Peacham lies in the western part of the county, in lat. 44º 20', and long. 4º 47', and is bounded on the northeast by Danville, southeast by Barnet, southwest by Groton, and northwest by the Washington county line.    It was granted by Governor Benning Wentworth, December 31, 1763, to seventy grantees, with an area of 23,040 acres, As then constituted, there laid between Danville and Peacham a tract of land which was afterwards chartered as a township under the name of Deweysburg. In 1810 this township was divided, a part going to Danville and a part to Peacham, thus increasing the area of the latter township to 25,695 acres. 

       A high ridge of land passes through the westerly part of the town, extending northeast and southwest, which divides the waters of the town running into Lake Champlain from those passing into Connecticut river. The territory of the town lies chiefly on the eastern slopes of this dividing ridge, and though a varied surface has many excellent farms well adapted for all kinds of grain, grass and pasturage. From the summits of some of the high hills, beautiful prospects are obtained. On one of these, called by way of legendary distinction “Devil Hill,” looking west and north the eye gazes upon an almost unbroken wilderness, extending from the base of the hill directly beneath one's feet for several miles, while by just turning around, without other change of position, the cultivated farms of Peacham and Barnet are spread out to the beholder's view. From Cow Hill, a still higher eminence, the vision is bounded north and west by the Green mountain range, and to the east by the Franconia and White mountains of New Hampshire.  Looking west, or looking east, the whole intervening country lies spread out in all its untold variety of hill, valley, forest, pond, farm and village.   Within the limits of the town are several ponds, or small lakes, some of which, environed with forests and fed by mountain springs, are remarkably clear and well stocked with the finny tribe. Onion river pond, so called as the source of one of the principal branches of Onion or Winooski river, is in the westerly part of the town, covering an area of about 300 acres. Little Osmore pond, one mile west of Onion, has on its bed a fine deposit of infusorial marl. There are several streams of water running easterly, affording numerous mill privileges. 

       In 1880, Peacham had a population of 1,041. In 1886 it had ten school districts and ten common schools, taught during the year by fifteen female teachers, at an average weekly salary, including board, of $4.71. There were 250 scholars, 57 of whom were attending private schools. The entire income for school purposes was $1,499.12, while the whole amount expended was $2,786.35, with Alice L. Stevens, superintendent. 

       Peacham is a pleasant post village, located in the central part of the town. It has two churches (Methodist and Congregational), the county grammar school, two stores, an hotel, a tin shop, blacksmith shop, harness shop, etc., and about forty dwellings. 

       South Peacham is a post village, located about a mile south of the above. It has a store, grist-mill, wagon shop, box factory, and about thirty dwellings. 

       Peachum Hollow, located about a mile north of  Peacham village, has a store, blacksmith shop, and about twenty dwellings. Just east of this village, on the Robert Esden farm, Hon. Thadeus Stevens spent his boyhood days. 

       The Caledonia County Grammar School, located at Peacham village, is the oldest educational institution in the state retaining its original corporate name. The school was chartered October 27, 1795, and the first meeting of the trustees was held on the 17th of the following November. The first preceptor was Ezra Carter, Esq. The present principal is C.A. Bunker, A.M. 

       James L. Judkin's carriage and general repair shop was built by Lewis G. Gilson, about 1855, and was purchased by Mr. Judkins in 1875. 

       George B. Hatch & Co.'s steam saw-mill, on the west side of Onion river pond, cuts 1,500,000 feet of lumber annually. 

       Sanford B. Hooker's grist-mill was built by him in 1857. It has three runs of stones, and grinds about 3,000 bushels of western corn per year. 

       John Ewell's saw and grist-mill, erected by Isaac W. Ewell, is located on road 25.  It has also a shingle-mill capable of sawing 10,000 shingles per day. 

       Thomas P. Bingham's rake factory was built by James Worden, about 1845, and was purchased by the present proprietor in 1881. He turns out 600 dozen hand-rakes, twenty-five dozen drag rakes, and three dozen horse-rakes per year. He has also a saw-mill. 

       James Stevenson's saw-mill was originally built by Phineas Dow, about 1825. Governor Mattox rebuilt the mill about 1842; that was burned, and it was again re-built by Joseph Bruce, about 1866. Mr. Stevenson manufactures shingles and all kinds of lumber. He owns about 450 acres of woodland in Peacham, but resides in Cabot, Washington county. 

       According to charter prescription, the first meeting of the proprietors of Peacham was held in Hadley, Mass., January 18, 1764. Affairs slumbered, and for nearly twenty years the town remained in almost unbroken silence. At long intervals the proprietors held an occasional meeting, and made some progress in surveying lots and running lines around the town. Their first meeting held in Peacham bears date August 20, 1783, six months previous to the first regular town meeting of which there is any record. The disturbed condition of the country, arising from the contested claims of New Hampshire and New York, and the American Revolution, retarded the growth of the town. A very few inhabitants tried to carve out homes for themselves and families as early as 1775, but lived in constant peril by day and night. Early in the spring of that year, Deacon Jonathan Elkins, of Hampton, N.H., came with a few others, and began cutting down the forests ; but from fear of the enemy they soon returned to Newbury.   In 1776 the solitude was broken by the marching of several companies of soldiers along a line made by blazed trees from Newbury to Lake Champlain.  It was an early spring, and they marched on snow-shoes. But upon hearing of an invasion from Canada, they soon marched back again. The few people who were here fled with them. Deacon Elkins, however, with John Skeele and Archey McLaughlin, returned in the fall and spent the winter together in Peacham. These were the first white men who wintered here, and may be called the fathers of the town. But the few increased a little from year to year, till the close of the war. 

