HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF 

GUILFORD

      GUILFORD lies in the southeastern part of the county, in lat. 42° 47' and long. 4° 26', bounded north by Brattleboro, east by Vernon, south by Massachusetts, and west by Halifax. It was originally chartered by New Hampshire, April, 2, 1754, to fifty-four proprietors, principally of Massachusetts, containing an area of 23,040 acres. Relative to this grant, etc., Thompson, in his Gazetteer of Vermont, says:
"When granted, the town was a perfect wilderness, yet by the charter, the grantees were to hold their first meeting for the choice of officers, etc., on the first of May, 1654, and on the first Tuesday of March, ever afterwards. It seems the town was first organized by and under the very grant itself. Power was given to the grantees to transact the business of the town as a majority shall see fit, subject only to the control of the parliament of England. This little enterprising band, composed of Samuel HUNT, John CHANDLER, David FIELD, Elijah WILLIAMS, Micah RICE, Ira CARPENTER and others, having little to fear from the nominal power of parliament, in the wilderness of Vermont, assumes the title, which was virtually created by their charter, of a little independent republic. By the records of their first meetings they appear to have been governed by certain committees, chosen for the purpose of surveying the lands, laying roads, drawing the shares or lots, taxing the rights, etc., but their greatest object was to procure and encourage settlers. Their meetings were held at Greenfield, Northfield, Hinsdale or Brattleboro, until 1765, when their first meeting was held at Guilford. There was a condition which, if not performed, went to defeat the grant. The grantees were to settle, clear and cultivate, in five years, five acres for every fifty, in said township. Although much time and money were spent in making roads and clearing lands, yet on the 20th of March, 1764, the grantees, by a special committee chosen, petitioned the governor of New Hampshire for a confirmation of their grant, and an extension of the time, stating that the intervention of an Indian war had made it impracticable for them to fulfill the conditions of their charter. Their prayer was granted and the time for settling the town was extended to the 1st of January, 1766.

"From the time the charter was confirmed in 1764, the town began to be rapidly settled by emigrants from Massachusetts and other New England States. Through the policy of the original proprietors, the first settlers began upon lots of fifty acres, in order to fulfill the condition of the grant. So rapid was the increase of population, that the town soon became the largest in the State as to numbers. Yet there was not a single village in the township, or rather the whole township was a village -- all the hills and vallies were smoking with huts. By the charter 350 acres were called a share, and all the proprietors shared alike. The reservations in the charter consisted of one whole share to the society in England for propagating the gospel in foreign parts, one to the first settled minister of the gospel, and one whole share for a glebe for the ministry of the church of England, as by law established. The governor was not unmindful of his own interests. He reserved 500 acres, to be located by itself, for his own. The town was laid out into fifty and one hundred acre lots. The public rights were fairly located, but that of the royal Governor fell upon the only mountain in town, which still bears the name of authority, `Gov. Mountain.' Although no reservation was made in the grant for the use of schools, yet one whole share was located for that purpose. This was a just and generous act of the proprietors, but it was not the same liberality that governed them when they located, sold and settled one whole tier of hundred-acre lots north beyond the extent of their charter. That was the case, however, and the same is held by the town to this day. All the pine trees suitable for masting the royal navy were reserved to his Majesty. This shows the attention the English paid to the navy. One hundred miles from the ocean, where no such timber grew, was that reservation made. What has been related, with a little ` proclamation money,' was the price of the charter."

      In 1765, soon after the settlement of the boundary line between New Hampshire and New York, application was made to Lieutenant-Governor COLDEN of the latter province, for a re-grant of the township. This he promised to give as soon as the petitions for lands in the new territory should come under consideration. Another petition on the same topic was presented to Gov. MOORE, in the year 1766, but, like the former, was "either neglected or mislaid." A third representation, made in the year 1767, experienced a similar fate. The subject was then allowed to rest, the proprietors hoping that they should, in the end, receive their just deserts. Meantime, however, a patent comprehending 1,200 acres of the township, was issued by New York to a certain Col. HOWARD, and by which grant a number of the inhabitants were deprived of all of their property. Redress was earnestly sought in a memorial to the governor of New York, dated May 11, 1772. Among the means proposed to restore confidence and create satisfaction for this malappropriation of that tract, was a re-charter for the land in Guilford, outside of the bounds of HOWARD's tract, and a grant in some other locality as a compensation for the loss occasioned. But the inhabitants were unable to obtain redress until by the war of the Revolution the possessions of loyalists became the property of the rebels.

      The surface of the township is hilly, but not mountainous, the only mountain, being "Gov. Mountain." East Mountain, so-called, extending the whole length of the town, north and south, is the largest hill. It is about one mile wide, descending gradually to the east and south. The soil is naturally rich and deep, with a sufficient mixture of earth to make it warm, and, at the same time, prevents its leaching. The lower lands and plateaus form excellent farms for tillage, while the hills afford fine grazing lands. The natural growth of timber is principally maple, hemlock, walnut, beach, birch, ash, basswood, butternut, and elm, while occasionally black oak, locust and sycamore are found.

      Green river flows a southerly course through the western part of the territory, while broad brook, a smaller stream, flows easterly through the northern part. There are two small streams, branches of Broad brook, which run north, on through the center of the town, and the other at the foot of East mountain, on the west side. On both of the former are fine mill-sites. The rocks of the town are mica slate, lying in light ledges, interspersed with strata of quartz, and running from north to south. Impure garnets are plentiful in the former, and some good specimens of rock, crystal are found. Quartz and schrol, in various mixtures, are found, some having the appearance of lava. On the east side of the town is a range of argillaceous slate, which has been wrought into roofing slate, Rolled rock of granite, from huge masses to small pebbles, appear on every hand. In some localities are limestone and bog iron ore, but neither sufficiently pure or plentiful to warrant manufacture. gneiss and hornblend slate, with those above mentioned, comprise the principal rocks of the town.

      In 1880 Guilford had a population of 1,096, and in 1882, had fourteen school districts and fourteen common school, employing ten male and eighteen female teachers, to whom was paid an aggregate salary of $2,223.74. There were 247 pupils attending common school, while the entire cost of the schools for the year, ending October 31st, was $2,375.79, with Frank E. WARD, superintendent.

      GUILFORD, a post village located in the northeastern part of the town, contains two churches (Congregational and Episcopal), one hotel, a grist-mill, baby carriage manufactory, saw-mill, blacksmith shop and about twenty dwellings.

      GUILFORD CENTER (p. o.) is a hamlet located near the central part of the town. It has one church (Universalist) and about fifteen dwellings.

      GREEN RIVER is a post village located in the western part of the town on Green river. It has one church (Methodist Episcopal), one store, a saw-mill, blacksmith shop, and about twenty dwellings.

      HINESBURG is a hamlet located in the northwestern part of the town. It has one church (Baptist), and about six dwellings.

      A. S. GALLUP's saw-mill, located on road 42, built in 1869, has the capacity for sawing 1,600 feet of lumber per day.

      The Green River grist and saw-mill, Henry STOWE, proprietor, was built in 1871. The mill has one run of stones, cuts 5,000 feet of lumber per day, 2,000 butter boxes per month, and also a considerable amount of chair-stock.

      Martin AKELEY's cider-mill, located on road 4, has the capacity for turning out five barrels of cider per day.

      The JINKS grist and saw-mill, located on Green river, has one run of stones and the capacity for cutting 1,500 feet of lumber per day.

      F. F. COOK's saw-mill, located on road 18, has the capacity for turning Out 1,500 feet of lumber per day. He has, also, at another point, a manufactory where he turns broom and hoe handles and cuts 5,000 per day.

