Lyndon occupies a position in the Passumpsic valley, in the eastern central part of the county, in lat. 44º 32', and long. 4º 54', and is bounded northeast by Sutton and Burke, southeast by Kirby, southwest by St. Johnsbury, and northwest by Wheelock. The town was located in the summer of 1780, by Hon.Jonathan Arnold, Daniel Cahoon and Daniel Owen, of  Providence, R.I., an exploring committee of an association of about fifty of the most enterprising citizens of that city and vicinity, to select ungranted territory for a township in which to settle a colony in the new state of Vermont and procure its charter. Barnet, Peacham and Ryegate were the only towns then chartered within the present limits of Caledonia county.  The approach of the committee to the ungranted territory was by the way of the Connecticut river valley; and, as a natural continuation of the same valley, they followed up the Passumpsic river to its Great and Littlefalls, and its extensive meadows on the main river and its many tributaries; and they made such further reconnoissances as they deemed necessary, to be sure they were right.   They then, from the summit of a high, conical hill, southeast of the "Corner Village," with the eye fixed the outlines now forming the boundaries of the town of Lyndon, as best comporting with the interests of their mission.   Before its charter, the territory thus selected was called Bestbury. The town was granted by the general assembly of Vermont, November 2, 1780, to Jonathan Arnold and his associates-in all fifty-three, inclusive of the governors of Vermont and Rhode Island, and the Rev. James Manning, D.D., of Providence, and the others, mostly his parishioners, uniting the interests of church and state in favor of the adventurers. The name Lyndon was given in honor of the oldest son of the first grantee, Dr. Arnold, whose name was Josias Lyndon. Historically the tract was chartered November 20, 1780; but the record in the town clerk's office bears date June 27, 1781, after its survey, and confers on the township the usual privileges and immunities of corporate towns, dividing their proprietary shares into seventieth parts, reserving six for public uses. 

       The surface of the town is uneven, being interspersed with hills and valleys carved out by the many tributaries of the Passumpsic flowing from other towns and uniting in this to form one beautiful river. Its waters are uncommonly cold and pure. These rivulets divide the town into a fair proportion of meadow and upland. The soil is a rich loam, easy of cultivation, and very productive. There is scarcely any barren or waste land in the town, and the highest hills are arable to their summits, usually as fertile and productive, leading to an abundant harvest of any crop; and they also afford excellent grazing for cattle, sheep and horses. The intervals, which are overflowed by the spring and fall freshets, are sufficiently enriched by the alluvial deposit thus given them as not to require the dressing which uplands need to restore the exhaustions of frequent harvests. Several excellent mill sites are afforded by these streams. The most noted of these are the “Great Falls” and the “Little Falls,” both being on the main branch of the Passumpsic, the former on the entire river as it leaves town; the head of the falls, over which the railroad, passes, being some sixty rods north of the south line of the town, and having a descent, in about thirty rods, of sixty-five feet. The Little Falls, about a mile above, have a descent from the bed of the stream about twenty-feet. The Connecticut and Passumpsic Rivers railroad passes through the town north and south near its center. 

       In 1880, Lyndon had a population Of 2,434.  In 1886 it had fourteen school districts and thirteen common schools, taught during the year by three male and twenty-nine female teachers, at an average weekly salary, including board, Of $14.10 for the former and $8.36 for the latter. There were 483 scholars, seventy-five of whom attended private schools. The total income for school purposes was $5,230.75, while the entire expenditures were $4,156.89, with Hiram M. Pearl, superintendent. 

       Lyndonville, located on the east side of the Passumpsic river, near the center of the town, is a beautiful, thriving post village, the largest in the township. The railroad shops were brought here in 1866-67, giving a large impetus to the growth and business interests of the village, as they furnish employment to nearly six hundred hands. 

       Lyndon Center (p. o.), is located just west of the above village, and west of the river, and is the seat of the Lyndon Institute. 

       Lyndon (p. o.) is located on the railroad in the southern part of the town, and is the seat of the Lyndon academy and graded school. 

       East Lyndon is a hamlet located in the eastern part of the town. 

       The National Bank of Lyndon on November 14, 1854, the Bank of Lyndon, a savings institution, was chartered, and began business in May, 1855.  Its capital was $50,000.00 subsequently increased to $100,000.00 E. B. Chase was elected president, and E. A. Cahoon made cashier. On March 23, 1865, the bank was re-chartered as a national institution, and in March 1885, its charter was again extended to 1905.  Dr. D. N. Trull is now president, and W. J. Stanton, Jr., cashier. 

       Lyndon Carriage Company.   This concern was established by George A. and William Miller, where Hall & Chase's saw-mill now is, over fifty years ago, and was removed to Lyndon village as early as 1849.  About 1853, G.Ide, Justus Trull and J.D. Miller organized the firm of Ide, Trull & Miller, and did business about two years. Then Miller & Trull eight or ten years. The firm of Trull & Mattocks (Dr. D.N. Trull and S.S. Mattocks), bought the business in 1862, and it has been substantially owned and operated by them since that time. The present business style was adopted in 1867. They own a large two-story factory building, a large store-house and a blacksmith shop in Lyndon village. Their machinery comprises everything essential to the equipment of a first-class shop, and is operated by steam power. They build from one hundred to two hundred carriages and seventy-five sleighs per annum, employing from twelve to twenty men, making a specialty of first-class carriages. 

       J.D. Hadley's steam carriage shop and lumber dressing-mill were built by him in 1886. He builds carriages and sleighs, does contracting in housebuilding, dresses lumber, etc. His mill also furnishes room and power for a granite polishing machine. 

       Hopkins & Thompson’s butter-tub factory at Lyndonville, was built by Matthewson & Miller, who operated it about three years. The present firm employs eight men. The machine shop in the same building is operated by Charles H. Hopkins. 

       B.F. Lincoln's saw and stave-mills, located in the northern part of the town, on road 28, were built by the Lyndon Mill Co. in 1872. They operated the mill about ten years, when it was taken by Mr. Lincoln. It has the capacity for cutting 20,000 feet of lumber per day.

       The Lyndon saw and grist-mills, located in the southern part of the town, on road 65, were built by Dudley P. Hall in 1855. The saw-mill employs fifteen hands, and is owned by the Hall estate and, Charles P. Chase. The grist-mill is owned by George P. Ide & Co. 

       The Lyndon pulp-mill, located in the southern part of the town, on road 51, was built by the present owners, C.T.Wilder & Co., of Boston, in 1876. They manufacture a carload of paper pulp per day. 

       Freemasonry in Lyndon.  It is said that a lodge of Freemasons was established in Lyndon in the early part of this century, but owing to the persecution of the “anti-Masonic period” its charter was surrendered and no organization maintained. While we have been able to find no absolute proof that such a lodge existed here, this is the generally accepted belief, and many tales are told of the overt and covert acts of persecution, suffered by the members of the order. For the history of the local organization, as established by record, we must come down to the fall of 1864, when meetings were held and a request prepared in conformance with which Crescent Lodge, No. 66, F. and A. M., was chartered January 12, 1865, the names of members appearing upon its charter being G.L. Bradley, C.H. Davis, N.L. Folsom, L.P. Brown, E.V. Cobleigh, S.R. Houghton, C.W. Scott, C.S. Cahoon, Alanson Scott, Jason Powers and Charles Powers.   The officers chosen at that time were L. P. Brown, W. M.; C.H. Davis, S. W.; E.V. Cobleigh, J. W.; whose names appear upon the charter. The succession of masters has been as follows : L.P. Brown, 1864-5-6; L.K. Quimby, 1867-70; S.S. Mattocks, 1868-69; W.R. Hubbard, 1871; S.E. Goss, 1872-75-79-80-81; H. Baxter, 1873 ;W.H. Fletcher, 1874-82-83; O.G. Chase, 1876-77-78; A.H. Walter, 1884-85; A.D. Paige, 1886-87.  Until November 1873, the lodge room was at Lyndon, but since that time it has been at Lyndonville, for several years in the brick block on Main, opposite Depot street. In 1882 they removed to their present quarters in Fletcher's block, where an elegant suite of rooms had been prepared for their use. These rooms, tastefully frescoed and furnished, are hardly excelled in this part of the state. This lodge now numbers 103 members. Dr.Horace Bartlett, who, with his wife, were drowned in the wrecking of the steamer City of Columbus, was an active member of the lodge, and officiated as its secretary for a number of years. 

       Odd Fellows in Lyndon.  Although the first appearance of this fraternity in Lyndon, as an organization, dates back only to 1878, it has already attained to the goodly membership of seventy-five, and has a comfortable home, furnished with taste and elegance, in Mathewson's block. The lodge was chartered as “Union Lodge NO. 4, I. 0. 0. F.,”  November 1, 1878, and instituted the 12th of the same month, with six charter members, namely, J.C. Sargent, J.L. Watchie, C.N. Harris, George F. Dame, J.C. Jones, and A.T. Bean. A.T. Bean was the first N. G., J.C. Sargent, V. G., F.D. Leonard, Sec., and G.F. Dame, Treasurer. The present officers are: N.E. Aldrich, N. G.; J.S. Buell, V. G.; G.W. Knight, Rec. Sec.; R.S. Pierce, Per. Sec.; E.C. Hodge, Treasurer. 

       The Town House and Village Hall, located at Lyndonville, was erected in 1883, by the village. It cost $6,000.00. It is a wood structure, with 1,200 seats. The basement is occupied by the fire company and band and engine room.  It is a fine structure and an ornament to the village.

       The grant of the township being to citizens of Rhode Island, most of the early settlers came from that state and vicinity, Seekonk and Rehoboth, Mass.  Others came from the interior of Massachusetts, and the valley of the Connecticut river, in Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire; and some from the interior of New Hampshire, Sandwich and its vicinity. The first settlement was commenced by Daniel Cahoon, Jr., a native of Providence, R.I., then coming from Winchester, N.H.  He, with a few chosen men, commenced a clearing on right No.3, allotted to his father as original proprietor, in April 1788. The first season was devoted to clearing land and building a log house, and growing scanty supplies of provisions, he having the honor of falling the first tree for the settlement. As the woods were full of game, and the river of trout, they fared more sumptuously than such adventurers would now. Mr. Cahoon's first experience in house-keeping was in a camp of boughs; and then in one covered with bark peeled from the trees in large sheets, and afterwards in a log house, covered with the same material, keeping bachelor's hall. After his beginning, others followed in his wake, and shortly many a new opening was made in the forests, and many a smoke-wreath rolling upward indicated that human habitations were in progress of construction. Jonathan Davis, Jonas Sprague, Nathan Hines, and Daniel Hall were of the number. They did not attempt a winter's residence, but retired to their friends for more comfortable quarters; and, after rest and social enjoyment, and obtaining supplies of necessaries, the adventurers returned the following spring, 1789, invigorated and with new zeal in their enterprises, and one at least with a new stimulant to action—Davis, with his wife, the first female settler of the town, they making their home in Mr. Cahoon's new log house. This year most of the beginners of the previous year, with several others, moved their families into town; and this year and the next were so well prospered and increased, that in 1791 so many had commenced settlements in the different parts of the town, that it became desirable to have it organized for the making and repairing of bridges and roads, and the better managing the prudential affairs of the community; and with the patriotic purpose of duly honoring the 4th of July, they fixed on that day for its organization; Abraham Morrill, Esq., of Wheelock warning the meeting and presiding until the purpose was effected by the choice of Elder Philemon Hines, moderator; Daniel Cahoon, clerk; James Spooner, Daniel Reniff, and Daniel Cahoon, Jr., selectmen and listers; Nehemiah Tucker, treasurer; and Nathan Hines, constable and collector. There were at this time fifty-nine inhabitants in the township. The subsequent growth of the township may be seen by reference to the. census table on another page in this work. 

