DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Line of Descent

III-
Richard Mortimer Anderson, Sr. b. October 23, 1902, d. March 13, 1969 and his wife Blanford Towler b. September 28, 1902, d. Unknown.  They married on September 15, 1923.

IV-
Richard Mortimer Anderson was the son of Dr. John Carlisle Anderson,Sr. b. April 11, 1852, d. November 23, 1921 and married on July 3, 1879 to Mary Jane Smith b. March 31, 1859, d. March 3, 1939.  Mary Jane Smith was the daughter of

V-
William Smith b. September 2, 1818, d. August 2, 1896 and m. February 18, 1856 to Rebecca Hodnett b. September 28, 1832, d. July 11, 1904. Rebecca Hodnett was the daughter of

VI-
James Hodnett, d. 1862 and m. May 3, 1819 to Mary (Polly) Jones. James Hodnett was the son of

VII-
John Hodnett b. June 30, 1767, d. 1807 and m. November 9, 1792 to Lucy Davis who m. 2nd to Jesse Woodson.  Lucy Davis was the daughter of

VIII-
William Davis d. 1791 in Pittsylvania Co., VA and his second wife, Susanna Wills, widow.  William Davis was the son of

IX-
William Davis m. October 9, 1729 and his wife, Elizabeth Shelton.
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DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY
Data given by  Chunk  Davis

3 brothers from Wales (Welsh and Dutch).  Two settled in Mecklenburg and one in Lunenburg and from them three other brothers settled in Pitts. Named William who owned farm Mrs. Duncan lived on where he is buried.  One ran the hotel at Chatham and one lived in old rock house which he built and now owned by Raleigh Shields near Banister River.  Wm. Davis above, married ---- Craft (grandparents of Chunk).  Wm.'s. Father was John Davis of Charlotte Co.

Miss Craft came from Red House and her mother was a Parker who was descended from Dr. Rush of Philadelphia; he signer of the Decl. of Independence.

Dr. Rush's life in  Drs. On Horseback and name of story regarding Dr. Rush in part called  Prince or Devil.

See Pegham Hayden lst right hand road after leaving Red Eye.

Davis-----
Lunenburg
John 1757 i
John 1773 i
James 1777 w
Jos. 1778 w
Thos. 1779 w

Charlotte
Wm. 1770 w
Jos. 1790
      1793 w
John 1779 w
Mecklenburg (I failed to copy these.  I imagine from Torrence)

Pittsylvania
Samuel 1773 w
Holder 1785 w
Richard 1785 i
William 1791 w

Zachariah Davis's dau. Mary Davis md. Peter Presley Thornton.
____________________
[Notes inscribed at top left-hand corner of this page with Davis crest on it:]

Wm. Davis & Susannah
Bro. Noire.  Wm. His ejor? Vid (?) never found will.

Chris (son of Peyton Young Davis, sons: Rev. Morrison Davis, BennettDavis, Chris & John.

DAVIS
MOTTO:    Authorities consulted show no motto for these arms.  However,  Ne tentes, aut perfice  (Do not attempt, or else accomplish) is listed in Fairbain's Book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland  as associated with the Davis family.

ARMS:    Gules a chevron ermine in chief two mounds or, in base a talbot passant of the last.

CREST:    Two arms embowed, habited ermine cuffs azure, hands proper supporting a mound, as in the arms.
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1915 Edition of Browning';s
 MAGNA CHARTA, BARONS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS

Baronial Order of Runnymede, William Davis

Descent from Sureties for the Magna Charta

--Gilbert De Clare, Richard De Clare






1.    Richard De Clare, Earl of Hertford, a Surety for the Magna Charta, had

2.    Gilbert De Clare, Earl of Hertford, a Surety forthe Magna Charta, who had

3.    Isabel De Clare, married Robert De Bruce, 5th Earl of Annandale, and had

4.    Robert De Bruce, Earl of Annandale, and Carrick,who had

5.    Robert  Bruce, King of Scotland, who had

6.    Marjory Bruce, married Walter Stewart, Steward of Scotland, who had

7.    Robert II, King of Scotland, who had

8.    Margery Stewart, married Eoin-Mar Macdonnall, 7th Lord of the Isles, who had

9.    Donald Macdonnall, Lord of the Isles, who had

10.    Alexander Macdonnall, Lord of the Isles, and Earl of Ross, who had

11.    Hugh Macdonnall, of the Isles, 2nd son, died 1498, who had

12.    Donald-Calloch Macdonnall, of the Isles, died1506, who had

13.    Donald-Crammoch Macdonnall, of the Isles, died1534, who had

14.    Donald-Gorme Macdonnall, heir titular Lord ofthe Isles, killed 1537, had

15.    Donald-Gorme Macdonnall, Lord of the Isles, andof Slate, died 1585, had

16.    Archibald Macdonnall, Lord of Slate Mo-anor, Antrim, who had

17.    Sir Donald Macdonnall, Lord of the Slate, firstBaronet, died 1643, who had

18.    Sir James Macdonnall, Lord of Slate, 2nd Baronet, died Dec. 8, 1678. Who had

19.    Marion MacDonnall, married Patrick Macgregor,chieftainof that ilk, who led his clansmen under Montrose in 1645, andwho outlawedwith his sons.  His estates were confiscated and he andhis sons werecommanded to assume other names, when John Macgregor, his heir, became JohnMurray and his second son, James,became

20.    Thomas MacGehee. Before September, 1701, (when he and other outlawed Scotchmen petition for landin Virginia), here moved his family to Virginia and was granted land in St. John's Parish, King William County where he resided, signing as  Thomas Mack Gehee, cone time James Mackgregor, of the old countrie   His will dated July 27, 1727, was proved in this county.  He had by his wife, surname unknown

21.    Edward MacGehee of King William County, Virginia, married Elizabeth DeJarnette, who had

22.    Mary MacGehee, second child, married Ayres Hodnett, and moved to Pittsylvania County, at that time Halifax County.  Her will is filed in Pittsylvania January 18, 1818.  They had a son, John Hodnett and others.  This

23.    John Hodnett married Lucy Davis, dau. Of William Davis,in Pittsylvania County November 9, 1792 and had

24.    James Hodnett who married Mary (Polly) Jones and lived at Whittles Depot, Virginia, who had

25.    Rebecca F. Hodnett who married William Smith February 18, 1856 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia and had

26.    Mary Jane Smith, married Dr. John Carlisle Anderson at  Mineola,  in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, who had

27.    Richard Mortimer Anderson, married Blanford Towler, in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, at the home of his brother, Dr. John Carlisle Anderson, and had
_________________________________

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY
Or
MCGEHEE FAMILY HISTORY
Books of Reference
1  3-  Agrees with Burke's Extinct Peerages

2   4     Playfair's British Family Antiquity  Vol. III, page 744.

4  7       Playfair's British Family Antiquity  Vol. III, page 740.

4   8       Wood's Douglas Peerage of Scotland Vol. II, page 8.

7   10-     Nobel's  Royal House of Stuart  (1795) page 28.

10  18      Burke's Peerage, Lord Macdonnall of Slate Co., Antrim, Ireland

       Wooten's  Baronets of Nova Scotia.

14   His claim, as heir, to the lordship of the Isles, was refused by James V, but his son restored in the family honors by Queen Mary in 1567.

17.       He was created a baronet of Nova Scotia, July 14, 1625, (Wooten).

19-20      Family letters of the immigrant identifying  James MacGregor and his wife, Marion Macdonnall.  See  Murray  baronets and pedigree.

21 -    In Colonial Wars, according to the records in files atVirginia State Library.

22.              Pittsylvania County,Virginia Records.

23.              Pittsylvania County,Virginia Records.

24-28    Pittsylvania County, Virginia Records
___________________________________

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

   In the Name of God Amen I William Davis of Pittsylvania County being far advanced in life though of perfect mind and memory, andknow that it is appointed for all Men to die do make this day my last Will and Testament, that is to say, I give to my Son John Davis three head of young cattle of two years old at least.  Item, I give to my Son Benjamin Davis his heirs and apigns [assigns] forever One hundred and fifty acres of Land including my Mansion Home, and Houses and Plantation, to begin at my upper line on the South side of Great Cherrystone Creek, thence down the said Creek as it meanders to about halfway between my Plantation and Mill thence or southwardly a proper distance to lake in the Plantation thence by a line to be run Wishwardly to my upper line to include the aforesaid hundred and fifry [fifty] acres, and also my Negro Man named James. Item, I give to my Son Joseph Davis his Heirs and apigns [assigns] forever One hundred and fifty Acres of Land adjoining his Brother Benjamin's line when run and my upper old line to include Brother Cabbin and joining Persyth's line.  Item, I give to my Son Thomas Davis his heirs and apigns [assigns]forever all the remaining part of my Tract of Land, except One Acre on the South Side of the aforesaid Creek contigeous to my Mill and joining the lines of Northside of the said Creek contigeous to my said Mill and joining the lines of Robert Wooding and John Perks Gentlemen. Item, I lend to my Daughter Nancy Rickett and her Heirs of her body Lawfully begotten on Negrogirl named Dafney and the increase of said girl, thoughfor want of suchheirs and Increase it is my will that the said Negro Girldecend to William Ricket Husband to my Daughter Nancy Ricket and his heirs forever. It is also my Will that if the Girl Increase after my Daughter Nancy's death that that increase shall decend to the said William Rickett and his heirs.  Item, I give to my Daughter Peggy Davis her Heirs andapigns[assigns] forever one Negro Girl named Queen, one Negro boy named Abraham and all my stock of Geese.  Item, I give to my Son in Law Thomas Maids the Money he owes me by bond and desire the bond be cancelled. Item I giveto my Son in Law William Corbin one Negro boy named Harry andone feather bed in consideration of a debt due him from me on my Brothersall, the Bedhe has in popepion [possession].  Item I give to my Sons Joseph and Thomas Davis jointly and severally the Heirs and Apigns [Assigns]forever my Grist Mill together with one Acre of Land contigdious there to on the South side of the Creek joining the lines of Robert Wooding and John Parker Gentlemen as before.  Item it is also my Will and I do hereby give all the rest and remainder of my Estate both Real and Personal to my three youngest Children, to wit Joseph Davis, Thomas Davis and Lucy Davis to beequally divided among them as may be or the survivors of them their Heirs and Apigns [Assigns] forever.  Item it is also my Will and I do  order according by that my Son Benjamin shall immediately rebuild my aforesaid Mill the hole to be done in a Workmanlike manner with a good boalting Cloath and bearing at least Eight feet Water at the pierhead in consideration of which it is my Will that my said Son Benjamin shall keep Popepion of my said Mill and all my working Slaves the term of three years for his own use andbehoof after the expiration of the said turm years it is my Will that the said Mill in good repair and the said slaves well clothed by delivered uphandfor the use of my other children as is by this Will directed.  Itemit is also my will that my Daughters have the use of my little Roomas longas they shall respectively live single and by supplyd with provisions fromthe profits of my Mill.  Item it is also my Will that is my Son Benjaminshall refuse to build my Mill on the turms aforesaid that my Executors forthwith let there build her to any person who will to build her on the aforesaid terms.  It is also my Will that the timbers &c for rebuilding my aforesaid Mill be got from off any part of the tract of Land where on I nowl ive.  It is also my Will that if either of my Sons Joseph or Thomas die before they arrive to Lawful age unmarried that then the sole right of my Mill shall descend to the survivors of them also the Slave and other personal Estate belonging to the Deceased.  Item I give to my Son in law George Mires nothing more of my Estate than which I have already give him which he has now in popepion [possession].  Item I give to my son in law Daniel Bradley nothing more of my Estate than what I have already given him, to wit, the Land whereon he now lives.  Item it is also my Will that my Executors dispose of as much of my Crop now on hand as shall be sufficient to pay the Debt due to Daniel Bradley from me on acct. Of my Brothers Estate deduction there from Seven poun [pounds] Lawfull Money for a feather Bed belonging to me now in popepion [[possession] of said Bradley.  And lastly I do hereby appoint my friend John Parks together with my Son Benjamin Executors of this my last Will and Testament. In Witnep [Witness] whereof I have hereto set my hand and Seal this fourth day of June one thousand seven hundred and ninety.
 