      Charles B. & E. J. CARPENTER's saw-mill, located on road 39, was originally built by Jedediah ASHCRAFT about 1800. It turns out about 12,000 feet of lumber and 15,000 shingles per day.

      Isaac A. WELD's cider and shingle-mill, located on road 39, manufactures eight barrels of cider and 5,000 shingles per day.

      Henry N. WILDER's carriage manufactory, located on road 52, turns out about $12,000.00 worth of goods per annum, employing six hands.

      W. J. WILDER's cider-mill, located on road 38, has the capacity for turning out twenty barrels of cider per day.

      East Guilford grist-mill, H. J. RICHMOND, proprietor, located at Guilford, on Broad brook, has two runs of stones.

      Jane E. GALE's cider-mill, located on road 15, has the capacity for manufacturing 500 barrels of cider per annum.

      J L. BULLOCK's cider-mill, located on road 7, has the capacity for manufacturing ten barrels of cider per day.

      J. M. HOUGHTON's brick yard and lime kiln, located on road 11, employs eight men, turning out about 300,000 brick and 1,200 barrels of lime per year.

      The first land cleared in the town was in 1758 by the Hon. Jonathan and Elisha HUNT. The first settlement was made by Micah RICE and family, in 1761, who was soon after followed by Jonathan BIGELOW, John BARNEY, Daniel LYNDE, William BIGELOW, Ebenezer GOODENOUGH, Paul CHASE, Thomas CUTLER, John SHEPARDSON and others. They came into town by the way of Broad brook. Beginning at the mouth of that stream, on Connecticut river, in Vernon, and passing up its banks they found their way into Guilford. That was then the only road, and even that was impassible with teams. The first settlers had either to boil or pound their corn, or go fifteen miles to mill with a grist upon their backs. The settlement increased rapidly, so that in 1771, according to the census of Cumberland county taken at that time, there were 436 souls here, the enumeration being as follows: 124 white males under sixteen years of age, ninety-two males between the ages of sixteen and sixty, five over sixty, 116 females under sixteen, ninety-four over sixteen, three black males and two black females. In 1772 there were 586 souls in the town, their names and the number in their families being as follows: 

NAME
NUMBER OF 
CHILDREN
David FIELD
9
Silas BARNARD
5
Thomas CUTLER
1
Asa RICE
7
Francis RICE
6
Peter RICE
4
Silas CUTLER
11
Jotham BIGLO
9
Alijah RICE
4
Abijah ROGERS
3
Daniel GREW
7
Hezekiah HOWELL
11
Shubeld BULLOCK 
3
Joel BIGLO
2
Michael RICE
1
Nathaniel CARPENTER
8
Daniel BOYDEN
6
*Joel CUTLER
7
Samuel MELLENDY
6
Jedediah WOODS
9
*Moses BIXBY
6
James CUTLER
5
Edward BENNETT
3
Gersham RICE
7
Enoch STOWELL
5
William NICHOLS
8
Ebenezer GOODENOUGH
5
David STOWELL
4
David GOODENOUGH
1
Samuel NICKOLS
5
Paul CHASE
2
William BIGLO
3
Nathaniel SMITH
5
John BARNEY
4
Edward BARNEY
1
Levi GOODENOUGH
4
Ithamer GOODENOUGH
6
*Jonathan HUNT
0
*Seth DWIGHT
0
*Samuel FIELD
0
*William MORRIS
0
*Matthew CLESSON
0
*Eleazer HAWKER
0
*Joseph BARNARD
0
*Obadiah DICKENSON
0
*Samuel BARNARD, Jr.
0
*Charles COATS
0
*James MORRIS
0
*Samuel PARTRIDGE
0
*David WELLS
0
*Aaron SCOTT
0
*John ALLEN, Jr.
0
*Richard CROUCH
0
*John CHADDICK
0
*James BOYD
0
*Elijah WILLIAMS
0
*Ebenezer BARNARD
0
*John CURTIS
0
*John CHADDICK, Jr.
0
*Nathaniel WILLARD
0
Benjamin GREEN
5
*Nathaniel GREEN
0
Timothy PAINE
2
*Benjamin EGAR
0
Peter GREEN
3
Samuel WILLIAMS
4
John CURTIS
6
Benjamin CURTIS
7
*George PRICE
0
*Thomas WOOLSLEY
0
John CAMPS
8
William LARKIN
6
Joseph JACKSON
5
*David Ayers
9
*David Avers, Jr.
0
*Jonathan Penney
0
John SHEPARDSON
11
Zephaniah SHEPARDSON
4
Benjamin CARPENTER
5
Benjamin PRESTON
4
Daniel WHITAKER
6
Caleb COLE
3
*John TIFFT
0
Daniel LYNDS
4
Joshua NURS
2
William WHITE
5
Zaccheus FARNSWORTH
7
Giles HUBBERT
3
Jedediah WOODS
7
Barnabas RUSSEL
2
*Oliver WILSON
7
Bononi SMITH
2
Josiah SCOTT
2
Henry HICKS
1
Abel TORRY
2
Amos WHITING
5
Ephraim WHITNEY
3
Samuel BENNIT
1
David WEEKS
3
Seth WHITAKER
5
John GATES
3
Samuel MELODY
9
William RAMSDALL
2
William BULLOCK
0
Merodock Zelloden SMITH
9
Josiah ALLEN
6
James KING
5
Aquelo CLUELAN
4
Samuel ALLEN
3
David JOY, Esq.
6
James DENNIS
3
Menassa BIGSBY
2
Jasper PARTRIDGE
1
                        * Had no wife.
      It appears, from what records can be found, that the town was .wholly governed by a set of officers chosen annually by the people, under their charter, until the 19th of May, 1772, when the inhabitants, at "a district meeting assembled," in the district of Guilford, voted, that Guilford was in the county of Cumberland and province of New York, and chose officers of the town, agreeable to the laws of that province. At that meeting a record was first made in a regular town book, which was purchased by the original proprietors, some years before. By that record it appears that John SHEPARDSON was chosen "district clerk, John BARNEY, supervisor," etc., and the meeting was then adjourned to a day after the annual meeting of the charter. Having renounced their charter, and there being no government which really exercised over them, they continued to legislate for themselves, and tradition says that good justice was done, yet one principal of the charter was still adhered to, for none but proprietors, or those who held under them, had a right to rule or vote in their meetings. Thus was this little republic regulated by a town meeting, which was adjourned from time to time, without interruption from abroad, or contentions at home, until the year 1776. Then the town was beset by violent Tories area Yorkers on the one side, and brave Whigs and New-States men on the other. The Whigs, united with those opposed to the claims of the State of New York, that and the succeeding year, out-voted the Tories and the Yorkers. In 1776 the town voted to pay the expenses of Benjamin CARPENTER, their delegate to the Westminster convention, in 1775. They voted to raise nine soldiers for the continental army, equip them with arms and powder, give them a bounty of £4 "boy money," by a tax upon the inhabitants of the town, which was done. They also resolved, that "no man should vote for town officers, who was not qualified according to the direction of the Continental Congress." Under that resolution their committee, chosen for the purpose, excluded Tories from the polls, vi et armis, and the poor, if qualified, participated in the government. The title of the town, as belonging to the State of New York, was left out of the records.

      To give some idea of the laws passed by the old republic of Guilford, we quote the following, passed the next year, 1777:

"Voted, Not to let any person vote in this meeting but such as have forty pounds real or personal estate.

"Voted, John BARNEY and Benjamin CARPENTER be a committee to go to Windsor, in June next, to hear the report of the agent sent to congress, concerning a new State.

"Voted, That any person who shall, for the future, pretend to hold lands by bush fence possession, shall be dealt with by the town as a breaker of the peace, and a riotous person, etc. Attest.