       The first child born in the town was a son of Nathan Hines, February 9, 1791, who was named Lyndon. Dr. Arnold had promised one hundred acres of land to the first child born in the town, but about this time the doctor died, so Lyndon never received the gift. In October of the same year another male child was born, Benjamin Parker, son of Daniel, Jr., and Juliet Cahoon. The first female born in Lyndon was Lydia, daughter of Zebin Wilder, who became the wife of Benjamin Powers. The first death was that of Daniel Cahoon, Jr., of consumption, June 11, 1793. He was buried near his own dwelling, where several other interments were made, but several years after his remains were removed to the burying place at the middle of the town.  During the same month of Mr. Cahoon's death the twelve year old son of Samuel Winslow was killed by a falling tree. In 1794 three deaths occurred, viz.: May 24th, a twelve year old daughter of Adniel Hall, of canker-rash; on the 4th of June, Elder Philemon Hines, during a fit of temporary aberration, hanged himself in the woods; and on the 12th of August, widow Cynthia Jenks died suddenly of lock-jaw. The first marriage ceremony performed in the town was that of Jeremiah Washburn and Hannah Orcutt, of Billymead (now Sutton), by Daniel Cahoon, Esq., June 26, 1794. The first mills were erected by Daniel Cahoon, Esq., in 1796, who received the right of land reserved by charter for this purpose. 

       Daniel Cahoon, Jr., was the first settler of Lyndon, and was also the first man who died in town, his death occurring June 11, 1793, aged twenty-six years. His father, Daniel, Sr., came to this town from Providence, R.I., in 1793, held many offices of trust, and built the first flour and saw-mill in town. He died September 13, 1811. His son Gen. William Cahoon also held many offices of trust, and was member of Congress four years. George C., son of William, married Mary Ripley, daughter of Hon. Nicholas Bayles, of Montpelier, and reared two children, Sarah, widow of Henry Bartlett, Esq., and George W.   He was a lawyer, served as town representative and was also senator. He died in 1879, aged eighty-one years. His son George W. is a lawyer, and has two sons and three daughters, viz.: James B., who is an ensign in the navy; George C., a lawyer at Lyndonville with his father; Mary, who married Edwin H. Hoffman, a partner in the firm of Cahoon & Hoffman; Charlotte and Grace, both at home. Mr. Cahoon resides in Lyndon. 

       Caleb Parker, a native of Massachusetts, came to Lyndon about 1790, and located on road 7, where he remained until his death at the age of eighty years. He married Sally Watkins, of Winchester, N.H., and reared three children. His son Caleb D. married Mary, daughter of Robert Green, and has reared four children, namely, Helen A., Edwin G., Roancy L. and Theodore W.  The last mentioned married Kate McVicker, and resides with his father on the homestead. Edwin G. married Rena G., daughter of Calvin Hodgdon, and lives on road 8. 

       Nathan Parker came to Lyndon at an early day, and located on the place where J.A. Smith now lives, on road 61. He married three times, first, Jemima Burbank, second, Betsey Brewer, and third, Malinda Hartwell, and had in all eighteen children. His son, Carlos Parker, married Susan Hill, and has had born to him two children. Nathan L., son of Carlos, married twice, first, Mary Dean, and second, Sophia Porter, has three children, Elwin, Carley and Ralph, and resides at Lyndonville with his father.  Mrs. Sarah Clark, daughter of Nathan Parker, is a widow, her husband, Eben Clark, having died in 1863, aged sixty-five years. She resides in Lyndon. Another daughter, Saloma, is the widow of Jason Bradley, who died in 1862, aged sixty-seven years. 

       Elijah Bundy, son of Nathan, came to this town, from Walpole, N.H., at an early day, married Sarah, daughter of Jacob Kibling, and reared five children, namely, Nathan, Benjamin, John, Mrs. Caroline Brockway, and Galusha J.  Nathan married Betsey E., daughter of Thomas Haselton, and had born to him four children, namely: Edward, Stillman, Angenette and Carlos J.  He died August 7, 1884, aged seventy-seven years. His widow survives him, is seventy-eight years of age, and resides with her son Carlos J., at Lyndonville. Galusha J. married twice, first, Mary A. Bartlett, who bore him two children, Sarah Buel, of Burke, and Annette L. Smith, of Lyndonville. He married for his second wife, Betsey Moore, and has one son, Fred G., who resides at Lyndonville with his father. 

       Benjamin Easterbrooks, a native of Connecticut, came to this town about 1793, and located on road 3. His son Luther married Henrietta Watkins, and reared seven children, of whom Willard married Laura Baldwin, and has two children, Luella and Luther S. The latter has married twice, first, Nancy Hoyt, and second, Alma C. Smith, and has one son, Don E.  Mr. Easterbrooks resides with his father on road 8. 

       William Ruggles came to this town about 1794, married Rebecca Hubbard, and reared six sons and three daughters, of whom Nathan W. married Lydia Garfield, of Burke, and has four children, namely, Adna B., George H., Everett E., and Albert E.  He has been selectman two years and resides on a farm on road 36, corner 38, where he has lived thirteen years. His brother Ephraim married Susan Stoddard, and has reared three sons, Hasley, Fred and Charles E. He resides on the homestead. His son Fred is a physician in Byron, Mich. Charles E. married Clara E. Dean, has one daughter, Mary, and lives on the homestead, on road 16. 

       Wait Bemis, son of Joel, a native of Spencer, Mass., came to Lyndon, about 1796, and settled on Bemis Hill, where Alfred and Arnold Bemis now reside. He died in 1850, aged seventy-seven years He married Relief Myers, and reared eight children, viz.: Nancy, Hiram, Relief, Samuel, Benjamin A., Otis, Lucius and Emery. The last mentioned married Cordelia Stockwell, and resides on road 27, where he has lived thirty-three years. 

       Elias Bemis was a native of Spencer, Mass., came to this town at an early day, married Content Jenks, and reared seven children. His son Welcome married Sarah Evans, and reared ten children, viz.: Emeline, Aveline C., Sarah C., Mary R., Eleanor, Kate D., William A., Alfred, Welcome A. and Lucy E. Welcome served as senator two terms, was selectman several times, and died in 1877, aged eighty years. His brother Amasa married Eliza A. Hall, and reared four children, Joshua, Catherine, Harris A. and Alonzo O. Joshua married Alma V. Bennett, and resides on the homestead with his brother Alonzo O. and his widowed mother. 

       Thomas Mathewson, a resident of Rhode Island, reared nine children, one of whom, Philip, married Hannah Mitchell, and reared three children, Hannah, Eliza Ann and Philip F.  The latter married Diantha Dow, and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Stephen Smith Mathewson, son of Thomas, came to this town at an early day, married Mercy Payne, and reared fifteen children, of whom George L. married Angie P. Walter, of East Haven, Conn., and has three children, Sarah M., Emma M. and James L. 

       Henry Hoffman was a native of Germany, served in the Revolutionary war, and came to Lyndon at an early day, settling on a farm on road 3, where William Hoffman now lives. He married Eleanor Connor, reared five children, and died in 1835, aged eighty-eight years. His son James B. married Lucy Rice, and reared twelve children. His son William married first, Nancy Fletcher, who bore him two children, John and Adelaide, and second, Helen M. Harris, and has had born to him three children, namely, Edwin H., Charles and Lila. He resides on the homestead.  Edwin H. married Mary Cahoon, has two children, Charlotte C. and Helen H., and resides on the Cahoon homestead, on road 65. He is a lawyer and insurance agent. 

       Eliphelas Graves was a native of Walpole, N.H., came to Lyndon about 1800, and settled on a farm on road 39. He married Lucy Gates, and reared nine children, viz.: Loren, Constant, Hubbard, Lorenzo D., Orison, John, Maria, Mary A. and Erastus. He died in 1825, aged fifty-five years. Erastus married, first, Sally Balch who bore him two children, Susan M. and Rosalind D., and second, Melissa Bradley, who bore him four children, Sarah, Miranda, Henry E. and Philo B. The last mentioned married Bell Cushman, has one son, Henry E.  and resides on the homestead with his father. Orison married Roxillana M. Spaulding, and has had two children, Lillian, now dead, and Emerson H.  The latter married Ella L. Hall, has one son, Clarence E., and resides on road 39, with his father.  Lorenzo D. married Abigail R., daughter of James and Lucy (Rice) Hoffman, and reared five children, viz.: Ophelia L., now deceased; William H.; Alice A. (Mrs. Briggs), who has two children; Harry K. and Edgar, and resides in Athol, Mass.; Harley, who married Nellie French, has one child, Katie A., and resides in Athol, Mass.; and Edward C., who resides on the home farm, on road 36, with his widowed mother, who is sixty-eight years of age. 

       Leonard Willmarth, son of Joseph, a native of Lyndon, married Dorothy Hubbard, who bore him six children. He married, for his second wife Clarissa Hubbard, sister of Dorothy, and had born to him five children.  Philotus M., a son by the first wife, married Mary A. Buel, and had born to him two daughters, Ella L. and Clara H.  Mr. Willmarth died December 5, 1867, aged thirty-seven years, and his widow died July 31, 1880, aged fifty-three years. 

       Jonathan Weeks, a native of Piermont,N.H. came to Lyndon, from Danville, in 1814, was a shoemaker, and died in 1838. He married Betsey Brown, and reared six children, as follows: George H., Benjamin F., Mary J., Charles M. and John M. The last mentioned married twice, first, Louise C. McGaffey, by whom he reared two children, Helen L. and Mary E., and second, Fannie E. Bartlett, has one son, Clinton B., and is a merchant in Lyndon.

