Virginia Infantry. He was in battles of Frankfort and Big Sandy (Kentucky), Princeton, (West Virginia), Chickamauga (Tennessee), and in the campaigns through Alabama and Georgia. His brother, Dr. W.W. Grissom, graduated from the medical college in St. Louis, Missouri, and was four years health officer in St. Louis. He was surgeon in the Confederate army under General Price, and is now settled in Los Angeles, California. John C. Grissom’s occupation is farming, his address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ABRAHAM GROSS- was a son of George and Joanna (McCoy) Gross, who were born, raised and married and who died in Bedford county, Virginia. His birth was in Bedford county, October 20, 1823 the date, and his home has been in Montgomery county since March 15, 1853. In Bedford county, November 25, 1851, he married Martha J. Cundiff, and their children were born: Lucy A., September 6, 1852; George T., October 28, 1853; James M., June 16, 1855; Sallie J., July 30, 1857; Abraham F., January 14, 1861; Josie J., May 30, 1853; Delia S., May 2, 1865;Oscar D., April 4, 1867; Bettie T., May 24, 1869; John H.L., December 27, 1874. James M. died February 18, 1869, Lucy A. lives at Alleghany Springs and the others at Big Springs, this county. The wife of Mr. Gross was a daughter of James and Jane A. (Beckner) Cundiff who came to Bedford county from Albemarle county, Virginia. She was born in Bedford county, January 4, 1828. Abraham Gross enlisted April 23, 1861, in the Confederate army, was in the first Manassas battle, the battle of Cedar Run, and others, and received honorable discharge August 30, 1863. His brother G.W. was a soldier of Virginia, and twice wounded, at Malvern Hill battle and at Chancellorsville. Abraham Gross owns 380 acres of good land, adapted to raising grain and stock, his farm lying two miles southeast of Big Spring. He hauled from the Peaks of Otter two pieces of granite now in the Washington monument at Richmond. Big Spring Depot, Montgomery county, Virginia, is his post office address.

 

WILLIAM G. GUERRANT- son of John r. and Octavia (Gibson) Guerrant, was born at Ash Grove, Franklin county, Virginia, February 19, 1829. In 1856 her made his home at Pilot in Montgomery county, where his grandfather had settled in 1802. When was between the States was inaugurated, William G. Guerrant was in Arkansas, and was elected captain of a company. He soon resigned to return and share the fortunes of his native State. He joined his company at Winchester, and with it participated in the first Manassas battle. He was directed by Governor Letcher to take command of the 75th Virginia Infantry, with which he served till it disbanded. He then served under General Heth as aide on the staff of Colonel King, commanding the artillery department of the Army of Western Virginia. He was detailed by General Loring recruiting officer, and in West Virginia and Kentucky raised a battalion, of which he was appointed major. The command was captured at Pikeville, Kentucky, and taken to Camp Chase. After exchange they returned to the field of action, and after six months further service, Major Guerrant resigned and joined the Otey battery of Richmond, with which he served till the close of the war. He had one brother, Peter M., in the Confederate army. September 5, 1867, William G. Guerrant and Bettie Porter Miller were united in marriage, and the children of their union were born: Willy M., June 8, 1868; Hugh C., January 22, 1870; Constance L., February 23, 1871; Edward Heath, April 17, 1873; John g., January 20, 1875; Sallie A., September 26, 1876. Edward Heath is deceased. The wife of Mr. Guerrant was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, January 25, 1830, a daughter of William H.J. and Mary J. (Guerrant) Miller. She came with her parents to Montgomery county in 1865. William G. Guerrant’s postoffice address is Pilot, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

DAVID P. HALL- is a son of David and Elizabeth (Pate) Hall, and was born in Montgomery county in 1819. His first wife was Henrietta Adams, and their children were Wilber, John, Burmen and Robert, all deceased. Henrietta Hall departed this life November 23, 1868. In Floyd county, Virginia, he married Elizabeth Howard, who was born in that county, a daughter of Colonel Joe Howard, now deceased. Two children, Eugene and Eulala, brighten their home. During the war David P. Hall was one year a magistrate of Montgomery county. He owns a fine farm in Auburn district, and receives his mail at Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

GORDON F. HALL- has been a resident of Montgomery county since his birth here in 1816, and is a farmer of Auburn district. His parents were David and Elizabeth (Pate) Hall, his mother born in Montgomery county, and his father coming here from Durbin county, New York, about 1792. The first wife of G.F. Hall was Theodocia Peterman, and their children were seven: James M., born December 20, 1840, was hospital steward during the civil war, and died January 27, 1865; Susan E., born November 1, 1842, died October 15, 1882, Henry C., born November 8, 1844, enlisted at seventeen years of age, and served through the war, a member of Captain William Smith’s company, Jenkins’ cavalry; Mary Jane, born November 23, 1846; Sarah C., January 3, 1849; Quintius C., April 9, 1852, died May 12, 1883; Theodocia A., February 26, 1853, died July 8, 1875. January 4, 1854, G.F. Hall was united in marriage with Minerva Sled, daughter of Josiah and Rebecca (Evans) Sled, of Campbell county, Virginia. She was born in Campbell county, Virginia, December 8, 1826, and their children were born: Don F., March 28, 1856; David H., June 15, 1859; Lunda, February 27, 1865. David H. is at home, the others live in Montgomery county. In 1838 G.F. Hall was elected captain in the State militia, and held the rank fourteen years. He was elected magistrate in May, 1883, for two years. His address is Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOHN W. HALL- was born September 21, 1860, on the farm he now lives on, four miles south of Alleghany Springs, on the South fork of Roanoke river, land taken up by Luke Munsey, in 1763, under patent from his majesty George III, of England. The great grandfather of John W. Hall was Jesse Hall, who came from New York to settle on the South fork of Roanoke about 1790. William M. Hall, J.W. Hall’s fathers, was born in Indiana, and he lived on the farm now owned by John W. He came here about 1821, and married Nancy Light, daughter of John and Polly Light. In Jonesboro, Tennessee, July 30, 1883, John W. Hall was united in marriage with Susie J. Dickerson. The bride was a daughter of Samuel C. and Rebecca J. (Brattin) Dickerson, of Russell county, Virginia, and was born in Russell county, March 14, 1854. The Jesse Hall who founded the family in Montgomery county was a soldier of distinction in the war for Independence. John W. Hall’s land consists of 600 acres, fine tobacco land, and well adapted to raising stock and grain. His postoffice address is Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS B. HALL- farmer and stock-raiser of Auburn district, Montgomery county, was born in this county April 5, 1825, a son of Asa and Martha (Crandall) Hall. His first marriage was with Catherine Lucas, who bore him seven children: Eveline, Rebecca (killed by a cow), Asa, Samuel D., Martha (deceased), Joseph, George and Sarah. In Montgomery county, November 2, 1865, Thomas B. Hall married Rebecca J., daughter of William and Margaret (Butts) Kelley. She was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, and her parents are no longer living. Of the last union their only child is a boy, J. Emory W. Hall, born February 12, 1860, who is at present attending Milligan College in Carter county, Tennessee. Two brothers of Mrs. Hall were in the Confederate service. Shannon F. Kelley was in an artillery company and was killed in North Carolina; William H. Kelley was in a Tennessee Cavalry company, was captured and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, and confined there for more than a year. After his release he accompanied an uncle to Missouri where in a few weeks he died of pneumonia. Mr. Hall’s parents are also deceased. During the war between the States he was on detached service for the Confederate government, making powder. His postoffice address is Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM G. HALL- born in Augusta county, Virginia, February 19, 1822, was a son of Cornelius and Susanna (Weigh) Hall, now both deceased. He served in the war between the States, and his military record is embodied in the Montgomery county record of soldiers in this work. In this county, December 19, 1866, he was united in marriage with Mrs.Emeline (Owens) Bane. Her birth was in Roanoke county, Virginia, September 29,1836 the date, and David and Rachel (Henry) Owens her parents. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Hall are one son and one daughter: Harvey T., born April 8, 1869; Lizzie Hart, April 2, 1876. Their first-born was a daughter, Maggie S., born September 27, 1876, lived only six months. An infant son, born in March 1873, died when a few days old. William G. Hall is owner of a farm in Blacksburg district, on which he resides, and has served in his district twelve year as justice of the peace. Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia, is his postoffice address.