       His
William X Davis (Seal)
      mark


Signed, Seal, and Published in the presents of
Thos. H. Wooding
William Miers
Jacob Miers
George Miers Junr.

   At a Court held for Pittsylvania County the twentieth day of June one thousand seven hundred ninety-one.  The above written last Will and Testament of William Davis deceased was exhibited into Courtand proved by the Oaths of the witnepes [witnesses] thereto to be the ac tand deed of the said William Davis and the same Ordered to be recorded by the Court
Teste           Will Tunstall Jr.  Clk.
________________-
Pitts. D. & W. Bk. 11, p. 216

Pittsylvania County, VA.
Court Order Book 3, p. 127, May 1790

Daniel Bradley, Plaintiff
Against
William Davis, Executor of his brother, Noire Davis, deceased, Defendant Ordered that case be dismissed.
____________________
Claims Book
Page 2:
To William Davis for 1 Grey Horse 4  10  high impressed for State Troops 20£
   To same for 1 Bay Horse 4 8 , 12 yrs. Old imp. [impounded] For State Troops 16£
   To same for 1 Black Horse 4  8  high,12 yrs. Old.
   To same for use of a Waggon and one Horse impd [impounded].[impounded]For State Troops 33 days @ 3/7
To same for 10 Lb. Bacon @ 7. And ½ Bu. Meal  1/6 impd[impounded].

Page 12:
To William Davis for 2 Bushels of Wheat @ 4/. Impd [impounded]. For Continental Troops -.8.-.
To William Davis for 106 lb.Bacon imp.d for State Troops  5.6.-.

Page 37: To William Davis for 340 lbs. Beef @16/8
1 Bu. Corn @ 15/. Impd [impounded]. For State Troops

See: D. A. R. No. 430743 for Pauline Duncan Boykin
__________________________________

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

William Davis b. 1710, d. 1791, married 2d on 5 May 1772 to Susanna, widow of Filmur [Philmur] Wills (or Wells)   Halifax.  Lived on Big Cherrystone Creek, on South side, West of confluence of Little Cherrystone Creek.

Issue:

1.    Benjamin Davis, d. 1830, on 31 January 1799 married Lydia Meador, dau. of Joab and Sarah Motley Davis

2.    Joseph Davis on 19 Mar 1793 married Lucy McGehee Hodnett, dau. of Ayres and Mary McGehee.  Issue of Joseph Davis and Lucy McGehee Hodnett: 1) William, 2) Garrett, 3) Thomas, 4) Joseph (called Tennessee Joe), 5) Jack, 6) Sally, 7) James, and 8) Elizabeth.

3.    Thomas Davis b. 1757 (Will Bk. 2, p. 88), d. 2February 1845, on 13 July 1797 married Sara Meador d. 1818, Pitts. Co.,VA, dau. of Joab and wife Sarah Motley.  Issue of Thomas Davis and Sara Meador [Meader]: 1) Garrett, born 1798, 2) Thomas, Jr., born 1805,died 1846/7, 3) Mary Taylor Davis, born 1802, 4 & 5) Sarah & Nancy, twins, and 6) William (Capt. Buck) Davis b. 13 April 1800, d. 11 September1886, on 14 October 1824 married Camelia Craft, b. 1809, d. 15 February1899, dau. of Philip.

Issue of William (Capt. Buck) Davis and Camelia Craft:

1. Pauline Jane Davis b. 17 October 1825, d. 30 April 1905, and m. on 20October 1853 to James Brown Duncan d. 26 April 1858.

Issue of Pauline Davis and James Brown Duncan

1.    William Davis Duncan b. 20 October 1856, d. 31January 1920, m. 29 February 1892 to 1) Hattie Lucy Bibb, 2) Frances (Fanny)Smith b. 28 July 1865, d. 16 September, 1949.  Issue of William Davis Duncan and Hattie Lucy Bibb: 1) Rebecca Duncan, unmd., 2) Jim Duncan m.Roy Payne, 3) Amelia Duncan md.Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson on 26 February1921 in New Orleans

Issue of Amelie Duncan and Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson: 1) Amelie Frances m.Ernest Bowling Milam, 7  b. 23 Aug 1922, Camp Stolisenberg, Philippines, m. 2 Dec. 1944

.  Issue of Amelie Frances Anderson and Ernest Bowling Milam: 1)Frances Lee Milam b. 31 Dec 1946, Fla., 2) David Scott Milam, b. 8 August1949

Issue of Amelie Duncan and Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson (continued): 2)Edward Otey Anderson b. 3 February 1924, Washington, D.C., m. Mary Oliver7/4/195?, 3) Dr. Charles Wm. Anderson b. 18 Nov. 1931
Jane Duncan md. Blair Motley-divorced

Issue of William (Capt. Buck) Davis b. 13 Apr 1800 + Camelia Craft (cont. from above)

2.    Sarah Ann Davis unmd., b. 19 July 1827, d. 21 April 1914

3.    Mary T. Davis b. 7 October 1829, d. 20 Nov. 1910, md. Edward (Ned) Robertson b. 4 May 1827, d. 31 December 1886.  Issue of Mary T. Davis and Edward (Ned) Robertson: 1) Alice M. Robertson b. 11 March 1861, d. 12 August 1912, md. George W. Taylor, 2) Thomas, 3) John,4) Sallie md. Redmond Adams, 5) Molie md. Kin Shields, 6) Jennie md. J.D. Shields, 7)Maude md. G. W. Taylor  had Mary George Taylor

4.    Thomas Philip Davis b. 7 October 1831 m. a Miss Jones near Roxboro, N. C. And had children 1) Tom and 2) Sally Jones md.Bennie Davis  1st cousin.

5.    Camelia Davis b. 2 Oct 1835, md. Jeff Brooks of Roxboro, NC.  Issue: Cook, Bub, Philip, George, May, Rosa, Sally and Polly.

6.    William George Davis b. 10 March 1838, D. 7 February 1909, unmd.

7.    Simeon Benton Davis b. 3 August 1842, d. 27 May 1916, m.Sallie Jane Fitzgerald b. 25 January 1848, d. 31 July 1882, the dau. of Thomas Jones Fitzgerald.  Issue: Sydney Orbrey David d. 28 February 1953, m.on 6 July 1899 to Lucy Thacker, d. 3/30/193?.  SEE data from Family Bible of Sydney Orbrey Davis.

8.    James Arastus Davis, b. 11 February 1844, d. 15 November 1912, unmd.

9.    Samuel T. Davis b. 3 December 1847, d. 31 October 1903, unmd.

10.    Abraham I. Davis (Abram Parker Davis on Tombstone) b. 21 November 1849, d. January 1851.

11.    Christopher Tene Davis b. 6 January 1853, d. 17January1905, md. Miss Jim Hall.  Issue: a) Infant died; b) Wm.  Chuck [Chunk?] Davis, died 1962.

Children of Wm. Davis & Susannah cont. ---

4.    John Davis married 26 September 1803, Nancy Hodnett
5.    Nancy Davis married 4 June 1789, William Ricketts
6.    Margaret (Peggy) Davis married 15 August 1791,Moses Chaney
7.    Elizabeth (Bettie) Davis married 17 May 1787,Daniel Bradley
8.    Sarah Davis married 1 February 1781 in Halifax Co., VA.,Thomas Meade
9.    Susannah married 19 February 1787, William Corbin
10.     Mary Davis married Mires (Myres)
11.    Lucy Davis marries 1st 9 November 1792, John Hodnett, died 1807 and married 2d Jessee Woodson, 1809.  Issue: 1)James Hodnett,d. 20 January 1840, m. on 3 May 1819 to Mary (Polly) Jones, daughter of Thomas Brooks Jones.

Issue of James Hodnett, d. 20 January 1840 and Mary (Polly) Jones

1.    John Hodnett md. 12 May 1857, Mary Ann Tucker
2.    Thomas Hodnett md. 5 September 1851, Harriett C. Tucker
3.    James D. Hodnett md. 19 December 1860, Tabitha Dodson
4.    Philip md. Nancy Elizabeth Griggs, 23 November1858
5.    Samuel Hodnett died at Gettysburg in Civil War
6.    Harriett md. 21 October 1844, Daniel Yeatts
7.    Rebecca Frances Hodnett, b. 28 September 1832,d. 11 July 1904 m. on 18 February 1856 to William Smith b. 2 September1816, d. 2 August 1896. (See Smith Family for their issue.)
8.    Jane Hodnett md. John B. Shelhorse, 2 December1853
9.    Nancy Hodnett md. 18 April 1861, Creed I. Tucker
10.    Ann Elizabeth Hodnett md. 3 December 1838, CharlesR. William
11.    George Andrew Hodnett md. 20 April 1865, MaryJane Kelly
12.     Alice Hodnett md. Beauregard Payne

NOTE:     Mr. William Chuck  Davis said three Davis brothers came from Wales.  One settled in Lunenburg County, Virginia and and two from Mecklenburg, and from them three other brothers came to Pittsylvania County and settled.  Two of them were our William, his brother, Noire and Thomas.   Chuck believes our Williamand brothers were children of John Davis of Charlotte Court House.

Thomas Davis from Pittsylvania County, Virginia Clerk's Office: Transcript: August 20, 1834: Thomas Davis, aged 88 years, a resident of PittsylvaniaCounty made affidavit that he entered the Army of the UnitedStates in the year 1776 under Capt. James Dillard in the County of Pittsylvania where he resided for two years.  That he marched to James Town in Virginia where he was attached to a Virginia Regiment under Col. Haynes Morgan, Col.Perkins and others.  He served as a private for three months. Ensign Dalton resigned and left the Army when he was promoted to the Rankof Ensign. He served as such at Guinns Island and other places in the lower counties of Virginia.  After this service he commanded a small detachment of men at Pittsylvania Court House by order of Col. John Wilson as a guard toBritish Prisoners at that place for three months.  In the winter of 1781, when Lord Cornwallis was marching through the State of North Carolina, he volunteered with Capt. Gabriel Shelton and others.  They joined GemGreene's Army and served six weeks.

The Court declared its opinion that the applicant was a Revolutionary Soldier and the same was proved by the affidavit of David Irby who served with Thomas Davis in the Revolutionary Army.

Mary Davis married 17 March 1795, Samuel Yates in Pittsylvania County, Va.  According to Pittsylvania Death Register, Mary Davis Yates was daughter of Thomas Davis and died 19 April 1858 at 90 years of age.
________________________________________-

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

1.    William Davis b. 1710, m. on 29 October 1723 1)Elizabeth S., b. 1711, dau. of Ralph Shelton.  He married 2) SusannahWills (Widow of Filmur Wills [Wells] of Halifax Co., Va. On May 5, 1772.

William Davis's will probated in Pitts. Co., Va. June 20,1791.