ELIJAH WELCH, Town Clerk."

      They further chose a committee to establish the price of labor, all kinds of produce, goods, wares and merchandise. The report of the committee was adopted as the law of the town. All the articles mentioned were a legal-tender for debts, with a penalty of the article sold, or the value thereof, with costs. The punishment of offenders was various, such as the "beech seal," fines, etc.; but the most disgraceful of all was to be compelled to embrace the "liberty pole" with both arms, the time being specified by the committee of inspection, or judges.

      In 1778 there was again an entire change of politics. It appears by the records that a warrant and notification for a town meeting was sent from the “Council of Benninton," and a meeting was held upon the same, when it was "Voted, not to act agreeable to said warrant," and the meeting was dissolved. In 1779, after doing the customary town business, it was "Voted, Lovell BULLOCK, Timothy Root and Henry SHERBURN a committee to defend the town against the pretended State of Vermont, and to represent the town in county committee." "Henry 'SHERBURN, Elliot and Hezekiah STOWELL," all violent Yorkers, "were chosen to take special care of the powder and lead and other town stores," -- and the meeting adjourned to the next year. In 1780 a like meeting was held. There is the following record for 1781: 

"Then all the people met together that means to stand in opposition against the pretended State of Vermont. * * * Voted, to defend themselves against the insults of the pretended State of Vermont * * * Voted, Peter BRIGGS and William BULLOCK for a committee to send to the Charlestown convention. * * * Voted, that Hezekiah STOWELL keep the names of those that are against said pretended State." 
      Also in May, 1882, was the following:
"Then the people met in general, and voted to stand against the pretended State of Vermont, until the decision of Congress be known, with lives and fortunes. * * * Voted, to receive the instructions which came from New York, etc. * * * Voted, and chose Henry EVANS, Daniel ASHCROFT and Nathan FITCH, to forbid the constable acting."
      These appear not to be regular meetings of the town, but of the Yorkers, who had gotten possession of the town books and stores by a majority of votes in 1778. They in turn excluded the other party from the polls, by force of arms. Frequently a company of armed Yorkers came from Brattleboro, to stand sentry at their meetings, when skirmishes ensued and hostile shots were exchanged. The Whigs and Vermonters also kept up their system of government by regular and stated meetings, but their records were lost. In their turn they sent hostile scouting parties to Brattleboro, to the assistance of their friends in that town. The Vermonters had a sheriff in Guilford, and their party, also, had a constable, who continued to collect taxes for the support of their cause. Those who were friendly to the new State paid without compulsion, while the property of the Yorkers, both real and personal, was sold at the post for taxes. For that the committee before mentioned was chosen "to forbid the constable acting," and their doings were spread upon the records of the town, by proclamation, as follows:
"To all the officers of the civil authority under the pretended State of Vermont: You are hereby forbid to proceed against any person, or persons, that owns the jurisdiction of the State of New York, according to what is recommended in a handbill, by Congress, bearing date June 2, 1780, and we hereby forbid the constable venduing those numbers hereby given him [referring to certain lots on the plan of the town], and we hereby forbid on your apparel. 

HENRY EVANS,
DAN ASHCROFT, 
NATHAN FITCH,
Committee.

      The Yorkers held a like meeting in 1783, April 29th, and adjourned to their annual meeting in 1784. From 1778 to 1783 the town was governed, principally, by their former laws. Both parties had their committees, and the Yorkers, although in authority, could not govern the town, yet, in connection with the Tories, prevented anything being done under the direction and government of the new State. During the years 1783 and 1784, the enmity of the parties was carried to an alarming extent. Social order was at an end; physicians were not allowed to visit the sick without a pass from the several committees. Handbills from various quarters inflamed the minds of the people. Relatives and neighbors were arrayed against each other. The laws of Vermont were disregarded by the partisans of New York, and her executive officers were openly resisted. Not alone was this the case in Guilford, however, but it was general throughout the county.

      In this state of things, in the summer of 1783, Gen. Ethan ALLEN was directed to call out the militia for enforcing, the laws of Vermont, and for suppressing insurrection and disturbances in the county of Windham. ALLEN proceeded from Bennington at the head of one hundred Green Mountain Boys, and on his arrival at Guilford he issued the following proclamation:

“I, Ethan ALLEN, declare that unless the people of Guilford peaceably submit to the authority of Vermont, the town shall be made as desolate as were the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, by God!"
      The Yorkers, having fired upon ALLEN and his men, were pursued, and all either taken prisoners or dispersed. Those taken were put under bonds for their good behavior, and were compelled to furnish supplies and quarters for the troops. Under ALLEN's martial law, the constable found no difficulty in the collection of taxes; nor was he very scrupulous about the sum assessed in the tax bill. Produce, horses, cattle and sheep, and whatever else could be found belonging to the most violent Yorkers, were taken and sold for the benefit of the State.

      From 1784 to 1791, in which latter year the troubles were allayed by Vermont's becoming one of the United States, no records of the proceedings of the town are preserved. In March of the last mentioned year, also, the town was, for the first time, duly organized under the laws and constitution of Vermont. William BIGELOW was chosen town clerk, who came peaceably into possession of the papers and records of the town, such as were to be found. Samuel SHEPARDSON was chosen constable, and William BIGELOW, Benjamin Bucklin and Elihu ROOT, selectmen.

      Tradition says that during the seven years in which no records were kept, both parties held public and private meetings, but that it was a perfect rule of anarchy. The Yorkers, although they had the town books, dared not record their proceedings in them, and both parties kept secret their own records. During this confusion and jealousy one party stole the records of the other, and hid them, together with their own, and many deeds and proprietor's papers, under the earth in the pound, in order to conceal them from the other. There they lay, through some sad misfortune, until they were totally spoiled. When discovered and dug up they could not be read. During that time the Yorkers, having been so closely pursued by the military and civil authority of Vermont, and their property mostly confiscated, fled to the State of New York, and settled upon the grants made by that State to the New York sufferers. Almost a whole township, now called Bainbridge, located in the southern part of Chenango county, was first settled by emigrants from Guilford. This accounts for the rapid decrease in the population of the township from 1784. While the town was independent of any power superior to the "town meeting assemblies," refugees from the neighboring States flocked into it; but when the law came, they fled. The violent Yorkers found but little peace under the energetic and persevering measures of the State's attorney of Windham county. To him the people of Guilford were indebted for the establishment of law and order, without the effusion of blood, and the dispersion of the riotous. Migrations have not only been westward, but they have been northward and eastward. Most of the towns in the northern and middle parts of the State contain descendants from the inhabitants of the old town of Guilford. Since 1791 there has been nothing remarkable in the history of the town. From that time the inhabitants have supported the character of free and independent farmers, very jealous of their rights, and for many years noted for their strong prepossessions in favor of the political school of Jefferson.

      Hon. John SHEPARDSON, born in 1718, was a firm patriot of the Revolution, and held the offices of judge of the supreme court and member of the council for several years. He died in 1798.

      Hon. Samuel RICHARDSON, born in 1757, was a useful member of society, and had the honor of sitting as a member of the council several years. He died in 1813.

      Hon. William BIGELOW, one of the first settlers, and always a father of the people, born in 1751, was a judge of the county court, which office he held with honor to himself. He died in 1814.

      Among the prominent early settlers of the town, after 1796, might be mentioned the names of Hon. Royall TYLER, Hon. James ELLIOT, Hon. Richard WHITNEY, Hon. Micah TOWNSEND, Hon. Henry SEYMOUR, Hon Gilbert DENISON, Hon. Samuel ELLIOT, Hon. John NOYES, and many others.