 

JOSEPH HAMILTON HARMAN- born at Cedar Hill, Montgomery county, in 1841, was a son of Joseph Harman, who was born in this county and was the son of one of its pioneer settlers, his father coming from England, and settling first in Shenandoah county, then, in 1797, coming to Montgomery county. Joseph Harman married Hannah Vickers, who came to this county in 1806. The marriage of Joseph Harman was solemnized in Wythe county, Virginia, in 1871, and his wife was born in that county in 1844, Cynthia R., Daughter of James D. and Nancy (Sayers) Calfee. Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Harman are the parents of: Molly E., born June 24, 1872; Nannie K., March 27, 1874; John W., August 5, 1875; Davis M., July 8, 1878; Albert P., August 2, 1881; James Boyd, May 19, 1883. Joseph Hamilton Harman volunteered in the army of Virginia in August, 1861, and served in Company F, 11th Virginia Infantry, Picket’s division, Longstreet’s corps, will he was wounded in action in February, 1864, and was obliged to suffer the amputation of his arm in consequence. Mary (Harman) Holly, an aunt of J.H. Harman, was killed by her dress becoming entangled in the tumbling rod of a thresher in 1868. He is a farmer of Auburn district, with postoffice address at Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

LYCURGUS HARMAN- brother of Taylor Harman, whose sketch follows this, was born March 4, 1851. In this county on the 8th day of January, 1884, he was joined in wedlock with Nettie G., daughter of William H. and Bettie (Kipps) Linkous. The parents of Mrs, Lycurgus Harman are both deceased, her mother dying in 1883, and her father in 1884. John M. Linkous, brother of Mrs. Harman, served in the Confederate army during the war. Lycurgus Harman has been thus far in his life engaged in the pursuits of agriculture. His address, Vicars Switch, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

TAYLOR HARMAN-born in Montgomery county, September 25, 1850, is a farmer of this county, and a grandson of one of the earliest settlers here. His father was John Harman, who died in 1860, and his mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Hall, is still living in this county. His brother Milton held a captains commission in the Confederate service, 6th Virginia Infantry, and was killed in the battle of Chancellorsville, May 8, 1863. He had two other brothers in the service, Hannibal, who fought through the entire conflict unharmed, and David who was discharged from the service for disability. Taylor Harman’s postoffice address is Vickers Switch, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES A. HEERMANS- son of Sylvanus and Martha M.(Thorp) Heermans, was born in Lucerne county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1843. He has been many years a resident of Virginia, and served in the Confederate army, 15th Virginia Infantry, and had two brothers, Edgar and Nile, in the same army. Their father was a soldier of the Federal army. The first wife of Charles A. Heermans was Corley M. Haney, and their children were three: Hattie born March 14, 1870; A. Winton, February 21, 1872; Lewis E., March 28, 1875. In Pulaski county, Virginia, March 10, 1880, Corintha A. Roberts became the wife of Mr. Heermans, and their son, Charles M., was born in the 18th of May, 1883. Corintha A., daughter of Samuel P. and Sarah (Crowell) Roberts, was born in Pulaski county, in October, 1858. Her father is no longer living. Charles A., Herrmans established the Virginia People, in 1872, in Pulaski county, and in 1875 he established the Scott Banner, in Scott county. In 1882 he cast his fortunes in with the people of Montgomery county, and became editor and publisher of the Blacksburg News.

 

WILLIAM F. HENDERSON, M.D.- born in Montgomery county, was a son of natives of this county, Francis and Nannie (Brown) Henderson. His mother is no longer living. T.J. Henderson, his brother, was a soldier of the Virginia army in the war between the States. William F. Henderson is established in practice as a physician and surgeon in Blacksburg, which is his postoffice address.

B.W. HINES, M.D.- was born in Rockbridge county, a son of Michael N. and Agnes V. (Matthews) Hines, who in 1858 took up their residence in Montgomery county. He was one of five brothers who entered the Confederate service; Robert, who served in the 11th Virginia Infantry, and was killed at the battle of Seven Pines, May 31, 1862; George, who was in Edgar’s battalion, and was twice wounded; John, who served in Morgan’s command, and was killed at Cynthiana, Kentucky; William, who served two years; and B.W., who was twice wounded, July 3, 1863, and again at Drewrys Bluff, May 16, 1864. B.W. Hines was postmaster at Newport, Giles county, in 1853, and in 1865 settled in practice in Montgomery county. In Floyd county, Virginia, April 25, 1866, he was united in marriage with Annie M. Evans, and they are the parents of three daughters and seven sons: Sally, Edmonia, Robby, Norris, Oscar, Brainard, Richard; Edward and William, who are twins, and Charlotte, a bright, beautiful child, who died in her seventh month. Samuel and Sallie(Jackson) Evans, who settled in Floyd county, in January, 1848, were the parents of Annie M., wife of Dr. Hines, and she was born in Floyd County, in January, 1844. Mrs. Hines is a sister of Dr. Samuel T. Evans, a prominent physician of Tennessee, and William M. Evans, who at his death stood high among the members of the bar at Portland, Oregon. Dr. Hines has a very large practice and many warm friends among his patrons and acquaintances. His residence and postoffice address are at Pilot, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JAMES HUMPHRIES- is a son of Reuben Humphries, who was born in Hanover county, Virginia, and in 1820 went to Roanoke county, Virginia, where he married Mary (Then Polly) Smith, February 22, 1823. She was born in Roanoke county, September 22, 1804. Reuben Humphries was s son of Jesse Humphries, and served in the 1812 war. James Humphries was born in Roanoke county, April 10, 1824 and made his home in Montgomery county in 1842. In this county, May 9, 1853, Eliza Jane Lore became his wife. She departed this life in 1877. Their children are three living, two deceased: Rhoda V., born March 24, 1854, died May 18, 1855; James M., October 7, 1855; Ella G., September 16, 1861; Isaac W., February 15, 1865; John W., September 18, 1868, died December 2, 1869. James Humphries enlisted in October, 1864 in the 4th Virginia Infantry, and served until Lee’s surrender. He was in the hospital at Staunton for more than a month suffering with pneumonia. In 1865 he was elected justice of the peace in Alleghany district, and served two years. His occupation is farming, his address is Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ELISHA JOHNSON- physician, merchant and farmer of Auburn district, was born in Campbell county, Virginia, September 21, 1834, and settled in Montgomery county in 1878. His wife, Sarah E. (Holland) Johnson was born in Franklin county, Virginia, May 8, 1839, at which place she was married to Mr. Johnson September 24, 1856. The dates of the birth of their children are as follows: Sarah Ann (Childress), born July 31, 1857; John S., July 16, 1859, deceased; James A., February 8, 1861; Albert S., August 27, 1863; Mary E., August 11, 1865; Franklin E., December 23, 1867; Robert L., February 14, 1870, deceased; William T., October 29, 1871; Edward E., March 1, 1874; Charles A., October 23, 1876; Thomas H., May 4, 1879, and Walter, born March 7, 1884. John Holland and Sarah W. (Holland) Holland, the parents of Mrs. Johnson, lived and died in Franklin county, Virginia. Dr. Johnson’s parents, John C. Johnson and Sarah A. (Whitten) Johnson, are buried in Campbell county, in which county they had always lived. Dr. Johnson was elected township supervisor of Tazewell county, Virginia, for two terms f four years each, but tendered his resignation before the expiration of the last term. Thomas Johnson, brother of the doctor, entered the Confederate service from Texas, served three years and died in the hospital at Atlanta, Georgia. Mrs. Johnson’s brother, Thomas Holland, was killed near Appomattox C.H., about the time of Lee’s surrender. In 1870 Dr. Johnson became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church (South), and in the same year was licensed to preach in that faith; his wife is a devoted member of the same denomination. He receives his mail at Riner, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

GEORGE H. JUDKINS- is a New Englander b birth, born on the 13th of May, 1831, in New Hampshire. He was a son of Seth and Phebe (Abbott) Judkins, both now deceased. He has been many years a resident in Virginia, married in this State, in Campbell county, and followed the fortunes of the State in the civil war, serving three years in the Confederate army, 20th Virginia Battalion of heavy artillery. December 23, 1852, Martha C. Cochran became his wife, and joy and sorrow have visited the home established by their marriage. Five children have been born to them, and only one remains: Virginia L., born September 18, 1853, died October 15, 1860; George A., born May 6, 1855, died September 2d following; Eliza C. and Alice N., born April 29, 1857, both died in the same year, June 20 and June 24 respectively; William C., born July 22, 1858, is at home. George and Mary Ann (Burton) Cochran, both now deceased, were the parents of Martha C., wife of Mr. Judkins. She was born in Campbell county, May 29, 1834. George H. Judkins carries on a boot and shoe manufactory in Christiansburg, Montgomery county. He has been a resident of the county since 1879.