Issue:

a.    Benjamin Davis md. 1/31/1799, Lydia Meador, dau.of Joaband Sarah Motley.

b.    Joseph Davis md. 19 Mch. 1793, Lucy McGehee Hodnett, d. c1869 at 105 yrs. Age.  Issue:  1) Wm. Davis, 2) Garrett Davis (Louise Keeling's grandfather), 3) Thomas Davis, 4) Joseph Davis (called Tennessee Joe), 5) Jack Davis, 6) Mary Davis, 7) James Davis, 8)Elizabeth Davis m.

c.    Thomas Davis m. 8 July 1797, Sally Meadows

d.    John Davis m. 19 March 1793, Nancy Hodnett

e.    Nancy Davis m. Wm. Ricketts, 5/4/1789

f.    Peggy Davis m. 15 Aug, 1791, Moses Chaney

g.    Elizabeth (Betty) m. 17 May 1784, Daniel Bradley

h.    Lucy Davis m. 9 Nov. 1792, John Hodnett   1st- died 11 9 ???; m. Jesse Woodson 2nd, 1809

i.    Sarah Davis m. 1 Nov. 1781 Thomas Meade (Maide)

j.    Susannah Davis m. 27 Feb 1786, Wm. Corbin

k.    Mary Davis m. George Mires

------------------------------

Halifax County
State of Virginia:
Deed Made: 16 May 1776
Recorded: 15 August 1776

William Davip (Davis) and Susana Davip (Davis) his wife of Halifax County for 50 (?) sell to George Watkins 133 Acres being the Dower of Susanna Wells, now Davip lade and divided by the Executor of Philmer Wells decd.

His mark                                                     Her mark
William W. Davip [Davis]                     Susanna Davip [Davis]
___________________________________

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Data Copied From Family Bible Owned by Sydnor Orbrey Davis   1952
By Blanford Towler Anderson






Thomas Davis m. Sally Meadows, July 13, 1797.
Issue :

F.William Davis b. April 13, 1800, d. Sept. 11, 1886, m. October 14,1824, Camelia Craft b. 1809, d. Feb. 15, 1899.

Issue of William Davis m. Camelia Craft

a)    Paulina Jane Davis b. Oct. 17, 1825; d. Apr. 30,1905;
b)    Sarah Ann Davis b. July 19, 1827;
c)    Mary T. Davis b. Oct. 7, 1829;
d)    Thomas Philip Davis b. Oct 7, 1831;
e)    Camelia Davis b. Oct 2, 1835;
f)    Wm. George Davis b. Mar. 10, 1839; d. Feb. 7,1909;
g)    *Simeon Benton Davis b. Aug 3, 1842, d. Feb 7,1909;
h)    James Arastus Davis b. Feb. 11, 1844, d. Nov.15, 1912;
i)    Samuel T. Davis b. Dec. 3, 1847, d. Oct 31, 1903;
j)    Abraham I. Davis b. Nov. 21, 1849, d. Jan. 1851;
k)    Ches Tene Davis b. [Christopher Tene]

*G.  Simeon Benton Davis b. Aug. 3, 1842, d.  May 27, 1916 md.Sally Jane Fitzgerald b. Jan. 25, 1848, d. July 31, 1882 (dau. Thomas Jones Fitzgerald)

Issue of Simeon Benton Davis and Sally Jane Fitzgerald:

1.    Sydnor Orbrey Davis m. July 6, 1899, Lucy JaneThacker

Their Issue:

Thomas Jackson Davis b. May 5, 1900
Orbrey Nathaniel Davis B. May 4, 1902
William Arastus Davis b. May 21, 1904
Lucile Irene Davis b. Aug. 14, 1907
Nancy Jane Davis b. Mch. 17, 1922

(Issue of Simeon Benton Davis + Sally Jane Fitzgerald continued)

2.    1 Infant unnamed
3.    Simeon Benton Davis, Jr.
4.    Rosa Irene Davis md. Thomas Smith (son of Wm.Smith and Rebecca Hodnett)

Issue of Rosa Irene Davis + Thomas Smith

Alpha Smith m. Aug. 1921 to Nimrod Anderson, d. Oct 194?
Theo Smith unmd., b. Feb. 10. 1900
Janie Smith unmd., b. November 22, 1902
Ryland Smith m. Edith Walker (dau. of Senie Walker, Clima---
Benton Smith b. Jan. 15, 1907, m. on July 3, 1937 to Elizabeth Arthur b.Dec. 22, 1907

NOTES on above:

   Simeon Benton Davis (Nicknamed Tim), son of William Davis (nicknamed Capt. Buck because he trained men for the Civil War had no campsas today so met in communities for training very much likethe “National Guard.

   Thomas Philip (Tom) Davis married a Miss Jones near Roxboro, N. C. And had son Tom and Dau. Sally who md. 1st cousin Bennie Davis, son of Simeon Benton Davis and Wm. Md. Irene Rocas (Reeves/Reese?).

   Ches. Tene Davis [Christopher Tene Davis] md. Miss Jim Hall, dau. of Nathan Hall and were parents of William (Chunk) Davis of Chatham, Va.

Bill, Sam, and Jim never married.

Camelia (Nealy) Davis md. Jeff Brooks of Roxboro, N. C. and had Cook, Bub, Philip, George, May, Rose, Sally, and Polly Brooks.

Mary T. (Polly) Davis md. Ned Robertson (had bro. Wm. K. Robertson)and lived of the Davis rock house. They had son Tom who md. Mamie Colemanand son Johnny Robertson md. dau. of John Motley.

Sarah Ann (Sally) Davis unmd. and brother Thomas Philip Davis ran hotel in Chatham.

Issue of Thomas Davis m. Sally Meadows continued:

2.    Garrett Davis of Keeling, Va. from the Keelingfamily descend.  His home was the old brick house where all of Thomas  Davis's family were born.  In 1952 Raleigh Shields lived there near Banister River.

NOTE: Miss Amelia (Camelia) Craft, wife of Wm. Davis above, was from Red House, Virginia.  Her mother was a Parker who was descended from Dr.Rush of Philadelphia, signer of the Declaration of Independence. Story of Dr. Rush found in book Drs. on Horseback and name of story is  Prince or Devil

Miss Craft rode on horseback to look after the men making brick to buildhouse owned by Mr. Bigham Hayden (1952).  At this time he was 90 yrs.Of age    Feb. 11, 1952.

   Much of the above information was given to me by him as he lived with the family.

                       Blanford Towler Anderson
------------------------------
 
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Revolutionary War Record of William Davis of Pittsylvania County, Virginia

William Davis assisted in the establishment of American Independence during the War of the Revolution were as follows:

William Davis contributed generously of stock and supplies

 To William Davis for one Grey Horse 4 10  high impd. For militia
 To William Davis for one Bay Horse 4 8 High, 12 yrs.Old L16
 To William Davis for one Black Horse 4 8 High, L10
 For use of wagon and horse for 33 days
For 340 lbs. Beef; for 106 lbs. Bacon, etc.   He was too far advanced in years to see active service, being about 70 years. This was in 176? When the Southern Campaign was most active, but served his country by giving supplies; Ref: Clement's History of PittsylvaniaCounty, Virginia,pp. 169-172.  Sent to militia under Gen. Greene at the Battle of Guilford.

One company of Minute Men marched from Pittsylvania against Lord DunmireJune 1776, commanded by Capt. Thomas Dillard, Lt. Jesse Heard & Ensign Robert Dalton.  Known members were Thomas Davis, etc.  They marched through counties of Halifax, Charlotte, & Dinwiddie to Petersburg from Pittsylvania crossing the James River at Cabham., and proceeded on to Gwynn's Island.  Here they stationed several weeks under Gen. Andrew Lewis & took part in the battle fought there July 9, 1776, &c.  Page 150, Pitts Co.History

Page 214: A Thomas Davis, private in Pittsylvania County in War of 1812.

Page 216: An old yellowed sheet from the adjutant';s book preserved in paper of Maj. Langhorne Scruggs, gives the officers of the 101st Regiment in 1846 as follows:  Capt. Christopher Davis.

Page 281: Tithable 1767 John Davis; Benjamin Davis
Page 285: Tithable  1767: William Davis; Jonathan Davis.
Page 289: Tithable  1889-90: Beverlly A. Davis Member ofHouse of Delegates

Pittsylvania County, Virginia ;Claims Book  pg.27: To Thomas Davis for 1 musket impf for State Troops 1/10/0.

Thomas Davis served 2 years 1776-1778 under Capt. James Dillard of Pitts.   Pitts. Court Order 24, P. 75: William Davis came into Court  A Commipion [commission] apply him a Lieutenant in the 101st Regiment 1st Brigade and first division of the militia & took the several oaths required, by law.
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

From the Time the First One Came to America and Settled

1.    Marion Macdonnal married Patrick Macgregor, chieftain of that ilk who led his clansmen under Montrose in 1645 and was outlawed with his sons.  His estates were confiscated and he and his sons were commanded to assume other names, when John Macgregor, his heir, became John Murray and his second son James became
2.    Thomas MacGehee.   Before September 1701 (when he and other outlawed Scotchmen petition for land in Virginia) he removed his family to Virginia and was granted land in St. John's Parish, King William County where he resided, signing as   Thomas Macgregor or the old countrie His will dated July 27, 1727, was proved in this country.  He had by his wife, surname unknown
3.    Edward MacGehee of King William County, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth DeJarnette, daughter of a Huguenot refugee from France  who came over when the Edict of Nantes was revoked.  Through the DeJarnettes we are eligible to become members of the Society of Huguenots, which is a very exclusive one.  Through the McGehee, we are eligible to membership in the Baronial Order of Runnymede.  Edward and Elizabeth had
4.    Mary McGehee, second child, and married Ayres Hodnett.  They moved to Halifax County which was later Pittsylvania County when the latter was formed from Halifax.  Mary's will was filed January 19, 1818 in Pittsylvania leaving all her propertyto her daughter, Lucy Hodnett Davis.
5.    Lucy Hodnett married Joseph Davis, Mary 19, 1793.  She died aroun 1869.  Their children were William, Garrett, Thomas, Joseph, (called Tennessee Joe), Jack, Polly, James and Elizabeth (married Daniel Bradley.  Lucy Hodnett Davis lived to the age of 105 years.

Joseph Davis who married Lucy Hodnett was son of William Davis who married secondly, Susanna Wells (Wills), widow of Philmer Wills.  She was not Joseph's mother.

Halifax County
State of Virginia
December 14, 1831
Deed Bk. 31, pg 417:

Joseph Davis, Sr. and Lucy Davis his wife, formerly Lucy Hodnett sold Joseph Davis, Jr. their son, all of all of their interest in the estate in Halifax County, Virginia belonging to William McGehee decd.of the State of Georgia for $100.

Witnesses:
Bird L. Ferrell
Levi Hill
Deed Bk. 12, pg. 353:  September 18, 1783

266 2/3 Acres and interest in estate from William Wills heir at law to Tilmur Wills Decd. adjoining land laid off for widow of Tilmur Wills who has since intermarried William Davis   tract Tilmur wills purchasedfrom William Hudson.

Halifax County, Va. Records:

Mar. Reg. B. 1, p. 2: William Davis married Susanna (widow) Wells (Wills) May 5, 1772.  Thomas Tunstall, Bondsman; Mary Tunstall, Witness.

Will Bk. 1, pg. 134 Halifax Court December 1774: Robert Wooding, Thomas Hope, Thomas Tunstall Gent. or any two of them are appointed to allot to Susanna Davis late widow of Philmer Wells decd. her dower in the slaves of the said Wells and to make report to this court.