      William MARSH came to Guilford about 1760, and settled the farm on road 6, now owned by A, B. AKLEY. He worked at his trade of shoe making and cleared up his farm. His son William, born about 1764, married for his second wife Olive BIXBY, of Guilford. He lived upon the homestead farm and cared for his parents. Of his ten children only three are known to be living. Olive, his daughter, married Bernard LYNDE, who died in 1864. She now lives with her daughter, who married S. L. SIBLEY of this town.

      Manassah BIXBY came from Rehobeth, Mass., about 1770 and settled upon the farm now owned by Paul MORRIS, on road 8. He died in the town. His son Thaddeus was born and always lived in the town. Some of the descendants of this family still reside here.

      Abel TORRY came to Guilford in 1770 and settled in Weatherhead Hollow with his family of nine children. His son David was taken prisoner at the surrender of Quebec. Jonas, another son, died while on duty at Plattsburg, N. Y., in the Revolution. None of the name are left in the town, though some of the descendants still reside here.

      Hon. Benjamin CARPENTER was a member of the first convention in Vermont, held at Dorset, in 1776. In those trying times with the brave sons of the Green mountains, when they had not only to oppose the powerful State of New York, the claims of New Hampshire and Massachusetts, the Tories .and Yorkers at home, and the menacing threats of congress abroad, but also the power of his Majesty's legions in war, that brave patriot, with an allowance of three days' provisions upon his back, would cross the Green mountains on foot, by marked trees, to attend the legislature at Bennington, for the purpose of devising ways and means of defense against all the enemies of the State. As delegate to the assembly, as a member of the council, and as lieutenant-governor of the Vermont, he deservedly holds a conspicuous place in the history of the same. A large white marble tombstone, in the western part of the town, marks his last resting place, and upon which is engraved the following inscription:


SACRED TO THE MEMORY
OF THE
HON. BENJ. CARPENTER, ESQ.
BORN IN REHOBOTH, MASS., A. D. 1726,
A MAGISTRATE IN RHODE ISLAND IN A. D. 1764,
A PUBLIC TEACHER OF RIGHTEOUSNESS,
AN ABLE ADVOCATE TO HIS LAST FOR DEMOCRACY,
AND THE EQUAL RIGHTS OF MAN.
REMOVED TO THIS TOWN, A. D. 1770,
WAS A FIELD OFFICER IN REVOLUTIONARY WAR,
A FOUNDER OF THE FIRST CONSTITUTION AND GOVERNMENT OF
VERMONT.
A COUNCILOR OF CENSORS, IN A. D. 1783,
A MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL, AND LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF
THE STATE IN A. D. 1779,
A FIRM PROFESSOR OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
FIFTY YEARS. LEFT THIS WORLD
AND 146 PERSONS OF LINEAL POSTERITY, MARCH 29, 1804;
AGED 78 YEARS, 10 MONTHS AND 12 DAYS,
WITH A STRONG
MIND AND FULL FAITH OF A MORE
GLORIOUS STATE HEREAFTER.
STATURE ABOUT SIX FEET -- WEIGHT 200.
DEATH HAD NO TERROR.
      In his early life he seems to have been of a roving disposition, for his ten children were born in five different towns of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. He removed to Guilford with John BARNEY and others, from Rehoboth, in 1770, six years after the town was granted to the original proprietors, where he became an ardent patriot and one of the foremost advocates of separate State sovereignty for Vermont. Aside from the offices mentioned in his epitaph, he was also one of the council of thirteen appointed to revise the State constitution, in 1785. He was descended from the patriarch, William CARPENTER, who came from the South of England in the little ship “Bevis” in 1638, with his wife and four sons. It is interesting to observe that Richard DUMMER, an ancestor, probably, of the DUMMER for whom Dummerston and Fort Dummer were named, was a passenger by the same ship. Settling first in Weymouth, Mass., the CARPENTER family removed to Rehoboth with the first settlers of that town, in 1643. Joseph CARPENTER, one of the four sons born in England, and great-grandfather of Benjamin C., became a constituent member of the Baptist church in Swanzey, the oldest church of that order in Massachusetts, in 1669. The late Senator Matt. CARPENTER, of Wisconsin, and the late Hon. Abbott LAWRENCE, of Boston, were among his numerous posterity. Cyrus, the youngest of Benjamin CARPENTER's ten children, was born in Killingly, Conn., in 1769, and was brought as an infant by his parents to Guilford, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was a hardworking farmer and a much respected member of the Baptist church. He reared thirteen children, all of whom lived to have families of their own. His first wife, Betsey BARNEY, was the mother of four sons and six daughters, all of whom made their homes in other States. The fourth son, Mark, however, spent the later years of his life in his native county, serving the Baptist churches in Brattleboro, West Dummerston and South Windham successively, as pastor. He died at his residence in Townshend in 1882, at the age of eighty, leaving five sons scattered in various parts of the world. Cyrus's second wife, Betsey PUTNAM, was the mother of two sons and one daughter. The eldest of these three children, Edwin B., resided in the old homestead in Guilford for some years after his father's death. He was early engaged in the manufacture of reed organs in Brattleboro, and is still engaged in the same business in Mendota, Ill., while his eldest son Edwin P., has recently established a factory of the same kind in Brattleboro, right under the shadow of the successful and powerful firm of ESTEY & Co. He will doubtless do everything that pluck, energy, and fair dealing can do to build up his native town and at the same time achieve an honorable success.

      Daniel LYNDE, from Worcester, Mass., was among the early settlers of the town. He reared seven children, one of whom, Daniel, Jr., born in 1791, resided here until his death, at the age of seventy-one years. He was thrice married and reared fifteen children, eight of whom are living, and four in Windham county, viz.: Thomas J., in Brattleboro; Louis H., in Dummerston; Mrs. G. N. McCLURE, in Guilford. William W., born here in 1829, has been in business in Brattleboro since 1868. He represented the town of Marlboro in the legislature thirteen sessions, was State senator in 1870-71, and was quarter-master-general of the State from 1871 to 1875. He married Calista J. PERSON, daughter of Ebenezer PERSON, of Marlboro, September 5, 1852, and has one daughter, wife of Hugh M. ADAMS. Another daughter, an infant, died in 1860.

      Aaron WILDER came here from Providence, R. I., about 1773, and took up a piece of land on road 38, the farm now owned by his grandson, W. J. WILDER. After a residence of three years he returned to Providence, and served about a year in the army. He then came back to Guilford, and died here in 1844. Abigail, his wife, died in 1843. Of his two sons and six daughters, only two are living. Aaron, who was born here in 1789, is the oldest resident of the town. He lives with his son Joseph M. He married Clarissa SMITH of Guilford, and had five children, two of whom are living, Joseph M., and Emeline, who married Jonathan ALDRICH. Sarah W. BULLOCK, a daughter of Aaron WILDER, the pioneer, was born in Guilford in 1791, and now lives in the old house built by her father about 1795. John, another son of Aaron, was born about 1796, and died here in 1864. He married Lovinia ROSE, who died in 1881, aged eighty-two years. They had one son, Warren J., who still resides here.

      John BARNEY, born in Pomfret, Conn., in 1730, married Rebecca MARTIN, of Rehoboth, Mass., and came to Guilford in 1764, where he reared a family of twelve children. In 1772 he was chosen a supervisor of the town, and during that year his son Aaron was born. Aaron remained at home and cared for his parents in their passing old age, both of whom died in 1807. He represented the town in the legislature a number of years, was town clerk several years, and did a large amount of work as a justice of the peace, and was also a general of militia. He died at the age of sixty-two years. His youngest son, Aaron C., also held many of the town trusts, and died at the age of sixty-nine years. After his death the old homestead, which had been in the family's possession ninety-nine years, was sold to J. C. CUTTING, who now occupies the same. William W., the eldest son of Aaron C., lives about half a mile from the old homestead. He represented the town in the legislature during the years 1861, '74 and '80, and is the present town clerk.