       In October, 1777, was born Harvey Elkins, the first white male child born in Peacham, and the next year Ruth S. Skeele, the first female child was born, who died September 25, 1860, aged eighty-two years.  In 1779, General Hazen, stationed at Newbury, had orders to clear a road from that place to Champlain, and thus gave name to the so-called Hazen road, which for a long time thereafter was a great convenience to the inhabitants. As usual, in those early days, the road did not avoid the high hills. In 1780 a Captain Aldrich built a picket around James Bailey's house for security from the enemy, and this was probably the only block-house in the limits of Peacham. Generally the people had to take care of themselves as best they could, and seasons of alarm were not unfrequent; though it was not known that any was killed. A few in the vicinity were taken prisoners, among whom were Cols. Elkins, of Peacham, and Johnson, from Newbury, in 1781, and two persons by the name of Bailey, in 1782. Colonel Elkins was carried to Quebec, thence to England, and was there exchanged for a prisoner of equal rank. Colonel Johnson returned on parole. 

       After the war closed the population rapidly increased. It was a point of considerable commercial importance in Indian trade, and as the Hazen road became famous as a medium of transit across the country the land came rapidly under cultivation. People began to forget past trials in the prospects opening before them, and the population became respectable in numbers, intelligence and character. By December, 1784, there were twenty-four freemen in the town, and a population of some 200 souls. The census of 1791 shows a population of 365. In 1800 there were 873. Thus in 1784 the town was fully organized, and in the same year it was voted to raise $60.00 for preaching, to be paid in wheat at 6s. per bushel, and the selectmen were the committee to hire ministers and appoint places for preaching. 

       John Skeele came to Peacham, from Salisbury, N.H., in 1775, remained here for a time and did some clearing, and then returned and brought his wife (Phebe Wilister). He reared four sons and seven daughters, one of whom, Ruth, born in 1776, was the first child born in town. She was a teacher and died in 1860. Electa, youngest daughter of John, was born November 21, 1779, married Rufus Miner in 1821, and was the mother of three sons and four daughters, viz.: Ethan, of  Peacham, Curtis, who died in the army, Ellen C; (Mrs. A. L. Pattridge), of Illinois, Electa L. (Mrs. J. A. Kidder), of Hardwick, Frances A. (Mrs. Truman Martin), of this town, Catherine H. (Mrs. E. Wheeler), of East Hardwick, and Edwin R., of California. 

       Archibald McLachlin was born in Sterling, Scotland, in 1743, married Christiana McKinley, and came to America in the spring of 1775. He located on the farm where his grandson Archibald now lives. His son John, born in 1770, married Mary, daughter of James Whitehill, and reared five sons and six daughters, namely, Mary, Jane, Eliza, Nancy, Archibald, John, who died at the age of three years, Annie, John, 2d, and Susan, twins, James and William. Archibald was born in 1810, married Mary Ann, daughter of Nathan and Mary (Rowell) Thorne, in 1848, and has had born to him three sons and three daughters, namely, Harrison A., Alice (Mrs. Charles Dubois), Lewis and Lucia, twins, and Langlin and Nancy, twins. His wife died in 1885. He is a farmer, and resides on the homestead. Harrison A., son of Archibald and Mary A. (Thorne) McLachlin, was born in 1849, married Susan L., daughter of Pliny and Sophia (Richmond) Granger, in 1875, and has two daughters, Alice S., born in 1879, and Mary E., born in 1883. He is a farmer, and lives on road 18. John, son of John and Mary (Whitehill) McLachlin, was born in 1816, married Betsey Mills, of Topsham, Vt., in 1846, and has had born to him one son and two daughters, as follows: Beattice, born in 1847, Flora E., born in 1848, and Helen M., who died in 1877, at the age of twenty-five years. He resides on road 62. James, son of John and Mary (Whitehill) McLachlin, was bon in 1818, married Almira, daughter of John and Mary (Morse) Varnum, in 1844, and has had born to him four sons, namely, William V., of this town, George J., Charles and Harvey M.  His son William V. was born in 1846, married Addie C., daughter of S. H. and Cordelia (Ballou) Rowell, in 1876, and has one daughter, Virginia, born in 1878.  William, son of John and Mary (Whitehill) McLachlin, was born in 1821, married Samantha L., daughter of John T. and Matilda (Hall) Hopkins in 1858, and has one son, Edward H., born in 1860, graduated from Dartmouth college in 1883, and is now principal of the High School at Westboro, Mass. 