Same book,  - same page February 15, 1776  The allotment of the estate of Philmer Wells decd. was Retd. to court and ordered to be recorded.

Will Bk. 1, p. 187 November 1776  Wells estate  division of slaves of Philmer Wells decd Lot #1 two negroes Adam and Teeny for James Wells part; to #2 two negroes John & Eve for William Wells part; but to pay Lot #3 15 pounds in cash.  Lot #3 one negro man viz. Teney for Thomas Witter's part, but to receive of Lot#2 (Wm. Wells's part)15 pounds cash.  Given under handsJ uly 21, 1777.  Signed Wm. Thompson, John Coleman, Muhl.Roberts.

Will Bk. 10, pg. 225  Will signed April 1815 and recorded February 1817  Frances Strange names Daughter Rebecca Wells.

Deed Bk. 2, pg. 155 May 15, 1760  William Hudson of Lunenburg to Filmer Wells of Halifax for 70 pounds 300  acres on Terrible Creek it being a part of a tract that was patented by Hudson.  Signed Wm.and Sarah Hudson.

Deed Bk. 2, pg. 155 May 15, 1760 William Hudson of Lunenburg to Filmer Wells of Halifax for 70 pounds 400 Acres   (same as above.)

Deed Bk. 10, pg. 102  May 16, 1776 William Davis and Susanna his wife of Halifax sell to George Watkins of Halifax for 50 pounds 133 acres.  It being Susanna Wells now Davis  do were in the lands of Philmur Wells decd her late husband.

Plea Book 9, pg. 83  Jeremiah Keen made Guardian of Filmer Wells orphans.

Deed Bk. 12, p. 353  September 18, 1783  266 2/3 acres and interest in estate on Terrible Creek from William Wills of Mecklenburg for 200 L beginning at branches of Terrible Creek William Wills heir at law to Tilmur Wills DDD Decd.  Adjoining land laid off for widow of Tilmur Wills purchased from William Hudson.
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

(Copy of a letter written by Mrs. George L. Corbin, 3 Oak Lane, Hampton Gardens, and Richmond, Virginia to Mildred Keeling, Keeling, Virginia).1939

I am afraid you have selected the wrong person to talk about the DAVIS family for I am so interested I may bore you.  Just a fewyears ago I became family conscious.  Other people boasted of their family trees and I wondered why in the fast forests we could not find a Davis tree of which we might be proud.  My father said:  Youd d better not search too closely for you might find somebody hanging from oneof the limbs Well, I replied,  we would not be unlike all the other proud old families if I did.  If their skeletons are not hanging to the trees, they are hidden in the family closets. But, you see, they make such a do about those relatives who have become prominent that people forget about the skeletons in the family closets.

You know I just felt that the Davis family was obliged to be better,a little better than the average run of folks.  Not speaking of my own generation, the Davis line just preceding me of which my mother andAunt Mary Sue and the other brothers and sisters were representatives, you'll agree with me, was exceptional.  They had little money but there was a certain pride of family, grace of bearing, neatness of attire, to say nothing of the wonderful traits of character they displayed which set them apart. We Davis  have the reputation of being just a mite  close but Scotch blood will show up. Our mothers and fathers could make alittle go a long way; in our family it was often a  mighty  little,too.  I remember my mother telling me about her grandmother who cautioned her thus:  Child, don't use so much water when you wash clothes for the more water you use the more soap it takes. When she was an old woman Grandma Lucy Davis insisted on laundering her own clothes but in later years Aunt Anne did the ironing for her.  I have Grandma Lucy's iron which was given her (my mother) by Grandma Betsy.

Perhaps, I will be clearer if I tell about the Strickland family first.  It is an old English family, dating back historically to 1200.  TheStrickland's lived in the beautiful old Sizerge Castle in Kent County, England. They married into the powerful De La Warr family, and were favorites of the king.  The present Strickland family at Sizerge Castle highly prize a bedquilt worked by Catharine of Parr and handed down in the family.

Of the Virginia Strickland's we know little.  Our grandfather James Belcher Strickland, was an orphan and I could not find out much about him.  My mother told me he was adopted without change of name by a family in Charlotte County by the name of Burgess.  Aunt Mary Sue thinks he came down from near News Ferry.  Wherever he came from he must have been an unusual personage.  They say he was very particular and had most refined tastes. He was married four different times but most of his children were born of the first marriage.  His first wife Lucretia Tanner was our ancestor. It is said that when Jimmie Belcher Strickland was a young man and had gone to fight in the War of 1812, a neighbor named Carter passed the Tanner home while Lucretia Tanner was on a scaffold putting out cherries to dry. She slipped and fell and Mr. Carter remarked: Now, Lucretia, you need not try to kill yourself because Jimmy Strickland has gone to war, he'll come back and marry you.   This is just what he did.  They were married soon after the war, in 1815.
Their children were John, James, Edwin, Eliza, Susan, Fontaine, Mack, Isaac, Hampton, and Martha.  In 1838, Grandpa James Belcher Strickland married Elizabeth Davis who was the sister of our Grandpa Garrett Davis,s o our grandfather's sister married his father in law. Grandma Betsy, I think, was the fourth child of the union of James Belcher Strickland and Lucretia Tanner Strickland.  Most of you knew and loved Grandma Betsy.  Really to know her was to love her.  She was a wonderful character gentle but firm, honest, industrious and intelligent.  As a child I remember how keen her eyes were and howI stood in awe of her.  I always thought Uncle John looked more like her than any of the other children.  She and Grandpa Garret Davis were married November 21, 1839.  Grandma Betsy was the stuff of which heroines were made.  I marvel at her strength, patience and endurance.  When Uncle Sterl left for the army you know her heart was broken for they say he was her favorite child.  Judging from his letters Uncle Sterl was a most lovable boy.  Then when news came of his illness and she could not go to be with him, how she must have grieved.  Garrett, her husband, went, however and cared for Sterl until his death.  His body was brought home but the casket could not be opened.  Then shortly afterward, Uncle Sam was taken.  You know he died while on sick furlough in Danville.  Not only were her children killed during the Civil War but two, at least, of her brothers died in the army.  Grandma stood all this, and then, later on, men over 50 were called to the Southern army and Grandpa Garrett had to go.  Mama wouldn't talk much about how Grandpa Garret had to go.  The two older boys were dead, only four young children were at home and then how do you suppose Grandma felt to have to send her husband to what she had learned was certain death?  Put yourself in her place and you will wonder how she lived through it.  She toldhim goodbye and he went some twenty miles or perhaps thirty on the way toLee's  forces but, on arriving at a bridge (perhaps the one over Banister River)he met the Confederates coming home and was told that Lee had surrendered.  I have tried to picture Grandpa Garrett's homecoming.  Even if Lee had surrendered he and Grandma Betsy and the children were happy and thankful.

Then, when Uncle Ben and Uncle John were still children, Grandpa Garret, knowing he could not live long, talked with his wife and, though still weak, hecarried her around the farm, telling her where she and the boys might plant the following season.  Bu  he said, and mama would choke up when she told this,  After that, Miss Betsy, you will have to do the best you can   After his death she and the boys kept the farm going.  Uncle Ben and Uncle John proved worthy sons of worthy parents.  All of Grandma Betsy's children turned out to be good citizens.

At Halifax Court House, we found deeds in which Garret Davis bought from Mary Durham 8 to 10 acres up to line of land sold by William Davis to Garret.  And again, a deed in which William Davis bought a tract of land from Ephraim Ferrell of Birch Creek.  This 100 acres began at a corner pine on Ferrell's to William Clardy's line and Isaac Durham''s.  Our grandfather later paid $500.00for this land which became part of the old home place.  If you have not seen any of these old deeds you will be amused at the way they are worded.  Take this one, for instance: Our great grandfather, JosephDavis, was the purchaser of the property  Beginning at a corner elm on a drain thence down said drain at it meanders to a blackgum,etc., to a corner white oak on a branch.   It seems to measureby trees is a funny way to do it.

Now let's talk a bit about the Davis side of our family.  I was fortunate in hunting up data about them.  Jim Schofield, here, wrote me to read and article by Stark Young in a current issue of the Saturday Evening Post, if I would like to know something about our McGehee kin. The article was entitle  Cousin Micajah and was a biographical sketch of the author  great uncle who had gone to California to hunt gold.  It was a well written sketch but what Jim and I were interested in was if it were true.  So, I wrote and asked the author who averred for its truthfulness.  Cousin Micajah was a McGehee of Cumberland County, and that is where our McGehee folks came from. Later on I corresponded with a cousin of Stark Young and with his help and the information I got from other sources I secured a lot f data which proves conclusivelyto me that we are from that family of McGehees.

It seems that the McGregor family was very prominent in Scotland but they took part in the Montrose Rebellion against the king and were banished from the country and required to give up the name of MacGregor.  Therewere two of these MacGregor brothers.  One of them went to England and took the name of Murray.  The other came to America and located in York County; his name was Major James MacGregor.  He came from Scotland in 1653.  His son, Thomas died in 1724.  Thomas's son Edward was in the French and Indian War.  Through him we could claim the right to belong to the Daughters of Colonial Dames.  This Edward McGehee went to Cumberland County to live.  He married Elizabeth De Jarnett, daughter of a Huguenot refugee from France who came over when the Edict of Nantes was revoked.  Through the DeJarnetts we are eligibleto become members of the Society of Huguenots, which is a very exclusive organization.  Edward McGehee died around 1770, his will was probatedin 1771.  In his will he mentions the following children: John, Micajah,Daniel, Mumford, William, Samuel,Jacob, Elizabeth, and Mary.  Mary married Ayres Hodnett and became our ancestor.  This couple must have spent most of their lives in Halifax but mama and Aunt Mary Sue remember their grandmother telling them of howshe and her mother and brother, went back to see her people in Cumberland. They went back on horseback and only intended staying a short while but Lucy,the daughter, must have had a good time for she spent the better part of a year with her relatives.  The McGehees were reputed very wealthy. I think they owned a lot of land and left the biggest part to the sons as was the old English custom.  Mama said her grandmother used to talk about having slaves to do everything needed so she did not have to work. Unfortunately the Cumberland Court House records have been burned to we arenot able to secure copies of old wills, etc.there.  The McGehees have always been important people in their communities.  The family which went to Mississippi were fabulously rich.  At the time Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation Edward McGehee of Mississippi, owned a million dollars worth of slaves.  He built the fifth railroad in the United States.  He also built the first cotton mill in the South and operated it with the labor of his own slaves.  He was a friendof Zachary Taylor and was offered a cabinet post by him, but declined it because he had too vast an estate of his own to look after.  Through a cousin of Stark Young I have come into possession of papers which prove that the McGregors who called themselves McGehees were descendants of royalty, coming by directline from Robert Bruce of Scotland, and, through him, from Alfred I of England. Oh we have a lot to be proud of!

I haven't the McGregor coat of arms but have been told it carries a picture of a fallen tree.  The story is told about how this coat of arms was won.  During the reign of Davis II of Scotland (1125-1155)the king was out hunting and was attached by a wild boar which probably would have killed the king had not Malcolm MacGregor, the eighth chieftain of the  clan, seeing the King's danger, asked if he could assist him. The King replied: Een do and spare nocht  whereupon Malcolm pulled up a sapling and warded off the beast until the King could slay him. The King, in appreciation, presented MacGregor with a coat of arms containing an oak tree  eradicated and the above motto was adopted.   So on the MacGregor coat of arms today we find the uprooted tree with the inscription:  Een do and spare nocht
 

Through the McGehees our family is elligible to membership in the Baronial Order of Runnymede.  This society is made up of descendants of the signers of the Magna Charta.  We are also eligible to the  Most Noble Order of the Garter.  It that means anything to us! AnywayI wish I had known this when I was studying history, it would have made the study less laborious.