       Benjamin Quimby came to this town, from Sandwich, N.H., at an early day. He served in the Revolution. His son Major Aaron, one of eight children, came here as an early settler, married Elizabeth Wells, and reared eleven children, of whom True married Caroline Kibling and reared seven children. His son Lorenzo K. married, first, Sarah Eaton, and second, Lizzie Payne, and has two children, William L., now at Dartmouth college, and Nellie S. at home. He has been president of Lyndon National bank three years, has been a successful merchant for thirty-two years, and is now retired from the business, residing in the village of Lyndon. Johnson D., son of Major Aaron, married Corrilla Blake, and has had born to him two children, Able B., who served in the late war, in Co. G, 3d Vt. Vols., and died in 1870, and Orville J., a resident of Lyndonville. Johnson D., also son of Major Aaron, served in the late war, and resides at Lyndon Center. Alpha, another son of Major Aaron, married Sarah Ann Quimby, located on road 10, and reared three children, namely, Elmore J., who lives on road 17, Gilmer H., who resides on road 10, and Leona, a resident of Lyndonville. Elmore J. married Angia A. Watson, and has four children, Bainbridge F., Walter H., Euna A. and Grace E. Aaron W., son of Aaron, married Harriet Funwald, and reared twelve children, five of whom are living, namely, Adaline, Martin J., Madison, Charles and Wells L.  He died in 1862. Wells L. resides on the homestead with his widowed mother. 

       Stephen McGaffey, a native of Sandwich, N.H., came to this town with his father, William W., about 1800, and settled on the farm where C. Coleman now lives, on road 65. He married Sally Hoyt, of Wheelock, and reared ten children, six of whom are living, viz.: Judith Park, Flavia Fulsome, Aurelia Willard, Martha Miller, Sarah Miller, and Stephen R. The last mentioned married Kate Bemis, and has two children, Lucius K., of New Mexico, and Amasa B., at home. Stephen R. served in the late war, in Co. G, 15th Vt. Vols. 

       Oren Hubbard, a native of Chesterfield, N.H., married Mary Butler, of Hinsdale, N.H., and reared seven children, viz.: Mary, Sarah, Miranda, Carrie, George W., Horace R. and James. The last mentioned married Annie McDonald, has one daughter, Addie May, and resides at Lyndonville, where he has lived nineteen years. He served three years in the late war. 

       Richard Hubbard, son of Nathan, an early settler here, married Loraine Weeks, and reared seven children, viz.: Mary, Lorenzo W., Nathan, Martha, Frank, Elsena and Charles. The last mentioned married Luella M. Park, has two children, Louise and Harry, and resides on a farm on Road 5, where he has lived nine years. Lorenzo W., son of Richard, graduated from Bellevue Hospital Medical college, of New York, and first commenced practice at Lunenburg, Vt. After six years he came to Lyndon, where he has had an extensive practice for the last thirteen years. He was a member of the legislature in 1882. He served in the late war, married Mary E. Holton, and has two children, Charles B. and Mary E. 

       Seth A. Fisher, son of Jesse, who was a native of Hinsdale, N.H., came to Lyndon about 1810. He married Sarah Fisher, of Hinsdale, and reared seven sons and seven daughters. He resided on road 34, where he died at the age of eighty-four years. His son Francis B. married, first, Celia Powers, and second, Martha, daughter of Samuel Densmore, of Sutton. He has seven children, viz.: Martin, Harley, Charles, Mary J., Freddie, Mertie and Carl, and resides on road 33. 

       Benjamin Powers, one the twelve children of Jonathan, married Lydia Wilder, the first female child born in Lyndon, and reared four children, of whom Benjamin F. married Henrietta Colburn, of Brighton, and has had two children, Nellie, now deceased, and Henry G.  The latter married three times, first, Carrie Ewins, second, Jennie Ewins, sister of Carrie, and third, Mary Hutchinson, who has borne him four children, Charles H., Hattie I., George H. and Harry E. 

       Samuel Park, a native of Newfane, Vt, came to Lyndon about 1800, and was the first settler on the farm where his grandson, William L. Park, now resides, on road 5. He married Rachel Chase, of Hartland, Vt. His son Abel married Sophia Dow, of Wheelock, and reared seven children, of whom William L. married Algie L. Williams, and has four children, namely, Hiram A., Ethel M., Lucius W. and Clarence E. He resides on the homestead. Stephen L., son of Samuel, married Clarissa Leavitt, and has had born to him three children, Helen L., Horace E., now dead, and George M. He lives off road 63, where he has lived fifty-eight years, is now eighty-two years of age, and his wife, who is still living, is also eighty-two years of age. 

       Alpheus Houghton, son of Elijah, was born September 19, 1769, came to this town at an early day, held many offices of trust, and married Isabella Wood. He located on road 65, where he remained until his death in 1849. His son Paul was a native of St. Johnsbury, and came to this town with his father when very young. He was selectman nine years, married Eunice Potter, and reared six children, viz.: William P., Henry A., Austin W., Milo G., Alvira L. and Silas H. The last mentioned married Sarah Shurtliff, and has four children, namely, Eunice N., Mertie H., Sadie E. and Carrie. He is a farmer and veterinary surgeon, and resides on the homestead. William P., son of Paul, married Maria B. Ayer, of St. Johnsbury, and has four children, as follows: Miranda W. (Mrs. Shackford), Luville E., Achsah E. and Wallace W. He lives on a farm on road 64. 

       Zebina Wilder, a native of Winchester, N.H., came to this town as an early settler, and located on the place where Elias F. now resides, on road 64. He married Abigail Griggs, and reared four children. His son Levi married Sophronia Hartwell, and reared eleven children, of whom Elias F. married Elvira D. Monroe, of Lowell, Mass.  He has two children, Mabel A. and Katie G., and resides on the homestead.

       Joseph Randall was born in Providence, R.I., in 1747, married Anna Comstock, and died in 1840, aged ninety-three years. Job, one of his five children, was born January 19, 1777, married Irene Sales, came to Lyndon about 1800, and settled on road 18, where he remained until his death, September 25, 1867. His son William married Aurora McGaffey, has two children, Edward and Job, and lives on the homestead. His wife died in 1882. Willard, son of Job, and brother of William, married Roancy, daughter of Eli Smith, and has one son, Joseph W. who resides with his father on road 53.

       David Bean, a native of Canterbury, N.H., came to Lyndon about 1809, and located on road 19½. He married Mary Thompson, and reared seven children, of whom William married Almira T. Currier, had born to him three children, Helen, Louise H. and Austin W., and died on the homestead in 1842, aged thirty-four years. Austin W. married Sarah R., daughter of Dr. Hiram Hoyt, and has three children, Myra I., Willie H. and Helen L.  He served in the late war, in Co. G, 15th Vt. Vols. 

       Jonathan Locklin, son of Jonathan, a Revolutionary soldier, came to Lyndon at an early day, with his father, when nine years of age. He married Rachel Park, reared six children, namely, Elvira, Caroline, Elias B., Rachel, Franklin I. and Jonathan P., and died in 1869, aged seventy-three years. His son Franklin occupies the homestead. Jonathan P. married first, Julia A. Stevens, who bore him two children, Hattie M. and Julia A., and second, Esther J. Smith, who has borne him one son, Elmer J. H.   Mr. Lockling lives on road 20. 

       Col. James Williams, born January 31, 1735, a native of Providence, R.I., served in the Revolution as colonel, came to Lyndon in 1802, and built the first log house on a farm on road 55. He married Betsey Peck, reared eight children, namely, Darius, Hosea, Joseph, Cyril, Ira, James, Sally and Cyrena, and died in 1852, aged eighty-four years. His son James married Hannah Kimball, of Ellsworth, N.H. Of his three children, Darius is dead, and Marshall and Ashley are living. The latter married Jennie E. Thayer, of Burke, has one daughter, Rosa H., and resides on the homestead, with his widowed mother, who is seventy-three years of age. 

       John Williamson, a native of Ireland, came to Canada while young, married twice, first, Mary Duff, and second, Julia Shepard.  William, one of his thirteen children, married Sarah Deos, and resides on road 49, in this town. 

       Stephen Eastman, a native of Bow, N.H., came to Lyndon about 1800. His son David married Rhoda Brewer, of Sutton, Vt., and reared ten children. His son Silas married Hannah C. Matthewson, and has one child, Frank S., who married Kate Le Point, has five children, and is in the jewelry business at East Hardwick, Vt.  Silas lives on road 5.  David, son of David, married Diantha M. Willey of Sutton, Vt., and had born to him two children, Cyrus W., now deceased, and Mrs. Emma A. Atwood, who lives on the Eastman farm. Mr. Eastman resides at Lyndon Center. 

      Joseph Fletcher, son of Joseph, married, first, Catharine Cummings, and second, Abigail Reed. Joseph, one of his six children, came to Lyndon about 1838, locating on road 39, married Ruth B. Elliot, of Pepperell, Mass., and died in 1882, aged sixty-five years. He reared seven children, viz.: Catharine C., Abigail S., Harriet E., William H., who served in the late war, in Co. H, 14th Vt. Vols., Isaac F., of Minnesota, Frank A., who served in Co. G, 15th Vt. Vols., and resides in Minneapolis, Minn., and Joseph A. The last mentioned is the seventh generation of Joseph's in the Fletcher family. He married Mary A. Bradley, has two children, Carrie M. and Allen J., and resides on the homestead, on road 39; with his widowed mother, who is seventy-nine years of age.

       Ira Kitteridge came to Lyndon about 1818, and was the first settler on a farm on road 33, where his grandson George H. now resides. He married Hannah Phippen, of Westminster, Vt., and reared four children, namely, Lucia A., Milo, Joseph and George R. He died in 1864, aged about seventy years. George R. married Mary H. Frye, and had born to him three children, Judson H., Delia R. and George H. The latter married, first, Julia A. Newcomb, who bore him one son, Albert H., and second, Carrie L. Shurtliff. He resides on the homestead, on road 33. 

       Leonard Gilson, born in 1795, came to Lyndon in 1837, locating on road 29, married Abigail M. Brigham, of St. Johnsbury and reared seven children. He died October 24, 1869. His son Daniel B. married Harriet E. Hill, of West Concord, Vt., has had born to him two children, Alvah D. and George A., and resides on the homestead. 

       Josiah Ladd, a native of Sandwich, N.H., came to Lyndon about sixty years ago, married Marian Webster, and reared ten children, of whom Asa married four times, first, Mercy Quimby, second, Dolly Quimby, third, Hannah Whitten, and fourth, Mrs. Sophia Dow. His children were as follows: Sarah, Mercy, Aaron, Helen, Charles and George J. The last mentioned married Josephine Perham, has four children, Emma, Dolly, Edwin L. and Elsie M., and resides on road 14. 

       John T. G. Cunningham, a native of Weare, N.H., came to Lyndon, about 1825, locating on road 11, where he now resides. He married Nancy Willmarth, and has two children, Ira W. and John T.  Mr. Cunningham has served as lister thirty years, has been selectman many times, town agent several years, and has been honored with many offices of trust. He is eighty-four years of age, and during his lifetime has settled 165 estates. His son John T. married Azelia H. Eaton, of Sutton, has one daughter, Susan B., and resides on the homestead with his father. Ira W. married, first, Carrie A. Brigham, of Boston, who bore him one daughter; Marian, and for his second wife, Julia A. Bolton, and has one daughter, Ethel C.  He resides at Lyndonville. 