       Moody Morse came to Peacham, from Massachusetts, with his wife (Mary Foster) and family, about 1779, and located on the place where William W. Morse now lives. He was the first shoemaker in town. Thomas, one of his eight children, was born in 1796, married Cynthia, daughter of Aleck and Elizabeth (Eastman) Blanchard, in 1831, and had four sons and one daughter viz.: Francis A., Mary E. (Mrs. H. Balcolm), Lucius O., deceased, Abel, who died at the age of ten years, and William W.  The last mentioned was born in 1845, married Ellen E., daughter of Alonzo and Mary J. (Clark) Robbins, in 1868, and has had three daughters, namely, Mary E., who died in 1881, at the age of ten years, Olie J. and Carrie M.  Mr. Morse resides on the homestead, which has always been in the Morse family, and is located on the corner of roads 56 and 57. 

       Abial Blanchard, born in Concord, N.H., in 1747, married Mary Eastman in 1778, and came to this town in 1779, locating on the place where his grandson, Edmund C., now lives. He died in 1808, and his widow died in 1830. Of his seven children, Jacob was born in 1779, and married Miss Thomas Jefferson, daughter of Judge John Cameron, and granddaughter of General Stark in 1824. He reared three sons and four daughters, viz.: Mary, John C., Enoch, who was a surgeon in the late war, and is now in Illinois, Elizabeth, Nathaniel, Jane and Flora M. (Mrs. Jacob Trussell). His first wife died in 1843, and he married for his second wife Myra, daughter of Timothy and Susan (Fairchild) Cowles, in 1846. He had born to him two children, Lucius H., who died in 1869, aged twenty-two years, and Edmund C., who was born in 1849. The latter married Ada, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Root) Atwell, and has had two daughters and one son, Bernice E., Susie A. and Carl A., who died young.  Edmund C. is a farmer and lives on the homestead, which has always been in the Blanchard family. John C., son of Jacob, was born in 1827, and at the age of twenty-four years went to California, where he remained five years. He married Abbie M., daughter of James and Mary (Clark) Staples, in 1858, and served in the late war, enlisting as 1st lieutenant in 1862. He had born to him seven sons and four daughters, viz.: Abraham L., of Kansas, Effie C., who died in 1882, Walter N., Mary E., a teacher, Edward C., Jane, Lewis H., Alice T., James S., Dan C. and Philip. Mr. Blanchard died November 6, 1883. His widow and family live on road 58. 

       Jeptha Woodward came to this town from Rhode Island, with his widowed mother, six brothers and four sisters, in 1782, and located on the place where Benjamin Woodward now lives. He married Mrs. Persis (Washburn) Rowell, and had born to him three sons and two daughters. He died August 28, 1871, at the great age of one hundred years, seven months. His son Benjamin was born December 23, 1803, married Nancy Sulham in 1828. Of his two sons and three daughters, only one, Lucinda (Mrs. Henry W. Northrup), of this town, is living. 

       John Harriman, son of Leonard, born in Pembroke, N.H., in 1765, was a blacksmith, married Lucy Foster, and came to Peacham about 1785. Of their nine children, Joshua married Mary, daughter of David Elkins and reared six sons and two daughters, viz.: David E., Almira E. (Mrs. H. B. Graham), Henry E. and Sprague E., twins, Samuel B., William D., Alvin and Mary E. (Mrs. Albert Brock), of St. Johnsbury. Sprague E. married Lucy, daughter of James and Sarah (Abbott) Livingston, in 1854, and has had three sons and two daughters, namely, Fred S., who married Mary Emerson, Edward A., who died in infancy, Herbert, a physician in Massachusetts, Kate I. (Mrs. C. A. Hutchinson), and Sarah A., who is a teacher and lives at home.  Mr. Harriman lives on the place where he was born, on road 45. 

       Asahel Martin was a Revolutionary soldier, and came to Peacham about 1785, locating on the place where Andrew Whitehill now lives. He married two of Deacon Miner's daughters, both of whom died leaving no children, and for his third wife he married a sister of General Chamberlain. His son Moses, born October 30, 1796, married, first, Jane Martin, and had born to him three daughters, one of whom is Louisa (Mrs. L. F. Parker), of this town. He married for his second wife Almira Dana, in 1827, by whom he had three sons and three daughters, viz.: Elizabeth, who married Rev. George S. Woodhull, Ashbel, Moses M., a Congregational minister in Michigan, Almira (Mrs. James Shaw), Almina who died in 1862, and Caroline (Mrs. Andrew Whitehill), of Peacham. Ashbel, born in 1830, married Hannah, daughter of Moses and Phebe (Brock) Wesson, in 1857, and has had one daughter and six sons, as follows: Carrie M., who died at the age of six years, Moses W., twins not named, deceased, Edwin A. and Willie B.  Mr. Martin served as town representative in 1874-75, and lives on road 62. 

       Truman Martin married Mary Noyes, and came to this town in 1811, locating on the place where his son Truman now lives. He reared four sons and two daughters, viz.: Sally, who died in 1835, Truman, 1st, who died in infancy, Amos, who died in Missouri, in 1863, Benjamin, of Manchester, N.H., Truman, Jr., and Hannah N. Truman Jr., was born on the homestead, on road 70, in 1818, married, first, Martha E., daughter of Abel Walker, in 1854, who died in 1856, and second, Frances A., daughter of Rufus Miner, in 1860. 