      John NOYES came here from Connecticut about 1775, and settled in the south part of the town. He built a log house and cleared the land around it. The seed for the first blade of grass grown upon his farm was sown by his wife. There was then no mill nearer than Deerfield, Mass., a distance of eighteen miles. Mr. NOYES represented the town when the legislature met at Windsor, and though not a lawyer by profession, he pleaded law to some extent. He died in 1827, aged more than eighty years. He had six sons and one daughter. Two of the former, Isaac and James, settled here. The latter married Mary TAYLOR and settled on the homestead farm on which he was born. He was a justice of the peace for many years. He died in Jun 1864, aged eighty-three years and eleven months. His widow died in February, 1865, aged eighty-three years. His son, Jeremiah T., was born on the old farm, August 24, 1820. He married Sarah A. DENNISON, who bore him one son, Charles S., who lives in Brattleboro. His second wife was Augusta CARPENTER, by whom he has two children.

      David THURBER came with his family of nine children, by means of an ox team, from Richmond, N. H., in 1776, and settled upon the farm now owned by his grandson, Edward THURBER, on road 3. He represented the town in the legislature one term. He was a member of the Baptist church, and labored zealously to promote its interests. He died respected by the community. His son Edward, who was eight years old when his father came to Guilford, married Betsey WELLS, and settled on the homestead farm. His influence as a pacificator won for him the respect and confidence of his townsmen. He had ten children, only two of whom are living. Amos, his son, now lives on road 3. Amos's first wife was Almira WORDEN, of Halifax; his present one, L. L. THURBER, the widow of his brother John W. Edward THURBER, a grandson of the pioneer of the family, who succeeded his father to the homestead farm, married Aurelia M., daughter of Capt. Jesse WILKINS. He has been a member of the Baptist church for fifty-one years, and is still an active religious worker. He has been a lister and assessor for several terms. The house he now occupies was built by his father in 1799.

      Vine HAYNES came from Groton, Conn., in 1778, and settled on the farm now owned by Russell L. ROBERTS, who married a granddaughter of his, on road 35. He was a carpenter and cabinet-maker, and endured many hardships and privations while clearing his land. He brought with him to his new home his wife, Molly BROWN, and their six children. Three children were born to them after their settlement here. Among these was Asa, on the homestead, on which he always lived, in 1784. He, like his father, was a carpenter, and was also a Methodist minister. He married Sally BRIGGS, by whom he had nine children who grew to maturity. Five are living, among them a daughter, who became the wife of Russell L. ROBERTS.

      James and Rufus CHASE came from Rehoboth, Mass., during the Revolutionary war, and settled on the John H. RUDD farm. James afterwards removed to the west part of Dummerston, and lived to be ninety-three years of age.

      John KING came here from Connecticut about 1783, bringing his kit of joiner's tools with him upon his back. Some years after he returned to Connecticut and married Sarah MARVIN, of Middletown, in that State. He returned with her to Guilford, and settled in the center of the town, removing a few years later to the farm now owned by Mrs. C. A. KING, where both died at a good old age. Of their nine chiidren, all of whom reached maturity, not one is living. Their son Joseph, who was born in this town, married Katharine BANGS. He was a carpenter, and died in 1861, aged sixty-six. Two of his nine children are living, Frederick H., at Miller's Falls, Mass., and Frank R., now living with his mother on road 30.

      Calvin WELD came from Plymouth, Vt., about a hundred years ago, and settled on the farm now owned by his grandson, Isaac A. WELD, where he died. His son Isaac, who was born here in 1800, married Sally ARCHERAFT, by whom he had four children, Isaac A., Calvin J., Louisa, and David. He was a gunsmith, and in addition to that business carried on the manufacture of ox-bows. He died February 12, 1873, and his wife June 11, 1865. The old house, built nearly a hundred years ago, is still standing and muse.

      David BIXBY settled in the east part of the town something more than a hundred years ago. He subsequently removed to the west part of the town, to the farm now owned by Lemuel WHITNEY, where he died. His son Stephen, who came with him to Guilford, married Desire GORE, and lived on the old homestead. His son Daniel, who was born in 1808 and has always lived in the county, married Betsey JONES, and has two children living, Melissa and Nelson H.

      Abijah ROGERS, who was a descendant in the seventh generation of John ROGERS, the English divine, who suffered martyrdom by burning in 1555, came to Guilford at an early day and settled in the central part of the town, on a part of the farm now owned by J: L. BULLOCK, on road 7, which he cleared up and on which he died. His family is said to have been the thirteenth to settle in Guilford. He had four wives and sixteen children. His daughters all married and settled in this vicinity and raised families.

      Jabez FRANKLIN, son of Aaron, and a native of Rhode Island, settled in Guilford, on the farm now owned by his son Jedediah, on road 41, previous to 1794, and died there. He served in the war for independence. He was twice married. His first wife was Sarah STAR, who bore him seven children, Luther, Comfort, Abigail, Anna, Jabez, Sarah and Samuel. His second wife was Sarah DARLING, by whom he had two children, Jedediah and Benjamin. Jabez, the only surviving child by his first wife, was born on the homestead farm in this town in 1794, and still lives adjacent to it, on the farm on which he settled at his marriage with Sarah FULTON, of Colerain, Mass., who died in 1872, having had two children, Hannah, who died in 1854, and J. H., who resides with his father. Both children of the elder Jabez by his second wife are living, Benjamin, in Boston, and Jedediah, on the old homestead. The latter was born in September, 1808, and married Sarah BARTLETT, who bore him nine children.

      Philip FRANKLIN was among the early settlers of Guilford. He located on the farm now owned by Maria, widow of Philip F. FRANKLIN, on road 40. His son Joel married Fanny GROUT, and settled upon the old homestead. The latter's son Philip married Louisa SARGENT, and for his second wife Maria MOWRY, of Leyden, Mass. He died April 19, 1881.

      Joseph BURROWS, one of the first settlers in Guilford, located in the southwest part of the town. His son Joseph settled near him, while Hiram succeeded to the homestead. All lived and died here. Allen BURROWS and Esther, wife of L. S. WRISLEY, both of whom reside here, belong to this family.

      Thomas AKELEY settled on the farm now owned by his son Martin, on road 4, about 1800, and in 1816, built the brick house, which is still in a good state of preservation. His father, whose name he bore, was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and an early settler from Massachusetts in the town of Brattleboro. He located on the farm now owned by his grandson Henry AKELEY, and lived and died there. Thomas AKELEY, Jr. died in Guilford, where six of his eight surviving children still reside, viz.: Hiram, Samuel, Elizabeth, Almira, Melissa and Martin.

      Peleg RICHMOND, from Rhode Island, came to Guilford with five children previous to 1800, and settled on the farm now owned by his son Martin. He had eleven children, four of whom reside in this town, viz.: Russel, Peleg, Martin, and Hannah R., wife of J. B. DICKINSON.

      Solomon CHAPIN, son of Joel, was born in Bernardston, Mass., in 1770, and married Rebecca PORTER, of Hopkinton, R. I. He came to Guilford previous to 1800 and settled in the southeast part of the town, on the farm now owned by his son Nathan P., who is the only known survivor of his twelve children. He died in 1822, and his widow in 1854. Nathan P. CHAPIN was born Aug. 17, 1801, and married Abigail HUBBARD, of Vernon, who was born in Sullivan, N. H., in 1803, and died in 1877. He settled and has since lived on the homestead. He has filled nearly every office in the town, which he represented in 1847-248. He is selectman and lister and has been justice of the peace since 1836, having married during that time some 220 couples. He was captain of a company of light infantry in this town, and is now an active man for one of his age. One of his daughters, Aurelia H., is the wife of Joseph E. Jacobs of this town. Another, Sarah J., is living at home.