       Otis Evans was born at Spencer, Mass., January 11, 1790, came to Lyndon about 1815, and located on the place where H. Watson now resides, on road 13. He was a lumberman, married Betsey Watson, of Spencer, and reared seven children, namely, Louisa M., John W., Caroline M., Albert H., Oramel, Alanson W. and Helen L. John W. married three times, first, Emily Fisher, of Burke, second, Abbie Darling, and third, Mrs. Mary Colburn. He had born to him four children, namely, Emma F., Albert T., Caroline L., and Ella P. now deceased. Albert T. married Ida Bowen, of Burke, and resides on the homestead. 

       Joel B. W. Butterfield came to Lyndon in 1835, was a blacksmith, married Eliza Pierce, and reared nine children, viz.: Charles, Nancy, Bailey, George, Caroline, Cora, Florence, Priscilla and Harley A.  The last mentioned married, first, Hattie P. Lawrence, of Waterford, who bore him two children, Nina and Hattie, and second, Florence P. Plummer, of Manchester, N.H., who has also borne him two children, Herman and Bailey. He resides on road 41. 

       Enoch Hoyt was long a resident of Tunbridge, Vt., where he died, aged eighty years. Samuel, one of his eight children, married Rachel Swan, and reared six children, of whom William H. married Sophia Smith, who bore him two children, Charles R. and Emily, now dead, and died at the age of forty-nine years. William H. lives in Lyndonville. John M., son of Samuel, married Matilda, daughter of Nathan Parker, and died August 21, 1876. His widow resides in Lyndonville, aged seventy years.

       Bernard Hoyt was a native of Canterbury, N.H., and resided many years in Wheelock, Vt., where he died in 1850, aged seventy-three years. His son Joseph married Mary A. Weeks, and reared five children, four of whom are living, namely, Charles L., Joshua W., Alden B. and Bernard. Charles L. married Marrilla Houghton, has two children, Joe and Sarah (Mrs. W. S. Brown), of Bridgewater, N.H., and resides on road 42. 

       Hon. Sumner S. Thompson was born in Halifax, Mass., April 12, 1823, and came to this town in 1836. He is extensively engaged in business as a railway contractor, and as a lumber, grain and flour dealer. He served as town representative in 1860-'61-'66 and '67, has been selectman five years, and has held many other town offices. He was a senator from Caledonia, county in 1876. 

       James Briant, son of James, who was a native of England, came to this town in 1838, married Laura A. Pierce, and has had born to him two children, Francis and James, both deceased. His wife died in March, 1882, aged sixty-four years. Mr. Briant resides at Lyndonville. 

       Major William Miller, a native of Dummerston, Vt., married Hannah Worden, and reared eleven children. One son, George A., came to Lyndon in 1819, was the first wheelwright in town, and built the first hearse. He married Louise Haven, of Dummerston, and reared ten children, nine of whom are living. The youngest son, Horace H., married Sarah F. McGaffey, and has had born to him two children, George A., now deceased, and Mrs. Mary L. Hutchinson. He resides on Central street, at Lyndon Center. 

      Ephraim Bigelow was a native of Westminster, Mass., and moved to Wheelock, where he died in 1835, aged seventy years. He married Lydia E. Johnson, of Westminster, Mass., and reared nine children. One son, Samuel, came to Lyndon in 1844, but moved to Stanstead in 1865, where he remained until his death, in 1880, aged eighty-one years. He married Sally H. Davis, of Wheelock, Vt., and reared two children, Lydia A. and Calvin D. The latter married Mary A. Sanburn, has two children, Elisha and Flora M., and resides on road 25. 

       Alpheus Houghton, a native of Rhode Island, moved to St. Johnsbury about 1786, where he remained twenty years, and then came to Lyndon, where he remained until his death, in 1845, aged seventy-four years.  Paul, one of his seven children, came to Lyndon at the age of nine years, married Eunice Potter, and reared seven children. His son Austin married Ann A. Prescott, has four children, namely, George, Hattie, Anna and Etta, and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Jonathan Ingalls, a resident of Sheffield, married Hannah Joy, reared two children, John and Joseph H., and died at the age of ninety-five years. Joseph H. married Comfort Weeks, of Wheelock, and reared ten children. Hollis married, first, Maria Carter, of Wheelock, who bore him three children, Comfort, Mary and Joseph H., and second, Dianna Payne. Mr. Ingalls lives on a farm where he has resided nineteen years. 

       Moses Chase, a native of Cornish, was a lawyer, and located for a time in Bradford.  He came to Lyndon in 1836, where he died at the age of eighty-four years. He married Deborah Bull, of Litchfield, Conn., and reared seven children. His son Epaphras B. married Louise Baldwin, of Bradford, Vt., and reared six children, viz.: Emily, Charlotte, now deceased, Ada, Mary L., Martha E. and Henry. Epaphras was one of the early permanent settlers of the town, owned one of the most productive farms in the town, and was a man greatly respected by all. His son Henry has held the office of selectman many times, and was representative in 1864, married Sarah W. Robinson, of Brooklyn, N.Y., and has five children, namely, Henrietta H., Gordon B., Florence, Charlotte and Robert R.  He resides on a farm on road 50, corner 25. Charles M. Chase married Mary E. Wells, of Sycamore, Ill., has five children, namely, Everett B., John B., George, Jennie and Nellie, resides at Lyndon village, and is editor and publisher of The Vermont Union. 

       D. P. Chase, of this town, son of Ebenezer, who died in Sanbornton, N.H., at the age of eighty-six years, married Dolly Randlett, of Belmont, N.H., and reared three children, two of whom are living, Francis L., of Carmel, Me., and Oren G.  The latter married Mrs. Sarah M. Hutchinson, who has two children by her first husband, Irving B. and Mrs. Estelle S. Morrison, and has one son, Ernest B.  Mr. Chase served in the late war, as 1st and 2d lieutenant, in Co. A, 11th Vt. Vols. 

       Andrew Latham, a native of Winchester, N.H., came to Lyndon and settled on road 59, where he lived until his death, in 1857, aged seventy-eight years. He married Mary Burbank, and reared five children, of whom Emeline, the only one now living, married Ward Knapp, and has reared three children, viz.: George, who served in the late war, in Co. H, 7th Vt. Vols., and died in the Mobile hospital, in June, 1865, aged twenty years; James S., and Mary L. who resides with her mother. James Knapp was a native of Petersham, Mass. came to Lyndon about 1800, married Louise Stearns, of Walpole, N.H., and died in 1840. He reared ten children, one of whom, Ward, was the husband of Emeline Latham. Ward died in September, 1873, aged seventy-two years. 

       Louis Boudett was a native of Canada, and died there in 1868. His son David, also a native of Canada came to Vermont in 1833, and located in Lyndon. He married, first, Ora Fisher, who bore him one daughter, Mrs. Anna Smith, and second, Mrs. Sarah J. Fisher, who has one daughter, Lizzie L., by her first husband, and has had born to him one child, Alza D.  Mr. Boudett lives off road 65, where he has resided thirty-eight years. 

       Daniel Bowker was born in Fitzwilliam, N.H., January 12, 1795, married Phila Ripley, of St. Johnsbury, Vt., and reared ten children, three of whom are living, namely, John A., a physician, Mary and Algernon S.   He came to Lyndon in 1820, engaged as a cabinet-maker, and remained until his death, in 1861, aged sixty-six years. His widow died in 1872, aged seventy-six years. Algernon S. married Marianne Dwyer, and has had born to him eight children, only three of whom are living, William H., Lillie and Franklin. He resides at Lyndon village. William H. married Mary A. Carpenter, and resides in the village. 

       Josiah Pratt, a native of Plainfield, Vt., married Abigail Lamb, reared ten children, and died in Plainfield, at the age of seventy-five years. His son Silas married Maria Russell, and died in Stowell, Vt., aged seventy-three years. He had seven sons and three daughters, of whom Josiah married Josephine J. Hayes, of Bakersfield, Vt., has one son, Julius J., and resides in this town.  Julius J. married Mary J. Suitor, of East Concord, Vt. 

       Henry Gray, long a resident of Sheffield, Vt., moved to Grafton, N.H., where he died at the age of eighty-three years. John, one of his seven children, married Maria Simpson, of Sheffield, and reared five children, four or whom are living, namely, Ellery, Henry A., Josephine and Lorenzo W.  He was a life-long resident of Sheffield, where he died, aged forty-two years. His son Lorenzo W. married Comfort Gray, has three children, Edwin A. Dorney D. and Nellie E., and lives in Lyndon. 

       Benjamin Wing was a native of Hardwick, Mass., and reared twelve children. Enoch, the youngest son, married, first, a Miss Heath, and second, Mary Miner, of Littleton, N.H.  He reared seven children, three of whom are living, namely; Russell W., now in California, John A., of Needham, Mass., and Willard C.  He died in January, 1835, aged sixty years. Willard C. married, first, Maria Knapp, who died in 1857, aged forty years, and second, Gabriella Knapp, who died in 1881, aged forty-seven years. He resides on the homestead, on road 41. 

       Jonas M. Trefren, son of James, who was a native of Alton, N.H., moved to Danville, Vt., at an early day, married Nancy Chark, of Alton, and reared eight children, of whom James married Emeline Roberts, of St. Johnsbury, and has two children, Cephas J., and Emeline J. who resides at home with her father, on road 52.  Cephas J. married Amada C. Powers, has two children, Joanna A. and Frank J., and lives off road 57. James Trefren served in the Revolutionary war. His son Jonas M. served in the War of 1812, and died in 1833, aged thirty-eight years. 

       Ebenezer Thompson married a Miss Baker, of Holderness, N.H., moved to Danville, was a carpenter and farmer, and died in 1843, aged sixty-six years. He reared six children. His son Nathan B. was born in Wheelock, in 1800, married, first, Lucinda Stevens, and second, Mrs. Cynthia (Morrell) Pope. He died in 1870, aged seventy years. Of his six children, James S. married Helen L. Park, and has five children, viz.: Philip S., Clara L., Nathan L., George D. and Anna M. He served in the late war as captain in Co. F, 10th Vt. Vols., and now resides in this town.

       George W. Staples, a native of Williamstown, Vt., married Theodosia R. Nichols, of Wllliamstown, and moved to Barton Landing. He reared five children, viz.: Mrs. Hattie E. Goodrich, of East Hardwick, Mrs. Nellie A. Fulsome, of Barton Landing, Vt., Mrs. Nettie F. Chandler, of East Hardwick, Louise E. and Henry G. The last mentioned married Ellen A. Dodge, of Montpelier, and has three children, namely, Carroll W., Henry Corsell and F. Lillian, Mr. Staples is a dentist, and resides in this town, on Chapel street. 

       Franklin Wilson was a native of Drewsville, N.H., married Sarah J. Anger, and reared six children. His youngest son, Willard A., married Alice J. Bacon, of Lowell, Mass., and has one daughter, Ina F.   Mr. Wilson lives in Lyndonville, and has been a freight conductor on the Passumpsic railroad for the past seven years. 