I told you that Mary McGehee married Ayres Hodnett and came to Halifax to live.  They had six children: Ayres, Jim, Sallie, John, Will andLucy.  (The author left out Benjamin).  One of them, Lucy, married Joseph Davis; I found a copy of the marriage certificate of Joseph Davis and Lucy Hodnett which was dated March 19, 1793.  Her father, Ayres Hodnett, was not mentioned but brother, John, was her bondsman and Lazarus Dodson performedt he ceremony.  The names of their children were as  follows:  Garret, Joe, Ben, Tom, Jack, William, Polly, James and Elizabeth.

Grandmother Lucy Davis was very independent.  The last years of her life she lived with her son Garet, our grandfather.  She claimed to be 105 when she died and her people say they know she was at least 100. She would get out of patience with her husband and tell the children that she went through beautiful forest where there were lovely trees and wonderful flowers and then picked up a  crooked stick . Poor Joseph!  She would sit in the chimney corner and seed cotton and Grandma Betsy never crossed her.  Mother said she could not remember a time when there was the slightest misunderstanding between the two women. With the children it was different.  Grandma Lucy fell out with the children occasionally and then she would pack her things and go to see the Byrd Ferrell who were good neighbors of hers.  In a few days Mama said Grandma would come on home and nobody ever mentioned the trouble that had arisen.  Which goes to prove, as much as anything else, what I have already declared about Grandma Betsy's gentle disposition.

About the Davis&  name proper I have not mad research thoughI found that one William Davis, who I take to be our ancestor, was in the Revolutionary War.  I have not joined the D. A. R.  but did join the Daughters of 1812 on Grandfather Strickland's record.

Through a kinsman in New York I have secured copies of the McGehee line of ancestry, together with their genealogical claim as descendants of Robert Bruce and Alfred Great, as well as their descent from the Magna Chart signers.

These are for distribution if any of you would like to have them.  Before I close may I just say that I trust we will be proud of our people, their name and their fame, and may we never do anything to bring them shame.  Let us remember:That noble birth is better still with noblerdeeds

WILL OF JOSEPH DAVIS

Wl. Bk. 2, p. 27:

IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN I Joseph Davis of Charlotte County being in my perfect Sense and memory tho’ weak in body and calling tomind the uncertainty of life and knowing it was appointed once for allmen to die do make this last will and Testament.  First I recommendmy soul to God that gave it and my body to the Ground from whence it wastaken to be buried in a decent manner, after the burial of a Christian at the discretion of my friends bestowing my estate in the following mannerand form (Vizt).  First I bequeath to my loving wife Levinah Davis  one bay mare dureing her life, and the other bay mare and the stock of all kinds and all the household furniture, during her widowhood, and after to be equally between my children.  I giveto my Son Joseph Davis partof the land with the plantation where on I now live, and the other part Igive to my Son William Davis.  The Dividing line to run from Russels Corner Tree on Roanoke up the branch which makes cut of my plantation, straight up to Bowers line, my wife is to live where she does now this comeing Winterand after to have a house built on the part of the land belonging to William Davis, where to I have Set my Hand and Seal this Tenth day of July 1791. To my son John I give five pounds.

His mark
Joseph Davis (S S)

Signed Sealed & Delivered in presence of William Russell, David  Tinsley, Jean Mullins X her mark.

At a Court held for Charlotte County the 7th day of January 1793.  This last will and Testament of Joseph Davis decd was presented in Court, & the same was proved in Court by the oath of Wm. Russell & Jean Mullins.  On the motion of Levinah Davis made oath according to Law Certificate is granted

Thomas Read   Clk.
 
 
 
 
 

Wm. Davis Rev. Record

Pitts. Co.

There was a Co. Wm. Davis from Pitts. Co who fought in the Rev. This record is found in Chatham:

A Court held April 16, 1782 said,  Zachariah Lewis came into court and proved that he'd served as a sergeant three yrs. In the Tenth Va.Regiment under Capt. Nathan Reid who was commander by Col.Wm. Ingram, and the said Lewis made oath that he has lost his discharge, and that he never before proved or claimed his right to lands for the service saforesaid  which is ordered to be certified to the register ofthe Land Office:

 I think, but have not verified, that the said Wm. Davis married Susanna Wells (a widow) in 1772.  Perhaps he is the Wm. Davis who is listedin the State Archives in Es. Coms. (from Halifax) in 1781.

If we could prove that this Col. Davis was our ancestor, we might establish claims to the Society of Colonial Dames.

So said Mrs. George L. Corbin, 3 Oak Lane, Hampton Gardens, Richmond,Va.

BENJAMIN DAVIS of Pittsylvania Co., Va. Was in Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina.  He died 1836; married Lydia Meadows.  She died 1848.

Pitts. Death Register:

Thomas Davis had daughter, Mary Davis, who died 19 April 1858 at the90th year of age so born 1768.  She married 17 March 1795 to Stephen Yates who died 1836.

Even, Joseph & Samuel Davis were immigrant brother came to the U.S.  Joseph was lost at sea.  Samuel went to the middle states and Evan settled in GA. but later went to Georgia.  The latter was ancestor of Jefferson Davis.
 
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Line of Descent

I-
Richard Mortimer Anderson III b. Sept. 13, 1959, m. on Apr 13, 1979to Angela Regina Ghoens b. August 22, 1962.  Richard Mortimer AndersonIII was the son of

II-
Richard Mortimer Anderson, Jr. b. Jan. 16, 1941, m. Feb 22, 1959 toDonna Lee Shanaberger b. Feb 4, 1941.  Richard Mortimer Anderson,Jr. wasthe son of

III-
Richard Mortimer Anderson, Sr. b. October 23, 1902, d. March 13, 1969and his wife Blanford Towler b. September 28, 1902, d. Unknown.  Theymarried on September 15, 1923.

IV-
Richard Mortimer Anderson was the son of Dr. John Carlisle Anderson,Sr.b. April 11, 1852, d. November 23, 1921 and married on July 3, 1879to MaryJane Smith b. March 31, 1859, d. March 3, 1939.  Mary JaneSmith was the daughter of

V-
William Smith b. September 2, 1818, d. August 2, 1896 and m. February18, 1856 to Rebecca Hodnett b. September 28, 1832, d. July 11, 1904. Rebecca Hodnett was the daughter of

VI-
James Hodnett, d. 1862 and m. May 3, 1819 to Mary (Polly) Jones. James Hodnett was the son of

VII-
John Hodnett b. June 30, 1767, d. 1807 and m. November 9, 1792 to Lucy Davis who m. 2nd to Jesse Woodson.  Lucy Davis was the daughter of

VIII-
William Davis d. 1791 in Pittsylvania Co., VA and his second wife, Susanna Wills, widow.  William Davis was the son of

IX-
William Davis m. October 9, 1729 and his wife, Elizabeth Shelton.

Chris (son of Peyton Young Davis, sons: Rev. Morrison Davis, BennettDavis, Chris & John.
 
 
 

(Need Coat of Arms scanned for this page)

DAVIS

MOTTO:    Authorities consulted show no motto for these arms.  However,  Ne tentes, aut perfice ; (Do not attempt, or else accomplish) is listed in Fairbain's  ;Book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland,  as associated with the Davis family.

ARMS:    Gules a chevron ermine in chief two mounds or, in base a talbot passant of the last.

CREST:    Two arms embowed, habited ermine cuffs azure, hands proper supporting a mound, as in the arms.
 

 

 12.    Donald-Calloch Macdonnall, of the Isles, died1506, whohad

13.    Donald-Crammoch Macdonnall, of the Isles, died1534, who had

 DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY
 
 

Issue:

1.    Benjamin Davis, d. 1830, on 31 January 1799 married Lydia Meador [Meadows?], dau. of Joab and Sarah Motley Davis
 

2.    Joseph Davis on 19 Mar 1793 married Lucy McGeheeHodnett, dau. of Ayres and Mary McGehee.  Issue of Joseph Davis andLucy McGehee Hodnett: 1) William, 2) Garrett, 3) Thomas, 4) Joseph (calledTennessee Joe), 5) Jack, 6) Sally, 7) James, and 8) Elizabeth.

3.    Thomas Davis b. 1757 Will Bk. 2, p. 88, d. 2 February 1845, on 13 July 1797 married Sara Meadows d. 1818, Pitts. Co., VA, dau.of Joab and wife Sarah Motley.  Issue of Thomas Davis and Sara Meador[Meader]: 1) Garrett, born 1798, 2) Thomas, Jr., born 1805, died 1846/7,3) Mary Taylor Davis, born 1802, 4 & 5) Sarah & Nancy, twins, and6) William (Capt. Buck) Davis b. 13 April 1800, d. 11 September 1886, on14 October 1824 married Camelia Craft, b. 1809, d. 15 February 1899, dau.Philip.

Issue of William (Capt. Buck) Davis and Camelia Craft:

1. Pauline Jane Davis b. 17 October 1825, d. 30 April 1905, and m. on20October 1853 to James Brown Duncan d. 26 April 1858.

Issue of Pauline Davis and James Brown Duncan

1.    William Davis Duncan b. 20 October 1856, d. 31January 1920, m. 29 February 1892 to 1) Hattie Lucy Bibb, 2) Frances (Fanny)Smith b. 28 July 1865, d. 16 September, 1949.  Issue of William DavisDuncan and Hattie Lucy Bibb: 1) Rebecca Duncan, unmd., 2) Jim Duncan m.Roy Payne, 3) Jane Duncan md. Blair Motley – divorced, 4) AmelieDuncan m. on 26February 1921 in New Orleans to Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson

Issue of Amelie Duncan and Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson: 1) Amelie Francesb. 23 Aug 1922, Camp Stolisenberg, Philippines, m. 2 Dec. 1944 to ErnestBowling Milam, 7.  Issue of Amelie Frances Anderson and Ernest BowlingMilam: 1) Frances Lee Milam b. 31 Dec 1946, Fla., 2) David Scott Milam, b.8 August 1949

Issue of Amelie Duncan and Brig. Gen. Edward Anderson (continued): 2)Edward Otey Anderson b. 3 February 1924, Washington, D.C., m. Mary Oliver7/4/195?, 3) Dr. Charles Wm. Anderson b. 18 Nov. 1931

Issue of William (Capt. Buck) Davis b. 13 Apr 1800 + Camelia Craft (cont. from above)

2.    Sarah Ann Davis unmd., b. 19 July 1827, d. 21 April 1914

3.    Mary T. Davis b. 7 October 1829, d. 20 Nov. 1910, md. Edward (Ned) Robertson b. 4 May 1827, d. 31 December 1886.  Issue of Mary T. Davis and Edward (Ned) Robertson: 1) Alice M. Robertson b. 11March 1861, d. 12 August 1912, md. George W. Taylor, 2) Thomas, 3) John,4) Sallie md. Redmond Adams, 5) Molie md. Kin Shields, 6) Jennie md. J.D. Shields, 7)Maude md. G. W. Taylor –had Mary George Taylor

4.    Thomas Philip Davis b. 7 October 1831 m. a MissJones near Roxboro, N. C. And had children 1) Tom and 2) Sally Jones md.Bennie Davis – 1st cousin.

