WINDSOR County, Vermont
History <-> Genealogy

 


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County Coordinators:
E-mail:  Ann Mensch

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Windsor County is located in southeastern Vermont.
Select this LINK to see GENERAL Windsor County Menu information and links .
Select from the TOWN / TOWNSHIP list below to view information and links specific to each location.
Select this link to view a history of the FORMATION of the TOWNSHIPS within Windsor County.

Windsor County TOWNS are listed in bold print below.
Villages and communities within each town follow the town's name, in normal type.
If you are interested in becoming a Town Coordinator, please visit the
Windsor County: Volunteers / Town Coordinators' page.

 

 

TOWN - Villages and communities

Town coordinator for Genealogy & History 

ANDOVER - Andover, Simonsville

 

BALTIMORE - Baltimore

 

BARNARD - Barnard, East Barnard

 

BETHEL- Bethel, West Bethel

BRIDGEWATER - Bridgewater, Bridgewater Center, Bridgewater Corners, West Bridgewater

 

CAVENDISH - Cavendish, Proctorsville, Whitesville

 

CHESTER - Chester [historical names: Flamstead, New Flamstead] After 1768, when Cumberland County, New York was created, legal matters could be settled at Chester, VT, where there were courts of common pleas and of quarter sessions.

 

HARTFORD - Hartford, Quechee, West Hartford, White River Junction

 

HARTLAND - Hartland, Hartland Four Corners, North Hartland, Wilder (aka Olcott/Olcott Falls)

 

LUDLOW - Ludlow, Smithville

 

NORWICH - Lewiston, Norwich, Pompanoosuc, West Norwich

 

PLYMOUTH (historical name: Saltash) - Tyson, Plymouth, Plymouth Union 

Town coordinator:  Nancy Wygant

POMFRET - Hewitts Corner, North Pomfret, Pomfret, South Pomfret

 

READING - Felchville, Hammondsville, Reading, South Reading

 

ROCHESTER - Emerson, Rochester, Talcville

 

ROYALTON- North Royalton, Royalton, South Royalton

Town Coordinator: Mark A. Davis

SHARON - Sharon

 

SPRINGFIELD - North Springfield, City of Springfield

STOCKBRIDGE- Gaysville, Stockbridge, "No Town"

Town Coordinator: Barb Vellturo: Barb Vellturo

WEATHERSFIELD - Amsden, Ascutney, Nelsons Corners, Perkinsville, Weathersfield Bow, Weathersfield Center

WESTON - The Island, Weston

 

WEST WINDSOR - Brownsville, Sheddsville

 

WINDSOR - Windsor

 

WOODSTOCK - Prosper, South Woodstock, Taftsville, West Woodstock, Woodstock

 

GENERAL WINDSOR COUNTY, VT
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About Windsor County: 
Organization of Townships

QUERIES

CEMETERIES

CENSUS & Aids to Census Research

HISTORY & Societies

MAILING LISTS

MAPS

MILITARY

NEWSPAPERS

PROBATE

TOWNS

 

VITAL RECORDS

ARCHIVES

QUERIES



Would you like to post a QUERY related to Windsor County, Vermont ?  Please post your Windsor County, VT Query on the Rootsweb message board for Windsor County, VT .



Please note:  Though the information on this web page is believed to be correct, the possibility of error remains.  Please notify the Ann Mensch should an error be found. 


 

 

Windsor County, Vermont:
Organization of Townships
 
 

Abstracted from:  History of Windsor County, Vermont, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.1

When the State of Vermont was admitted to the Federal Union, in 1791, all that had been previously done by the State toward erecting and maintaining an independent government was confirmed and sanctioned by Congress, while the jurisdiction theretofore attempted to be exercised by New York was withdrawn and declared at an end.  At that time the county of Windsor, and others of the State as well, was fairly well organized, the officers of each branch of the local government were in the exercise of their functions, and peace and plenty prevailed on every hand. 

But the townships of Windsor county, or at least a majority of them, were organizations the creation of which antedated that of the State and that of the county, by a number of years.  Between the governor of New Hampshire on the one side, and of New York on the other, there was but little of the territory of Vermont that had not in some manner been granted and chartered.  These grants, of course, were conflicting in numerous cases, and the grantees and their successors were compelled to pay allegiance to one or the other of the Commonwealths; and instances are not wanting in which the settlers of towns surrendered their original charter from the one government, and purchased anew from the other. 

Of the several towns that now comprise Windsor county the first to be chartered was that now known as Chester, but which under the original grant was named Flamstead .  The first grant of this town was made February 22, 1754.  However, the charter proprietors failed to comply with the conditions and requirements of the grant, whereupon it was forfeited.  The second charter of the same territory was made on the 3d of November, 1761, to another set of proprietors, and under another name, the latter being New Flamstead.  Under this grant settlements were made and pioneer improvements commenced.  But it appears that during the early years of the controversy between New York and the Green Mountain Boys, the inhabitants of this town were disposed to favor the New York interests, and being  imbued with such spirit, yielded up or set at nought the New Hampshire charter and procured another from the former province.  Under this last grant, which was made on July 14, 1766, the name Chester was given the township, and by that name it has ever since been known.  In 1771, under the New York authority, an enumeration of the town's inhabitants was made, and Chester was found to contain one hundred and fifty-two souls. 
 The next grants of townships now of Windsor county under the authority of New Hampshire were made on the 4th day of July, 1761, by which the towns of Hartford and Norwich were brought into existence.  Then, following two days later, on July 6th, Governor Wentworth made grants of the townships of Saltash (now Plymouth), Reading, and WindsorPomfret came next, July 8, 1761, and was followed on the 10th of the same month by Woodstock, Hertford (Hartland), and Woodstock. Barnard was chartered on the 17th of July, 1761; Stockbridge on the 21st; Sharon on the 17th of August; Springfield and Weathersfield on the 20th; Ludlow on September 16th; Cavendish on October 12th; Andover on October 13th.  All of these towns were granted during the year 1761 by Governor Benning Wentworth of New Hampshire.  But not all of these towns were organized and continued under the authority of the New Hampshire charters, some subsequently, like Chester, receiving a new grant from the provincial governor of New York. 
 

And there were other towns, too, that now form a part of this county that were organized or granted under still another jurisdiction--that of the independent district or State of Vermont, although they were, of course, a latter-day creation.  Bethel was one of the latter class of townships, being the result of an associations, which was formed at Hanover, N. H., and which petitioned the Vermont authority for a charter right for the purpose of making a settlement on the White River and its branches.  This petition was made to the Vermont Legislature in 1778, and was granted during the month of March of the same year. 

In substantially the same manner was the town of Rochester brought into existence, the grant therefore being made on the 30th of July, 1781.  It contained originally slightly more than twenty-three thousand acres of land, but its township area was materially increased by subsequent annexations from adjoining towns. 