      John BURNETT came from Warrick, Mass., previous to 1800, and settled upon the farm now owned by his son John, on road 8, where he carried on the business of carpentry and farming, and died about 1850. His son John, who succeeded to the homestead, married Mary BROWN of this town. He has two children living, Hollis H., who resides with his father, and Susan S., who married John S. CUTTING, and lives in the town of Brattleboro.

      Peter BAKER came to Guilford about i800, and settled on road 53. He owned a large tract of land, and had a numerous family of children, only one of whom is living in this county, Elvira, who married Henry BABCOCK, of Guilford. His son Lorin, who was born in Guilford, and died in 1863, married Cynthia BARRETT, of New Hampshire, and settled on the farm now owned by his son D. G. BAKER, on road 53. His widow and eight children survive him.

      David CULVER was an early settler on the farm now owned by Robert FULTON, where he lived and died. His son Joshua settled near him. He also died in the town. Not one of the name remains. His daughter Irene married Hiram BURROWS, of Guilford.

      Otis ALDRICH was an early settler in Guilford. His son Lyman, who was born in this town, lived here most of his life and died here. His son, Silas W., married Mary L., daughter of Samuel WILCOX, of Halifax, and settled on the farm now occupied by his widow, on road 25. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, a justice of the peace, and a lister. He died March 16, 1882. He had one child, Frank W., who died March 14, 1882.

      Daniel, James and William BOYDEN, brothers, came to Guilford at an early day from Worcester, Mass. Daniel settled on the farm now owned by Charles A. SQUIRES, on road 16. He and his wife, the latter of whom died in 1829, both lie in the Blanchard burying-ground. Their sons were Daniel, Jr., Ebenezer and Levi. Ebenezer removed to Georgia; Daniel settled on the homestead farm and resided there until his death; Levi located on the farm now owned by his son Levi, at Guilford village. He was born October 16, 1774, and came to Guilford at the age of ten years. He was a farmer, and died April 21, 1859. His first wife was Dolly SMITH, of this town, who died in 1824. His second wife was Olive CUTLER, who died without issue, March 20, 1857. Levi, Jr., one of the six children by his first wife, was born in Guilford, April 28, 1803, and married Lucia RICHARDSON, of Claremont, N. H., who bore him two children, Louisa, wife of Isaac CLEVELAND, who lives with her father on the old homestead, and Charles, who died August 20, 1864. His wife died February 21, 1874. He is still living at the advanced age of eighty-one years, having been honored with most of the offices within the gift of his town, which he represented in 1856-'57. He has been a farmer, and was for many years proprietor of a grist-mill. His son Charles married, Julia NEWMAN, of Brattleboro, and had one son, Walter L., who is teller in the bank of East Hampton, Mass. His daughter Louisa, who was born in 1832, married for her first husband Warren HOWE, of Vernon.

      James BOYDEN located on the place where his grandson, Samuel B. BOYDEN, now lives, on road 18. He carried on the business of cloth dressing until his death, November 20, 1816. Henry A. N. BOYDEN, son of James, was born March 26, 1792, and married Amanda HALEY, February 5, 1829. He lived on the old homestead and carried on the same business as his father until 1852, when failing health compelled him to retire. He died June 7, 1877, and his wife in 1879. Of his five children only William B., born April 8, 1833, and Samuel B., born January 13, 1838, are now living. The former resides in San Francisco, Cal., and is president of a mining company; the latter, who married Julina L. WORDEN, of Halifax, occupies the old homestead, which is about one hundred years old.

      Caleb BLANCHARD came to Guilford in company with his brother, from Massachusetts, at an early day. He died February 14, 1844, aged sixty-six years. He had three children, Warren, Electa and Edson C. Warren married Alvine BURDICK and settled in Dover, removing after a residence of three years to Guilford, and from thence in 1850 to Brattleboro, locating on the farm now owned by Col. S. B. WELLS. He was a school teacher, and superintendent of schools in Brattleboro and Guilford. He also traveled and delivered lectures on sacred history. He died June 2, 1854. His widow is still living in Brattleboro. He leaves two children, Virgil W., who is a physician in New York city, and Augusta E., wife of F. A. WELLS, residing in Brattleboro. Electa, daughter of Caleb BLANCHARD, married Lorenzo ALLEN, of Brattleboro, and died without issue, March 17, 1881. Edson C. married Mary A. BAKER, of Brattleboro, and had one child, Minnie, who resides with her mother in Guilford. He died May 5, 1883.

      Lovell and William BULLOCK, brothers, from Rehoboth, Mass., came to Guilford at an early day and settled on road 10, on the farm now owned by O. H. HALLADAY, which they cleared and on which they lived together for seven years, when William married and purchased the interest of his brother, who located on the farm now owned by his grandson, J. L. BULLOCK, on road 7, upon which he spent the remainder of his life. He was a prominent man, a representative from his town, and was familiarly called Capt. BULLOCK. His son Daniel was born upon that place in 1793, and died there in 1850. He married Emily, daughter of John KING, and had two children, J. L. and Elizabeth, the latter of whom died young. J. L. married Sarah M. KING, of Hinsdale, N. H., and has two children, Samuel M. and Lyman B. He occupies the old homestead, which was built about a hundred years ago, and which is now in a good state of preservation. He has in his possession an old shot-gun with which, it is said, was killed the last wolf in the town.

      Samuel MELENDY was an early settler on the farm now owned by Charles A. SQUIRES, on road 16. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and was taken prisoner by the Tories, who took all his stock, except one calf, which one of his boys succeeded in withholding from them. He married Sarah GALE, by whom he had eleven children, all of whom grew to maturity. He died Sept. 20, 1813, aged seventy-two years, and his wife, March 30, 1832, aged eighty-two. Asa, one of his sons, was born Feb. 12, 1781, and married Sally MOORE, who was born May 11, 1793. He died Nov. 29, 1866, and his wife, March 24, 1865. Three of their eight children are living, Mary W., in Guilford, Edward, in Sheboygan Falls, Wis., and A. B., in Rogersville, East Tennessee. John, son of Samuel, lived and died upon the homestead. Jonathan also lived-in the town.

      Joseph and David GAINES, brothers, were early settlers in Guilford. Joseph located in the southeast part of the town and died here. His son Joseph, who accompanied him here, married Tabitha STEBBINS and settled on the farm now owned by his son Joel, on road 56. He was a farmer, and had ten children, eight of whom grew up. He died in 1869, and his wife in 1878. His sons Joel and Horace, who are farmers, occupy the old homestead. David GAINES lived and died in the town. He had two sons, Samuel and David, but none of the family are living.

      Joseph WEATHERHEAD, from Rhode Island, was an early settler in Guilford. He located on the farm now owned by Henry THOMAS, on road 37. He died in the town. He had three boys, Joe, Jerry and John, and two girls. Jerry, who was born in Guilford, married Abigail WILDER and settled on the farm now owned by his son Joseph L. Of his ten children, Bradley, Joseph Lewis, Emerson, Willard and Asenath are still living.