 

GEORGE M. KINZER- born in Montgomery county, February 6, 1836, has a fine farm in Blacksburg district, on which he resides with his wife and their six children. His wife was Eliza, daughter of George and Mary (Clemmer) Palmer, and she was born in Augusta County, Virginia, July 21, 1832. They were married in Salem, Roanoke county, October 13, 1859, and their children were born: James Walker, October 9, 1860; Charles Jackson, June 27, 1862; Maggie Lee, April 21, 1864; Franklin D., August 11, 1866; Mollie M. , August 5, 1868; Virginia Ellen, July 4, 1870. George and Margaret (Bane) Kinzer were the parents of George M. Both are deceased, as are the parents of his wife. He enlisted in October, 1864, in Company L, 4th Virginia Infantry, "Stonewall brigade", Ewell’s division, and was captured at the fall of Petersburg. His postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

SAMUEL KINZIE- is a native of Botetourt county, Virginia, born May 15, 1817. He has been a resident in Giles county a number of years, and was five years supervisor during the time. He took up his residence in Montgomery county in 1876, and is a farmer of Christiansburg district. His parents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Berry) Kinzie, have been many years dead, and his first wife, who was Mary A.D. Farrier, died June 7, 1867. The record of their children is: William C., Born October 22, 1843, died April 21, 1864; Robert N., born January 27, 1845. Lives in Giles county; Oscar V., June 16, 1847, lives in Giles county; Lewis D., October 11, 1849, lives in Indiana; Rufus M., January 27, 1852, lives in Craig county, Virginia; Charles W., October 8, 1854, died December 28, 1869; Amanda E., December 25, 1856; Permelia M., April 8, 1859; Harriet S., November 11, 1861; Samuel W., September 17, 1864; Mary A., April 25, 1867- the last five in Montgomery county. Robert N., Oscar V., and Amanda E. are married. William E., Robert N. and Oscar V. were soldiers in the Confederate army, and William died in the service. Samuel Kinzie was also a soldier for fifteen months of the war between the States. In Montgomery county, November 10, 1869, he married Sarah Walters, born in this county, February 14, 1826, and they have one daughter, Alice O., born May 18, 1871. Sarah Walters was a daughter of John and Nancy (Bishop) Walters, who are no longer living. Samuel Kinzie’s postoffice address is Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

HENRY E. LECKIE- son of Edgar J. and Jane (Snyder) Leckie, and a grandson of one of the first settlers in Montgomery county, was born in this county, June 20, 1854. His father was a soldier of the South during the entire four years of the war between the States, and died in 1871. His mother is still living in the county. July 27, 1880, Henry E. Leckie and Jennie Dodson were united in marriage, and their home is in Christiansburg. They have one daughter, Lula M., born January 20, 1881. Jennie, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Williams) Dodson, was born in Montgomery county, May 27, 1854. Her parents are still residents here. Henry E. Leckie is filling the office of town sergeant of Christiansburg.

 

JOHN LUCAS- was born in Montgomery county, on Wilson creek, December 13, 1807. Samuel and Catharine (Davis) Lucas were his parents, the former born in this county and the latter coming to make her home here when she was nine years old. The grandfather of John Lucas, also named John Lucas, came from Sinking creek, Giles county, to make his home in Montgomery county in 1775 or ‘76. He married Polly Wilson at the time of his settlement here. The country was then an unbroken forest for miles around and the present John Lucas remembers to have heard his father say that he has hunted rabbits on the present site of Christiansburg. On New river, Montgomery county, December 19, 1837, John Lucas was united in marriage with Agnes Brown. She was born in this county, September 23, 1811, daughter of Michael and Catharine (Black) Brown, who were raised in Montgomery county. The children of Mr. And Mrs. Lucas were born; Michael A., November 3, 1838; Samuel H., June 6, 1840; John B., November 9, 1841; Margaret V., January 25, 1844; Henrietta M., February 16, 1846; James C., February 28, 1848; Louisiana, April 20, 1851; William A.Q., March 6, 1853. The last named is deceased, as are the two oldest sons, who died in the army , and the others live in this county. Michael A. was a soldier of Company D, 63d Virginia Infantry, Reynold’s brigade, Stevenson’s division. He was wounded at Murfreesboro, December 7, 1864, and died of the wound April 7, 1865. Samuel H. served in Company F, 14th Virginia Cavalry. He was accidentally wounded at Peterstown, about December 1, 1863, from the effects of which he died December 9, 1863. John Lucas entered on the duties of magistrate in his district in 1852, discharging them for four years. He owns a farm in Auburn district, and receives his mail at Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOHN B. LYBROOK- born in Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia, August 9, 1865, is a son of John and Mary (Peery) Lybrook. He is editor of the Blacksburg Times, established October 12, 1882 (Democratic). At this date Mr.Lybrook is said to be the youngest active and managing editor in the State. His editorial pathway has not been strewn with roses, having once had his establishment blown up with powder by enemies incurred, it is said, by the conduct of his paper.

 

FLOYD F. McDONALD- is a son of Jonas McDonald, son of Joseph McDonald, son of Bryan McDonald, Jr., son of Bryan McDonald, who came from County Wicklow, Ireland, to Mill Creek Hundreds, New Castle, Delaware, in1689. Floyd F. was born in Montgomery county, July 26, 1819; is one of the farming residents in Blacksburg district. His mother’s name was Elizabeth (Foster) McDonald and she died in February, 1858, and his father died two years previous. His wife is Jane, daughter of Charles and Rhoda (McDonald) Black, now many years deceased, and she was born in Blacksburg, August 21, 1827. The marriage of Floyd F. McDonald and Jane Black was solemnized at Blacksburg on the 22d of November, 1849. Jonas Floyd, their first child, was born December 24, 1852, and died January 18, 1865. They have one son and three daughters, all at home; Ellen Taylor, born June 10, 1855; Charles Black, August 11, 1860; Virginia, June 5, 1863; Mary Edward, May 31, 1872. The family postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

W.C.G. MYERS-was born in Carter county, Tennessee, and wedded in Wythe county, Virginia. His parents, now both deceased, were Jacob and Louisa (Taylor) Myers, and he married Charlotte A., daughter of Clayton and Cassandra (Seager) Cook. He was born April 19, 1830, his wife was born August 27, 1835, and June 27, 1850, was their wedding day. They have eight children. James C., Jacob A., Cassandra L., Missouri l., David W., Eldred A., Roberta L. and Frank C., Cassandra L., James C., and David W. have their home in Lynchburg, Virginia, the others in Montgomery county. The birth of Mrs. Myers was in Wythe county; her father and mother are now deceased. Her father was killed in the battle of Wytheville, not as an enlisted soldier but as a citizen of the South, defending his home from invasion. In 1854, W.C.G. Myers came to Montgomery county, which has since been his home. He is a coal merchant and blacksmith, and he has served his district as road supervisor. His postoffice address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JAMES H. OTEY, M.D.- is a physician and farmer of Blacksburg district, and has lived in Montgomery county since September 1, 1859. He was born in Bedford county, Virginia, January 12, 1825, a son of Colonel Armistead and Sallie (Gill) Otey, now deceased. His marriage was solemnized in Montgomery county, May L. Kent here becoming his wife on the 23d of January, 1855. She was a daughter of James R. and Mary (Cloyd) Kent, and was born in Montgomery county, July 23, 1837. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Otey were born: Mary G., May 14, 1856; Cloyd, November 19, 1857; Lizzie K., April 16, 1859; James A., June 27, 1862; Lula P., June 2, 1871. Mary G. married R.M. Patterson, of Philadelphia, and her home is in that city. Two children were born of their union: Louise, March 22, 1880, died July 9th following: Robert, July 5, 1881, is also deceased. Mt. Otey’s other children live in Montgomery county, and Lizzie K. is the wife of Alex. Black. Dr. Otey began the study of his profession with his brother, John A., and attended the Hampden-Sidney College at Richmond, for three years, graduating in 1852. James H. Otey’s postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM H. PALMER- was born in Richmond, Virginia, October 9, 1835, a son of William and Elizabeth W.(Enders) Palmer. His father is no longer living. William H. made his home in Montgomery county in 1861, and was one of her soldiers in the war between the States, as his military record, elsewhere given, shows. In Montgomery county, November 26, 1856, William H. Palmer was united in marriage with Sarah E. Anness. She was born in Montgomery county, September 7, 1835, Edwin I. And Sarah E. (Peck) Anness, now deceased, her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer are the parents of: Lelia, born October 20, 1857; Florence, August 9, 1859, died October 2, 1861; Sallie P., September 24, 1863; Bessie Enders, November 16, 1861; Edwin A., November 15, 1865, William H., July 3, 1867; Harvey B., January 28, 1873, died February 13, 1873; Claudia M., April 24, 1876. Leila married Egbert G. Leigh, Jr., February 2, 1882, and they have one son, William H. Palmer Leigh. William H. Palmer is engaged in a manufacturing business in Richmond, and is president of a fire insurance company. His estate in Montgomery county is within one-half mile of Blacksburg, where he has one of the finest farms in the county, containing 650 acres. Two springs are on the land, one flowing into the tributaries of the Roanoke, the other into New river. He may be addressed at either Blacksburg or Richmond.