       James Wilson, son of Robert, married first, Polly Morrison, of Rockingham, who bore him three children, namely, Sally, Mark and Rodney, and second, Hannah Morrison, and had born to him three children, George, Martha and Squires J.  The last mentioned married Abbie C., daughter of Ezra Smith, and has two children, Charles H. and Homer C.  The latter married Alice Lincoln, and lives in Lyndonville. 

       Joseph Hall, son of Joseph, and a descendant of John, who came to America in 1617, married Mary Cox, and reared eight children. His son Elias married three times, and reared eighteen children. Dudley P., son of Elias, came to Lyndon in 1864, married Amelia Gregory, and had born to him eight children, viz.: Albert H., Edward C., Delia, now deceased, Emma H., Albert C., Ella A., Mabel and Alice E.  He was an extensive manufacturer and dealer in lumber, was justice of the peace, served in many offices of trust, and died in 1885. His widow survives him, is sixty-two years of age, and resides on road 65. 

       Robert Pettigrew was a native of Scotland, came to New York city in 1808, was a contractor on public works, and remained there until his death, at the age of sixty-three years. His son John, a native of Scotland, came to New York city when he was fourteen years of age, married Mary Innis, of that city, and reared four children; John, Ellen R., Mary J. and Robert. He was a contractor in New York city, where he died, aged sixty-three years. His son Robert married Mary E. Hall, and has reared seven children, viz.: Mary R., John, Hannah, Robert, Julia S., Mrs. Josephine Quimby, now dead, and Julia E., also deceased. Mr. Pettigrew resides in Lyndonville, on Park street. Mary R. Pettigrew, daughter of Robert, married Henry E., son of Larnard Watson, of Burke, and has seven children, viz.: Cora A., Claud, Ellie, Edna B., Guy H., Mary E. and Robert P. They reside in this town on road 13. 

       Nathan Smith, a native of Massachusetts, married Elisheba Atwood, and reared a large family of children.  Philip, son of Nathan, married Sophronia Watkins, is a clothier by trade, and has resided in Burke for the past forty-seven years. He reared six children, three of whom are living; George P., Henry E. and Frank H.  The last mentioned married Hattie E. Powers, and has four children, namely; Edith L., Elva L., George E. P. and Bertha A. He is a clothing merchant at Lyndonville. Stephen Watkins, grandfather of Frank, was born July 18, 1765, married twice, first, Susannah Rice, of Hardwick, Mass., and second, Eunice Crane. He reared fifteen children, and died in 1852, aged eighty-seven years. 

       Asa Smith, son of Nathan and Elisheba (Atwood) Smith, married Marion Smith, of Barnard, Vt., lived for a time in St. Johnsbury and Lyndon, and finally moved to Burke, where he died in 1865, aged seventy-five years. Of his eight children; John A. married Mehetable Way, of Sutton, Vt., and has four children, namely; George E., Mary E., Abbie E. and Fred D.  The latter married Cora E. Gorham, of Kirby, and resides with his father in Lyndon, on road 61. Nathan Smith, son of Asa, served in the late war, in Co. A, Vt. H. A., and was killed on the Welden railroad, at the age of twenty-six years. Another son, George C., is now located at Carmel, N.Y., and is principal of Drew seminary, where he has been for twenty years. 

       Eli Smith, a soldier in the War of 1812, came to Lyndon when young, and married Clara Bemis. His children were Mrs. Roancy E. Randall, Mrs. Susan Dresser, of Canada, Mrs. Alma Easterbrooks, of Lyndon, and Mrs. Nancy J. Darling. The latter has been twice married, first to Dr. Edward Mattocks, and has had two children, Mrs. Estelle Dennison, of Boston, and Enos, who married May Moulton, and resides in Montana. She married for her second husband Benjamin B. Darling, and resides on road 26. 

       Thomas Dunton, a native of Sturbridge, Mass., reared five children, and died aged eighty-five years. His son Joseph married Elizabeth Simpson, of Sturbridge, and reared ten children. His son John married Wealthy Dyer, and has reared three children, namely, Martha, Lorinda and Silas E. Lorinda is at home with her father, who resides in Lyndonville. His wife died in 1874. Silas E. married Ellen F. Welch, has one son, Arthur, and lives in this town on road 6. He served in the late war, in Co. G, 15th Vt. Vols.

       Jonathan Bradley, a native of Haverhill, Mass., moved to Wheelock, Vt., where he died at the age of ninety-four years. Ward, one of his six children, married Hannah Nutting, and reared six children, namely; Hial, Charlotte, Emily, Adeline, Harriet and Sewell. The last mentioned was born in Wheelock, and lived the most of his long life in that town and Sheffield. About 1870 he removed to Lyndon Center. Mr. Bradley was honored by the towns he resided in with many offices of trust, and at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of eighty-two years, was president of the Lyndonville National bank. He was a prominent member of the Freewill Baptist church, married, first, Eliza Chase, who bore him five children, three of whom are living, namely, George L., of Minneapolis, William C., of New York, and Mrs. J. Q. McLellan, of Glover. He married for his second wife Sally H. Townsend, of Sheffield, Vt. 

       Jason Bradley, son of Philo, was a native of St. Johnsbury, where he held many offices of trust, and came to Lyndon in 1866, where he died at the age of sixty-eight years. He married Saloma M. Parker, and reared eight children, viz.: Lucy, Ellen M., Parker N., William H., Martha E., Amasa B., Ida S. and Herman P. Herman P. married Ruby L. Kedney, has one daughter, Blanche I., and resides on the homestead, on road 46. 

       Oliver Stevens moved to St. Johnsbury at an early day, married Betsey Lang, and reared seven children. One son, Nathaniel, married Esther Armington, reared nine children, and died at the age of seventy-three years. His son Curtis married Emily Quimby, of this town, and has reared four children, viz.: Carrie E., Frank A., Sarah M. and Emma M.  Mr. Stevens is now proprietor of the Lyndon Hotel. Carrie E. married William Jeffers, and resides at Lyndonville. Pembroke S., son of Nathaniel, and brother of Curtis, married twice, first, Mary S. Flint, of St. Johnsbury, who bore him one daughter, Esther M., and second, Maria Flint, sister of his first wife. He resides in St. Johnsbury, on a farm where he has lived twenty years. 

       Stephen Willey, a resident of Wheelock, reared seven children, one of whom, Josiah, married Mary Bean, of Sutton, and reared children as follows: Josiah, Charles, Zeno,Mary A., Abigail, Roanthy, Hannah and David. The last mentioned married Elizabeth Eastman, and has two children, Luvia and George.  Mr. Willey resides at Lyndon Center. 

       Ichabod Willey resided in Wheelock for a time, but died in Sheffield. Holmes, one of his four children, married Martha Wallace, and had born to him four children, namely, William, Sumner, Dora and Jewett S. The last mentioned married Ada A. Chesley, of Greensboro, has one daughter, Bertha M., and resides in this town, on road 47. 

       Samuel Phillips, a Revolutionary soldier, was a native of Williamstown, Vt., married Beda Martin, and reared five children. His son Dana married Jerusha Haywood, of Tunbridge, and reared ten children, five of whom are living; viz.: Charles, Enos M., John, Agnes and Henry E.  The last mentioned married Jennie N. Martin, of Corinth, has had three children, Gertrude E., Gifford E. and Gerald, now deceased, and resides on road 50. Enos M. married Jennie Barber, of Wheelock, has one child, Beda F., and resides on road 41. 

       Robert Green married Polly Batchelder, reared seven children, and died in this town, aged seventy-four years. His son Oren married Marilla C. Houghton, and reared nine children, three of whom are living, namely, Mrs. Roseline L. Willmarth, James M. and Henry L. The latter lives in Lyndon village. His grandfather, Jacob Houghton, served in the War of 1812. He reared nine children, one of whom was Abraham, who married Eloise Allen, and had two children, Eunice L. and Betsey A. The latter resides with her widowed mother, at Lyndon village. 

       William Green, a native of New Hampshire, moved to Newport, Vt., in 1840, where he died at the age of ninety-three years. He was twice married. Of his eight children three are living, Mehetable, Ann and William. William married Clorianna, daughter of Ephraim Carpenter, has three children, Amy F., George E. and Horace C., and resides in this town, on road 49, where he has lived twenty-eight years. 

       Abel Carpenter, a native of Providence, R.I., served in the Revolutionary war, and came to Lyndon in 1796. His son Ephraim came here at the same time, lived here many years, and moved to Newport, Vt., where he died at the age of ninety-one years. 

       Hiram Taylor, a native of Denmark, Me., came to Lyndon with his widowed mother when he was eight years of age, and married Louise, daughter of Seth A. Fisher. He served in the late war, in Co. C, 3d Vt. Vols., and died at White Oak Church, Va., aged forty-five years. His children were as follows: Laura, Catharine, Charles D., Sarah J. and Silas L. Silas L. married Olive A. Densmore, of Sutton, Vt., and resides in town, on road 63. 

       Daniel Taylor was a native of Vermont, reared five children, and died in Berlin, Vt. His son Daniel married Sally Stewart, and reared seven children. One son, Daniel L., married Mary A. Sawyer, of Charlestown, Mass., has one daughter, Mary E., and lives in Lyndon, on road 3. 

       Ami Burrington, a native of Connecticut, reared three children, Renselaer, Edward and Wilber, and moved to Burke about 1795. Wilber married Lucy Hunter, and reared nine children, of whom Joseph W. married Annette A. Aldrich, of Concord, Vt., and has one son, George W. The latter married Julia Jeffers, and resides in Lyndon, on road 32. Alvin W., son of Wilber, was a native of Burke, and came to Lyndon at the age of four years. He married Olive J. Eggleston, of Burke, and has three children, namely, Adna F., Willie F. and Winford L.  He has resided on road 33 twenty-eight years. 

       John Allen was a resident of Lyme, N.H., and reared fourteen children. His youngest son, Edward, moved to St. Johnsbury, where he now resides, in 1836. He married Rhoda Flint, of Lyme, and has had born to him two children, Edward P. and John. The latter married Lydia M. Perham, and has three children, Gertrude M., Edith E. and Harris O. He resides on a farm on road 37, corner 38, which was first settled by Watson Brothers.  Mr. Allen served in the late war, in Co. K, 15th Vt. Vols. 

       Moses Gage, son of Moses, was a native of Orford, N.H. He moved to Burke about 1845, married Mary Smith, and reared six children, of whom Richard married three times, first, Roancy L. Hunter, who bore him three children, Eddie, Nellie and Fred, and second, Jane Rosebrooks, who bore him two children, Asa and Willie.  Mr. Gage married for his third wife Mrs. Ellen Ainger, and resides in Lyndon, on road 29, where he has lived twenty years. Henry, son of Moses, married, first, Wealthy White, of Burke, who bore him five children, Calista M., Caroline A., Elizabeth L., Wealthy E. and Justus, and second, Amy J. Quimby. He resides in town, on road 27. 