       Lemuel Northrup, a pensioner of the Revolutionary war, came to this town from Newton, Conn., about 1785, married Lois Woodard, and had two sons and one daughter, Jonathan, Joseph and Prudence. Joseph was born in 1799, married Jerusha, daughter of Clergy and Deborah Woodard, and reared four sons and four daughters, of whom John C. was born July 4, 1823, married Roxianna, daughter of Nathan and Hannah (Smith) Porter, in 1846, and had two sons and three daughters, as follows: Eleanor F. (Mrs. Charles F. Thresher), Elsie J. (Mrs. Frank G. Chandler), Elmore F., who died in infancy, John C., who died at the age of four years, and Eva M. (Mrs. F. Chandler). Henry W., son of Joseph, was born September 4, 1826, married Lucinda, daughter of Benjamin and Nancy (Sulham) Woodward, in 1848, and has one son, Clark H., who was born in 1850, married Alice Graham in 1872, and has had born to him three sons and two daughters, viz.: Minnie J., Henry W., who died in infancy, Frank L., Milton B. and Lou May. The wife of Clark H. died February 16, 1886. 

       Jesse Merrill came to this town about 1789, with his wife, Priscilla Kimball, and located on the place where A. G. Bickford lives. He reared five sons and one daughter, as follows: James, who was a lawyer, and died in Pennsylvania, in 1841; Samuel, who was also a lawyer, and died in Indianapolis, in 1855; Jesse, who was a physician, and died in Hopkinton, Mass., in 1861; Hazen; David, who was a Congregational minister, preached the last twelve years in Peacham, and died in 1850; and Betsey, who married Leonard Johnson, and died in 1855. Hazen was born in 1796, married three times, first, Flora, daughter of Noah and Mary (Root) Martin, in 1826, second, Augusta Martin, and third, Marion Eastman. His daughter Augusta F. was born in 1829, married Albert G. Bickford, son of Benjamin and Bridget Bickford, in 1862, and has two daughters, Flora Martin and Mary Merrill. Mr. Bickford is a farmer, and resides on the Merrill homestead. 

       John and Phineas Varnum, brothers, came to this town from Dracut, Mass., about 1791, and located in the eastern part. John, son of John, was born in town in 1806, reared a family of twelve children, and died in 1880.  His sons John, Jr. and Leonard R. reside in town. John, Jr., is town clerk, served as town representative in 1867-68, has been justice of the peace twenty years, and postmaster fifteen years. 

       Asahel Hand was born in Bethlehem, in 1779 and came to this town with his widowed mother, at the age of twelve years, locating on the farm where Harmon Hand now resides. He married, first, Mary Hurd, who bore him two children, Sylvia and Elias, and second, Laura Hurd, who bore him two sons and two daughters, viz.: Emeline (Mrs. Franklin Bailey), Harmon, Leverett A., of Canada, and Sarah A. Harmon, born in 1816, is a farmer, and resides on the homestead. 

       Jonathan Clark came to this town, from Connecticut, as one of the early settlers, locating on the place where his grandson, George W., now lives. He married Faith Martin, and reared five children, of whom Jude A. was born on the farm, in a log house, in 1806, married Sarah L., daughter of Joseph Prime, and reared seven children, viz.: Lizzie S., who married M. M. Wheeler and died in 1876, George W., Chester M., deceased, Cynthia. E. (Mrs. T. B. Ainsworth), Joseph P., Oliver P., and Emily (Mrs. George Sanborn).  George W. was born in 1842, married Lutheria, daughter of James and Sophia (Gillman) Wheeler, in 1869, and has two sons and one daughter, Elsie M., Chester M. and Alden J.  Mr. Clark resides on the homestead. 

       Edward Clark, a Revolutionary soldier, married Elizabeth Wesson, and came to Peacham about 1797. His son Russell was born in Haverhill, N.H., in 1795, served in the War of 1812, married Florella Foster in 1828, and had three children, of whom Ephraim was born on the homestead in 1828, married Clarissa Johnson, and has had five sons and four daughters.  Mr. Clark is a farmer, and resides on the homestead, which was settled by his grandfather, Ephraim W., son of Edward Clark, graduated from Dartmouth college in 1824, went as a missionary to the Sandwich Islands in 1827, and remained there forty years. He died in Chicago in 1878. 

       Parker Hooker came from Sturbridge, Mass., about 1800, and located in the northwestern part of the town, on the farm now owned by Benjamin Kidder. He married twice, and reared ten children. Orman P., son of Parker and Judith (Carr) Hooker, was born in town, in 1818, married Mercy Blanchard in 1841, and had born to him two sons, Hazen B. and Herbert P.  Mr. Hooker represented his town in 1869-70, and died October 10, 1885. Hazen B. was born in 1842, served in the late war, in Co. G, 3d Vt. Vols., and was killed at the battle of the Wilderness May 5, 1864. Herbert P., of this town, was born in 1846. 

        Jonas W. Robbins, a descendant of Jonas Robbins, and a son of Jonas and Mary (Chappel) Robbins, was born in this town, in 1827. He is a farmer, a breeder of Jersey cattle, and resides in the village. 

       Seth Willey came to this town about 1800, settling on road 32. His son Seth was born here, married Abigail Glines, and had four ions and six daughters, of whom Silas G., born in 1830, married first, Sarah S. Spencer, who died in 1862, and second, Mary B., daughter of Baldwin Martin, in 1873. He has had born to him two sons and two daughters, only one of whom, Emily E., born in 1879, is living. Mr. Willey resides at Peacham Hollow. 