 

CHARLES D. PECK- is a son of John Peck, who died in 1849, and Elizabeth (Snyder) Peck, who died in 1856. He was born in Giles county, Virginia, October 28, 1819, and was married in Montgomery county, June 25, 1845. His wife was born in this county, Rachel H., daughter of William Thomas. Her birth was in 1828, and her parents are now both deceased. Her mother’s maiden name was Hoge. The death of her father occurred in 1863. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Peck were eleven: William T., Mattie M., and Sarah S., who are deceased; Mary E., Clara S., Fanny W., Rachel H.,Margaret B. and John K., who are at home; Julia J. (Ayer), who lives in Loudoun county, Virginia; Lucretia E., who is the wife of Dr. McClaugherty, lives in Mercer county, West Virginia, and has five children. Charles D. Peck was one year surveyor in Giles county, and in 1865 was elected to represent the county in the State legislature. He entered service at the beginning of the 1861 war as first lieutenant of Company F, 24th Virginia Infantry, Captain Eggleston, and in December of that year resigned his commission on account of injured eyesight, caused by doing picket duty for three successive nights without being relieved. The following summer he joined a company hastily made up in Giles county for the defense of Preston’s salt works. This company having disbanded he conducted a wagon train for General Echols to the Kanawha salt works in1863. In 1864 he joined Company G, 80th Virginia Infantry, and was with General Jubal Early in the Valley, remaining with this command till its capture between Fishersville and Waynesboro in 1865. Escaping he joined General Echols in another expedition to the salt works; returning from there the command was disbanded at the general surrender in 1865, at Big Spring, Montgomery county, Virginia. In 1870 he came to Montgomery, where he combines the conduct of a farm with surveying. He may be addressed at White Sulfur Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOSEPH E. PEPPER- son of John and Mary (Robertson) Pepper, and a descendant of two of the oldest families of Montgomery county, was born in this county, January 9, 1826. At Marion, Smyth county, Virginia, October 12, 1854, he married Emily F. Staley, and their children were born: Frank P., December 22, 1855; John W., April 23, 1858; Jesse N., February 14, 1859, died January 15, 1861; Georgia E., January 11, 1863; Alma J., February 13, 1867; Mary R., April 6, 1872; Pauline P., June 11, 1874. The wife of Mr. Pepper was born in Wythe county, Virginia, June 20, 1834, a daughter of Frank P. and Jane M. (Aker) Staley. She was fourteen years old when her parents settled in Smyth county, where her marriage occurred. The great grandfather of Joseph E., was Samuel Pepper, who settled, in 1735, in Montgomery county, north of Blacksburg, on the stream named in his honor, Peppers run. His widow lived to be nearly one hundred years old, and was then lost and died in the woods near Peppers Ferry, in Pulaski county. William, son of Samuel, settled at Big Spring, in Roanoke county, in 1754, was made prisoner in the French and Indian War, and never returned. Samuel Pepper, Jr., grandfather of Joseph E., married Anne Burke of Bedford county, Virginia, in 1764, and lived for a time in Montgomery county. They then settled in Pulaski county, where he died in 1804. Mary, mother of Joseph E., was born in Montgomery county, September 2, 1793, a daughter of Colonel James Robertson, who took up the land now owned by the subject of this sketch. It is 130 acres in Alleghany district, and in addition to its cultivation, Mr. Pepper has a custom grist mill and saw mill, doing good business, on South fork of Roanoke. He was commissioner of the revenue for Montgomery county, 1870-2, and has been supervisor of Alleghany district since 1879, His address is Big Spring Depot, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JACOB H. PERFATER- was born in Roanoke county, Virginia, May 30, 1841, and has lived in Montgomery county since he was five years of age. John and Sarah (Stover) Perfater, his parents, are no longer living. He enlisted in Montgomery county, at the outbreak of the war between the States, and served in Company L, 4th Virginia Infantry, the famous "Stonewall Brigade", till he lost an arm in the second Manassas battle, in 1863. His brother, James E., fell at the battle of Gaines Mills, June 27, 1862. In Montgomery county, December 29, 1870, Jacob H. Perfater and Eliza V. Hendricks were united in Marriage, and their children are five, born: Thomas T., February 12, 1872; Birdie N., September 12, 1875; Minnie M., August 24, 1877; Ida, May 23, 1879; Lloyd F., May 26, 1881. The wife of Mr. Perfater, who was born in Appomattox county, Virginia, is a daughter of Moses and Nancy (Asher) Hendricks. Her father is deceased, her mother living in Montgomery county. In this county, Mr. Perfater is carrying on the milling business, with postoffice address at Prices Fork, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

MRS. OCEANA S. POLLOCK- (nee Goodall)- was born in Columbus, Georgia, November 23, 1832, and is one of those exceptional women who are the product of the nineteenth’s century on American soil. She was educated in the Wesleyan Female College at Macon, Georgia, having been fully graduated at that institution in 1851. In 1852 she was married to the Rev. David Wilson Pollock, an eminent clergyman of the Methodists Episcopal Church ( south), who, having lost his health in the California Mission work, died in 1853. After the brief months of her wedded life were ended, she turned her energies and accomplishments to usefulness in the educational field. She taught successively in the following places, all in Alabama: Cunnynugges, Glenville, Auburn, and Montgomery. From the latter place, in 1870, she came to Christiansburgh, Virginia, and occupied the chair of English in the Montgomery Female College for four years, during which time Dr. S.K. Cox was president. In 186 she purchased the entire property, determining to devote her life and energy to the education and training of girls, by the establishment of a first-class girls’ school. Her success has been greater than her anticipations, but not beyond what she has merited. Beginning with seven pupils, she now has more applications than she can entertain, having limited her number to fifty boarding pupils. Mrs.Oceana S. Pollock, Christiansburgh, Montgomery county, Virginia, is her postoffice address.

HUGH CAPERTON PRESTON- was a son of Colonel James Francis Preston, who was a son of James Patton Preston, governor of Virginia, 1816-19. James Patton Preston was born at Smithfield, the family homestead, June 21, 1774, and was a Colonel in the 1812 war. The county of Preston in West Virginia, is named in his honor. A further sketch of him will be found in the department of "Eminent Virginians", in this work. His eldest son, William Ballard Preston, was born at Smithfield, November 29, 1805, was a lawyer by profession, was secretary of the navy under President Taylor, also United States commissioner to France. He was a member of the Confederate senate at his death. Robert Taylor Preston, second son of James Patton Preston, was born at Smithfield, May 2, 1809, was a farmer and a general of the militia before the late war, and in that war held the rank of colonel, commanding the 28th Virginia Regiment, serving through the war. James Francis Preston, third son, and father of Hugh C., was born at Smithfield, November 8, 1813. He was a lawyer by profession, was commonwealth attorney for Montgomery county, represented the county in the legislature, was captain of the company from this section which joined Colonel Hamtramck’s regiment and served through the war with Mexico; and went into the Confederate service as colonel of the 4th Virginia regiment, "Stonewall Brigade." his regiment capturing Rickett’s battery at the first Manassas battle. He was taken sick soon after, and died January 18, 1862. He married Sarah A. Caperton, daughter of Hugh Caperton, of Monroe county, (now) West Virginia, who still survives him, living in this county. Their son Hugh C., was born in Union, Monroe county, (then) Virginia, September 5, 1856, and is now a farmer of Blacksburg district, this county. At Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, he married Caroline, daughter of Dr. Robert Frederick and Caroline Marx (Barton) Baldwin. She was born in Winchester, Virginia, September 10, 1858, and her parents are no longer living. James Francis, born November 31, 1879, now deceased, and Robert Baldwin, born May 12, 1881, were the children of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh C. Preston. William Ballard Preston, brother of Hugh C., is commandant of cadets and professor of English literature in the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College at Blacksburg. He was born in this county, September 30, 1858. H.C. Preston’s postoffice address is Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

MICHAEL S. PRICE- was born August 23, 1852, in Montgomery county, a son of Noah and Catharine (Kipps) Price. His father belonged to Preston’s Reserves in the war of the States, and is now deceased; his mother is still living in Montgomery county. Michael S. Price is one of the enterprising business men of the day, conducting two mercantile establishments, one at Prices Form, and the other at Newport, Giles county, and making a business success of all he undertakes. He is making a specialty of the manufacture and sale of the "Brush Mountain Pebble Mill-Stones", of which shipments have been made to a number of States. Prices Fork, Montgomery county, Virginia, is his postoffice address.