       Solomon R. Stockwell, son of Daniel, who was a native of Williamstown, married Sophronia Town, and located in Stowe, Vt. He reared eleven children, of whom Henry A. married, first, Mary E. Parish, who bore him one daughter, Alice L., and died March 10, 1881. He married for his second wife Lydia A. Hunter, has three children, Fred, Flora and Robert, and resides on road 28. 

       Grickson W. Dickerman, a native of Lyndon, married Fanny Perry and reared eight children. He died in 1885, aged eighty-four years. His son John married ElizabethBradshaw, and has had born to him nine children, viz.: Lewis, Marilla, Lottie, Mary, Frank, George, Addie, Josie and Ezra E. The last mentioned married Alice Stockwell, and resides in town, on road 23. 

       David Shurtleff, a Revolutionary soldier, was born in Carver, Mass., married Mercy Atwood, and reared nine children. He died in Carver, aged ninety years. His son David married Waitstill Hammond, and of his ten children, Nathan H. came to Lyndon in 1872, became connected with the Lyndon Mill Co., and is at present engaged in the manufacture of lumber. He married Martha C. Lincoln, and has had born to him eleven children, viz.: Mercy, Nathan H., Nathan L., Hattie, Lysander G., Henry J., Sarah S., Carrie, Anna, Matie and Ada. He lives on road 28.  Lysander G. married Lelia R. Kittridge, and resides in East Burke. 

       Jonathan Hunter, one of the early settlers of Concord, Vt., married Lucy Fry, reared fourteen children, and died at the age of eighty years. His son James was born in Concord, married Phebe Minor, and died at the age of sixty-eight years, having reared six children, as follows: Lucy L., Horatio M., Stephen W., David B., Jonathan A. and Charles M.  The last mentioned married Abbie S. Jenkins, has two children, Angia L. and Effie M., and lives in Lyndon, on road 30. Jonathan A. married Cynthia J. Eggleston, of Burke, and has five children, viz.: Jesse A., Asahel W., Allen F., Ira M. and Eva M.  He lives on road 31, where he has resided thirty-two years. His son Jesse A. married Mary R. Conley, of Westmore, Vt. 

       Philemon Allard, a native of Sutton, Vt., married Wealthy P. Fogg, and had born to him six children. He died in Westmore, Vt. in 1854, aged forty-two years. His son Ambrose married, Julia Duntley, of Westmore, Vt, has one son, George A., and lives in this town, on road 29. 

       William Eggleston, son of Joseph, was a native of Connecticut, and moved to Burke as one of the early settlers, where he died at the age of eighty-nine years. John M., one of his fourteen children, married Harriet Allen, of Burke and had born to him six children. He died in Burke, in 1879, aged sixty-three years. His son Ira D. married Francelia M. Burrington, has one son, Ora W., and lives in Lyndon, on road 32. 

       Methewell Newcomb, a native of Connecticut, moved to Thetford, Vt., where he died in 1824. Isaac, one of his ten children, married Eliza Green, and reared eleven children. His son Silas D. married, first, Hulda V. Thompson, who bore him three children, Sidney,Julia A., now deceased, and Charles S., of  Nebraska.  Mr. Newcomb married for his second wife Emily H. Graves, and has two daughters, Bertha M. and Grace E. He has resided in Lyndon, on road 37, twenty-two years. 

       Enoch Heath, a native of Corinth, N.H., moved to Derby, Vt., as one of the early settlers, and remained there until his death, at the age of about eighty years. His son Daniel married Phebe Howe, and reared children as follows: Emeline, Phileam, David, John, Eliza, Mary and Wilder W.   The last mentioned married, first, Mandana B. Gay, and second, Ann A. Wells, of Derby, and has four children, Albro A., Albert E., Lydia A. and Mertie A. He has lived on road 11, corner 10, twenty years. 

       Jeremiah Dodge, a native of Rowley, Mass., married Judith Spafford, and reared seven children, of whom Eliphalet married Mary Cox, and reared twelve children. His son George was born in Thetford, Vt, December 28, 1802, and came to Lyndon in 1881. He married Octavia Freeman, who bore him three children, William O., Charles P. and George E.  Mrs. Dodge died October 24, 1881, aged eighty-one years. George E. married Cornelia E. Blake, of Boston, and has had born to him five children, viz.: Arthur O., now deceased, Ella C., Clarence B., Fred W. and Addie L. He lives at Lyndonville, where his father also resides.

       William Wilkinson, a native of Ireland, moved to Canada in 1841, married Emily Squires, and reared six children, namely, Cyrus, Vinan and Edith, of Canada, and Sidney T., A. John and Anna K.  The last three came to Lyndon about 1880, and are located on a farm on road 3. 

       Michael Rice, a native of Sandwich, N.H., moved to Sutton, Vt., about 1810, and was one of the early settlers of that town. Alfred C., one of his six children, married Esther Hammond, and had born to him one son, Ruez H. The latter married Bertha Woods, has two children, Ruez W. and Lulu E., and resides on a farm on road 3. 

       Joseph Lynn, a native of England, came to America in 1828, located in Dunham, Canada. He had born to him two children, Jane and Joseph. The latter married Elizabeth Dodge, reared ten children, and died in Dunham at the age or eighty-four years. His son Michael married Mrs. Rhoda Powers, of Lyndon, and came to this town in 1840, where he now resides on road 42. 

       Rufus Hutchinson, a native of Cavendish, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was at the battle of Plattsburg, where he died. His son Titus R. came to this town at the age of nine years, where he now resides on road 65, corner 66. He married Matilda Fairbanks, of Newark, Vt. 

       John Grant, a native of Massachusetts, moved to Concord, Vt., in 1807, married Dorcas Nicholas, and reared eight children. His son Ira married Lydia Williams. He died in Concord, May 20, 1885, aged sixty years. John W., one of his nine children, married twice, first, Lutheria Quimby, of Concord, Vt., who died in 1874, and second, Eliza L. Nichols, of Lunenburg, Vt. He has raised a large family of children as follows: Emmet, Ulysses S., Claridus A., Lena L., John W., Ira N., William F., Lucia E. and Perley E. He resides in town, on road 66. 

       John Whittier, a native of Haverhill, Mass., married Ruth Dustin, and reared seven children. His son Calvin married Martha Lyford, of Cabot, and reared five sons, of whom Fred married, first, Betsey J. Porter, and has had born to him one child, Katie M., now deceased. He married for his second wife Ellen A. Hill, and resides in town, on a farm on road 62, corner 63. Captain Lyford, father of Martha, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

       John Russell, a native of Canada, married Alice Knight, of Canada, and reared five children. He moved to Kirby about 1860, and remained there until his death, in 1875, aged ninety-eight years. His son Luther married, first, Anna Wood, who bore him eight children, namely, Wealthy A., Alice, Ormel F., Palmer W., Luther, J. Sanford, Edwin E. and Samuel W. He married for his second wife Maria Esterbrooks, and had born to him one child, Anna. Samuel W, married Mary A. Chase, of Littleton, N.H., has one daughter, Mrs. Clara L. Gage, and resides in Lyndon, on road 61.  J. Sanford served in the late war, in Co. E, 6th Vt. Vols., and died in Hagerstown in 1862, aged twenty-two years. Edwin E. served in Co. G, 15th Vt. Vols., and died in Fairfax, Va., in 1862, aged eighteen years. 

       James Simpson married Jane Cassidy, reared five children, and lived in Canada, where he died at the age of sixty-five years. His son John E. came to Lyndon in 1855, married Susan Gilbert, and reared six children, namely; James E., Phebe J., Carrie E., Freddie E., Nathan G. and Edgar A.  Mr. Simpson has resided on road 61 for eighteen years. 

       Cornelius Coleman went to Boston in 1838, then moved to Rutland, Vt., and finally came to this town in 1858. He married Sarah Harrington, and has reared children as follows: John, Cornelius, Daniel, Patrick, Dennis, Lizzie, Ellen, Sarah and Mary. He resides on a farm off road 65. 

       Joseph Collins, of Canada, served in the War of 1812, and is now living at the age of 102 years. His son Joseph, born at St. Thomas, Canada, married Genevieve Cross, has had born to him eight children, and is seventy years of age. His second son, Peter, came to this town in 1876, and married for his second wife, Mrs. Mary A. Plant, and lives on a farm on road 44. 

       John Coucher, a native of Canada, reared five children, and died in Lowell, Mass., at the age of fifty-four years. His son John married Mary A. Champion, of East Haven, Vt., and has one child, Mabel I. He came to Lyndon in 1869, and located on a farm on road 22, where he now resides. 

       Francis W. Sanger came to Lyndon in 1863, and located on the place where he now resides. He married Loretta, daughter of Simon Ayer, of St. Johnsbury, and has had born to him six children, namely, Emma, Ella, Sarah J., Nettie, Villa and Ezra S. 

       James Ayer, a native of Massachusetts, moved to  St. Johnsbury at an early day and finally came to Lyndon, locating on a farm, where J. S. Willey now resides. He died in 1860, aged ninety years. His son Ezra N. married Emily Swasey, of St. Johnsbury, and had born to him eight children, viz.: William, James, Leroy, Edwin, Emma, George, Sarah and Warren C. The last mentioned married first, Sarah G. Sanger, and second, Mary Clement. He has had born to him three children, namely, Lizzie, Susie and Nellie, now deceased. 

       John H. Hopkins, of Rhode Island, came to Lyndon, where he lived many years, married Phebe Dunwell, and moved to Haverhill, N.H. where he died at the age of eighty-six years. He reared ten children. His son Jerry married Betsey H. Williams, of Lyndon, and had born to him two children, Elwin L., of Brocton, Mass., and Eugene B. The latter resides with his widowed mother, who is sixty-four years of age. 

       John Pierce, a native of Chesterfield, of the same family as President Pierce, served in the Revolution. William, one of his six children, married Ruth, daughter of Maj. Ephraim Hubbard, and reared nine children, two of whom are living, George W. and William E.  The latter married Adaline Houghton, of Lyndon, and has two children, Emily A. and George W. His wife died at the age of forty-three years. He resides on road 41. 

       Joseph Bonett, a native of Paris, France, came to America at the age of sixteen years, with General Lafayette, and served under him during the Revolution. He married Tamma Johnson, and reared six children. His son John married Hannah Wilson, of Barnet, lived in Waterford, and finally moved to Kirby, where he died at the age of fifty-six years. His son Chatman D. married Elsie J. Bean, of Kirby, and has had born to him seven children, five of whom are living, viz.: Abner H., Holland J., Simon D., Roswell D. and George W. The last mentioned married Ella Burdick, of Danville and lives in town with his father. 

       Elisha Sanborn was born May 17, 1770, married Agnes Moore, reared twelve children, and died May 25, 1841, aged seventy-one years. His youngest child, Charles, married Nancy Hill, of Sheffield, and reared nine children, as follows: William H., Julia A., Frederick F., John G., Myra E., Martha L., Joel F., Austin G. and Mary J.  Mrs. Sanborn survives her husband, and resides on a farm on road 25. 