       Lyman Pattridge, born in Chesterfield, N.H., came to Peacham at an early day, locating in the southern part of the town. He married Theodosia Wood in 1818, and reared four sons and four daughters. One son, Francis W., was born December 17, 1833, was reared on a farm, and went to California when he was nineteen years of age, where he remained ten years.  When he returned he bought his father's homestead, married May J., daughter of William and Ruth (Gilfillan) Graham, in 1866, and has had born to him three children, Loren E., Blanche G. and Mary F.  Mr. Pattridge resides on road 65. 

       Alexander McDonald (or Macdonald), was born in Glasgow, Scotland, enlisted in the English army, was taken prisoner at the battle of Bunker Hill, and was taken to Charlestown, No.4, where he was kept a prisoner three years. After his release he married Catherine White, and moved to Ryegate in 1789. He reared a large family of children, of whom the following are living: Alexander, Sally, James, Charity, Amassa and Ann. Alexander was born in this town in 1802, married Betsey, daughter of John and Hepsey (Woodard) Taylor, in 1826, and had born to him two sons and five daughters, viz.: Maria, who died in 1857; Jane, who died in 1870; Harriet; who died in 1872; Elizabeth, who died in 1868; Abel B., Anson S. and Jeanette (Mrs. George Blodget), of St. Johnsbury.  Abel B. Macdonald was born in 1833, and at the age of eighteen years shipped on board a whaling vessel, and was gone three years. In 1862 he enlisted in the United States navy, and was on board the war sloop, Ossippe one year. He married Harriet, daughter of Dr. James Neal, and has had born to him three sons and one daughter, namely, Fred T., of Boston; Emma W., who married Frank B. Granger, and died in 1886; George A., of Boston, and William A., of Florida. Mr. Macdonald was on the police force in Boston for several years, and now resides in this town, on road 26. 

       David Sanborn was born in Sanbornton, N.H., in 1778, married Mary Burbank, and came to Peacham in 1804, locating on the place where Mrs. Rebecca Blake now lives. His son Harvey, now of this town, was born in 1817, learned the mason's trade, married Abigail, daughter of Seth Willey, in 1841, and has one son and one daughter, namely, Agnes (Mrs. George P. Blair), of West Barnet, and Austin W., of Kansas. 

       Samuel Chandler came to this town, from Pomfret, Conn., in 1806, married Mehitable, daughter of Major Henry Blake, a Revolutionary soldier, in 1808, and located on the place where George D. Chandler now lives. He reared three sons and three daughters, of whom George D. was born in 1822, married Mary A., daughter of Captain Avara Gillman, and has had four sons, namely, George H., who died at the age of eleven years; Frank G., born in 1853; John S., born in 1861, and Myron, who died at the age of four years. 

       Thomas Eastman, son of Captain John and Sibyl (Chamberlain) Eastman, was born in Concord, N.H., in 1789, and came to Peacham about 1809. He married Lucy Cushing in 1814, and reared two sons and five daughters, viz.: Marion E., Sarah M., Thomas M., Harriet, Lucy, Martha and John.  Mr. Eastman was a farmer, and died in Peacham in 1872. Marion E. (Mrs. Hazen Merrill), is a widow, and resides in Peacham village. 

       Timothy Cowles came to this town, from Connecticut, at an early day, married Susan Fairchild, and reared eight sons and three daughters. His son John O. was born in 1816, married Laura A. Harmon, in 1842, add had born to him one son and eight daughters, viz.: Ellen, who died aged twenty-eight years; Martha, who died at the age of thirteen; Sarah, who married Dr. C. Cargil, of California; Laura J., of California; Alice M., (Mrs. C. Bowman), also of California; Flora B.; Willie H., in Iowa; and Susie T. and Fannie, at home. Mr. Cowles died April 24, 1885, and his widow resides on the homestead. 

       Benjamin Farrow located in this town in 1819. He married Ruth Tart, and reared eight sons and five daughters, Drusilla, Theodore G., Submit, Cecelia, Israel, Franklin, Independence, Constantine, Benjamin and Lucy, twins, Caleb W., Emeline and Miranda. Theodore G., born in 1807, married Eliza, daughter of John Fife, for his first wife, who bore him four sons, Moses, Hiram, Samuel M. and Ephraim. He married for his second wife, Phebe, daughter of Alexander Stewart, in 1847. Samuel M., born in 1841, married Hannah J., daughter of James and Jane Hall, in 1867, and has one son and one daughter, Harry E. and Gertie E. Franklin, son of Benjamin, born in 1814, married Elizabeth McMillen. Two of his sons are now living, Millen, of this town, and Benjamin F., of Atlanta, Ga. 

       Isaac Ewell came to Peacham, from New Hampshire, with his wife, Lillias Sandeland, in 1819, bought the grist-mill at Ewell Hollow, and built the house where John Ewell now lives. His children were six, of whom John was  born in 1827. He married for his first wife Olive W. Allen, in 1857, who died in 1870, and for his second wife Harriet Pennington, widow of A. L. Allen, in 1877. The Allen children were James D., born in 1857, died in 1882; Fred B., born in 1861, is a manufacturer of lumber and shingles. William I., of California, and Archie L.   Mr. Ewell is proprietor of a grist, saw and shingle-mill at Ewell Hollow, on road 25. Horace, son of Isaac Ewell, was born in 1837, married Ida A., daughter of Moody M. and Harriet A. (Weeks) Boynton, in 1866, and has one daughter, Hattie L.  Mr. Ewell resides on road 18. 