PETER L. PRICE-born in Montgomery county, in 1829, and Cynthia Snyder, born in this county in 1827, were here united in marriage on the 1st of December, 1854. His father has been dead about thirty years, and his mother departed this life March 13, 1883,, at the advanced age of one hundred years and three days. The parents of Mrs. Price are deceased. He was a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Keister) Price, and his wife was a daughter of Michael and Ann (Davis) Snyder. During the war between the States, Peter L. Price was one of the soldiers of the Confederate army, serving in Benjamin Linkous’ company, 36th Regiment, Wharton’s division. When the war was ended he returned tot he farm life in which he was engaged when he went into the service of his State, and he still continues engaged in farming. His address is Prices Fork, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM T. PRICE- son of David and Eliza Jane (Fink) Price, now both deceased, was born in Montgomery county, June 2, 1846, and is the owner of a farming estate in Blacksburg district. He served in the war between the States, which was ended before he reached his twentieth year, as a member of the 23d Battalion, Wharton’s division, Echols’ brigade. In Montgomery county, June 4, 1873, Maggie E. Hawley became his wife and their son, Harvey Lee Price, was born March 18, 1874. Maggie E., daughter of Crockett and Elizabeth (Hornbarger) Hawley, was born in Montgomery county, January 19, 1850, and her parents have been many years honored residents here. William T. Price’s postoffice address is Prices Fork, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ALICE BURHART RINER- is a daughter of David and Margaret M. (Flagg) Riner, who came from Berkeley county, West Virginia, and made the home of their wedded life in Montgomery county in 1852. She was born in this county April 9, 1860,and is now one of the most successful teachers in this county. The brothers and sisters of Miss Alice B. Riner are George H., born September 10, 1849, lives in Kansas; Mary E., born September 2, 1851, died August 2, 1853; John D., November 9, 1853, died May 15, 1882; Martha J., November 28, 1855, married James H. Altizer, and lives in this county; William T., October 12, 1857, married Sarah Altizer, lives in Auburn, this county; Margaret C., married James J. Wall and lives in Montgomery county; Emma V., February 21, 1865; Lucy F. and David H., October 28, 1868. The parents of Miss Riner were born in Berkeley county, her father December 8, 1819, and her mother July 9, 1826. They were married in that county December, 1848, Rev. Philip Lipscombe officiating clergyman. After their marriage they resided in Berkeley till the flood of 1852 destroyed all their property. The postoffice address of Alice B. Riner is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

COLONEL CHARLES A. RONALD- is a son of William S. Ronald, who was a son of Andrew Ronald, who was a Royalist in the Revolutionary war, and was council for the crown in colonial times. William S. Ronald married Mary Crow, and both are now deceased. Their son Charles A. was born in Montgomery county, January 18, 1827, and on the 1st of June, 1859, he married Sallie McCulloch. They have one daughter, Mary N., born September 7, 1868. The wife of Colonel Ronald was born in Washington county, Virginia, in 1837, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Tilly) McCulloch. Her parents are no longer living. When Colonel Ronald was a boy of sixteen years, the war with Mexico occurred, and his father being opposed to the war he ran away and joined the company raised in Montgomery county by Captain James F. Preston. The company was part of the 1st Virginia Infantry, commanded by Colonel John F. Hamtramck, of which Randolph was lieutenant-colonel and General Jubal A. Early was major. The Montgomery company, 106 men, was said to have been the finest appearing in the service, few of its members under six feet. The services of Colonel Roland in the war between the States are recorded in the military history of Montgomery county. He is a lawyer by profession, and was commonwealth attorney, elected for four years, and when he had served two years sent to the house of delegates, where he represented Montgomery county four year, 1855-8. He again served in the sessions of 1874 and 1875. Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia, is his postoffice address.

 

ROBERT R. RYAN- son of William and Frances (Dillard) Ryan, who are now deceased, was born in Bedford county, Virginia, July 30, 1830. His brothers, White G. and James L. Ryan, who were soldiers of the Confederate army, were both wounded in the service. The parents of Robert R. Ryan came to Montgomery county when he was about three years old, and he grew to manhood in this county, and engaged in the avocation of farm life, now owning a farm in Alleghany district. In Montgomery county, December 10, 1868, he married Virginia K. Givens, and their children are nine: Sarah K. , born September 23, 1869; Mary F., August 27, 1870; John W., December 16, 1871; Charles D., August 1, 1873; Norval W., December 3, 1874; Byron D., February 19, 1876; Emma V., June 11, 1877; Maude G., March 24, 1879; Eva R., May 10, 1881. Charles T. died November 4, 1877, the others still at home. The wife of Mr. Ryan was a daughter of Elisha P. and Mary A., (Dudding) Givens, who live now in Roanoke county, Virginia, and she was born in Craig county, this State, April 15, 1841. Robert R Ryan’s postoffice address is Shawsville, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOHN DOKE SCOTT, M.D., D.D.S.- was born in Floyd county, Virginia, February 28, 1829, and is of Irish descent. His grandparents came from County Tyrone, Ireland, to settle in what is now Floyd county while its soil was yet disputed for by the savage and the white invaders. His first marriage was with Almira P. Kipps, and was solemnized March 8, 1853, in Mercer county,(now) West Virginia. She was born in Montgomery county, November 5, 1837, and died November 4, 1874. Their children were born: Evan Brown, May 27, 1854; Rosanna, September 24, 1856; Matthew Pendleton, January 4, 1860; Evelina, May 5, 1864; Sallie Lou, June 30, 1866; John Wesley, June 27, 1869. Evan Brown Scott was married in January, 1883, Evelina in September, 1882, and Rosanna on the 25th of June, 1883. The second wife of Dr. Scott was Margaret Virginia Lucas, born January 25, 1844. They were married August 26, 1875, and their children are: Walter Lucas, born October 7, 1876; Robert Mayo, January 15, 1878; China Agnes, May 5, 1879; Samuel Alexander, February 26, 1881; Hercules James, May 7, 1883. Dr. Scott had three brothers in the Confederate army, Robert, Mark and Hercules. Hercules was captain of Company G, 24th Virginia Infantry, and was twice wounded, at Manassas and at Gettysburg. Mark belonged to the home service, and Robert was captain of a militia company. Since his residence in Montgomery county, Dr. Scott has served as mayor of Christiansburg one year. He is now living eight miles west of that city, with address, Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

JOHN T. SHELBURNE- was born in Charlotte county, Virginia, December 23, 1835, a son of Nathaniel R. and Elizabeth (Hines) Shelburne. His mother is deceased, his father still living in Pulaski county. In 1852, John T. Shelburne came to Montgomery county, and four years later, in this county, he wedded Octavia Meredith. She was born in Montgomery county October29, 1830, a daughter of William and Catharine (Farmer)Meredith. Her mother is no longer living, her father still a resident here. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shelburne, William J., Joseph R., Elizabeth, Catharine, Mary, Crencher, Haseltine, Jethro, David and Belle Pearl. All are at home except the youngest son, Jethro, whom death has taken. During the war between the States, John L. Shelburne was three years a faithful soldier of the South, in Company F, 54th Virginia Infantry. He is now farming in Auburn district, with his postoffice address at Childress Store, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM T. SHELOR- is a native of Pulaski county, Virginia, born November 15, 1840. In the county of his birth, in December, 1862, he was united in marriage with S.E. Snow, who was born in Pulaski county in July, 1840. Two children were born to them: Jotham and Mary S. The son is deceased. Thomas G. and Mary (Pierce) Shelor were the parents of William T. His father is no longer living, his mother makes her home in Montgomery county. His wife is a daughter of Asiel Snow, of Pulaski county. Her mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Douthat, is deceased. William T. Shelor was three years a soldier, Company A, 24th Virginia Infantry, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Williamsburg. His brother Jotham was killed in the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. In 1871, William T. Shelor cast his fortunes in with the people of Montgomery county, and conducted a mercantile business till his death, which occurred in November, 1883. Mrs. Shelor’s postoffice address is Snowville, Pulaski county, Virginia.