Royalton was one of the townships granted first under the authority of New York, on November 13, 1769, but the claimants under that charter felt insecure in their possession, and were fearful lest the constantly increasing and arbitrary power of Vermont should deprive them of their believed rights, and were consequently induced to apply for a new charter under the new State, which was granted to the petitioners on December 20, 1781. 

Next in the order of formation came the township of Baltimore ; a small, triangular tract of land, embracing some three thousand acres, which, for the convenience of  the residents of that part of the town of Cavendish who lived southeast of Hawk's Mountain, was set off into a separate sub-division of the county, by an act of the Vermont Legislature passed October 19, 1793.  This is the smallest by several fold of any of the county's sub-divisions, but none the less a township organized and conducted upon the same truly democratic plan of government so characteristic of all New England towns. 

The same necessity that led to the formation of Baltimore also induced the erection of the township of Weston out of the lands that formerly formed a part of Andover and the five thousand acre tract known as Benton's Gore.  The extremely high ridges known as Mount Terrible and Markham Mountain extended north and south about through the central part of Andover, thus making it exceedingly difficult for the residents of the western part of that township to hold business communication with the eastern half; and for this reason the western inhabitants betook themselves to the State Legislature, asking that their section be erected into a separate township.  Their prayer was heard, and on the 26th of October, 1799, the western part of the town, together with the gore, was erected into a separate town and named Weston. 

The town of West Windsor is the junior of the subdivisions of the county, its separation from the township of Windsor having been effected first in 1814, but restored during the next year.  Again, in 1848, the town of Windsor was divided, and West Windsor set off.  The act of the Legislature that effected the last division was passed October 26, 1848. 

It is also proper to furnish to the reader the names of the townships of this county which were organized under the jurisdiction and control of the province and subsequent State of New York; and this mention, collectively, becomes important from the fact that the preceding paragraphs have primarily noted the organization under New Hampshire and Vermont authority.  The towns now forming a part of Windsor county which were chartered or granted by the governors of New York, together with the date of each, are as follows: 

   Bethel. -- This town was first chartered or granted to a company of men, most of whom were then, or afterwards became, Tories.  The date of this charter is unknown.  [per Deming's Catalogue] 

   Cavendish. -- This town was chartered by New York June 16, 1772.

   Chester. -- Already mentioned; chartered by New York July 14, 1766. 

   Hartland. -- Chartered as "Hertferd" by New Hampshire July 10, 1761; but charter confirmed by New York to other proprietors July 23, 1766. 

   Plymouth, formerly Saltash. -- Town granted by New York to Ichabod Fisher and others May 13, 1772. 

   Reading. -- Granted by New York March 6, 1772, to Simon Stevens and others. 

   Royalton. -- Chartered by New York November 13, 1769. 

   Springfield. -- Granted by New York to Gideon Lyman March 16, 1772. 

   Stockbridge. -- Granted by New York to William Story and others in 1761. 

   Weathersfield. -- Granted, April 8, 1772, to Gideon Lyman and others. 

   Windsor. -- Granted, July 7, 1766, to David Stone, 2d, and others. 

Formation of Windsor County, Vermont

 A division of the State, or, as it was then known, the district of  the New Hampshire Grants, into counties, was made by the province of New York, on the 3d of July 1766, by virtue of an act of the Provincial Assembly.  By that act all the district of the grants that lay eastward of the Green Mountains was erected into a county by the name of Cumberland.  This act, however, was annulled by the Royal decree of 1767, which was intended to forbid New York from exercising further authority over the district, at least for the time being, but that province continued its policy, notwithstanding the kin's order, and in 1768 repassed the act and proceeded again to organize the county.  They established a Court of Common Pleas and appointed judges for the county.  For a number of years the courts were held at Chester, one of the towns of Windsor county, but there seemed to be an element of the population in Chester that strongly favored the new State policy, and, as the New York control had erected no county buildings in the town, it was deemed expedient to move the seat of justice to Westminster, where existed less opposition to New York.  This removal to the more congenial locality was made during the year 1772. 

In the year 1770, by an act of the Provincial Assembly of New York, passed March 7th, the territory of Cumberland county was divided, and the county of Gloucester was formed, comprising the lands lying north of the present north line of Windsor county, and the county seat of the new sub-division was fixed at Newbury.  Thus did the district of land east of the mountains remain until the year 1778, after the Independence of Vermont had been declared; and from that time forth until the New York dominancy became gradually extinguished the people of the territory now of Windsor county were living under the double and conflicting authority of the two States. 

In March, 1778, the Governor and Council and the General Assembly of Vermont met in session at the meeting-house in Windsor; and among the proceedings of that session were those looking to the erection of counties and the establishment of such other institutions as were necessary to complete the civil organization of the districts.  On the 17th of March the Governor and Council recommended that the Assembly divide the territory of the State into two counties, that portion west of the main chain of the mountains to be known as Bennington, and the part east to be known as "Unity county."  The first request was complied with, but the latter was, on the 21st of March, amended or altered by the Assembly, the name "Cumberland county" being adopted instead of "Unity county."  It was also voted at the same time that each county have four probate districts; also that the county elections be held on the 4th day of June, 1778. 

On the 26th of March the Council appointed John HATCH, Joshua BAYLEY, Ezra SARGEANT and Darius SESSIONS as county surveyors for the county of Cumberland for the time being; also John BENJAMIN as sheriff, for the time being, which meant until the forthcoming election.  The shire town of the county of Cumberland was fixed upon as Westminster, and judges of its courts were appointed by the Assembly as follows:  Major John SHEPARDSON, first; Mr. Stephen TILDEN, second; Hubbel WELLS, third; Deacon Hezekiah THOMSON, fourth; and Nathaniel ROBINSON, fifth judges for the shire.  And on the 17th of June the Assembly boted to appoint special judges for the several shires, those for Cumberland county as follows:  John SHEPARDSON, Stephen TILDEN, Hezekiah THOMSON, Colonel Samuel FLETCHER and Joshua WEBB. 

In October, 1778, after the State election, the Legislature again met at Windsor; and there were present members elected by the towns that form a part of Windsor county, as follows:  Springfield, Lieutenant Samuel SCOTT; Chester, Major Thomas CHANDLER; Weathersfield, Captain William UPHAM; Windsor, Captain Ebenezer CURTISS and Thomas COOPER; Hertferd (Hartland), William GALLOP; Woodstock, Captain Phineas WILLIAMS and Captain John STRONG; Hartford, Stephen TILDEN; Pomfret, Captain John THROOP; Barnard, Captain Edmond HODGES; Sharon, Benjamin SPAULDING; Royalton, Lieutenant Joseph PARKHURST; Norwich, Abel CURTISS and Captain Joseph HATCH. 