      William and Simeon EDWARDS, from Windham, Conn., were among the early settlers of Guilford. William located and lived and died on the farm now owned by L. D. FRANKLIN, on road 41, and Simeon on that owned by Jabez FRANKLIN, on the same road. Not one of Simeon's family is left in the town. William was a farmer and shoemaker. His son Benajah married Mary STOWELL and settled on the farm now owned by his son Benajah, on road 41. He was a selectman and lister. He subsequently went to Illinois and died there in 1839 or '40. Benajah, Jr., was born in 1802 and married Asenath RICHMOND of Guilford. He has three children living, John R., in Montana, and J. Harvey, and Mary, who married Frank ASHCROFT of Guilford.

      Adonijah PUTNAM was one of the first settlers in Guilford. He came from Sutton, Mass., and located on road 27. He died in the town. Jared, the youngest of his nine children, married Eliza RUEL. He also died in the town, leaving a son and two daughters, A. W., Nancy, and Polly. A. W. PUTNAM was born in Guilford in 1813, and married Serepta HOLBROOK, who died in September, 1866. He subsequently married Prudence SHEPARDSON. He has been honored with various public trusts, having been chosen selectman, lister and justice of the peace.

      William YEAW came to Guilford just after the close of the Revolutionary war, in which he took part. His son Samuel was born in this town, but lived and died in Dover. Truman, another son, now lives in Guilford.

      Daniel ASHCRAFT came to Guilford with his wife and four children, from Fisher's Island, where he had been plundered of all his property by the Tories, to whom he was no friend. He located on the farm now occupied by J. C. MINER. He was a brick-maker and mason by trade, and carried on brick-making in connection with farming. He died on the place where he settled. His son Urial, who came with him, married Lucinda NICHOLS, of Guilford, and settled on the farm now owned by his son T. S., where he spent his life. He built, in 1815, the house now standing on that place. T. S. ASHCRAFT, the present occupant, was born in 1805, and married Flora C. Slate. Daniel ASHCRAFT, son of the pioneer of that name, came with his father to Guilford, and married and lived here some years. He afterwards removed to New York State. Jedediah, son of Daniel, married Sally DAVIS, of Guilford, and settled, lived, and died on the place now occupied by E. J. CARPENTER, the house on which was built in 1792. He operated a saw-mill and carding-machine, and also carried on farming. He had a numerous family. His daughter Delight married Asa NICHOLS, of this town, and removed to Charlemont, N. H. His son John, who was born in Guilford, married Clarissa STOCKBRIDGE, of Hadley, Mass., and settled on his father's homestead, where he died. Lucretia, another daughter, married William BIGELOW, of Guilford. Simeon, son of Jedediah, and grandson of the pioneer Daniel, succeeded his father on the homestead. Some of his descendants are still living.

      Thomas COLGROVE was an early settler on what was called Colgrove Hill, where he lived and died. His son Thomas was born in the town, and married Abigail DAVIS. He settled on the farm on which Tyler JOHNSON now lives, and died there. Four of his nine children are living, Lavina, who married C. S. HARRIS, of Vernon; Delight, who married David DARLING, and lives in Palmer, Mass.; and Willard and Charles, who reside at Hampton, Ill.

      Capt. Jonathan CHASE was born at Swanzey, R. I., in 1778. In early life he went to Pomfret, Conn., where he learned the carpenter's trade. In 1799 he removed to Guilford and worked at his trade here until he enlisted in the army during the war of 1812. He was appointed lieutenant of a company, of cavalry, and was afterwards made captain. When his term of service expired he returned to Guilford and purchased a farm in the western part of the town, where he largely engaged in dairying. He was thrice married, first to Nancy STEWART, and second to Sophia STEWART, both daughters of Colonel Daniel STEWART, of Brattleboro. By these marriages there were seven children born. The third marriage was to Ruth HOUGHTON, daughter of Maj. Edward HOUGHTON. Capt. CHASE died in Guilford, in 1858.

      Capt. Henry S. CHASE, son of Jonathan CHASE, was born in Brattleboro, December 12, 1811, and removed to Guilford when quite young, where he was educated in the common schools and academies. He has followed the occupation of farmer and teacher, having taught school fifty-five terms, and has served as superintendent of schools ten years. He has been selectman of the town two years, lister or assessor fifteen years, and for several years was captain of the Guilford Rifle Guards. He was twice married, first to Lucy M. WEATHERHEAD, and second to Martha P. WARD, daughter of Henry WARD. By these marriages nine children were born, three by the first, and six by the second wife. Mr. CHASE removed to Brattleboro in 1882, where he now resides.

      Capt. Abel WEATHERHEAD, son of Joseph, was born in Guilford, and married Ruth DAVIS, of this town. He settled on the farm owned by Edwin CARPENTER, and was considered one of the best farmers in the town. He held the office of selectman for several years, and was a militia captain. He died in the town, May 6, 3865, aged seventy-eight years. He raised twelve children, six boys and six girls, six of whom are living, Aurelia, Sarah E., D. L., Adeline M., Alonzo, and Jane. All reside in this town except Jane, who married George CALDWELL, and lives in California.

      Philip FRANKLIN came to Guilford, with his family, from Scituate, Mass., and settled on road 40, where he died, and is buried in the Franklin cemetery. His son Philip, who came and lived with him, also died in the town, leaving six children. His son Joseph, who was born December 29, 1780, married Asenath WILDER, of Guilford, and settled first in Dover, but remained there only a few years, when he removed to the farm now occupied by his son J. E. and grandson W. A., on road 4, in Vernon. He was well and favorably known in the town, which he represented in the legislature. He was selectman for several years, and held other town offices. He died May 6, 1866, and his wife, November 23, 1850. He left one child, Joseph EDSON, who was born April 10, 1819, married Chloe MANN, of Dover, and settled on the old homestead, in Vernon, where he still resides. He represented the town in 1847, '48, '58 and 59, was selectman for eleven or twelve years, lister, and filled other town offices. He was a justice of the peace for some thirty years, and is still very active for one of his age. He has one child, Woodburn A., who married Mary COOK, of Guilford, and lives on the same farm.

      Ezekiel BURDICK, from Easterly, R. I., came to Guilford in 1796-'97, in company with four sons, Pardon, Nathan, Henry and Robert, and several daughters. All but Pardon and his family, however, subsequently removed to the west. Pardon's wife was Mary LEWIS, of Stonington, Conn., who bore him five children, Pardon, Jr., Jerred, Beriah L., Henry, and Thompson E., of whom the latter occupies the old homestead. Thompson E. married Elizabeth NOYES, rearing four sons, Henry T., Frank N., Frederick T., and Hilon A. Henry T. was an officer in the army during the late civil war, serving four years, and is now a merchant of Kansas City, Mo. Frank N. is a physician in Dakota, surgeon to the government troops, mayor of the young city of Vermillion, and a councilor in the Territorial legislature. Fred F., a farmer, resides in Guilford, on road 39 ½.

      William HINES came to Guilford from Rehoboth, Mass., and settled at Hinesburg, which derives its name from him. He was a farmer. His sons Thomas, John, and William settled and lived there. John built a grist-mill and carding-mill which are still extant. He subsequently went West, and Thomas removed to Monroe, Mass. William continued his residence here, and some of the descendants are still living in the county.

      Benjamin FESSENDEN came here from Halifax, his native town, to which his father, Solomon FESSENDEN, removed at an early day. Benjamin settled on the farm now owned by his son W. S., and died there in 1881, aged eighty-eight years.

      Cyrus CARPENTER came to this town from Rhode Island when but seven years old and worked around among the farmers. After a few years he started a wheelwright shop at Guilford village, and carried on that business for many years. He was deputy sheriff several years and high sheriff one term; also constable and collector for eighteen years. He married a daughter of Artemas GALE of this town, and had two sons and two daughters, but one of whom, Augusta, wife of J. T. NOYES, is living in the town. He died in September, 1863, aged sixty-three years.