 

HENRY L. SMITH- son of Bird and Lydia (Iddings) Smith, who are residents in Floyd county, Virginia, where they made their home in 1831. Henry L. was born in that county, October 16, 1833, and went into the Confederate army October 1, 1861, where he served till the war was ended. He was a participant in a number of hard-fought battles, and was wounded in the left arm, August 18, 1863, in the battle at Atlanta, Georgia. After the close of the war he took up his residence in Montgomery county, where he had married, November 21, 1859, Paulina M. Hall, born in this county, October 29, 1835. She was a daughter of John and Sarah (Pate) Hall, and a granddaughter of Jesse Hall, who settled here in 1786, and was one of the wealthy and prominent men of his day in this section of Virginia. One son and one daughter have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith: Alonzo L., September 9, 1860; Lola M., July 16, 1867. Henry L. Smith owns 600 acres on the South fork of Roanoke, good farming and grazing land, and is one of the substantial farmers of Alleghany district. His postoffice address is Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

SAMUEL SMITH- has lived in Montgomery county for seventy years, and was born in Giles county, Virginia, July 16, 1804, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Harless) Smith. July 26, 1824, he married Elizabeth Brose, who died February 28, 1841, the mother of his children: James P., Born May 13, 1825; Eliza A., December 31, 1826; Harvey H., February 24, 1830; Samuel R., April 26, 1836; Riley T., July 6, 1838. James P. married Elizabeth Surface, and has eight living children: H.H. married Susan Shuey, and they have two children living; Samuel Rufus married Clementine Reynolds, and their children were five: Mary M., Laura Jane, Samuel Floyd, John and Essie Brown Smith. These five children are living with their grandfather, their father having died in 1880. He was a minister of the Lutheran Church, a bright light in his calling, and loved and mourned of all who knew him. In November, 1840, Samuel Smith married Nancy Harless, born in this county in 1800, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Price) Harless. She died in 1875. Samuel Smith has been one of the council of the Lutheran Church for fifty-six years, and superintendent of the Union Sunday school for fifty-two years. He has been thirteen years magistrate, and was registrar during the reconstruction of Virginia. His postoffice address is Prices Fork, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THOMAS R. SMITH- is a son of Floyd and Ann C. Smith, who are honored residents of Montgomery county, and have spent more than thirty years of wedded life together here. Floyd smith rode six years as the first sheriff of Montgomery county after it was set apart. Previous to the adoption of the new constitution he was three years deputy sheriff. Thomas R. was born in this county, May 30, 1840. His father was a member of the Home Guards during the civil war. His occupation now is farming, and his address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM T. SMITH-is descended from one of the earliest and most prominent families of Montgomery county. His grandfather, Thomas Smith, was one of the pioneers of the present prosperity of this county, and his father, named William Smith, rode as high sheriff of Montgomery county for twelve years. William Smith, father of William T., married Melvina B. Zoll, and both are now deceased. William T. Smith was born January 17, 1840, and her served four years in the Confederate army, with the rank of captain, leading his company on the fields of Manassas-first and second battles, Kernstown, Gettysburg, and others . In Montgomery county, February 28, 1865, he wedded Nickettie Harvey, who was born in this county in 1847, a daughter of Nathaniel B. and Elrica (Rorer) Harvey. Her mother is living in the county; her father deceased. William T. Smith is a farmer and stock raiser, and his home is brightened with the presence of six children: Walter R.S., Melvina, Elrica, William, Estelle and Floyd. His postoffice address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JOHN CULLUM SPICKARD-son of John and Julia B. (DeJarnett) Spickard, was born in Blacksburg, Montgomery county, March 10, 1832. In Craig county, Virginia, October 11, 1853, Mary H. Wilson became his wife, and their children are two: Frank May Spickard, born May 1, 1862; Lulia Ragan Spickard, born July 10, 1868. Mary H., wife of Mr. Spickard, was born in Craig county, in December, 1830, a daughter of Zedekiah and Eliza Jane (Vinyard) Wilson. John C. Spickard was in the Confederate army, Company L, 4th Virginia Infantry, "Stonewall Brigade". For a short time at the beginning of the war, receiving discharge August 15, 1861. He is a farmer and saddler, with postoffice address at Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

DAVID L. STEPHENS- is a son of Henry Stephens, who was a son of David Stephens, who was born May 4, 1770, and was one of the pioneers of Montgomery county. David Stephens married Elizabeth Watterson, who was born September 22, 1775, and died in March, 1850. He died May 27, 1850. Their son Henry was born January 11, 1796, and married Mary A. Charlton, who was born March 23, 1803. He was a soldier of the 1812 war, and died April 2, 1876, and his widow died May 23, 1879. Their son David L. was born in Montgomery county, June 22, 1829, and in Pulaski county, Virginia, October 22, 1856, he married Margaret Caddall. She was born in Pulaski county, a daughter of John Caddall, who died May 20, 1880, and Eliza (Shepherd) Caddall, who died in March, 1871. Mr. and Mrs. David L. Stephens are the parents of: Bettie M., born August 22, 1857; E. Woodie, November 13, 1860; John C., July 23, 1864; Mary, June 22, 1868; Samuel S., June 22, 1870- all living in this, the county of their nativity. Mr. Stephens is one of the farmers of Christiansburg district, and his postoffice address is Bangs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM E. STONE- son of William A. and Clara A. (Pettus) Stone, both now deceased, was born in Lunenburg county, Virginia, November 1, 1827. His great-grandfather on his mother’s side came from England during the reign of George the Third, and settled in Lunenburg county on an estate where his descendants still live. The father of William E. was raised in Mecklenburg county, as was his father, and his grandfather; the great-grandfather of William E., represented that county in the Virginia legislature in former days. In Powhatan county, Virginia, October 10, 1849, William E., Stone was united in marriage with Mary H. Miller, and their children were five: Clara L., born December 3, 1851, lives in Pulaski county, Virginia; William S., July 23, 1854, lives at home; James J., November 3, 1858, deceased; Nora M., March 1, 1864, and Eva M., November 21, 1867, are at home. The wife of Mr. Stone was born in Powhatan county, September 29, 1829, a daughter of John and Mahala L. (Lewis) Miller. William E. Stone was two years a soldier in the Confederate army; has been a resident in Montgomery county since 1850, and is proprietor of a hotel of Christiansburg, this county.

 

JAMES H. SUBLETT- was born in Montgomery county, October 17, 1842, a son of Samuel and Margaret (Crockett) Sublett. In his nineteenth ear he entered the service of the South, enlisting April 17, 1861, in the Montgomery Fencible (Company G, 4th Virginia Infantry), and serving in the "Stonewall Brigade". He was made prisoner at Moorefield, West Virginia, August 8, 1864, and exchanged March 11, 1865. His first wife was Alean C. Helm, and their children were four, born: Mary L., October 1, 1866;Maggie C., July 11, 1869; Alean A., July 24, 1874; Samuel J., February 4, 1876. In Franklin county, Virginia, February 15, 1882, James H. Sublett was united in marriage with Bettie A., daughter of Skelton L. and Mary (Younger) Helm. James H. Sublett has an estate of 500 acres near Alleghany Springs, on the south fork of Roanoke river. It is a good grazing farm, and well adapted to cultivation. He has served his district four years as supervisor. Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CAPTAIN JOHN U. SUMPTER- was born in Liberty, Bedford county, Virginia, July 15, 1839. He was a son of Benjamin E. and Catharine P. (Shumaker) Sumpter. His father died in Lynchburg, Virginia, and his mother is living in Georgia. At the outbreak of the civil war, John U. Sumpter had been one year a member of the State militia, and in April, 1861, he entered the Confederate service, continuing therein till the close of the war. He was a member of the 11th Virginia Infantry, Pickett’s division, and was wounded in the engagement of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862. At Lynchburg, Campbell county, Virginia, September 15, 1870, John U. Sumpter and H. Annie Booker were united in marriage, and they have four children: Willa B., born November 29, 1871; Charles W., June 20, 1874; Guy P., February 17, 1877; Tom A., November 25, 1880. The wife of Mr. Sumpter is a daughter of David E., and Willa A., (Harriss) Booker, of Lynchburg, and she was born in that city, May 5, 1843. In November, 1876, John U. Sumpter made his home in Montgomery county, and he is proprietor and manager of the Big Spring Hotel, and also passenger conductor on the N. & W.R.R. These springs are yearly growing in popularity as a summer resort, and are more easy of access than any in this section of the State, lying, as they do, on the N. & W.R.R., and surrounded with good roads. Captain Sumpter may be addressed at Big Spring Depot, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