       Herbert Spencer came to America, from England, in 1767, and first settled in Campton, N.H., as one of the early settlers. He built the first grist and saw-mill, was a large land owner, and died there in 1831, aged ninety-four years. He reared seven sons and four daughters. His son Gratis married Susanna Dirth, and moved to Bloomfield, Vt., where he died in 1867, aged eighty-four years. He reared six children, of whom Gratis P. married Annette Caswell, and has had born to him nine children, five of whom are living, viz.: Frank, Fred, George, Lula and Willie, who reside at home with their father in this town, on road 25. 

       Henry Jones, of Canterbury, N.H., moved to Wheelock, reared three sons, William, John and Samuel H., and died in 1840. Samuel H. married Betsey Root, and reared eleven children, four of whom are living, namely; Samuel A., Emeline R., Hannah C. and Albinus S. The last mentioned married Ellen, daughter of Francis Tobey, has one daughter, Cora B., and lives in this town. 

       Timothy J. Goodell, of Warwick, N.H., married Lucretia Young, and moved West, where he died at the age of sixty-three years. Of his thirteen children, six are living. His son Andrew J. married Mrs. Calista M. Waterhouse, daughter of Nathan Barron, has had born to him four children, viz.: Carrie L., Harriet F., Charles H. and George W., and lives in this town. John Bly and William Barron, ancestors of Mrs. Andrew Goodell, were Revolutionary soldiers, and were both at the battle of Bunker Hill. 

       Jeremiah Leavitt married Sarah Sheldon, of Exeter, N.H., and reared nine children. Jeremiah, Jr., married Sarah Sturtevant, of Barton, Vt., reared a large family of children, and died on the way to Utah, in 1845, aged about fifty years. His widow resides in Utah. Their children were as follows: Jeremiah, Dudley, Lemuel, Thomas, Mary, Betsey, Sarah P. and Clara. The last mentioned married, first, Horace Sturtevant, who died at the age of fifty-nine years, and second, Simon Colton, who died in 1884, aged eighty-one years. Mrs. Colton is sixty-five years of age, and resides in Lyndon. 

       David Darling, a pensioner of the Revolution, married Judith French, reared eighteen children, and died in Wheelock, at the age of seventy-five years. His son, Reuben D., married Hannah Chandler, and reared seven children, of whom Drusilla married Galusha Dow, and had two children, George C. and Delia M. The former married Grace Ryemouth, has two children, Clifford L. and Harry, and resides in St. Paul, Minn. Delia M. married E. E. Cleveland, has two children, Mable D. and Harry E., and lives at Lyndonville. 

       Robert McKoy came to America, was shipwrecked on the voyage, at which time one of his brothers was lost, and landed at Nova Scotia. He married Anna Willson, moved to Lunenburgh, and after many years came to Lyndon, locating on the place where Henry Kilby now lives, where he died at the age of eighty-four years. He reared nine children. His son Charles W. married Rebecca H., daughter of Deacon Joseph Gleason, of Lunenburg, Vt., and died May 19, 1883, aged eighty-two years. His widow resides in this town. 

       Bartholomew Duhigg, a native of Ireland, married Honora McNarira, and reared four children. His son David came to Lyndon in 1849, married Ellen Reardon, and has had three children, Mary (Mrs. F. E. Quimby), Dennis and Honora. He resides in town on road 49. His son Dennis studied law, with G. C. & W. Cahoon, served in the late war, in Co. N, 11th Vt. Vols., and was killed at the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864, aged twenty-four years. Honora married Marshall K. Willmarth, has had one daughter, Corinne M., and lives in Lyndon. Mr. Willmarth served in the late war, in Co. M, 1st Vt. Art., and was killed at the battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, aged thirty-two years. 

       Philip Goss, son of John, who came to America from England, in 1630, married Hannah Hopkins, and reared five children. His son Philip married Judith Haywood, and reared ten children. Samuel, son of  Philip, Jr., settled in Winchester, N.H.  Of his four children, Willard married Mary White, of Londonderry, Vt., in 1830, and reared five children, viz.: David, Mary A., Harriet H., Lorenzo W. and Samuel E. The latter married Jane A. Fowler of Windsor, Vt., has two children, Willard J. and Florence E., and resides at Lyndonville. He served in the late war, in Co. F, 5th N. H. Vols., three years, and was twice wounded. 

       Enoch Badger was an early settler of Danville, where he died at the age of eighty years. Jonathan, one of his five children, married Alvira Clifford, and reared seven children, viz.: John, Wells M., Asher R., Sarah J., Rhoda R., Electa and Oliver M. He died at the great age of ninety-six years. Oliver M. married Delilah A. Curtis, and has four children, namely, Harley T., Lillian S., Royal M. and Maud D.   He has resided in Lyndonville seventeen years. 

       Rev. E. C. Smalley, son of Dr. Henry S. and Parmelia (Chamberlain) Smalley, was a native of Stowe, Vt, When sixteen years of age he moved to Albany, Vt., and finally to Sheffield, where he died in 1875, aged fifty-one years. He was a minister of the Freewill Baptist church, married Johanna Stiles, and reared three children, Horace H., Emily C. and George H. The latter married Viola I., daughter of Dr. Hiram P. Hoyt, and has one son, Howard H.  Mr. Smaller is engaged in the life insurance business, and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Michael McCann came from Ireland about 1850, went to St. Johnsbury, and finally came to Lyndon, where he died at the age of fifty-six years. He was an employee of the Passumpsic Railroad Company, married Ellen Connors, and reared three children, namely, Mary, Maggie and John C.  The latter married Maggie McFarlin, of Canada, and his two children, Charlie and Clarence. He is a locomotive engineer, and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Joshua Stoddard, Jr., married Abigail Lawrence, reared thirteen children, and died at the age of ninety-one years. His son Frederick W. married Dorothy B. Quimby, has three children, William F., Ann J. and Emma A., and resides at Lyndon Center. 

       Ezeriah Webb, a native of Lunenburg, Vt., was a colonel in the Revolutionary war, and died at the great age of ninety-eight years. His son Joshua R. married Dorothy Sanborn, of Lunenburg, Vt.  Charles, son of Joshua R., married Juliet Foster, of St. Albans, and has two children, Willie and Annie, the latter an adopted daughter.   Mr. Webb is the proprietor of Webb's Hotel, of this town. His son Willie N. married Luella Cobleigh, and is in the hotel with his father. 

       Ebenezer Severance, a Revolutionary soldier, resided in Walpole, N.H., and reared four children. His son Ebenezer married, first, Roxy Johnston, who bore him one son, Quartus, and second, Rebecca Chandler, and had born to him three children, Mary, Roxana and Chandler A.   The last mentioned married Sophronia M. Chapman, of East St. Johnsbury, and has two children, Mrs. Carrie R. Alcott and George I. 

       Joseph Kenyon was a native of Plainfield, N.H., served in the war of the Revolution, and reared eight children. His son Philo C. married Orissa Thorndyke, and reared five children, viz.: Fred W., Edgar W., Sidney P., George F. and William H. The last mentioned married Mary A. Weston, and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Elder Hicks, a native of Scotland, came to this country about 1790, first settled in Burke, and was one of the first preachers of the town. His son Peleg married, first, Mercy Tute, and second, Sally Buckingham. He reared eight children, and died in 1852. His son Jesse, born January 7, 1800, married Maria Calkins, and reared ten children, seven of whom are living. He died July 31, 1863. His son Abram H. married Caroline S. Tute, of Burke, has one daughter, Roanna Stevens, of Woodsville, N.H., and resides at Lyndonville. He served six years in the Mexican war, and was an ensign in the United States Navy four years. 

       Artemas Southworth married Alvira Woodbury, and reared six children, three of whom are living, namely, Mrs. Pamelia Aldrich, of Lowell, Mass.; Elizabeth Sherman, of Lisbon, N.H., and Edwin W., of this town, He died in Concord, Vt., at the age of forty-five years. Edwin W. married Mary McAllister, and has two children, Henry A. and Ellen E.   Mr. Southworth served in the late war, in Co. D, 1st Vt. Cav., and was confined in Andersonville prison six months. 

       Capt. Samuel Knight married Mehetable Goss, of Waterford, and moved to Canada, where he died at the age of eighty years. His son Samuel married Julia A. McGaffey of Canada, and reared six children. One son, George W., who came to Lyndon in 1881, married Sarah V. Dean, of Rockland, Me., and has six children, viz.: Annie, George H., Viola, Susie, Gertie and Franklin. 

       John Sleeper went to Newark, Vt., about 1820, married Olive Thayer, and reared eight children. John, Jr., married Chastina Powers, and reared two children, Lyman O. and Alison P. The latter married Idella A. Corliss, of Newark, Vt., has two children, Mabel and Ethel, and resides in Lyndonville. 

       Jacob Twombly, a native of Ashland, N.H., was an early settler of Holderness, married Tamma Hill, who lived to the great age of ninety-six years, and reared seven children, four of whom are living. His son Samuel married Arvilla Flanders, and reared seven sons, of whom Aaron married Mary A. Aldrich, and has three children, viz.: Mrs. Ida F. Randall, who has one child, Lena; Albert L., who married Clara R. Baxter, and is at Lyndonville, engaged in the dry goods trade with his father; and Fred, also with his father. 

       Jonathan Tillotson married Jerusha Rolland, reared thirteen children, and was an early settler of Topsham, Vt., on a farm where he died at the age of fifty years. His son Henry L. married Lucinda Cilley, and had born to him one child, Willie C.  The latter is a physician, and first commenced practice at Lyndonville. He married Fannie Kidder, of Barre, Vt. 

       Americus J. Carter, a native of Kentucky, graduated at Jefferson Medical college, at Philadelphia, and from the State University of Missouri, at St. Louis, and commenced practice at Forth Smith, Arkansas, where he remained five years. He then moved to Cassville, Mo., moved to Wheelock in 1863, and finally came to Lyndon Center, where he now remains. He married Mary A. Leavitt, of Wheelock, and has five children. His son Oscar E. is a practicing physician at North Danville. 

       Richard Hovey, a Revolutionary soldier, moved to Peterboro, N.H., as an early settler, and died there at the age of eighty-five years. Stephen, one of five children, married Martha Ferson, and reared four sons and three daughters. Joseph, son of Stephen, married Mary A. Shoneyo, of Canada, and has three children, namely, Hosea E., Joseph L. and Mary A.  Mr. Hover has been a resident of Lyndonville thirteen years. 

       David Morrison married Sally Clark, and reared eight children, viz.: Hannah, Joseph C., David, Fannie, Susan E., Philinda T., Sally and George G. of this town. The last mentioned married Amanda M. Robie, and has had born to him three children, namely, Philinda I., Carrie, now dead, and Byron G. The latter married Stella Hutchinson, and resides in St. Johnsbury. 

       William Pearl, a native of Barrington, N.H., married Rachel Twombly, and moved to Sheffield, Vt., about 1790, as one of the first settlers. Nicholas, one of his six children, married Johanna Grey, of Wheelock, and reared seven children, of whom Jeremy married Samantha Folsom, and has had born to him four children, James and Lydia S., who are now deceased, Hiram M. and Ida S.  He resides in Lyndonville, on Park street. Hiram M. is cashier of the Lyndonville National Bank, and Ida S. is cashier of the Lyndon Savings Bank.