      Charles B. STEVENS was born in Petersham, Mass., about 1786, and came to Guilford when twenty years of age to reside with his uncle, Simon STEVENS. He married Julina GRAVES, who died in September 1854, surviving him about one year, he having died in October, 1853. Of their four children Solomon L. resides in Clinton, Mass., Thomas G. in Illinois, and Charles H., who has been a school teacher, merchant and manufacturer, in Brattleboro, Rosella M., the only daughter, married Nelson FROST, and died in 1848.

      Capt. Jonah CUTTING, a Revolutionary soldier, came to Guilford from Leicester, Mass., about 1790. He built a paper, oil and saw-mill here, carrying on the same a number of years. He died in November, 1842. John, one of his six children, born here in 1800, married Emily STEWART for his first wife, and Charlotte STEWART for his second. He removed to Brattleboro in 1824, locating upon the farm now owned by his son, J. S., on road 38. He reared six children, and died in 1844. Four of the children are living, viz.: Joseph C., in Guilford; Emily (Mrs. Rev. J. EASTWOOD), in Newport, N. H.; and Henry M. and J. S. in Brattleboro. J. S. has taught school forty-five terms, represented the town in 1874-'75, was superintendent of schools five years, lister eight years, and is now a justice of the peace.

      Isaac BROWN was an early settler in the town of Dover, where he lived until 1803, when he removed to Guilford, and settled in Weatherhead Hollow. After a few years' residence there he removed to the farm now owned by his grandson, Alfred S. BROWN, on road 15, where he died. His son Isaac was born in Dover, March 1, 1793, and married Delinda KEEP, who bore him seven children, Imla K., Hannah E., Mary M., Isaac E., Abigail A., George R. and Alfred S. He was a farmer and was widely known and respected. He was ever active in promoting the public and social interests of the community in which he lived, and in the town held various public offices, serving as selectman thirty successive terms. He was captain of a militia company in Guilford in 1813. He died in 1870. His wife died in 1877, aged eighty-six years. His son Alfred S. married Mary J. ARMS and has one child, Mary S.

      Nathan CONANT, son of Samuel P., born in Acton, Mass., Oct. 30, 1791, came to Guilford October 1, 1816, settling upon the place now occupied by H. H. WARD. He was a cooper by trade and made all the barrels used in this locality. He represented this town in 1834. He has been selectman some years and has filled other town offices. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and now draws a pension from the government. He married Susan DAVIS and had four children, Lucius, who died September 24, 1850; Susan, who died March 8, 1848; Caroline C., who lives with her father at Guilford Center; and Maria B., who died July 11, 1848. Caroline C. was born August 7, 1823, and December 25, 1845, married George W. PENNIMAN, of Rockingham, Vt., who died May 12, 1874, aged fifty-three.

      Joseph and L. Nathan JACOBS came to Guilford at an early day. Joseph settled in the east part of the town and lived and died there. Nathan settled on the farm now owned by C. SQUIRES. His sons Elias and 'David married two sisters named GAINES and removed to the State of New York. Joseph had three sons, Joseph who was killed in the war of 1812, Rufus, who lived and died in the town, and Simon, who lived and died on the homestead. Joseph, son of Rufus, was born on the farm now owned by his widow, on road 30, the old house on which was built about 1800. He was a farmer and was for some years a selectman. He married Sarah E. WEATHERHEAD, October 17, 1830, and had six children, three boys and three girls, three of whom are living. He died February 20, 1875. William, son of Rufus JACOBS, was born in Guilford March 4, 1811, and married Mary W., daughter of Asa MELENDY, April 13, 1835. He settled on the farm now owned by his wife, and son W. H. He was an excellent farmer. He had four children, three sons and one daughter. One son, C. H., now lives in Wanwatosa, Wis. George A. was a private in Co. B, 16th Vt. Vols. and was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. M. Ella married Charles OGDEN and lives in South Boston, Mass. W. H., who lives on the homestead with his mother, married Cora B. YOUNG.

      Samuel L. HUNT came from Worcester, Mass., in 1835, and settled at Guilford Center, where he carried on the business of tanning and the manufacture of boots. He held several town offices. He was town clerk for twenty years, and represented the town for several terms. He married Harriet SIBLEY and has three children, Samuel S. and Ellen M., wife of S. A. SMITH, both living in Guilford, and Frank L., who lives in Philadelphia, Pa.

      Joel FLAGG, son of Silas, was born in Heath, Mass., March 10, 1808, and married Delight WAITE in 1834. He came to Guilford in 1851, and settled on the PHELPS farm, where he has since resided. He has one child living, Joel, Jr., who married Lizzie A. BARBER, of Vernon, and lives with his father.

      Horace W. TAFT, son of Zadock, was born in Winchester, N. H., Feb. 27, 1827, and married Mary M. PIERCE. In 1849 he removed to Brattleboro, where he worked at blacksmithing until 1859, when he removed to Guilford, where he has since carried on the same business. The house in which lie lived was built about a hundred years ago and was formerly kept as a hotel.

      John H. RUDD was born in Westmoreland, England, in 1831, and emigrated to this country in 1831. In 1854 he located in Guilford, where he now resides, on road 9. He married Sarah WATERMAN, who died in 1871. He has five children, all of whom live in the county.

      Ephraim TYLER was born in Buckland, Mass., April 19, 1791, and moved with his father's family to Wilmington, Vt., in 1800, where he resided forty years. He married Mary BISSELL and raised seven children; was postmaster under John Quincy ADAMS's administration; town representative in 1828; was identified with all of the town's early history and one of its largest and best farmers; moved to Guilford in 1840, where he resided until his decease in August, 1878; he held the important offices in town; had great force of character and a wide knowledge of public men and affairs in which he maintained a deep interest till the close of his life. His youngest son, William H., lives in the old homestead. Another son, Hon. James M., is a prominent citizen of Brattleboro.

      The Congregational church, located at Guilford, was organized as early as 1778. The present building was erected in 1856, at a cost of about $1,500,00. The society has now no pastor and no regular organization.

      The Methodist Episcopal society holds its meetings at Gulford Center and Green River. It was organized in June, 1859, Rev. Albert L. PRATT being the first pastor. The society now has forty members, with Rev. 0. K. EDWARDS, pastor.

      The First Universalist Society.-This society, located at Guilford Center, was organized December 27, 1838, the constitution being signed by thirty-two of the leading men of the town. At this time Rev. Charles HEWS resided in town and preached every Sabbath. Rev. William N. BARBER, the next resident clergyman, was ordained here in March, 1840. After Mr. BARBER left town, they had preaching by clergymen who resided out of town for several years; but about 1850 Rev. Sumner ELLIS came to Guilford and preached about two years, after which there was preaching half of the time by different clergymen up to April, 1876, when Rev. M. H. HARRIS commenced his regular services, alternate Sundays, at half-past two P. M. From April to December he gave a series of evening week-day lectures. September 14, 1879, the church was re-organized, with twenty-four members. The present minister is Rev. E. W. WHITNEY, who preaches and gives a course of lectures, same as the Rev. M. H. HARRIS did. Mr. WHITNEY commenced his services with the society in May, 1880. The present number of church members is thirty-three. A Sunday-school was organized years before the church organization, which now has a library of about 175 volumes. The school is kept up through the whole year, the average attendance being thirty. The present superintendent is Miss Minnie TAYLOR. The church building was erected in 1837, and is valued, including grounds, at $3,500.00.

Gazetteer and Business Directory of 
Windham County, Vt., 1724-1884.
Compiled and Published By Hamilton Child,
Printed At The Journal Office, Syracuse, N. Y., July, 1884.
Page 194-216

Transcribed by Karima Allison ~2004