THE TAYLOR BROTHERS AND SISTER- are the children of Henry and Margaret (Pepper) Taylor, their parents born in Montgomery county, and both children of early settlers here. William Taylor, father of Henry, settled in the count about 1780, taking up land at the junction of the South and North forks of the Roanoke. John Pepper, father of Margaret (Pepper) Taylor, was one of the pioneers of the county, and laid out the town of Lafayette. The children of Henry Taylor and wife for whom this sketch is compiled are: James R., born September 5, 1836; William P., January 12, 1843; John E., February 24, 1846; Annie E., February 22, 1832. William P. enlisted April 22, 1861, and served through the entire time of the war between the States. He was wounded at Winchester, and made prisoner at Spotsylvania C.H., May 12, 1864. James R. enlisted with him, served in the same battles, and was made prisoner at the same time. He was not wounded. John E. enlisted March 1, 1864, and served till the close of the war. Charles W., another brother, was killed at the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862. He entered the service as second sergeant and had been, in a little more that a year, promoted to rank of captain, when death put an end to his promising life. All served with fidelity the cause of the South. The farm the Taylor Brothers are cultivating contains 436 acres of fertile land. The family postoffice is at Lafayette, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

ERASTUS H. TAYLOR- son of James and Margaret (Wilson) Taylor, who were born in Montgomery county, was born in this county on the 3d of September, 1833. In this county, December 31, 1857, he was united in marriage with Nancy, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Garlic) Maddox. Her birth was in Montgomery county, October 22, 1839 the date. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are eleven: Laura Alice, Mary V., Frank L., Margie A., William, Samuel M., Eugenia, Nannie, Mattie, Florence and Maurice. Erastus H. Taylor was one of five brothers who entered the Confederate army, and fought for the Lost Cause. He enlisted in Company D, 63d Virginia Infantry. In March, 1862, and in May, 1863, while fighting in Georgia, received a wound that disabled him, and was discharged. He has been a justice of the peace in Montgomery county for twelve years. He owns a fine farm on South fork of Roanoke, equally adapted to the raising

of grain and of stock, in both of which he is engaged. He receives his mail at Alleghany Springs, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

HON. JAMES C. TAYLOR- was a son of Creed Taylor, who was born in Bedford county, Virginia, and came to Montgomery county about 1814. In this county Creed Taylor married Mary Craig, who was a daughter of early and prominent settlers here. He was a relative of Chancellor Creed Taylor, and named for him. In Christiansburg, December 24, 1851, James C. Taylor married Kate R., daughter of William and Rebecca (Crow) Wade. Her people were also prominent among the settlers of Montgomery county. The parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are now deceased. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor: Wade, now a farmer of this county; Mary E., lives in Christiansburg, Virginia; Maggie V., deceased; Bettie M., lives at Richmond; Robert C., lives at home; Florence and Archer, deceased; Kate, lives at home. The birth of James C. Taylor was in Montgomery county, on the 23d of September, 1826, and he has served his country in two wars. He held commission of captain in the State militia, under Governors Letcher and Wise, and was one of Montgomery county’s volunteers in the Mexican war, as was his brother George M. Their company was commanded by Captain James F. Preston, and the regiment served in Mexico under General Zach. Taylor. For the defense of Virginia in the civil war, James C. Taylor was one of five brothers to enter the service: George, John, Creed, and Robert serving with him the cause of the South. All but Creed held commissions. Lieutenant Robert C. was killed at Malvern Hill by a minie-ball through the head. John L. was wounded at Manassas by a minie-ball. James C. was captain, then major of the 54th Virginia Infantry. Among his engagements the most severe was the battle of Middle Creek, Kentucky, and the engagement at Princeton, Mercer county, West Virginia. James C. Taylor read law with Preston & Staples, and was admitted to the bar in October, 1850. He has practiced in the State courts from the justice of the peace to the supreme court of appeals, and in the National courts from district court to the supreme court of the United States. He was a member of the Virginia senate from 1863 to 1865; was attorney general, 1869-74; was member of the house of delegates, 1881-3. His residence and postoffice address, Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES M. TURNER- born in Montgomery county, November 12, 1842, was a son of Thomas and Margaret (Pierce) Turner, who are now deceased. He was a soldier of the South before he attained his majority, enlisting in Company G, 4th Virginia Infantry, the famous "Stonewall Brigade", and serving four years. He was a participant in the battles of first and second Manassas, Chancellorsville, Paynes Farm, Kernstown and others. Nancy L. Currin was his first wife. In Montgomery county, in June, 1881, he married Lavalette F. palmer, who was born in this county in 1852, a daughter of George and Mary(McMath) Palmer. Her parents are still honored residents in this county. In 1881 Charles M. Turner was elected constable, and served two years. He then received appointments as deputy sheriff and jailor, and is still engaged in the duties of his office. His address is Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JAMES M. VADEN- is a farmer of Alleghany district, and owes his present prosperity entirely to his own exertions. His land lies on Paris mountain, north of Lafayette, near North fork of Roanoke. He was born in Montgomery county, August 19, 1845, and in this county, March 13, 1868, he married Rebecca A. Reese, who was born in Montgomery county, March 1, 1847. Their children are six living, one deceased; John H., born April 22, 1869; Samuel, August 25, 1870; Charles W., September 15, 1872, died October 19, 1873; Mary V., October 9, 1874; James M., April 1, 1876; Lillie A., June 20, 1878; Lucy B., September 12, 1881. James M. Vaden was a Confederate soldier, and a participant in the battle of Cloyd Mountain. He served first in Dunn’s battalion, and was then transferred to the 21st Virginia Cavalry. He is a son of Vincent and Sarah E., (Martin) Vaden, who came to Montgomery county from Bedford county, Virginia, in 1832, and his wife is a daughter of William T., and Mary M. (Graham) Reese, who were natives of Montgomery county. James M. Vaden’s postoffice address is Lafayette, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM E. VADEN- is a son of Vincent and Sarah E. (Martin) Vaden, who came to Montgomery county from Dinwiddie county, Virginia, in 1832. His father is of French descent. William E., was born in Montgomery county, September 27, 1848, and at the age of fifteen years, September 23, 1863, he entered the Confederate army, serving in Dunn’s battalion, then in the 21st Virginia Cavalry. He was wounded in the battle of New River Bridge, October 3, 1863, and among the other heavy engagements in which he was a participant was the battle of Cloyd Mountain. His oldest brother was in the service, and died January 26, 1863, at White Sulphur, Montgomery county. In Montgomery county, March 24, 1875, Ann B. Perdue became the wife of William E. Vaden. She was born in Bedford County, Virginia, January 14, 1856, a daughter of John W. and Lucy J. (Richardson)Perdue. She was three years old when her parents made their home in Montgomery county. Her father is of German descent. Lillie V., born May 28, 1876, died December 24, 1878, was the first child of Mr. and Mrs. Vaden. They have three with them: Eliza C., born April 14, 1878; Olly C., March 6, 1880; Bessie A.,June 16, 1882. Mr. Vaden is owner of an estate on Paris mountain, which he devotes to farming, and raising of tobacco. He has raised some of the finest tobacco in Virginia, some of which brought $1.05 per pound. He is a first-class merchanic and builder, having served an apprenticeship of two years under Peter Cole of Dinwiddie county. He also worked with Samuel Watterson of this county for one year. He has also been contractor with the N. & W.R.R., for bridge building. His address is Lafayette, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

JAMES J. WALL- was born three miles southeast of Central Depot, in Montgomery county, on the 2d of December, 1850. His parents were born in Montgomery county, Elijah H. and Emeline H. (Zoll) Wall. Since reaching manhood, he has given his attention entirely to the pursuits of agriculture, and has a fine farm in Auburn district. At the residence of the bride’s parents in this county, November 28, 1878, he was joined in wedlock with Karen A., Kinser, and two daughters were born to them: Blanche E., born April 11, 1880; Grace F., January 18, 1882. Karen A., daughter of John C. and Frances (Haven) Kinser, was born in Montgomery county, as were her parents. January 24, 1855 was the date of her birth, and she departed this life March 23, 1882. February 7, 1884, Mr. Wall was a second time united inmarriage. Miss Maggie C., daughter of David and Margaret C., (Flagg) Riner, becoming his second partner in life, the ceremony being performed by Rev. S.S. Caton at the residence of the bride’s parents. J.C. Wall, brother of James J., was a soldier of the Confederate army, Company K, 24th Virginia Infantry, Kemper’s brigade, Pickett’s division. He fell mortally wounded in the fight of Seven Pines, and died three days later. James J. Wall’s postoffice address is Lovely Mount, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

H.D. WALTERS- son of John and Rhoda (Rhutroff) Walters, who are residents of Floyd county, Virginia, was born in that county, April 11, 1849. His father was a soldier of the Confederacy. April 17, 1878, H.D. Walters came to make his home in Montgomery county, and in this county, at Christiansburg, March 26, 1874, Rosa M. Gardner became his wife. She was born in this county, a daughter of Hamilton and Julia (Thompson) Gardner. Her father is deceased, her mother living with her. Mr. and Mrs. Walters are the parents of: Robert G.,born on Christmas Day, 1874; George W.D., April 1, 1878; Harvey L., March 3, 1880; Rhoda A., April 1, 1882. H.D. Walters is a watchmaker and jeweler of Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