5.    Camelia Davis b. 2 Oct 1835, md. Jeff Brooks ofRoxboro,NC.  Issue: Cook, Bub, Philip, George, May, Rosa, Sally andPolly.

6.    William George David b. 10 March 1838, D. 7 February 1909, unmd.

7.    Simeon Benton Davis b. 3 August 1842, d. 27 May1916, m.Sallie Jane Fitzgerald b. 25 January 1848, d. 31 July 1882, thedau. of ThomasJones Fitzgerald.  Issue: Sydney Orbrey David d. 28February 1953, m.on 6 July 1899 to Lucy Thacker, d. 3/30/193?.  SEEdata from FamilyBible of Sydney Orbrey Davis.

8.    James Arastus Davis, b. 11 February 1844, d. 15November1912, unmd.

9.    Samuel T. Davis b. 3 December 1847, d. 31 October 1903, unmd.

10.    Abraham I. Davis (Abram Parker Davis on Tombstone) b. 21 November 1849, d. January 1851.

11.    Christopher Tene Davis b. 6 January 1853, d. 17January1905, md. Miss Jim Hall.  Issue: a) Infant died; b) Wm. “Chuck” [Chunk?] Davis, died 1962.

Children of Wm. Davis & Susannah cont. ---

4.    John Davis married 26 September 1803, Nancy Hodnett
5.    Nancy Davis married 4 June 1789, William Ricketts
6.    Margaret (Peggy) Davis married 15 August 1791,Moses Chaney
7.    Elizabeth (Bettie) Davis married 17 May 1787,Daniel Bradley
8.    Sarah Davis married 1 February 1781 in HalifaxCo., VA.,Thomas Meade
9.    Susannah married 19 February 1787, William Corbin
10.     Mary Davis married Mires (Myres)
11.    Lucy Davis marries 1st 9 November 1792, JohnHodnett, died 1807 and married 2d Jessee Woodson, 1809.  Issue: 1)James Hodnett,d. 20 January 1840, m. on 3 May 1819 to Mary (Polly) Jones,daughter of Thomas Brooks Jones.

Issue of James Hodnett, d. 20 January 1840 and Mary (Polly) Jones

1.    John Hodnett md. 12 May 1857, Mary Ann tucker
2.    Thomas Hodnett md. 5 September 1851, HarriettC. Tucker
3.    James D. Hodnett md. 19 December 1860, TabithaDodson
4.    Philip md. Nancy Elizabeth Griggs, 23 November1858
5.    Samuel Hodnett died at Gettysburg in Civil War
6.    Harriett md. 21 October 1844, Daniel Yeatts
7.    Rebecca Frances Hodnett, b. 28 September 1832,d. 11 July 1904 m. on 18 February 1856 to William Smith b. 2 September1816, d. 2 August 1896.
8.    Jane Hodnett md. John B. Shelhorse, 2 December1853
9.    Nancy Hodnett md. 18 April 1861, Creed I. Tucker
10.    Ann Elizabeth Hodnett md. 3 December 1838, CharlesR. William
11.    George Andrew Hodnett md. 20 April 1865, MaryJane Kelly
12.     Alice Hodnett md. Beauregard Payne

NOTE:     Mr. William “Chuck”[Chunk?] Davis said three Davis brothers came from Wales.  One settledin Lunenburg County, Virginia and and two from Mecklenburg, and from themthree other brothers came toPittsylvania County and settled.  Twoof them were our William, hisbrother, Noire and Thomas.  “Chuck”believes our Williamand brothers were children of John Davis of CharlotteCourt House.

Thomas Davis from Pittsylvania County, Virginia Clerk';s Office: Transcript: August 20, 1834: Thomas Davis, aged 88 years, a resident ofPittsylvaniaCounty made affidavit that he entered the Army of the UnitedStates in theyear 1776 under Capt. James Dillard in the County of Pittsylvania where heresided for two years.  That he marched to James Town in Virginia where he was attached to a Virginia Regiment under Col. Haynes Morgan, Col.Perkinsand others.  He served as a private for three months. Ensign Daltorresigned and left the Army when he was promoted to the Rankof Ensign. He served as such at Guinns Island and other places in the lowercountiesof Virginia.  After this service he commanded a small detachmentofmen at Pittsylvania Court House by order of Col. John Wilson as a guard to British Prisoners at that place for three months.  In the winter of 1781, when Lord Cornwallis was marching through the State of North Carolina, he volunteered with Capt. Gabriel Shelton and others.  They joined GemGreene's Army and served six weeks.

The Court declared its opinion that the applicant was a Revolutionary Soldier and the same was proved by the affidavit of David Irby who served with Thomas Davis in the Revolutionary Army.

Mary Davis married 17 March 1795, Samuel Yates in Pittsylvania County, Va.  According to Pittsylvania Death Register, Mary Davis Yates wasdaughter of Thomas Davis and died 19 April 1858 at 90 years of age.
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

1.    William Davis b. 1710, m. on 29 October 1723 1)Elizabeth S., b. 1711, dau. of Ralph Shelton.  He married 2) SusannahWills (Widow of Filmur Wills [Wells] of Halifax Co., Va. On May 5, 1772.

William Davis’s will probated in Pitts. Co., Va. June 20,1791.

Issue:

a.    Benjamin Davis md. 1/31/1799, Lydia Meader [Meadows?], dau. of Joab and Sarah Motley.

b.    Joseph Davis md. 19 Mch. 1793, Lucy McGehee Hodnett, d. C1869 at 105 yrs. Age.  Issue:  1) Wm. Davis, 2) Garrett Davis (Louise Keeling’s grandfather), 3) Thomas Davis, 4) Joseph Davis (called Tennessee Joe), 5) Jack Davis, 6) Mary Davis, 7) James Davis, 8)Elizabeth Davis m.

c.    Thomas Davis m. 8 July 1797, Sally Meadows

d.    John Davis m. 19 March 1793, Nancy Hodnett

e.    Nancy Davis m. Wm. Ricketts, 5/4/1789

f.    Peggy Davis m. 15 Aug, 1791, Moses Chaney

g.    Elizabeth (Betty) m. 17 May 1784, Daniel Bradley

h.    Lucy Davis m. 9 Nov. 1792, John Hodnett   1st- died 11 9 ???; m. Jesse Woodson  2nd, 1809

i.    Sarah Davis m. 1 Nov. 1781 Thomas Meade (Maide)

j.    Susannah Davis m. 27 Feb 1786, Wm. Corbin

k.    Mary Davis m. George Mires

------------------------------

Halifax County
State of Virginia:
Deed Made: 16 May 1776
Recorded: 15 August 1776

William Davip (Davis) and Susana Davip (Davis) his wife of Halifax County for 50 (?) sell to George Watkins 133 Acres being the Dower of SusannaWells, now Davip lade and divided by the Executor of Philmer Wells decd.

His mark                                                     Her mark
William W. Davip [Davis]                     Susanna Davip [Davis]
 
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Data Copied From Family Bible Owned by Sydnor Orbrey Davis; 1952
By Blanford Towler Anderson

Thomas Davis m. Sally Meadows, July 13, 1797.

Issue of Thomas Davis m. Sally Meadows (continued later on)

1)    William Davis b. April 13, 1800, d. Sept. 11, 1886, m. October 14, 1824, Camelia Craft b. 1809, d. Feb. 15, 1899.

Issue of William Davis m. Camelia Craft

a)    Paulina Jane Davis b. Oct. 17, 1825; d. Apr. 30,1905;
b)    Sarah Ann Davis b. July 19, 1827;
c)    Mary T. Davis b. Oct. 7, 1829;
d)    Thomas Philip Davis b. Oct 7, 1831;
e)    Camelia Davis b. Oct 2, 1835;
f)    Wm. George Davis b. Mar. 10, 1839; d. Feb. 7,1909;
g)    *Simeon Benton Davis b. Aug 3, 1842, d. Feb 7,1909;
h)    James Arastus Davis b. Feb. 11, 1844, d. Nov.15, 1912;
i)    Samuel T. Davis b. Dec. 3, 1847, d. Oct 31, 1903;
j)    Abraham I. Davis b. Nov. 21, 1849, d. Jan. 1851;
k)    Ches Tene Davis b. [Christopher Tene]

*G.  Simeon Benton Davis b. Aug. 3, 1842, d.  May 27, 1916md.Sally Jane Fitzgerald b. Jan. 25, 1848, d. July 31, 1882 (dau. Thomas Jones Fitzgerald)

Issue of Simeon Benton Davis and Sally Jane Fitzgerald:

1.    Sydnor Orbrey Davis m. July 6, 1899, Lucy JaneThacker

Their Issue:

Thomas Jackson Davis b. May 5, 1900
Orbrey Nathaniel Davis B. May 4, 1902
William Arastus Davis b. May 21, 1904
Lucile Irene Davis b. Aug. 14, 1907
Nancy Jane Davis b. Mch. 17, 1922

(Issue of Simeon Benton Davis + Sally Jane Fitzgerald continued)

2.    1 Infant unnamed
3.    Simeon Benton Davis, Jr.
4.    Rosa Irene Davis md. Thomas Smith (son of Wm.Smith and Rebecca Hodnett)

Issue of Rosa Irene Davis + Thomas Smith

Alpha Smith m. Aug. 1921 to Nimrod Anderson, d. Oct 194?
Theo Smith unmd., b. Feb. 10. 1900
Janie Smith unmd., b. November 22, 1902
Ryland Smith m. Edith Walker (dau. of Senie Walker, Clima---
Benton Smith b. Jan. 15, 1907, m. on July 3, 1937 to Elizabeth Arthurb.Dec. 22, 1907

NOTES on above:

   Simeon Benton Davis (Nicknamed Tim), son of William Davis (nicknamed Capt. Buck because he trained men for the Civil War  had no campsas today so met in communities for training very much like the  National Guard

   Thomas Philip (Tom) Davis married a Miss Jones near Roxboro, N. C. And had son Tom and Dau. Sally who md. 1st cousin Bennie Davis, son of Simeon Benton Davis and Wm. Md. Irene Rocas (Reeves/Reese?).

   Ches. Tene Davis [Christopher Tene Davis] md. Miss JimHall, dau. of Nathan Hall and were parents of William (Chunk) Davis ofChatham, Va.

Bill, Sam, and Jim never married.

Camelia (Nealy) Davis md. Jeff Brooks of Roxboro, N. C. and had Cook,Bub, Philip, George, May, Rose, Sally, and Polly Brooks.

Mary T. (Polly) Davis md. Ned Robertson (had bro. Wm. K. Robertson)and lived of the Davis rock house. They had son Tom who md. Mamie Colemanand son Johnny Robertson md. dau. of John Motley.

Sarah Ann (Sally) Davis unmd. and brother Thomas Philip Davis ran hotel in Chatham.

Issue of Thomas Davis m. Sally Meadows continued:

2.    Garrett Davis of Keeling, Va. from the Keelingfamily descend.  His home was the old brick house where all of ThomasDavis’s family were born.  In 1952 Raleigh Shields livedthere near Banister River.

NOTE: Miss Amelia (Camelia) Craft, wife of Wm. Davis above, was fromRedHouse, Virginia.  Her mother was a Parker who was descended fromDr.Rush of Philadelphia, signer of the Declaration of Independence. Storyof Dr. Rush found in book “Drs. on Horseback and name of story is Prince or Devil.”

Miss Craft rode on horseback to look after the men making brick to buildhouse owned by Mr. Bigham Hayden (1952).  At this time he was 90 yrs.Ofage  Feb. 11, 1952.

   Much of the above information was given to me by him ashelived with the family.