During this same fiscal year the county, now called Windsor, seems also to have had a fair representation in the higher body of State officials --the Council of Governor Chittenden; for the records disclose that Peter OLCUTT of Norwich, Paul SPOONER of Hartland, Thomas MURDOCK of Norwich, and Benjami EMMONS of Woodstock, were elected councillors, while Joseph MARSH of Hartford was elected lieutenant governor.  These persons were chosen to the same offices in the preceding March election, and their re-election seems to have shown that each possessed the entire confidence of his constituency. 
 

----- 
From what has already been stated, it will be observed that the greater part of the towns of Windsor county were in existence a number of years prior to the organization of the county itself.  When Windsor county was set off by the division of Cumberland county, the character of the government of the towns was in no manner changed, and the only effect of that act was to lessen the territory included within the county, and to make its government more convenient for its inhabitants and for the State.  And by the extinguishment of the New York authority and jurisdiction there seems not to have been occasioned any material change in any of the towns, and no interests appear to have been adversely affected.  The people were merely changed from the jurisdiction of one State to that of another, and all controversy over the rights of State was ended and forgotten.  Those of the town that were organized and governed under the New York charters continued for the time being their distinctive character, and the succeeding elections not infrequently found officers chosen under Vermont that had previously served under New York. 

Such became the situation of affairs in this county, and in others, when Vermont was admitted to the Union in 1791.  Disagreements and disputes were alike compromised and dropped as the result of that consummation, and an interest in the general welfare of the whole people took the place of strifes and contention among individuals. 

With the end attained, the people of the several towns of the county entered upon an era of prosperity not before enjoyed in the history of the Commonwealth.  And the people of the region were fully able to appreciate the advantages and blessings of peace and quiet, as for forty years prior to that event those who had lived in the State and upon the grants had seen nothing but a succession of combats and misfortunes and strifes and dissensions, and to them in particular was the peace that followed the year 1791 a double blessing. 

But for only one short score of years were the people to be thus favored, when America found herself on the verge of another war with Great Britain; and again was the farmer to leave the field, the woodsman the forest, and the mechanic his shop, and with sword and musket again join the ranks in the defense of that independence he had so lately fought to gain.  During the five years next preceding 1812, the whole country was in a state of nominal peace; but throughout these years there was gathering in the political horizon that dark cloud which was destined to plunge the nation into another foreign war.  In 1775, and the years following, America fought for independence, and achieved a recognition among the powers of the earth.  In 1812 she again engaged against the mother country to maintain that independence which in years past had been forcibly acquired.

ARCHIVES

Would you like to volunteer to assist with this Windsor County, Vermont site?  Please consider donating further information, history, biographies, and so forth, from a non-copyright Windsor County, Vermont resource?  These may be donated to this site, by contacting Ann Mensch , or you may donate to the USGenWeb Archives Project at the link below.

         USGenWeb Archives Project for Windsor County and Vermont -

 

CEMETERIES

         The Tombstone Transcription Project for Windsor County, Vermont Cemeteries

         The Political Graveyard: Windsor County, Vermont - includes Cemeteries and Memorial Sites in Windsor County.

         The Poorhouse Story , by Linda Crannell and CCS - a collection of information, by state, which invites submissions to help tell this untold tale, including cemeteries associated with 'poorhouses' - read "Emma's Story " to see the touching story behind the site!!!

         Etiquette of Funerals , from Polite Life and Etiquette or What is Right and The Social Arts, written by Georgene Corry Benham, published by Chicago : Louis Benham & Company, 1891.

CENSUS & Aids to Census Research

         familysearch.org 1790 Census

         familysearch.org 1800 Census

         familysearch.org 1810 Census

         familysearch.org 1820 Census

         familysearch.org 1830 Census

         familysearch.org 1840 Census

         familysearch.org 1850 Census

         familysearch.org 1860 Census

         familysearch.org 1870 Census

         familysearch.org - 1880 Census Index - Excellent resource!!!

         familysearch.org 1900 Census

         familysearch.org 1910 Census

         familysearch.org 1920 Census

         Obtaining EDs for the 1930 Census in One Step (Large Cities), by Stephen P. Morse, PhD, Joel D. Weintraub, PhD and David R. Kehs, PhD

         familysearch.org 1930 Census

         familysearch.org 1940 Census

         1890 Veterans Census for Vermont State [archived] - surname index by Melissa Perkins.

         NARA: National Archives and Records Administration

o    The Genealogy Page.

o    About Census Records

o    Clues in Census Records, 1790-1840

o    Clues in Census Records, 1850-1930

o    Indian Census Rolls

o    Nonpopulation Census Records

o    Prologue, Spring 1996, Vol. 28, No. 1, "First in the Path of the Firemen" The Fate of the 1890 Population Census, by Kellee Blake.

         Historical United States Census Data Browser

o    Historical Background of the Census : Article is scanned and reprinted from: 200 Years of Census Taking: Population and Housing Questions, 1790-1990. Washington, DC: Bureauof the Census, 1989.

 

HISTORY & Historical and Genealogical SOCIETIES

         Index to The Vermont Historical Gazetteer:  A Local History of All the Towns in the State, transcribed by Rod Skinner (County Coordinator for Windham County, VTGenWeb), 2006.  The VERMONT HISTORICAL GAZETTEER is a 5 volume set of historical information, by Abby Maria Hemenway, with Volume I published in 1867, and Volume V completed in 1891 after her death.  Thank you!  Thank you! to Rod Skinner!!!

         Center for Rural Studies: Information by Town, Windsor County .

         Local Historical Societies in Windsor County, Vermont .

         Vermont Historical Society

   109 State Street - Montpelier, Vermont 05609-0901  Phone: (802) 828-2291.

o    Genealogy Research in Vermont

         Genealogical Society of Vermont

   P. O. Box 1553 - St. Albans, VT 05478-1006

         Southern Windsor County, Vermont Tourism and regional information

         Eastern Vermont Tourism and regional information

         USGenWeb ftp Archives for Windsor County, VT

         USGenWeb Archives Search

MAPS

         Windsor County Historical Places

         Use the query form, at USGS, to map features including cemeteries, churches, populated places, and more.  Please note that the map town listed with a feature may be used as a map reference for the site, and may not be the town where the feature is actually located...Select a map to see the location of the actual feature.  This database may not be complete, and, as with any database, there may be errors.

         1895 Map of Windsor County, Vermont, online by Pam Rietsch

         Historic USGS Maps of Vermont

         VT Travel Information and Maps

         epodunk.com for Vermont maps and information

MILITARY

         Vermont in the Civil War , online by Tom Ledoux.

         Roll of Windsor County Soldiers, 1861-1865

         Military Pension, War of 1812, NARA File WC207, Pension Application for Sarah (Cary) Downing wife of Luther C. Downing, transcribed by Jill Nick  jjsnick@ncweb.com.