SAMUEL WATTERSON- was born October 3, 1836, in the house in which he now lives, and on the estate settled by his grandfather, Henry Watterson, in 1760, and afterward owned by the father of Samuel, Joseph Watterson. Henry Watterson came from Scotland to make his home in what was then the border land of Virginia settlement to the west, and his son Joseph was born in that county. Joseph Watterson married Susannah Murray, who was born in Botetourt county, Virginia. From the firing of the first gun of the civil war till Lee’s shattered army ay down their arms at Appomattox, Samuel Watterson was a faithful soldier of the Confederacy. July 1, 1865, he was elected justice of the peace, and served four years, and he entered on a second term of service July 1, 1879, his term expiring July 1, 1883. In Newcastle district, Craig county, Virginia, February 5, 1867, he married Mary Virginia Eakin, who was born in Newcastle, November 23, 1847, a daughter of Joseph and Martha A.,Eakin, her parents still residents in Craig county. Mr. and Mrs. Watterson are the parents of: Cora L., born November 23, 1867; Martha Susan, October 17, 1869; Joseph M., September 8, 1872; John W.H., March 4, 1875; Charles V., November 19, 1877; Pearl E., February 11, 1881; Lillie R., December 4, 1883. Two brothers of Henry Watterson accompanied him from Scotland and one settled in Maryland, the other in Georgia. Samuel Watterson is third cousin of Harvey and Thomas Watterson of Louisville, and fourth cousin to Henry M. Watterson, of the Courier Journal of that city. The postoffice address of Samuel Watterson is Lafayette, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM BYRON WILEY- was born in Covington, Alleghany county, Virginia, January 18, 1849. In Botetourt county, Virginia, in 1878, he married Bettie, daughter of James Lawson, her birth in Logan county, (now) West Virginia, and her parents no longer living. Colonel Robert M. and Mary (Scott) Wiley were the parents of William B. His father was one of Virginia’s most gifted sons. Robert Mason Wiley was born in Fincastle, Botetourt county, in 1825. He was endowed by nature with rare gifts, was a fine conversationalist and fluent speaker, few men surpassing him in the force and grace of oratory. At the early age of twenty he graduated with honor from the Virginia Military Institute, and a few months after married Mary A.E. Scott. In his twenty-seventh year he was elected to the house of delegates of Virginia, and for more than twenty years served in the councils of his native State. He moved to Tennessee in 1870, and died there on the 16th of July, 1882. Since 1872 William Byron Wiley has been a resident of this county. He was seven years a merchant, but is now engaged in a livery business in Blacksburg.

 

GEORGE W. WILSON- son of Colonel George W. and Susan M. (Claiborne) Wilson, was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, November 3, 1844. He volunteered for Confederate service in 1861, but was not accepted. His brothers, Major Nat. C. and William H. Wilson, were in the war, the former serving in the 28th Virginia Infantry, Pickett’s division, until killed while leading a charge at Gettysburg. The maternal grandfather of George W., Wilson was Nathaniel H. Claiborne, member of congress twelve or sixteen years, from about 1825 to 1838.Colonel George W. Wilson, his father, was seven years a member of the Virginia house of delegates, and a lawyer of prominence in Botetourt county for fifty years. He was nine years clerk of the circuit court. He is no longer living. January 13, 1881, in Fincastle, Botetourt county, George W. Wilson was united in marriage with Jennie B., daughter of James and Mary (Finch) Luster. Her birth was in Botetourt county, August 2, 1846, and her parents are no longer living. Mr. Wilson made his home in Montgomery county in 1879, and is commissioner of revenue. Address, Blacksburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

HARVEY P. WILSON- was a son of John and Nancy (Wilson) Wilson, who were born and raised in Montgomery county. His birth was in this county, on the 7th of August, 1819, and on the 3d of November, 1846, in this county, Theodocia I .Lucas became his wife. She was born in Montgomery county, February 14, 1826, a daughter of Wilson and Mary (Webb) Lucas. Her father was a native of this county, her mother was born in Franklin county, and came to Montgomery county in 1822. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson: Virginia M., August 9, 1847; Montgomery, August 31, 1848; Lafayette, February 7, 1850; Julia A., January 1, 1851; Franklin W., November 22, 1853; Charles W.A.R., September 12, 1856; James H., September 15, 1858; Melly E., October 18, 1860; Jefferson D., June 29, 1862. Julia A., made her home in Tennessee, and died there; Charles W.A.R. died at home; Virginia M. and Montgomery live in Floyd county, this State, and the others in Montgomery county. Harvey P. Wilson is a farmer of Auburn district, and served four years as overseer of the poor of the district, elected in1858. He served in the confederate army, second lieutenant of Company G, 63d Virginia Infantry, Colonel McMahon commander. His postoffice address is Snowville, Pulaski county, Virginia.

 

JOHN G. WOODS-born in Floyd county, Virginia, April 19, 1830, has made his home in Montgomery county since he was nineteen years of age. He served three years in the war between the States, and was justice of the peace from 1867 for one year. In 1883 he entered on a two years term of service as constable, and is still discharging the duties of the office. John N. and Jane (Glasby) Woods were his parents. The former died in 1854, and the latter in 1866. His wife Melinda, daughter of John and Nancy (Bishop) Finch, and their children are two daughters: Mary M., born January 15, 1860; Nancy J., January 25, 1862. Mary M. is the wife of Henry Gearhart, and they have four children: Hattie J., Minda, John J. and Graham. Her home is in Montgomery county, and the younger daughter is with her parents. The wife of Mr. Woods was born in Montgomery county in 1840: her father is now deceased, and her mother living in Pulaski county, Virginia. John G. Woods follows the trade of carpenter at Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

CHARLES ROLLIN WOOLWNE-and Mary Elizabeth Hoge were married in Montgomery county, October, 1868. Their children are: Hattie L., Maggie E., J. Hoge, Bettie M., Mary A. and Charles R. Mr. Woolwine was born in Montgomery county, July 2, 1844. His parents, Phillip and Harriett (Snider) Woolwine, were natives of the same county. His father is living in this county; his mother is deceased. Mrs. Woolwine’s father, Moses H. Hoge, was born in Pulaski county, and her mother, Harriett (Evans) Hoge, in Montgomery county, Virginia, and at the present time they are living in Texas. C.R. Woolwine in 1861 enlisted in Company F, 14th Virginia Cavalry, McCausland’s brigade, Lomax’s division, Army of Northern Virginia. Just before Lee’s surrender the regiment was transferred to Beale’s brigade, W.H.F. Lee’s division. Mr. Woolwine is the present magistrate of Christiansburg district, having been elected to that office in May, 1883. Besides owning a large farm, Mr. Woolwine is also engaged in teaching, Address, Pilot, Montgomery county, Virginia.

 

SAMUEL M. ZINK- was born in Buchanan, Botetourt county, Virginia, July 18, 1850. Andrew J. Zink, father of Samuel M.,was born in Augusta county, Virginia, August 17, 1813, and he married Julia Hight, of Nelson county, Virginia, on the 16th of January, 1840. Her birth was June 24, 1819, and she died on the 15th of August, 1854. The second wife of A.J. Zink was Lucy C. Lane, of Amherst county, whom he married June 28, 1855. He came to this county in 1867. S.M. Zink’s paternal grandparents both lived to the ripe old age of eighty-two years, the grandfather being a native of Woodstock, Virginia, and his wife from Augusta county. His maternal grandfather was a native of Nelson county, Virginia, and his grandmother Hight is yet living and enjoying good health at the advanced age of ninety-three. His great grandfather Zink, a Frenchman, was a soldier eleven years in the war in Flanders, seven years in the Revolution under Washington, and died in Augusta county, aged ninety-three. Andrew J. Zink is a first-class blacksmith, pattern-maker and finisher. The birth record of S.M. and Catherine Zink is: Alfa B., February 12, 1875; Andrew J., October 13, 1876; Mary E., December 29, 1878, and Harry B., May 15, 1882. On New Years Day, 1868, Samuel M. Zink took up his residence in Montgomery county, and he married Catharine Charlton, who was born in this county, July 25, 1854. She was a daughter of D.L. and Catharine (Howery) Charlton, and became the wife of Mr. Zink on the 10th of September, 1873. S.B. Sink, brother of Samuel M., was a soldier of the South in the war between the States. Samuel M. Zink is a skilled mechanic, with residence near and postoffice address at Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Virginia.