Montpelier is the chief town.  This county is nearly in the centre of the State, and the principal part of it lies between the two ranges of the Green Mountains.  It is bounded north by Lamoille and parts of Chittenden and Caledonia Counties, east by Caledonia County, south by Orange and Addison Counties, and west by Addison and Chittenden Counties.  It was incorporated in 1810, by the name of Jefferson, and took its present name in 1814.

    This county is finely watered by its chief river, the Winooski, or Onion, and many of its important branches.  These streams afford the county an abundant water power, and manufacturing establishments increase and flourish in this mountainous region.

    The surface of the county is uneven, hilly, and in some parts mountainous, but there is much valuable land along the streams, which in many parts are sluggish, and form large tracts of excellent intervale.

    The agricultural productions consist of neat cattle, horses, hogs, wool, and of the productions of the dairy.  There are large bodies of beautiful granite in the county, and slate of various kinds.
 

(Gazetteer of Vermont, by John Hayward, 1849, p. 130)


Barre
 Fayston
Plainfield
Berlin
Marshfield
Roxbury
Cabot
Middlesex
Warren
Calais
Montpelier
Waterbury
Duxbury
Moretown
Woodbury
East Montpelier
Northfield
Worcester