MAILING LISTS

         A Windsor County, VT Genealogy Mailing List on RootsWeb is administered by Darrell A. Martin.   If you would like to subscribe, e-mail to VTWindso-L-request@rootsweb.com with the word "subscribe" as the only text in the subject and in the message.   To post messages to this list use the address VTWindso-L@rootsweb.com, after you have subscribed.

NEWSPAPERS

         The Herald News   - Randolph, VT

         The Vermont Standard - Woodstock, VT

         White River Valley News - P.O. Box 877, White River Junction, Vt. 05001 

o    Phone: (603) 298-8711

         Vermont Newspapers

PROBATE

         Windsor District Probate Court

   P.O. Box 402 - North Springfield VT  05150 - Phone: (802) 886-2284.
*
Hartford District Probate Court:
   On The Green - Woodstock VT  05901  -  Phone: (802) 457-1503.

VITAL RECORDS
In Vermont, vital records are maintained by the city/town clerks.  To locate contact information for a town clerk, select the town of interest from the TOWNS TABLE .
Depending upon the specific location where a birth, marriage or death occurred, vital records may be able to be obtained through more than one resource.  Records and indexes may be available on microfilm, in book form, and birth, death, marriage, and divorce records more than five years old, from as early as 1760 to 1991, may also be requested through the state as well.  See the State of Vermont link below.  Please note:  There are minimal fees.

         State of Vermont

o    Vital Records Reference and Research

o    State of Vermont Department of Buildings & General Services

   Middlesex Complex  Reference & Research
     US Route 2, Middlesex - Drawer 33 - Montpelier, VT   05602
     Phone: (802) 828-3286



Would you like to post a QUERY related to Windsor County, Vermont?  Please post your Windsor County, VT Query on the Rootsweb message board for Windsor County, VT .



ANDOVER

         Virtual Vermont for Andover- contains town, travel and tourist information

         Andover Town Clerk:

   Linda Bargfrede
   953 Weston-Andover Road - Andover, VT 05143
   Phone: (802) 875-2765.

         Cemeteries include:


   Batchelder - Baldwin Cemetery, established in 1831; last burial in 1888;
   East Hill Cemetery, established in 1797; located in northeastern Andover,
     at Latitude:  431805N, Longitude:  0724143W
   Heald Cemetery, established in 1803;
      located in east central Andover, northwest from the village of Andover,
      at Latitude:  431700N, Longitude:  0724213W
   Middletown Cemetery, established in 1807; located in west central Andover,
      at Latitude:  431701N, Longitude:  0724434W
   Parkhurst Cemetery (private plot), established in 1844;
   Pettengill Cemetery, established in 1838; last burial in 1894;
      located in west central Andover, just north from the village of Andover,
      at Latitude:  431706N, Longitude:  0724144W
   Simonsville Cemetery, established in 1830;
      located near the village of Simonsville, in south central Andover;
      at Latitude:  431532N, Longitude: 0724305W


BALTIMORE - formed, in 1793, from Cavendish

         Baltimore Town Clerk:

   Judith A. Thomas, CMC
  1902 Baltimore Road - Baltimore, VT 05143
  Phone: (802) 263-5274.

         Cemeteries include:


   The Baltimore Cemetery, established in 1795; last burial in 1907;
      located at Latitude:  432203N, Longitude:  0723254W


BARNARD

         VTLiving for Barnard- contains town, travel and tourist information

         Barnard Historical Society Museum

   Charles Danforth Public Library - Barnard, VT 05031
   Phone: (802) 234-9183.

         Barnard Town Clerk:

   P.O Box 274 - Bamard, VT 05031  Phone: (802) 234-9211.

         Cemeteries include:


   There are several family plots in Barnard including the Boyden, Chamberlain, and Moore burial grounds.
East Barnard Cemetery, established in 1841;
     located at Latitude:  434438N, Longitude:  0723235W
Ellis - Ashley Cemetery, established in 1821; last burial in 1912;
      located at Latitude:  434606N, Longitude:  0723530W
Moore Cemetery, established in 1838; last burial 1949.
North Road Methodist Cemetery, established in 1810;
      located at Latitude:  434602N, Longitude:  0723638W
Nye Cemetery, established in 1807; last burial in 1956;
      located at Latitude:  434359N, Longitude:  0723950W
Perkins Cemetery, established in 1822;
      located at Latitude:  434212N, Longitude:  0723440W
Prosper Cemetery, located in southeastern Barnard
      at Latitude:  433835N, Longitude:  0723321W
Silver Lake Cemetery (see Village Cemetery).
South Barnard Cemetery, established in 1797; last burial in 1979;
      located at Latitude:  434053N, Longitude:  0723553W
Village Cemetery (aka Silver Lake Cemetery), established in 1915;
      located at Latitude:  434333N, Longitude:  0723717W
Winwood Cemetery, established in 1973.


BETHEL

         First Congregational Church, Bethel, VT:  1906 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         1848: Vermont's first train passes on the twenty-seven miles of tracks from White River Junction to Bethel..., online from the VHS.

         Map of Bethel, Vt. 1886 . Burleigh Lith. Establishment.  Burleigh, L. R. (Lucien R.), 1853?-1923. Published Troy, N.Y., L. R. Burleigh [1886]. Repository: Library of Congress Geography and Map Division Washington, D.C. 20540-4650 USA.

         The Fairbanks Brothers of Bethel and Royalton - soldiers of the Civil War

         Virtualvermont: Bethel, Vermont

         Randolph-Bethel area business guide

         Bethel Historical Society Museum

   Church Street - Bethel, VT 05032  -  Phone: (802) 234-9413.
   Hours: Open on Sundays, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. during July and August.

         Bethel Town Clerk:

   RR 2 Box 85 - Bethel, VT 05032  Phone: (802) 234-9722.


BRIDGEWATER -
     Villages and Communities include:Bridgewater, Bridgewater Center (Briggs), Bridgewater Corners, and West Bridgewater.

         UNH Dimond: Historic USGS Maps of Bridgewater, Vermont

         Bridgewater Town Clerk:

   Nancy Robinson
   P.O Box 14 - Bridgewater, VT 05034  Phone: (802) 672-3334.


CAVENDISH

         Cavendish, VT - Phineas Gage Anniversary and information.

         Cavendish Historical Society Museum - (VT Route 131 in Cavendish, VT)

   P.O. Box 110 - Cavendish, VT 05142  -  Phone: (802) 484-7498.

         Cavendish Town Clerk:

   Jane S. Pixley
   P.O Box 126 - Cavendish, VT 05142  Phone: (802) 226-7292.