                       Blanford Towler Anderson
------------------------------

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

Revolutionary War Record of William Davis of Pittsylvania County, Virginia

William Davis assisted in the establishment of American Independence during the War of the Revolution were as follows:

William Davis contributed generously of stock and supplies from his frontier Virginia plantation to the Southern Continental Army:

 To William Davis for one Grey Horse 4 10 ; high impd. For militia
 To William Davis for one Bay Horse 4 8 High, 12 yrs.Old L16
 To William Davis for one Black Horse 4 ;8 ;High, L10
 For use of wagon and horse for 33 days
For 340 lbs. Beef; for 106 lbs. Bacon, etc.”  He wastoo far advanced in years to see active service, being about 70 years. This was in 176? When the Southern Campaign was most active, but servedhis country by giving supplies; Ref: Clement';s History of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, pp. 169-172.  Sent to militia under Gen. Greene at the Battle of Guilford.

One company of Minute Men marched from Pittsylvania against Lord Dunmire June 1776, commanded by Capt. Thomas Dillard, Lt. Jesse Heard & EnsignRobert Dalton.  Known members were Thomas Davis, etc.  They marched through counties of Halifax, Charlotte, & Dinwiddie to Petersburg from Pittsylvania crossing the James River at Cabham., and proceeded on to Gwynn's Island.  Here they stationed several weeks under Gen. Andrew Lewis & took part in the battle fought there July 9, 1776, &c.  Page 150,  Pitts Co.History

Page 214: A Thomas Davis, private in Pittsylvania County in War of 1812.

Page 216: An old yellowed sheet from the adjutant's book preservedin paper of Maj. Langhorne Scruggs, gives the officers of the 101st Regiment in 1846 as follows:  Capt. Christopher Davis.

Page 281: Tithable 1767 John Davis; Benjamin Davis
Page 285: Tithable 1767: William Davis; Jonathan Davis.
Page 289: Tithable 1889-90: Beverlly A. Davis Member ofHouse of Delegates

Pittsylvania County, Virginia  Claims Book  pg.27: To Thomas Davis for 1 musket impf for State Troops 1/10/0.

Thomas Davis served 2 years 1776-1778 under Capt. James Dillard of Pitts.   Pitts. Court Order 24, P. 75: William Davis came into Court &pro. ACommipion [commission] apply him a Lieutenant in the 101st Regiment1stBrigade and first division of the militia & took the several oaths required,by law.
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

From the Time the First One Came to America and Settled

1.    Marion Macdonnal married Patrick Macgregor, chieftain of that ilk who led his clansmen under Montrose in 1645 and was outlawedwithhis sons.  His estates were confiscated and he and his sons werecommanded to assume other names, when John Macgregor, his heir, becameJohn Murrayand his second son James became—
2.   Thomas MacGehee. BeforeSeptember 1701 (when he and other outlawed Scotchmen petition for landin Virginia) he removed his family to Virginia and was granted land inSt. John's Parish, King William County where he resided, signing as  Thomas Macgregor or the old countrie  His will dated July 27, 1727, was proved in this country.  He had by his wife, surname unknown
3.    Edward MacGehee of King William County, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth DeJarnette, daughter of a Huguenot refugee from France who came over when the Edict of Nantes was revoked.  Through the DeJarnettes we are eligible to become members of the Society of Huguenots, which isa very exclusive one.  Through the McGehee, we are eligible to membership in the Baronial Order of Runnymede.  Edward and Elizabeth had
4.    Mary McGehee, second child, and married AyresHodnett.  They moved to Halifax County which was later PittsylvaniaCounty when the latter was formed from Halifax.  Mary’swill was filed January 19, 1818 in Pittsylvania leaving all her property to her daughter, Lucy Hodnett Davis.
5.    Lucy Hodnett married Joseph Davis, Mary 19, 1793.  She died aroun 1869.  Their children were William, Garrett, Thomas,Joseph, (called Tennessee Joe), Jack, Polly, James and Elizabeth (marriedDanielBradley.  Lucy Hodnett Davis lived to the age of 105 years.

Joseph Davis who married Lucy Hodnett was son of William Davis who married secondly, Susanna Wells (Wills), widow of Philmer Wills.  She was not Joseph's mother.

Halifax County
State of Virginia
December 14, 1831
Deed Bk. 31, pg 417:

Joseph Davis, Sr. and Lucy Davis his wife, formerly Lucy Hodnett sold Joseph Davis, Jr. their son, all of all of their interest in the estate in Halifax County, Virginia belonging to William McGehee dec’d.of the State of Georgia for $100.

Witnesses:
Bird L. Ferrell
Levi Hill
Deed Bk. 12, pg. 353:  September 18, 1783

266 2/3 Acres and interest in estate from William Wills heir at lawto Tilmur Wills Dec’d. adjoining land laid off for widow of Tilmur Wills whohas since intermarried William Davis   tract Tilmur wills purchasedfrom William Hudson.

Halifax County, Va. Records:

Mar. Reg. B. 1, p. 2: William Davis married Susanna (widow) Wells (Wills) May 5, 1772.  Thomas Tunstall, Bondsman; Mary Tunstall, Witness.

Will Bk. 1, pg. 134 Halifax Court December 1774: Robert Wooding, Thomas Hope, Thomas Tunstall Gent. or any two of them are appointed to allot to Susanna Davis late widow of Philmer Wells dec d. her dower inthe slaves of the said Wells and to make report to this court.

Same book,  - same page February 15, 1776  The allotment ofthe estate of Philmer Wells dec’d. was Ret’d. to courtand ordered to be recorded.

Will Bk. 1, p. 187 November 1776  Wells estate  division of slaves of Philmer Wells dec’d Lot #1 two negroes Adam andTeeny for JamesWells part; to #2 two negroes John & Eve for William Wells part; butto pay Lot #3 15 pounds in cash.  Lot #3 one negro   man viz. Teney for Thomas Wittes part, but to receive of Lot#2 (Wm. Wells’s part)15 pounds cash.  Given under handsJuly 21, 1777.  Signed Wm. Thompson, John Coleman, Muh’l.Roberts.

Will Bk. 10, pg. 225  Will signed April 1815 and recorded February 1817  Frances Strange names Daughter Rebecca Wells.

Deed Bk. 2, pg. 155 May 15, 1760  William Hudson of Lunenburg toFilmer Wells of Halifax for 70 pounds 300  acres on Terrible Creekit being a part of a tract that was patented by Hudson.  Signed Wm.and Sarah Hudson.

Deed Bk. 2, pg. 155 May 15, 1760 William Hudson of Lunenburg to Filmer Wells of Halifax for 70 pounds 400 Acres – (same as above.)

Deed Bk. 10, pg. 102  May 16, 1776 William Davis and Susanna hiswife of Halifax sell to George Watkins of Halifax for 50 pounds 133 acres.  It being Susanna Wells now Davis’ dowere in the lands of Philmur Wells dec’d her late husband.

Plea Book 9, pg. 83  Jeremiah Keen made Guardian of Filmer Wells orphans.

Deed Bk. 12, p. 353  September 18, 1783  266 2/3 acres andinterest in estate on Terrible Creek from William Wills of Mecklenburgfor 200 L beginning at branches of Terrible Creek William Wills heir atlaw to Tilmur Wills DDD Dec’d.  Adjoining land laid offfor widow of Tilmur Wills purchased from William Hudson.
 

DAVIS FAMILY HISTORY

(Copy of a letter written by Mrs. George L. Corbin, 3 Oak Lane, Hampton Gardens, and Richmond, Virginia to Mildred Keeling, Keeling, Virginia).1939

“I am afraid you have selected the wrong person to talk about the DAVIS family for I am so interested I may bore you.  Just a fewyears agoI became family conscious.  Other people boasted of theirfamily trees and I wondered why in the fast forests we could not find aDavis tree ofwhich we might be proud.  My father said: “Youd’dbetternot search too closely for you might find somebody hanging from oneof thelimbs”.  “Well,” I replied, “wewould not beunlike all the other proud old families if I did.  Iftheir skeletonsare not hanging to the trees, they are hidden in the familyclosets.” But, you see, they make such a do about those relativeswho have become prominentthat people forget about the skeletons in thefamily closets.”

You know I just felt that the Davis family was obliged to be better,a little better than the average run of folks.  Not speaking of myown generation, the Davis line just preceding me of which my mother andAunt Mary Sue and the other brothers and sisters were representatives,you’ll agree with me, was exceptional.  They had littlemoney but there was a certainpride of family, grace of bearing, neatnessof attire, to say nothing ofthe wonderful traits of character they displayedwhich set them apart. We Davis’ have the reputation of beingjust a mite “close”but Scotch blood will show up. Our mothers and fathers could make alittle go a long way; in our familyit was often a “mighty” little,too.  I remembermy mother telling me about her grandmother who cautionedher thus: “Child,don’t use so much water when you wash clothesfor the more wateryou use the more soap it takes.”  When shewas an old womanGrandma Lucy Davis insisted on laundering her own clothesbut in later yearsAunt Anne did the ironing for her.  I have GrandmaLucy’s iron which was given her (my mother) by Grandma Betsy.

Perhaps, I will be clearer if I tell about the Strickland family first.  It is an old English family, dating back historically to 1200.  TheStrickland’s lived in the beautiful old Sizerge Castle in Kent County,England. They married into the powerful De La Warr family, and werefavorites ofthe king.  The present Strickland family at Sizerge Castlehighly prizea bedquilt worked by Catharine of Parr and handed down in thefamily.

Of the Virginia Strickland’s we know little.  Our grandfatherJames Belcher Strickland, was an orphan and I could not find out much abouthim.  My mother told me he was adopted without change of name by a familyin Charlotte County by the name of Burgess.  Aunt Mary Sue thinks hecame down from near News Ferry.  Wherever he came from he must havebeen an unusualpersonage.  They say he was very particular and hadmost refined tastes. He was married four different times but most ofhis children were born ofthe first marriage.  His first wife LucretiaTanner was our ancestor. It is said that when Jimmie Belcher Stricklandwas a young man and had goneto fight in the War of 1812, a neighbor namedCarter passed the Tanner homewhile Lucretia Tanner was on a scaffold puttingout cherries to dry. She slipped and fell and Mr. Carter remarked:“Now, Lucretia,you need not try to kill yourself because Jimmy Stricklandhas gone to war,he’ll come back and marry you.”  This isjust whathe did.  They were married soon after the war, in 1815.
Their children were John, James, Edwin, Eliza, Susan, Fontaine, Mack,Isaac, Hampton, and Martha.  In 1838, Grandpa James Belcher Stricklandmarried Elizabeth Davis who was the sister of our Grandpa Garrett Davis,so our grandfather’s sister married his father in law. Grandma Betsy, I think, was the fourth child of the union of James BelcherStrickland and Lucretia Tanner Strickland.  Most of you knew and lovedGrandma Betsy.  Really to know her was to love her.  She wasa wonderful character—gentle but firm, honest, industrious andintelligent.  As a child I remember how keen her eyes were and howI stood in awe of her.  I always thought Uncle John looked more likeher than any of the other children.  She and Grandpa Garret Daviswere married November 21, 1839.  Grandma Betsy was the stuff of whichheroines were made.  I marvel at her strength, patience and endurance.  When Uncle Sterl left for the army you know her heart was broken for they say he was her favorite child.  Judging from his letters Uncle Sterl was a most lovable boy.  Then when news came of his illness and shecould not go to be with him, how she must have grieved.  Garrett, herhusband, went, however and cared for Sterl until his death.  His bodywas brought home but the casket could not be opened.  Then shortly afterward,Uncle Sam was taken.  You know he died while on sick furlough in Danville.  Not only were her children killed during the Civil War but two, at least, of her brothers died in the army.  Grandma stood all this, and then, later on, men over 50 were called to the Southern army and Grandpa Garrett had to go.  Mama wouldn’t talk much about how Grandpa Garret had to go.  The two older boys were dead, only four young childrenwereat home and then how do you suppose Grandma felt to have to send herhusband to what she had learned was certain death?  Put yourself inher place and you will wonder how she lived through it.  She toldhim goodbyeand he went some twenty miles or perhaps thirty on the way toLee’sforces but, on arriving at a bridge (perhaps the one overBanister River)he met the Confederates coming home and was told that Leehad surrendered.  I have tried to picture Grandpa Garrett’shomecoming.  Even if Lee had surrendered he and Grandma Betsy andthe children were happy andthankful.