       John B. Kinnerson, son of Joseph, who was a Revolutionary soldier, married Eleanor Richardson, and came to this town, from Orange, Vt., about 1830. His children were James, Josiah S., Harvey and Ellen F.  James R. was born in 1824, married Emily J. Bickford in 1847, and has had born to him three sons and two daughters, namely, Jerome H., of San Francisco, Cal.; Evagene, who died in childhood; Ida A., who also died young; Russell B. and Charles F.   Mr. Kinnerson is patentee and manufacturer of Kinnerson combination butter prints and butter carriers and boxes. He is a. deacon of the Congregational church, and superintendent of the Sabbath school. He resides on road 17. His son Russell B. married Lucy C., daughter of Charles M. and Mary (Blake) Bailey, in 1882, and has one daughter, Mary E. 

       Asa Sargeant, son of Asa, was born in Danville, Vt., in 1807, learned the tanner's trade, and worked in Maine several years. He married Mary J., daughter or Joseph and Cynthia (Putnam) Mealey, of Maine, in 1830, came to this town about that time, and reared two sons and three daughters, as follows: Joseph, who served in the late war, in Co. G, 3d Vt. Vols., and now draws a pension; Jennie S., widow of Phineas Blanchard; Francis E., who also served in the late war, and now lives in Montana; Arabella B. (Mrs. Martin S. Hidden), of this town, and Laura E. (Mrs. Frank E. Palmer), of Peacham Hollow. Mrs. Sargeant is eighty years of age, and lives at Peacham Hollow. 

       Turner Strobridge, son of William, came to Peacham, about 1820, married Eliza, daughter of Edward Clark, and had born to him two sons and one daughter, Lydia, who died at the age of ten years, Lafayette and Turner. Lafayette was born in town, in 1824, married Elizabeth, daughter of Russell and Florella (Foster) Clark, in 1848, and has one son and three daughters, viz.: Fayette, Jennie E. (Mrs. William F. Miller) of Manchester, N.H., Lydia S., at home, and Nellie L. (Mrs. N. J. Whitehill), a teacher in the high school at West Randolph, Vt. Mr. Strobridge has been justice of the peace twenty-five years, and resides in the village, where he had kept a hotel for fifteen years. 

       George J. Darling came here from Jaffrey, N.H., about 1828, married Charity W. Sulham, and had born to him one son and two daughters. His son Benjamin, born in 1835, learned the carpenter's trade, married Olive A., daughter of John and Olive (Walker) Martin, in 1857, and has had born to him five sons, namely, Leonard E., born in 1359, George W., born in 1866, Frank B., who died in childhood, Charles I. and Benjamin H. 

       John P. Ford came to Canada, from England, about 1833, and about one year later moved to Peacham. He was a weaver, and died in 1836. Two of his children reside in town. 

       Plynn Bolton, son of Luther and Julia (Hooker) Bolton, was born in Barnet in 1824, and when twenty-one years of age went to Boston, where he remained several years. He lived in Danville about three years, and came to this town in 1865. He married, first, Phebe B. Wesson, in 1858, who bore him one son, George W., and died in 1861, and second, Martha J., daughter of Ira and Recta (Wheelock) McLoud, by whom he has had three daughters, namely, Helen P., who died in infancy, May E. and Recta R.  Mr. Bolton represented the town in 1880-81-82-83, is a farmer, and resides in the village. 

       James Judkins moved to Danville, from Maine, some time previous to 1800, served in the War of 1812, and afterwards moved to Marshfield, where he lived a few years, and then returned to Danville, where he died in 1861. Of his children, James L., Mrs. John Way and Mrs. Cynthia W. Lawrence live in Peacham, and Mrs. Dr. Morse and Mrs. S. S. Badger live in Danville. 

       Luther F. Parker, son of Isaac, was born in Coventry, Vt., fitted for college at Peacham academy, and was two years at Burlington, in the University of Vermont. He studied medicine with Drs. Cobb and Farr, and located in town in 1854, since which time he has practiced here. He is president of the board of trustees of the academy, of which institution he has been a trustee since 1855. 

       Jacob Trussell moved to Danville, from Holderness, N.H., about 1780, and settled in the southeastern part of the town. He reared a large family, and died between 1840 and 1845. His sons John and Nathaniel remained in that town, and his son Joshua died at Derby Line, in 1845. Jacob, son of Joshua, was born in Sutton, in 1833, and came to Peacham to fit for college. He served in the late war, in Co. D, 1st. Vt. Cav. Vols., and was mustered out as 1st lieutenant. He was admitted to the bar in 1860, and represented the town in 1884. He is justice of the peace, and has held other town offices. 

       Elijah A. Whiting, son of Almon and Mary B. (Bacon) Whiting, was born in Barnet, Vt., in 1830, and married Jeannette, daughter of Robert and Agnes (Pardon) Craig, in 1852. Mrs. Whiting was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1833. They reside on road 8. 