Cemeteries include:

Cavendish Village Cemetery
Coffee Cemetery
Hillcrest Cemetery
Old Revolutionary War Cemetery
Proctor Cemetery
Twenty-Mile Stream Cemetery
Wheelock Resthouse Cemetery


CHESTER - historical names: Flamstead, New Flamstead

     Of the several towns that now comprise Windsor county the first to be chartered was that now known as Chester, but which under the original grant was named Flamstead.  The first grant of this town was made February 22, 1754.  However, the charter proprietors failed to comply with the conditions and requirements of the grant, whereupon it was forfeited.  The second charter of the same territory was made on the 3d of November, 1761, to another set of proprietors, and under another name, the latter being New Flamstead.  Under this grant settlements were made and pioneer improvements commenced.  But it appears that during the early years of the controversy between New York and the Green Mountain Boys, the inhabitants of this town were disposed to favor the New York interests, and being  imbued with such spirit, yielded up or set at nought the New Hampshire charter and procured another from the former province.  Under this last grant, which was made on July 14, 1766, the name Chester was given the township, and by that name it has ever since been known.  In 1771, under the New York authority, an enumeration of the town's inhabitants was made, and Chester was found to contain one hundred and fifty-two souls. 1

         Chester / Grafton Area - community information

         First Congregational Church, Chester, VT:  1868 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Virtual Vermont:  Chester 05143

         VTLiving:  Chester

         The Stone Hearth Inn: Chester & Vermont - A Brief History

o    Business Directory - Things to see & do

         The Whiting Library

   117 Main Street, PO Box 68, - Chester, VT 05143  Phone:  (802) 875-2277.

         Chester Historical Society

   Main Street - Chester, VT 05143
   Phone: (802) 875-3767 or (802) 875-2497.
   Hours: Collections displayed on Saturday and Sunday, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., and by appointment.

         Chester Town Clerk:

   Sandra K. Walker
   P. O. Box 370 - Chester, VT 05143  Phone: (802) 875-2173.


HARTFORD
     Quechee, Hartford, West Hartford and Wilder (aka Olcott/Olcott Falls) are located within the municipality of Hartford.

         2nd Congregational Church, Hartford, VT:  1891 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce

         Quechee, VT this site includes a history

         Hartford Historical Society

o    P.O. Box 547, Hartford, VT  05047    

o    Phone: (802) 296-3132 (messages) and (802) 295-3077 (M-F, 9:00-4:30 for assistance)

         Town of Hartford, Vermont

         Hartford Town Clerk:

   171 Bridge Street - White River Jct., VT 05001
   Phone: (802) 295-2785. 



Quechee

         Quechee Public Library

      41 Main Street - Quechee, VT 05059  Phone: (802) 295-1232.


HARTLAND

         First Congregational Church, Hartland, VT:  1906 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Hartland Public Library

         Hartland Historical Society

o    P.O. Box 297, 14 Rt. 12 - Hartland, VT  05048     Phone: (802) 436-1703

o    Hartland Cemeteries

         Hartland, Vermont

o    Brief History of Hartland

         Hartland Town Clerk:

   Clyde A. Jenne
   P.O. Box 349 - Hartland, VT 05048  Phone: (802) 436-2444.


LUDLOW

         Congregational Church, Ludlow, VT:  1907 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         PREDOM Central - The author of this family history site, John Predom, grew up in Ludlow, Vermont on Predom Hill. His grandfather came from Wallingford and Great Grandfather came from Canada where his name was Hormidas Prudhomme and became Frank PREDOM when he moved to the U.S.  The site contains family history and the author plans to further research of Predom Hill and the Wallingford area.

         Black River Academy Museum - (14 High Street in Ludlow, VT)

    P.O. Box 73 - Ludlow, VT 05149  -  Phone: (802) 228-5050.

         Fletcher Memorial Library

o    88 Main Street - Ludlow, VT  05149     Phone:  (802) 228-8921

         Town and Village of Ludlow, Vermont

o    Brief History of Ludlow

         Ludlow Town Clerk:

   Ulla P. Cook
   P.O Box 307 - Ludlow, VT 05149  Phone: (802) 228-3232.


NORWICH

         Congregational Church, Norwich, VT:  1891 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Town of Norwich, Vermont

         Norwich Town Clerk:

   Bonnie J. Munday
   P.O Box 376 - Norwich, VT 05055  Phone: (802) 649-1419.


PLYMOUTH (earlier place name: Saltash)

         VTGenWeb: Plymouth, Vermont Genealogy and History , by Nancy Wygant

         For 1790 U.S. Census of Plymouth, see Saltash, Vermont

         Tyson Furnace : "...In 1835, while looking for minerals, Isaac Tyson, Jr. discovered iron ore in the valley of the Black River near Plymouth. He set up his iron works in the southern part of Plymouth, which he named Tyson Furnace..."

         Plymouth Town Clerk:

   Rachel Lynds
      P.O. Box 39, Plymouth VT 05056;  Phone: (802) 672-3655.


POMFRET

         Virtual Vermont for Pomfret, VT

         Vital Records of Pomfret, VT, online at New England Historic Genealogical Society

         Pomfret Historical Society

o    P.O. Box 54, South Pomfret, VT 05067  Phone:  (802) 457-1021; E-mail:  PomfretHistory@aol.com

         Abbott Memorial Public Library

    Stage Road (P.O. Box 95) - South Pomfret, VT 05067
   Phone: (802) 457-2236     E-mail:  <abb_spomfret@vals.state.vt.us>

         Pomfret Town Clerk:

   JoAnn Webb
   P. O. Box 64 - South Plymouth, VT 05067  Phone: (802) 457-3861.



READING

         Some Early Marriage Records of READING, Windsor County, Vermont (Courtesy of Linda M. Welch) ( abt 1780-1866)

         The young Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase and Robert Estabrook on Shedd Hill, too, (in Reading, Vermont), by Stephen F. Ells, includes a photo view from Bald Hill, Reading, Vermont.

         Reading Historical Society Museum

   Reading, VT 05062   Phone: (802) 484-7271.
   Open Summer

         Reading Town Clerk:

   Barbara J. Acuna
   P.O Box 72 - Reading, VT 05062  Phone: (802) 484-7250.
 

         CEMETERIES in Reading, Vermont include:

Amsden Cemetery: Established in 1804,
  Located north of Felchville (Reading P. O.), in eastern Reading Township, near the Reading and West Windsor boundary,
   Latitude: 432817N; Longitude: 0723151W

Buck Cemetery (family): Established in 1828. Last burial in 1861
  Location unknown, if you can assist with the location of this cemetery, please e-mail Ann.
   Latitude: unknown; Longitude: unknown

Felchville Cemetery: Established in 1842,
  Located at Felchville, in southeastern Reading Township,
   Latitude: 432721N; Longitude: 0723232W

Hapgood Family Cemetery: Established ca. 1795,
  Location unknown, if you can assist with the location of this cemetery, please e-mail Ann.
   Latitude: unknown; Longitude: unknown

Hapgood-Spite Cemetery: Established in 1807,
  Located in east central Reading Township,
   Latitude: 433015N; Longitude: 0723407W

Rice Cemetery (family): Established in 1836. Last burial in 1864,
  Location unknown, if you can assist with the location of this cemetery, please e-mail Ann.
   Latitude: unknown; Longitude: unknown