       Samuel Chapman, long a resident of Brownington, Vt., died in Coventry, Vt., at the age of seventy-two years. His son Amassa married Isabella Plastridge, and had born to him four children. One son, Charles P., married Edna Billing, and has three children, namely, Claud A., Mable and Dora I.  He resides in Lyndonville, on Broadway. 

       Rufus Howe was an early settler of Grafton, Vt., where he died at the age of eighty years. Rufus, Jr., one of his eight children, married Susan D. Stewart, and had born to him nine children. One son, Leroy S., married Samaria M. Gibson, and has had born to him five children, namely, Percy L., now dead, Royal M. and Rosa V., twins, Albion and Irene E.  Mr. Howe served in the late war, in Co. D, 16th Vt. Vols., and was at the battle of Gettysburg. He resides in Lyndonville, and is an engineer on the Passumpsic railroad. 

       Lemuel Dow, of Hanover, N.H., married Abigail Dodge, and died in that town, in 1850, aged seventy-nine years. His widow died in 1852. Francis, one of his four children, married, first, Mary Church, of Hancock, Vt., and second, Sarah French, and reared thirteen children. Francis, Jr., married three times, first, Emily Kingman, of Orford, and second, Mrs. Naomi Highland, who bore him two children, Mrs. Hattie Wilson, of Massachusetts, and Frank E., who is located on the northern coast of Africa, on the flag ship, Brooklyn, of the United States navy. Mr. Dow married for his third wife, Mrs. Julia A. Tarlton, who had three children by her first husband, Charles F., Charles A. and Jennie. 

       Abial Goodell, of Pomfret, Conn., married Margaret Brown, reared six children, and moved to Westminster, Vt., where he died in 1830, at the age of eighty-three years. Abial, Jr., married Mary Goodrich, and reared six children, viz.: William, Ira, Mary, Fannie, Roxanna and Dan. The last mentioned married Mary Potwine, and has one daughter, Mary, who married Sylvester S. Doud, of Sutton, Vt., and has one son, Arthur V.  Mr. Goodell resides in Lyndonville, and has been deacon of the Congregational church seven years. 

       Robert Shirley served in the War of 1812, and resided in Chester, N.H., where he died at about seventy years of age. James, one of his four children, married Clara Forsyth, and had born to him four children, namely, Lucinda, Margaret, George H. and John. The last mentioned married Dorcas Collins, and has one daughter, Clara E.  His wife died in 1876, aged forty-four years. Mr. Shirley served in the late war, in 3d Vt. Bat. and now resides in Lyndonville.

       Bernard Hoye, a native of Ireland, moved to Wheelock in 1858, married Catherine Doran, and reared five children. His son Patrick D. married Mary A. O'Brien, of Lyndon, and has two children, William J. and Josephine A.  Mr. Hoye is an engineer on the Passumpsic railroad, and resides in Lyndonville. 

       William Bullock, son of Samuel, was a native of Rehoboth, Mass., married Susannah Kent, of Swansea, Mass., and reared twelve children. One son, Samuel, married Silence N. Bowen, and also reared twelve children. His son Jesse married Mercy Chandler, of Plymouth, Mass., and had born to him three children. Halsey Bullock, of this town, married Helen M. Ladd, and has four children, viz.: George I., of Illinois, Katie B., Fred C. and Charles H.

       Thaddeus Potter, a pensioner of the Revolution, died at Waterford, Vt., aged about ninety-five years. Thaddeus, Jr., married Charlotte Newton, of West Topsham, Vt., and reared seven children. One daughter, Charlotte, married, first, Orville H. Peck, and has reared four children, viz.: Julia E., Mary L., Susan M., and Charles W., who married Hattie Chesley, of Sheffield, Vt.  Mrs. Peck married for her second husband Edwin W. Barker, who served in the late war, in Co. E, 6th Vt. Vols., and died in 1881, aged sixty-four years. His widow survives him, lives at Lyndonville, and draws a pension. 

       Pearly Stone, a native of Massachusetts, reared four children, and moved to St. Johnsbury in 1834. His son Loren M. married Lydia Pierce, of St. Johnsbury, and resides in that town, to which place he came at the age of fourteen years. He has had born to him four children, namely, Alice C., Susan J., Abel P. and Albert M. The last mentioned married Lucy A. Fulsome, has two children, Agnes and Louise M., and resides at Lyndonville. 

       Dea. Benjamin Sanborn was born in Wheelock, October 16, 1798. He was the fifth child of a family of twelve—eight boys and four girls—all but one of whom lived to adult age. At the age of twenty Benjamin purchased of his father the remaining year of his minority, and struck out in life for himself. October 26, 1830, he was married to Miss Abigail B. Stanton, daughter of Isaac W. Stanton, of  North Danville. At the age of thirty-two, having accumulated, by industry and strict economy one or two thousand dollars, he purchased the farm in Lyndon, where he lived and died, a large part of the land being then heavily timbered with the stately maple, elm and hemlock. His own strong arm felled the forest, and by years of earnest, manly endeavor, the farm became one of the most productive and valuable in town.  In the summer of 1866 he sold to the Connecticut and Passumpsic Rivers Railroad Company 150 acres of the farm on which to locate and build the general offices and repair shops of the company, and where the thriving village of Lyndonville now stands, reserving to himself about forty acres of the meadow land, now owned and occupied by his son, Isaac W. Sanborn. He had two children, I. W. Sanborn, last named, and Martha A., now the wife of Dr. J. W. Copeland, of Lyndonville. Mr. Sanborn was a man of regular habits, strong and robust in health, possessed of good common sense, sound judgment, and a well balanced mind. He was an active member of the Free Baptist church in town for over thirty years, its deacon nearly as long, and until his death. In his early years his political views were Democratic, and later he was a Free  Soiler and Republican. He lived a long and useful life, was honored and respected by all, and passed to his rest August 28, 1876, after a brief illness, like a shock of corn fully ripe, in his seventy-eighth year. 

       Joel Trull was born in Dracut, Mass., in 1779. His father was a large farmer. When about twenty-one years of age Joel emigrated northward, and located in Danville, where he bought a farm. He came to Danville with a horse and $100.00 in money. About 1809 he sold his farm, taking his pay in potato whiskey, which he sold to Boston parties and received in exchange a stock of general merchandise, with which he started in trade in Burke, about 1810. He continued in business there until about 1849, when he came to Lyndon, where he did business for about four years, and erected the buildings now occupied by J. Hidden. He died here in 1855. While doing business as a merchant he served his town in various positions of trust. He married, first, in Danville, a Miss Pettengill, who bore him one son, Joel, Jr., and two daughters. He married for his second wife Cynthia Newell, daughter of Daniel Newell, of Burke, and had five children—two sons, Justus and Daniel N., and three daughters, Philena (Mrs. S. B. Crane), deceased, Philura (Mrs. O. P. Wakefield), of West Concord, Cynthia (Mrs. J. B. Negley), of Pittsburg, Pa. Justus Trull carried on the carriage and mercantile business at Danville about fifteen years, and died in 1870. Daniel N. received an academic education, attended lectures at Woodstock in 1853, and graduated from Dartmouth Medical college in the class of 1855.  He practiced in Lyndon for a year following, and in 1857 and 1858 in St. Johnsbury, succeeding to the practice of Dr. Bancroft. Being overworked in the large practice which devolved upon him, he was prostrated by disease, and for a year was confined to the house. He has never engaged in general practice since, but for twenty-four years has been connected with the carriage manufacture at Lyndon. During the war he was recruiting officer for the north half of Caledonia county, and has been connected with the directory of the National Bank of Lyndon several years. 

       Walter E. Ranger, A. M., principal of Lyndon Institute since 1883, was born in Wilton, Me., November 22, 1855. His parents were Peter and Eliza (Smith) Ranger. He prepared for college at Wilton academy, and was graduated at Bates college in 1879. During the next year he was acting principal of Nichols Latin school, Lewiston, Me.  Previous to his removal to Lyndon, he was principal of Lenox (Mass.) high school. 

       The First Congregational church was organized November 30, 1817, and reorganized as the "First Congregational Society," March 18, 1861. The church originally had nine members, and Rev. Samuel G. Tenney was the first pastor. The church building was erected in 1827-28, though it has been extensively repaired since. It will now comfortably accommodate 300 persons and is valued, including grounds, etc., at $4,000.00. The society has ninety members, with Rev. George W. Kelley, pastor. 

       The Methodist Episcopal church, located at Lyndon village, was organized in 1835. The church building was erected in 1839. It is a wooden structure, capable of seating 250 persons, and is valued, including grounds, at $5,000.00. The society now has sixty-six members, with Rev. Sylvester Donaldson, pastor. 

       The Free Will Baptist church, located at Lyndon Center, was organized by its first pastor, Rev. T. P. Maulton, with nine members, in 1843. The church building was erected in 1853, of wood, will seat 400 persons, and is valued, including grounds, at $3,000.00. The society now has eighty-six members, with Rev. E. Owen, pastor. 

       The First Congregational church, of Lyndonville, was organized by a council of churches, convened for the purpose, in December, 1870. It had originally forty-one members, and Rev. P. B. Fisk was the first pastor. The church building, erected in 1872, at a cost of $10,000.00, will comfortably accommodate 500 persons, and is a neat wooden structure. The society now has 160 members, with Rev. C. B. Hulbert, pastor. 

       The Roman Catholic church, located at Lyndonville, was organized by its present pastor, Rev. J. B. Bursinault, with fifty communicants, in 1875. The church building, erected during that year, will seat 400 persons, and is valued, including grounds, etc., at $3,500.00. The society now has 200 communicants. 

       The Methodist Episcopal church, located at East Lyndon, was organized in 1877, with 100 members. Rev. Elder Morgan was the first pastor. The church building, erected that year, will seat 200 persons, and is valued at $1,800.00. The society now has fifty members, with Rev. Elder Bemis, pastor. 

       The Methodist Episcopal church, located at Lyndonville, was organized by W. H. Wight, with twenty-five members, in 1878, and Rev. W. R. Davenport was the first pastor. The church building was also erected that year. It is a wooden structure, capable of seating 225 persons, and is valued at $2,000.00. The society now has sixty-six members, with Rev. Sylvester Donaldson, pastor. 

       The Universalist society, of Lyndonville, was organized in 1885. Services are held in the Matthewson block. The society has twenty-five members, with Rev. Mr. Jenkins, of St. Johnsbury, pastor. 
 
 

(Source: Gazetteer of Caledonia and Essex Counties, VT.; 1764-1887, Compiled and Published by Hamilton Child; May 1887, Page 229-259)

This chapter was provided by Tom Dunn January 2003

Tom Dunn


Lyndon Historical Society

 
1870 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners of the First  Congregational Church Church, Lyndonville, VT