       Frank W. Cook, son of Willard and Harriet (Clifford) Cook, was born in Danville, in 1830, learned the miller's trade, and married Adaline H., daughter of Joseph and Jerusha (Woodard) Northrup, in 1853.  Mr. Cook is a farmer, has been justice of the peace and town lister, and occupies a farm on road 8. 

       Albert Goss, son of Ashley and Fanny (Kimball) Goss, was born in Cabot in 1835, and came with his parents to this town in 1840. He married Jane Northrup, in 1859, and has had born to him two sons and two daughters, viz.: Mary F. (Mrs. Frank T. Woods), of Peacham, Ashley J., of California, Frank A. and Bertha J.  Mr. Goss resides on the Northrup place where his wife, was born.

       Alvin B. Farnum, son of Merrill, was born in Rumford, Me., in 1822, married, first, Ann Ewell in 1845, who died in 1848, and second, Isabell Somers, in 1855. He has had born to him one son and two daughters, viz.: Emma M. and Ella C., twins, deceased, and Scott M., born 1860. Mr. Farnum is a wagon-maker, and is located on road 25. 

       Andrew McClary located in the northern part of Groton in 1814, where he cleared a farm, and reared a family of five sons and three daughters. Two of them, Andrew and Ira L., located in Peacham. Ira L. came to this town in 1854, and has since been engaged in mercantile business. 

       James W. Houghton, son of Lyman, was born in Northfield, Vt., in 1833. He married Eleanor A., daughter of David Wilson, and had six sons and four daughters, as follows: Silas E., of Cabot, Herbert L., also of Cabot, Abbie A. (Mrs. O. P. Clark), of Dakota, Mark J., Addie S., who died in 1883, James W., who died in infancy, Alice N., Willie G., and Jennie who died in 1883, aged five years. Mr. Houghton is a carpenter and builder, and resides on road 30. 

       Hiram Rowe, son of Ichabod, was born in Nottingham, N. H., in 1802, learned the wheelwright trade, married Hannah Robie, and reared five sons and five daughters. He came to Peacham in 1860 and located on road 28, where he died in December, 1885. His son Ichabod was born in Corinth, Vt., in 1842, and went to Colorado in 1865, where he engaged in mining operations. After four years he returned, married Laura, daughter of Newel and Alice Prescott, in 1869, and has reared four sons and one daughter, viz.: Edward L., Hiram E., N. Dean, Fannie S. and Ichabod. Mr. Rowe came to this town in 1885. His wife died March 3, 1886. 

       Charles Adams, son of Cornelius, was born in Waterford Vt., married Mary Gills, in 1867, who bore him one son and two daughters, and died in 1871, and married for his second wife, Chloe T. English in 1875. His children are David, born in 1870, and Eliza A., born in 1881. Mr. Adams, now of Peacham, served in the late war, in Co. G, 4th Vt. Vols., was taken prisoner near Petersburgh, and was confined in Andersonville and Florence, S. C., prisons nine months. 

       James Esden was born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1863, and about 1800 came to America with his wife and children, Jean, afterwards Mrs. William Renfrew, and William, who died in Ryegate. He located in Ryegate, married for his second wife Janet Forsyth, and had born to him three sons and one daughter, namely: Robert, Jeannette (Mrs. Elliott G. Cawley), of this town, David, of Ohio, and James. Robert was born in Ryegate, in 1833, married Eliza Wright, in 1861, and has had born to him two sons and four daughters, Corilla, who died young, Carrie J. (Mrs. A. W. Ricker), of Peacham Hollow, Mattie P., Clarence R., and George W. and Isabella, twins. Mr. Esden resides on road 33, and has a summer boarding-house. James, son of James, was born in Topsham, Vt., May 15, 1840, married Julia M., daughter of Oliver S. and Persis (Goodell) Flint, in 1862, and has had born to him one son and one daughter, Harlow J., born in 1864, and Clara P., who died in 1879, aged twelve years. Mr. Esden located here on road 30, in 1866. 

       John Chapman, son of John and Rachel (Harris) Chapman, was born in Danville in 1817, learned the carpenter's and molder's trades, and worked in Lowell, Mass., about twenty years. He married Eliza Farrington in 1850, and has one son, William A., born in 1851. The latter married Lizzie M., daughter of B. G. and Margaret (Harvey) Somers, in 1875, and has one son and two daughters, Mabel B., Warren S. and Maggie E.  Mr. Chapman and his son are engaged in farming, and reside on road 29. 

       William Henderson, son of William, was born in Sterling, Scotland, in 1813, and came with his parents to America, locating in Quebec in 1820. He married for his first wife Hannah Gray, in 1836, who bore him seven sons and five daughters, and died in 1877. He married for his second wife Elizabeth McLachlin, in 1859 and has had born to him two sons and one daughter. His sons William J. and John were killed at the battle of Cold Harbor, in 1864. David died in California in 1862. Mr. Henderson came to Peacham in 1851, and resides on road 36. 