Shedd Cemetery: Established in 1831, Last burial in 1883,
  Located in north central Reading Township,
   Latitude: 433123N; Longitude: 0723434W

South Reading Cemetery: Established in 1811,
  Located at the village of South Reading, in Reading Township,
   Latitude: 432827N; Longitude: 0723515W

Spear Cemetery: Established in 1798,

Swain Cemetery: Established in 1825, Last burial in 1878,
  Located in central Reading Township,
   Latitude: 433049N; Longitude: 0723633W

Weld-Sawyer Cemetery (aka Sawyer-Stand Cemetery): Established in 1786
  Located in south western Reading Township,
   Latitude: 432859N; Longitude: 0723710W

PRINTED RESOURCES for Reading, Vermont research include:
1.  Centennial Celebration, Together with an Historical Sketch of Reading, Windsor County, Vermont, and its Inhabitants from the First Settlement of the Town to 1874, By Gilbert A. Davis, Bellows Falls, Press of A.N. Swain, 1874.
2.  History of Reading, Windsor County, Vermont. Vol. II. By Gilbert A. Davis,  [Windsor? Vt., 1903].  Supplementary to the author's "Centennial celebration, together with an historical sketch of Reading, Windsor County, Vermont, and its inhabitants from the first settlement of the town to 1874 ... Bellows Falls, Press of A.N. Swain. 1874."


ROCHESTER
  villages within Rochester:  Emerson, Jerusalem, Robinson, Rochester, Talcville, Tupper

         VTLiving for Rochester - contains town, travel and tourist information

         Rochester Public Library

   P. O. Box 256, 22 South Main Street -  Rochester, VT 05767

         Rochester Historical Society

   P. O. Box 238, Rochester, VT 05767-0238.

         Town of Rochester, Vermont - Designed, built, and maintained by students of the Rochester High School!!!!

o    Rochester History Index

o    The Rochester community Mapping Project: A Sense of Place

o    West Rochester Project - "...West Hill, Bingo, and Robinson make up what is collectively known as West Rochester.  These were thriving lumbering, milling, and farming communities during the 19th and early 20th Centuries that

have all but disappeared..."

         Rochester Town Clerk:

   Frances Guilmette
   School Street - P.O Box 238 - Rochester, VT 05767
   Phone: (802) 767-3631
   E-mail:  rochtown@sover.net
 

         CEMETERIES in Rochester, Vermont include:

 Bingo-West Rochester Cemetery: Established in 1822. Last burial in 1931,
  Located in western Rochester, by the fork of West Branch brook,
   Latitude: 435221N; Longitude: 0725308W

Little Hollow Cemetery: Established in 1853,
   Located near Alexander Hill, in eastern Rochester,
   Latitude: 435311N; Longitude: 0724420W

Lucy Morris Plot: (one person): 1888
   Latitude: unknown; Longitude: unknown

North Hollow Cemetery: Established in 1806,
   Located in north central Rochester, north from Rochester village.
   Latitude: 435458N; Longitude: 0724815W 

Old Village Cemetery: Established in 1798, Last burial in 1908,
   Located near Rochester village, in central Rochester, Vermont
   Latitude: 435232N; Longitude: 0724835W

Oliver Reynolds Cemetery: Established in 1846. Last burial in 1911,
   Located in West Rochester, by West Branch brook,
   Latitude: 435202N; Longitude: 0725248W

Tupper Cemetery (family): Established in 1813. Last burial in 1852,
   Located near the White River and SR 100,
   Latitude: 434835N; Longitude: 0724658W

West Hill Cemetery: Established in 1828,
   Located in West Rochester, to the north of SR 73,
   Latitude: 435118N; Longitude: 435118N

Woodlawn Cemetery: Established in 1825,
   Located in central Rochester, Vermont,
   Latitude: 435156N; Longitude: 0724827W

PRINTED RESOURCES for Rochester research include:
1. Rochester, Vermont, Its History, 1780-1975, by  Wendall Wales Williams, Published by the authority of the Town of Rochester, 1975 (Burlington, Vt. : Queen City Printers).
2.  Rochester Remembers: 1781-1981, edited by Earl N. Davis, Jr. and Mary O. Davis, [Rochester, Vt.? : s.n., 1975?].


ROYALTON

         The Fairbanks Brothers of Bethel and Royalton - soldiers of the Civil War

         Resources For Research of The Villages of Royalton, North Royalton and South Royalton, Vermont , by Mark Davis .

         National Register of Historic Sites for Royalton, Vermont

         Royalton Historical Society Museum -

    4184 Route 14 - Royalton, VT 05068  -  Phone: (802) 763-8567.
   E-mail: jdumville@dca.state.vt.us

         Royalton Memorial Library

o    P.O. Box 179, 23 Alexander Place - South Royalton, VT  05068;

o    Phone: (802) 763-7094

         Royalton, Vermont

o    Royalton Town History

         Royalton Town Clerk:

   Theresa M. Harrington
   P.O Box 680 - South Royalton, VT 05068  Phone: (802) 763-7207.

Royalton Cemeteries include:

o    Branch View Cemetery, established in 1791, still in use -

o    Broad Brook Cemetery, established in 1806, discontinued in 1909 - located in southeastern Royalton, on Urstadt Road.

o    Dewey Cemetery, established in 1795, discontinued in 1964 - located in northeastern Royalton, on LDS Lane.

o    Havens Cemetery, established in 1812, still in use - located off Dairy Hill Road, north of VT Route 14.

o    Hickey Cemetery, established in 1791, discontinued in 1967 - located in southwestern Royalton, on North Road.

o    Howard Cemetery, established in 1813, discontinued in 1836 - location not yet identified.

o    Lindley Cemetery, established in 1801, discontinued in 1820 - location not yet identified.

o    North Royalton Cemetery, established in 1779, discontinued in 1968 - located on VT Route 14, southeast from the interesection of  Route 107.

o    Perrin #1 Cemetery, established in 1814, discontinued in 1878 - location not yet identified.

o    Perrin #2 Cemetery, established in 1859, discontinued in 1888 - location not yet identified.

o    Pleasant Hill Cemetery, established in 1831, still in use - near Royalton center, on VT Route 14.

o    River View Cemetery, established in 1905, still in use - location not yet identified.

o    Samuel Metcalf Cemetery, established in 1801, discontinued in 1872 -  I believe this is the cemetery located on the north side of VT Route 14, by Happy Hollow Road, west of South Royalton Village.

o    South Royalton Village Cemetery, established in 1778, discontinued in 1950 - on South Windsor Street, in South Royalton Village (see map).

         Cemeteries in the Villages of Royalton, North Royalton and South Royalton, Vermont, by Mark Davis


SHARON

         Sharon Town Clerk:

   Joanne M. Slater
   P.O Box 250 - Sharon, VT 05065  Phone: (802) 763-8268.