Then, when Uncle Ben and Uncle John were still children, Grandpa Garret,knowing he could not live long, talked with his wife and, though still weak,hecarried her around the farm, telling her where she and the boys mightplantthe following season.  “But”, he said, and mamawouldchoke up when she told this, “After that, Miss Betsy, youwill haveto do the best you can.”  After his death she andthe boys keptthe farm going.  Uncle Ben and Uncle John proved worthysons of worthyparents.  All of Grandma Betsy’s childrenturned out to be goodcitizens.

At Halifax Court House, we found deeds in which Garret Davis boughtfromMary Durham 8 to 10 acres up to line of land sold by William Davisto Garret.  And again, a deed in which William Davis bought a tractof land from Ephraim Ferrell of Birch Creek.  This 100 acres beganat a corner pine on Ferrell’s to William Clardy’s lineand Isaac Durham’s.  Our grandfather later paid $500.00for this land which became part of the old home place.  If you havenot seen any of these old deeds you will be amused at the way they areworded.  Take this one, for instance: Our great grandfather, JosephDavis, was the purchaser of the property – “Beginningata corner elm on a drain thence down said drain at it meanders to a blackgum,etc., to a corner white oak on a branch.”  It seems to measureby trees is a funny way to do it.

Now let’s talk a bit about the Davis side of our family.  I was fortunate in hunting up data about them.  Jim Schofield, here, wrote me to read and article by Stark Young in a current issue of the SaturdayEvening Post, if I would like to know something about our McGehee kin. The article was entitle “Cousin Micajah” and was a biographicalsketch of the author’s great uncle who had gone to California to huntgold.  It was a well written sketch but what Jim and I were interestedin was ifit were true.  So, I wrote and asked the author who averredfor itstruthfulness.  “Cousin Micajah” was a McGeheeofCumberland County, and that is where our McGehee folks came from. Lateron I corresponded with a cousin of Stark Young and with his help andtheinformation I got from other sources I secured a lot f data which provesconclusivelyto me that we are from that family of McGehees.

It seems that the McGregor family was very prominent in Scotland butthey took part in the Montrose Rebellion against the king and were banishedfrom the country and required to give up the name of MacGregor.  Therewere two of these MacGregor brothers.  One of them went to Englandand took the name of Murray.  The other came to America and locatedin York County; his name was Major James MacGregor.  He came fromScotland in 1653.  His son, Thomas died in 1724.  Thomas’sson Edward was in theFrench and Indian War.  Through him we couldclaim the right to belongto the Daughters of Colonial Dames.  ThisEdward McGehee went to Cumberland County to live.  He married ElizabethDe Jarnett, daughter of a Huguenot refugee from France who came over whenthe Edict of Nantes was revoked.  Through the DeJarnetts we are eligibleto become members of the Society of Huguenots, which is a very exclusiveorganization.  Edward McGehee died around 1770, his will was probatedin 1771.  In his will he mentions the following children: John, Micajah,Daniel, Mumford, William, Samuel,Jacob, Elizabeth, and Mary.  Marymarried Ayres Hodnett and became ourancestor.  This couple must havespent most of their lives in Halifaxbut mama and Aunt Mary Sue remembertheir grandmother telling them of howshe and her mother and brother, wentback to see her people in Cumberland. They went back on horseback and onlyintended staying a short while but Lucy,the daughter, must have had a goodtime for she spent the better part ofa year with her relatives.  TheMcGehees were reputed very wealthy. I think they owned a lot of land and left the biggest part to the sons aswas the old English custom.  Mama said her grandmother used to talkabout having slaves to do everything needed so she did not have to work. Unfortunately the Cumberland Court House records have been burned to we arenot able to secure copies of old wills, etc.there.  The McGehees havealways been important people in their communities.  The family whichwent to Mississippi were fabulously rich.  At thetime Lincoln signedthe Emancipation Proclamation Edward McGehee of Mississippi, owned a milliondollars worth of slaves.  He built the fifth railroad in the UnitedStates.  He also built the first cotton mill in the South and operatedit with the labor of his own slaves.  He was a friendof Zachary Taylorand was offered a cabinet post by him, but declined itbecause he had toovast an estate of his own to look after.  Througha cousin of StarkYoung I have come into possession of papers which provethat the McGregorswho called themselves McGehees were descendants of royalty,coming by directline from Robert Bruce of Scotland, and, through him, fromAlfred I of England. Oh we have a lot to be proud of!

I haven’t the McGregor coat of arms but have been told itcarries a picture of a fallen tree.  The story is told about how thiscoat ofarms was won.  During the reign of Davis II of Scotland (1125-1155)theking was out hunting and was attached by a wild boar which probably wouldhavekilled the king had not Malcolm MacGregor, the eighth chieftain of theclan,seeing the King’s danger, asked if he could assist him. The Kingreplied: “Een do and spare nocht”, whereupon Malcolmpulledup a sapling and warded off the beast until the King could slay him. TheKing, in appreciation, presented MacGregor with a coat of arms containingan oak tree “eradicated” and the above motto was adopted.   So on the MacGregor coat of arms today we find the uprooted tree with the inscription: “Een do and spare nocht”.
 

Through the McGehees our family is elligible to membership in the Baronial Order of Runnymede.  This society is made up of descendants of thesigners of the Magna Charta.  We are also eligible to the “MostNobleOrder of the Garter.”  It that means anything to us! AnywayI wish I had known this when I was studying history, it would havemade thestudy less laborious.

I told you that Mary McGehee married Ayres Hodnett and came to Halifax to live.  They had six children: Ayres, Jim, Sallie, John, Will andLucy.  (The author left out Benjamin).  One of them, Lucy, marriedJoseph Davis; I found a copy of the marriage certificate of Joseph Davisand Lucy Hodnett which was dated March 19, 1793.  Her father, AyresHodnett, was notmentioned but brother, John, was her bondsman and LazarusDodson performedthe ceremony.  The names of their children were asfollows:  Garret,Joe, Ben, Tom, Jack, William, Polly, James and Elizabeth.

Grandmother Lucy Davis was very independent.  The last years ofherlife she lived with her son Garet, our grandfather.  She claimedtobe 105 when she died and her people say they know she was at least 100.She would get out of patience with her husband and tell the children thatshewent through beautiful forest where there were lovely trees and wonderfulflowers and then picked up a “crooked stick”. Poor Joseph!  She would sit in the chimney corner and seed cottonand Grandma Betsy never crossed her.  Mother said she could not remembera time when there was the slightest misunderstanding between the two women. With the children it was different.  Grandma Lucy fell out with thechildren occasionally and then she would pack her things and go to seethe Byrd Ferrell who were good neighbors of hers.  In a few days Mamasaid Grandma would comeon home and nobody ever mentioned the trouble thathad arisen.  Whichgoes to prove, as much as anything else, what Ihave already declared aboutGrandma Betsy’s gentle disposition.

About the Davis’ name proper I have not mad research thoughI found that one William Davis, who I take to be our ancestor, was in theRevolutionary War.  I have not joined the D. A. R.’s butdid join the Daughters of 1812 on Grandfather Strickland’s record.

Through a kinsman in New York I have secured copies of the McGehee line of ancestry, together with their genealogical claim as descendants of Robert Bruce and Alfred Great, as well as their descent from the Magna Chart signers.

These are for distribution if any of you would like to have them.  Before I close may I just say that I trust we will be proud of our people, their name and their fame, and may we never do anything to bring them shame.  Let us remember: “That noble birth is better still with noblerdeeds”.

WILL OF JOSEPH DAVIS

Wl. Bk. 2, p. 27:

IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN I Joseph Davis of Charlotte County being inmy perfect Sense and memory tho’ weak in body and calling tomind the uncertainty of life and knowing it was appointed once for allmen to die do make this last will and Testament.  First I recommendmy soul to God that gave it and my body to the Ground from whence it wastaken to be buried in a decent manner, after the burial of a Christianat the discretion of my friends bestowing my estate in the following mannerand form (Vizt).  First I bequeath to my loving wife Levinah Davisone bay mare dureing her life, and the other bay mare and the stock ofall kinds and all the household furniture, during her widowhood, and afterto be equally between my children.  I giveto my Son Joseph Davis partof the land with the plantation whereon I nowlive, and the other part Igive to my Son William Davis.  The Dividingline to run from RusselsCorner Tree on Roanoke up the branch which makescut of my plantation, straightup to Bowers line, my wife is to live whereshe does now this comeing Winterand after to have a house built on the partof the land belonging to WilliamDavis, where to I have Set my Hand and Sealthis Tenth day of July 1791. To my son John I give five pounds.

His mark
Joseph Davis (S S)

Signed Sealed & Delivered in presence of William Russell, David Tinsley, Jean Mullins X her mark.

At a Court held for Charlotte County the 7th day of January 1793.  This last will and Testament of Joseph Davis dec’d was presented in Court, & the same was proved in Court by the oath of Wm. Russell& JeanMullins.  On the motion of Levinah Davis made oath accordingto LawCertificate is granted

Thomas Read   Clk.

Wm. Davis Rev. Record

Pitts. Co.

There was a Co. Wm. Davis from Pitts. Co who fought in the Rev. This record is found in Chatham:

A Court held April 16, 1782 said,   Zachariah Lewis came into courtand proved that he'd served as a sergeant three yrs. Inthe Tenth Va.Regiment under Capt. Nathan Reid who was commander by Col.Wm. Ingram, and the said Lewis made oath that he has lost his discharge,and that he neverbefore proved or claimed his right to lands for the services afore said  which is ordered to be certified to the register of the Land Office:

 I think, but have not verified, that the said Wm. Davis married Susanna Wells (a widow) in 1772.  Perhaps he is the Wm. Davis whois listedin the State Archives in Es. Coms. (from Halifax) in 1781.

If we could prove that this Col. Davis was our ancestor, we might establish claims to the Society of Colonial Dames.

So said Mrs. George L. Corbin, 3 Oak Lane, Hampton Gardens, Richmond,Va.

BENJAMIN DAVIS of Pittsylvania Co., Va. Was in Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina.  He died 1836; married Lydia Meadows.  She died 1848.

Pitts. Death Register:

Thomas Davis had daughter, Mary Davis, who died 19 April 1858 at the90th year of age so born 1768.  She married 17 March 1795 to StephenYates who died 1836.

Even, Joseph & Samuel Davis were immigrant brother came to the U.S.  Joseph was lost at sea.  Samuel went to the middle states  and Evan settled in GA. but later went to Georgia.  The latter was ancestor of Jefferson Davis.

Transcribed by Sue Tiffany from the notes of Mrs. Anderson