Scott County Historical Society
Scott County, Virginia

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Mildred McConnell's Scrapbook Articles

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HERALDVIRGINIAN Thursday, December 31, 1964

Culbertson's Chapel Church With A History




Culbertson's Chapel Methodist Church organized at the close of the Civil War. This building log structure.

This big oak near the Church has been the home for a colony of wild bees for years.





J. Mitchell Dougherty noted Methodist Layman,
Teacher and Sunday School Superintendent

 

     There are two institutions which have operated in a superb manner in the mental and religious development of Scott County. They are the rural church and the one room school.

     In this sketch I want to point with pride to one of the outstanding country churches in this County, Culbertson's Chapel, located on a bluff overlooking the East Fork of Valley Creek about 2 1/2 or 3 miles west of Nickelsville.

     This church was organized shortly after the close of the Civil War under the leadership of Rev. A. H. Ingle one of the early pastors if not indeed the first. Tradition has it that he was the first licensed preacher of the M. E. Church south of the Mason & Dixon Line after the division of the church some years prior to the Civil War. The Rev. Ingle was a pulpit orator of the highest order. In the early years of the century I distinctly recall hearing him a number of times. I have recently talked with the Rev. N.P. King who preached Ingle's funeral, and who probably remembers more about Anthony Ingle than any other living man.

     Mr. King tells me that he to this day regards "Autney" Ingle as one of the greatest preachers, he has ever known. He describes him as earnest, energetic, loyal and dedicated. N. P. King, himself is a former pastor of the Culbertson's Chapel Church. He is very much of the same kind of minister he pictures the Rev. Ingle to have been. Recognition of this is fully demonstrated by the number of funerals in all parts of the county he is called on to conduct.

     Among other preachers who have served Culbertson's Chapel with distinction the present pastor, the Rev. Mabe and those of yesterday like W. Vance Elliott,!. N. Todd,Lonnie Cox, Rev. Lawson, Kenneth Williams and his son.

     Two outstanding Laymen should bl mentioned in any sketch of Culbertson's Chapel. They are J. Mitchell Dougherty and H. D. (Kay) Kilgore.  Mitchell is now 90 years old.

     For the past 75 years he has been an active worker in his church. A regular attendant at every service, he has served more than seventy yea r s either or both as Sunday school teacher and Sunday School superintendent. The magnificient work he has done during all these years is amaging to contemplate. For his church his community and country he has been and still is a valiant soldier. If these were such an office as Bishop of laymen, J. Mitchell Dougherty should be the layman to fill it.

     "Happy the man who in the evening of life can look back on days well spent and duties well performed. 

     Likewise H. D. (Kay) Kilgore loves the Lord and His work with a zeal and devotion unexcelled. To attend a service at the Culbertson's Chapel, to hear the gospel singing of Kay Kilgore, to hear the prayers to observe the reverence of all those fine people is refreshing and delightful to the spiritual life of any Christian.

     The present church building was dedicated in 1905. Dr. J. J. 'Manker of Chattanooga preached the dedicatory sermon. The building is a frame structure which in recent years has been remodeled and modernized. The church pews and other 'furniture are beautifully simple and simply beautiful. A good heating system, good lights and well kept grounds make it one of the most attractive country churches in a wide area. If you want to worship in a quiet, reverent atmosphere with a dedicated and a hospitable people, by all means give yourself a treat sometime by going to Culbertson's Chapel.

     The products of the church are business men, preachers, doctors and other professions widely scattered now but many of them make annual pilgrimages back to where they worshpiped in youth.

     The Rev. E. Gordon Gillespie was a native of the community. He and all his family were members of the church and Gordon did very much of his early preaching there. He later filled important pastorates in Gate City and in Tennessee. His two surviving brothers, Charlie M. and J. W., leading business men of Coeburn I am told, still have their membership at Culbertson's Chapel. "Blest be the tie that binds. "

 

Home ] Up ] One Room Schools ] Saratoga School ] Addington Frame ] Clinchport ] Hale Spring ] Patrick Hagan ] Figures of Speech ] Haunted House ] Trek West ] Carter Sisters ] High Knob Mystery ] Kinfolks ] Molly White ] Greenwood Normal ] Twin Springs ] James Aker 104 ] Superstitions ] Sunbright ] Rafting ] Old Timers ] Polly Phipps ] CW Death List ] Brick Church ] Midway School ] Hiltons ] Antioch Church ] Dungannon Past ] NHS-1936 ] Derting Bros ] Kane Homeplace ] William Lawson ] NHS-1929 ] Burial Customs ] Miss Mattie ] Good Ole Days ] [ Culbertsons Chapel ] Duffield ] NHS-1928 ] Kilgore Ft. House ] James Dougherty ] Cedar Point School ] Elliot Reunion ]