Sharon Cemeteries include:

o    Alexander Cemetery, established in 1842, discontinued in 1891 -

o    Broad Brook Cemetery, established in 1784 -

o    Chamberlin-Harvey Farm Cemetery, established in 1832, discontinued in 1868 -

o    Day District Cemetery, established in 1782, discontinued in 1903 -

o    Howe Hill Cemetery, established in 1784, discontinued in 1906 -

o    Orange Avery Cemetery, established in 1785, discontinued in 1867 - location not yet identified

o    Preston Farm Family Cemetery, established in 1802, discontinued in 1832 -

o    Roberts - Sharon 4 Corners Cemetery, established in 1815, discontinued in 1869 -

o    Village Pine Hill Cemetery, established in 1792, discontinued in 1976 - located on VT Route 14.

o    Wallace Doubleday Cemetery, established in 1798, discontinued in 1925 -


SPRINGFIELD

         Congregational Church, Springfield, VT:  1869 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Baptist Church, North Springfield, VT:  1878 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Springfield Vermont History and Genealogy , by Debbie Axtman and Bonnie McVicar-Briggs .

         Springfield Town Clerk:

   Bonnie L. Reynolds, CMC
   96 Main Street - Springfield, VT 05156  Phone: (802) 885-2104.

Springfield Cemeteries include:

o    Crown Point Cemetery, established in 1759, discontinued in 1760.

o    Eureka Cemetery, established in 1789, discontinued in 1836 -

o    Field #1 / Day Cemetery, established in 1789 discontinued in 1839 - located near the north end of Davis Road.

o    Field #2 Cemetery, established in 1785 - located near the north end of Davis Road.

o    Oakland Cemetery, established in 1893, still in use - located near River Street (Rt 106).

o    Parker Hill Cemetery, established in 1790, discontinued in 1857 - located in southern Springfield Township.

o    Pine Grove Cemetery, established in 1782, still in use - located by Cemetery Road, south of Route 106.

o    Pleasant Valley Cemetery, established in 1795, discontinued in 1958 - located by Boedker Road.

o    St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery, established in 1903, still in use - located on Walnut Hill Road, near the intersection of Orchard Lane.

o    Shedd Cemetery, established in 1810, discontinued in 1854 - location not yet identified

o    Summer Hill Cemetery, established in 1789, still in use - located on Cherry Hill Street, near to The Commons Park.

o    Walker-Gill Cemetery, established in 1799, discontinued in 1968 - located on Putnam Road, near the intersection with Route 5.

 


STOCKBRIDGE
     Gaysville and Stockbridge are located in the town/township of Stockbridge.  Though a portion of Gaysville was destroyed during the flood of 1927, it remains a vibrant village.
     Another hamlet, by the name of "No Town", though not appearing on modern maps that have been consulted, is found situated, in the southeastern corner of Stockbridge , on a 1911 map of the northwest corner of the Woodstock quadrangle, online at Historic USGS Maps of New England  & New York .  The boundaries appear to have varied through the years, with "No Town" appearing to be within Sherburne, in Rutland County on a 1943 map ., however, this area remains within Stockbridge presently.
 

         Virtual Vermont for Stockbridge - This site contains general information about the town and a photo.

         Abbott Family Cemetery in Gaysville, VT : researched by John R. Schroeder 1998.

         Congregational Church, Stockbridge, VT:  1858 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Vermont in the Civil War , online by Tom Ledoux,

o    Soldiers credited to Stockbridge in the War of the Rebellion

         Stockbridge Town Clerk:

   Catherine Brown
   P.O Box 39 - Stockbridge, VT 05772  Phone: (802) 234-9371.

         Cemeteries include:


Abbott Cemetery, established by ca. 1812;
      located about 1.2 miles northeast from the village of Gaysville,
      at Latitude:  434724N, Longitude:  0724103W.

o    Abbott Family Cemetery in Gaysville, VT : researched by John R. Schroeder 1998.

Alcorn Cemetery, established in 1828; last burial in 1865.
Betsey Bartlett Grave, single burial,
     near the village of Stockbridge, by the intersection of 107 and 100.
     located at Latitude:  434624N, Longitude:  0724534W.
Maplewood Cemetery, established in 1796;
     located at the village of Stockbridge,
     at Latitude:  434710N, Longitude:  0724521W.
Mt. Pleasant - Ranney Cemetery, established in 1820;
      located off 107, about 1/2 way between the villages of Gaysville and Stockbridge, at Latitude:  434521N, Longitude:  0724329W.
South Hill Cemetery, established in 1799;
     located in southwestern Stockbridge township,
     at Latitude:  434426N, Longitude:  0724719W.
Watkins Cemetery, established in 1835; last burial in 1844;


WEATHERSFIELD -
Villages and communities within Weathersfield include: Amsden, Ascutney, Downers, Greenbush, Newlsons Corner, Perkinsville (village), Weathersfield, Weathersfield Bow

         Town of Weathersfield, VT - website index

         Weathersfield Historical Society

         VTLiving for Weathersfield - contains town, travel and tourist information

         William Jarvis and the Merino Sheep Craze - "...Before settling in Weathersfield, Vermont in 1812, William Jarvis (1770-1859) had been a successful merchant and the United States Consul to Portugal..."

         Weathersfield Town Clerk:

   Flo-Ann Dango
   P. O. Box E - Ascutney, VT 05030  Phone: (802) 674-2626.

         Weathersfield Cemeteries include:


Ascutneyville Cemetery, established in 1794
   located at Ascutney, in northeastern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432428N, Longitude:  0722442W.
Deane (family) Cemetery, established in 1812
Eddy Cemetery, established in 1813; last burial in 1828
   located by the North Branch of Black River, in northwestern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432541N, Longitude:  0723118W.
Filley Burial Plot (one person), established in 1794
Greenbush Cemetery, established in 1825
   located by 106, in northwestern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432517N, Longitude:  0723117W.
Grout Cemetery, established in 1781
   located northeast from the village of Perkinsville, in central Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432257N, Longitude:  0722938W.
Hubbard Cemetery, established ca. 1790
   located in Weathersfield Bow, in eastern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432115N, Longitude:  0722423W.
Plain Cemetery, established in 1788
   located northeast from the village of Perkinsville, in central Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432256N, Longitude:  0722943W.
Richards Cemetery, established in 1774
Toles Cemetery, established in 1793
   located at Weathersfield Center, in central Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432236N, Longitude:  0722800W.
Tuttle Cemetery, established in 1772, last burial in 1882
    located by 5, between Weathersfield Bow and Ascutney, in eastern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432246N, Longitude:  0722501W.
 Upham-Aldrich Cemetery, established in 1804, last burial in 1886
   located south from Weathersfield Center, in south central Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432131N, Longitude:  0722811W.
 Weatherbee, established in 1794
 Weathersfield Bow, established in 1803
   located in Weathersfield Bow, in eastern Weathersfield township;
   at Latitude:  432134N, Longitude:  0722435W.