       Mark M. Wheeler, son of James C. and Sophia (Gillman) Wheeler, was born in Marshfield, in 1847, and came to this town in 1855. He married three times, first, Lizzie S. Clark, who bore him one son and one daughter, Elwin M. and Amy, who died in 1882, at the age of sixteen years. The mother of these children died in 1876, and he married for his second wife Laura T. Adams, who bore him two sons, Harvey J. and Clyde C., and died in 1882. He married for his third wife Carrie H. White, in 1884. He resides on road 38. Mr. Wheeler served in the late war, enlisting in 1861, in Co. D, 1st Vt. Cav., was at the battles of Bull Run, Gettysburg, Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor, was confined a prisoner at Andersonville and Florence, S.C., and served until the close of the war. 

        Van Ness D. Moulton, son of David and Hannah (Parker) Moulton, was born in Concord, Vt., in 1824, was in California several years, and served in the late war, in Co. D, 1st Vt. Cav., enlisting in 1864 and serving until the close of the war. He married Adeline E. Cutting, and has one son and one daughter, Harry C., born in 1874, and Alice E., born in 1880. Mr. Moulton came to this town in 1861, and lives on road 42. 

       Frank T. Woods, son of Lemuel, was born in Boston, and came to Peacham at the age of eight years. He has one son, Charles, and resides in the northern part of the town. 
Charles A. Hutchinson, son of Samuel, was born in Norwich, Vt. in 1858, and came to this town in 1881. He married Kate I., daughter of Sprague Harriman, in 1883. He is a farmer and is also a dealer in farming and dairy implements. 

       Chauncy L. Brown, son of Leonard and Maria (Kittredge) Brown, was born in this town in 1856, and is now engaged in farming. His father died several years since. Mr. Brown owns, with his mother, the Hutchins place, on road 26, corner 32. 

       Willie A. Ricker, son of William and Lodenia (Tasey) Ricker, was born in Hardwick, Vt. in 1861, married Carrie J., daughter of Robert Esden, in 1884, and has one daughter, Alice L., born in October, 1885. Mr. Ricker and his father are engaged in the produce commission business at Peacham Hollow. 

       William H. Ash, son of Phineas and Hannah (Cowan) Ash, was born in Lyman, N.H., in 1837, learned the blacksmith trade, and served in the late war, in Co. C, 3d Vt. Vols. He came here in 1864, engaged in blacksmithing, and married Electa H., daughter of John T. and Matilda (Hall) Hopkins, in 1867. He has had born to him two sons, Charles H., who died in 1879, at the age of eight years, and George E., born in 1873. Mr. Ash is a merchant and lives at Peacham Hollow. 

       William Whitehill was born in Scotland in 1793, and came to America with his parents, they locating in Ryegate when he was seven years of age. He married Mary, daughter of John Craig, and reared three sons and two daughters. His son Andrew, born in Ryegate in 1836, went west when he was thirty-three years of age, and remained five years. He married Carrie J., daughter of Moses and Almira (Dana) Martin, in 1874. Mr. Whitehill located on the Martin homestead, where his wife was born, in 1874. 

       Josiah Jennison came from Massachusetts, locating near Green Bay, in 1804, married the widow of Timothy Townshend, and had born to him one son and two daughters, Sally, John and Lucinda. John married first, Dorcas Weeks, who bore him one son, Ira J., and second, Sarah Gilfillan, and had born to him six sons and four daughters, viz.: Orin L., William, Moses, Harvey, Lyman, John, Lucinda, Sally, Mattie and Jane. Ira J. was born in this town in 1849, lived with Orrin Martin on the farm where he now lives, and married Clara M., daughter of Albert G. and Alma (Brown) Pattridge, in 1873. He resides on road 63. 

       Hosea Welch moved to Groton, from Maine, about 1800, and settled in the eastern part of the town. He married Polly Gray, and reared five sons and five daughters, of whom Ara was born in 1811, married Mary Whitehill, of Ryegate, in 1835, and had born to him two sons and seven daughters. His son Leonard was born in 1840, went to California at the age of twenty-three years, was there three years, in Iowa four years, and in Montana two years. He married Mary S., daughter of John and Lydia (Frost) Miller, in 1873, and has one son, Harry C., born in 1874. Mr. Welch resides on road 62. 

       William N. West, son of Noah and Eliza (Wheeler) West, was born in Danville, Vt., in 1837, went to Massachusetts at the age of twelve years, and worked for the A. L. Brooks Lumber Company seven years. He served in the late war, was taken prisoner at Weldon railroad, and was confined in Andersonville ten months. He married Elvira E., daughter of Salmon Lowell, in 1856, and has had one son and one daughter, Frank G., and May E. who died in 1881, aged eleven years. Mr. West came to Peacham in 1872, is an undertaker and house painter, and lives on Main street. 

       The Congregational church, located at Peacham Corner, was organized by a. council, with Dea. Jonathan Elkins, moderator, with fourteen members, April 14, 1794. Rev. Leonard Worcester was the first pastor. The church building is a wooden structure, capable of seating 450 persons, and is valued, including grounds, at $5,000.00. The society now has 239 members, with Rev. S.S. Martyn, pastor. 

       The Methodist Episcopal church, at Peacham Corner, was organized by its first pastor, Rev. Daniel Field, in 1831. The church building was erected in 1832. It will seat 300 persons and is valued at $2,500,00. The society now has nearly 100 members, with Rev. George A. Emery, pastor.
 
 

(Source: Gazetteer of Caledonia and Essex Counties, VT.; 1764-1887, Compiled and Published by Hamilton Child; May 1887, Page 269-283)
 

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