WEST WINDSOR

Villages and communities within West Windsor include:  Brownsville, Sheddsville and West Windsor

         West Windsor Historical Society

   P.O. Box 12 - Brownsville, VT 05037   Phone:  (802) 484-7474

         West Windsor Genealogical And Historical Information , by Mark Felone.

o    Roll of Windsor County Soldiers, 1861-1865, extracted from Aldrich's History of Windsor County

o    Men Who Served in the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, WWI and WWII

o    West Windsor, Vermont Genealogy, by Mark Felone

         West Windsor History, on Karima's site

         West Windsor Town Clerk:

   Cathy B. Archibald
   P. O. Box 6 - Brownsville, VT 05037  Phone: (802) 484-7212.

West Windsor Cemeteries include:

o    Brownsville Cemetery (1), established in 1839, discontinued in 1945 - located north of Route 44, on Brownsville Hartland Road, on the west side of the road.

o    Brownsville Cemetery (2), established in 1839, still in use - located north of Route 44, on the east side of Brownsville Hartland Road.

o    Daniel Cady Family Mausoleum -location not yet identified

o    Sheddsville Cemetery, established in 1795 - located near the center of West Windsor -  located on Sheddsville Cemetery Road.


WESTON
Villages and communities within Weston include: The Island and Weston

         VTLiving for Weston- contains town, travel and tourist information

         Congregational Church, Weston, VT:  1884 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Weston Town Clerk:

   Sandra M. Goodwin
   P.O Box 98 - Weston, VT 05161  Phone: (802) 824-6645.

         Weston Cemeteries include:


Forefathers Cemetery, established in 1806, last burial in 1895
   located at Weston, in central Weston township;
   at Latitude:  431738N, Longitude:  0724751W, (see map )
Island Cemetery, established in 1803
   located on Lowell Lake Road, in southern Weston township, near the northern boundary of Londonderry township; at Latitude:  431505N, Longitude:  0724719W, (see map )
Maple Grove Cemetery, established ca. 1860
   located on Andover Road, near intersection of Rte 100, at Weston, in central Weston township, near 43rd Infantry Div. Mem. Hwy. & the road to Andover;
   at Latitude:  431738N, Longitude:  0724716W, (see map )


WINDSOR
Villages and cities within Windsor township include: Windsor

         First Congregational Church, Windsor, VT:  1768-1898 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         Windsor, VT: Photo 1886 .

         Panoramic Photo - Windsor, VT .

         Town of Windsor, VT

         Windsor Town Clerk:

   Sandra Hinkley Jarvis
   Box 47 - Windsor, VT 05089  Phone:  (802) 674-5610.

         Windsor Cemeteries include:


Ascutney Cemetery, established in 1800
   located at Windsor, in eastern Windsor township;
   at Latitude:  432840N, Longitude:  0722408W.
Hewett Cemetery, established in 1806
Old South Church Cemetery, established in 1766, last burial in 1900
   located by SR 5, in Windsor, in eastern Windsor township;
   at Latitude:  432842N, Longitude:  0722317W.
St. Francis Cemetery, established in 1864


WOODSTOCK

         Welcome to Woodstock, VT.

         Congregational Church, Woodstock, VT:  1781-1917 List of Pastors, Deacons & Parishioners, by Janice Boyko, on the Northeast Kingdom website

         VTLiving for Woodstock - contains town, travel and tourist information

         Woodstock Historical Society and Museum

   

o    26 Elm Street - Woodstock, VT  05091  Phone: (802) 457-1822.

         Norman Williams Public Library

   

o    10 South Park Street - Woodstock, VT  05091 Phone: (802) 457-2295.

         Woodstock Town Clerk:

    Jerome R. (Jay) Morgan

o    31 The Green - Woodstock, VT 05091  Phone: (802) 457-3611.



Additional Research Resources:

         Vermont Historical Society

   109 State Street - Montpelier, Vermont 05609-0901  Phone: (802) 828-2291.

         State of Vermont

o    Maps of Vermont

o    Obtaining Vital Records in Vermont

o    Guide to Vermont Town Clerks

o    State of Vermont Telephone and E-mail Directory

         Vermont State Archives

o      ...located at the Redstone building in Montpelier, Vermont. The reading room may be visited between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. each business day.  State Archivist, Greg Sanford, may be contacted at E-mail: gsanford@sec.state.vt.us for details.

o       Office of the Secretary of State

o         Street address: 26 Terrace Street -  Montpelier, VT   Phone: (802) 828-2397

o         Mailing address: 109 State Street - Montpelier, VT 05609-1103

o     ARCCAT - catalog describing manuscript and archival collections held by various

Vermont institutions.

o    Access to Public Records

o    Guide to Vermont Town Clerks

o    Who's Who in Local Government

         Vermont Historical Society

o    60 Washington Street - Barre, Vermont 05641-4209  Phone: (802) 479-8500.

o    Genealogy Research in Vermont

         Genealogical Society of Vermont

o       P. O. Box 1553 - St. Albans, VT 05478-1006

         Vermont Probate Courts

         Vermont Libraries Directory

         VT Department of Libraries

o    Vermont Library Directory -1999

         Vermont State Historic Sites

o    By Location

         Vermont Tourism

o    Brief History of Vermont

o    Explore Vermont History

         Vermont Genealogy and Pathfinder to Vermont Collection, at Meredith Wing of Starr Library, Middlebury College (Addison County).

         Vermont Historical Society

o    Vermont City Directories in Selected Vermont Repositories, by VHS

         Vermont Vital Records Outside the Northeast Kingdom, by Janice Boyko

         Vermont in the Civil War by Tom Ledoux .

         Social Security Death Index Interactive Search , on Rootsweb

         1895 Maps of Vermont , by Pam Rietsch at: prietsch@ismi.net

         Local Catholic Church History & Genealogy Research Guide & Worldwide Directory + Vermont Page.

         Vermont Prehistory .

         Vermont History ,  from vergennes union high school.

         17th Century New England Links .

         The Making of America (search the digital library of primary sources in American social history from Reconstruction to the Rebellion).

         Underground Railroad Research .

         The Roaring 20s and the Great Depression - Temperance and Prohibition .

         VT WPA Life Histories

         NARA: National Archives and Records Administration

o    The Genealogy Page.

o    About Census Records

o    Clues in Census Records, 1790-1840

o    Clues in Census Records, 1850-1930

o    Indian Census Rolls

o    Nonpopulation Census Records

o    Prologue, Spring 1996, Vol. 28, No. 1, "First in the Path of the Firemen" The Fate of the 1890 Population Census, by Kellee Blake.

o    Native American Records

o    Immigration Records and Naturalization Records

o    "Any woman who is now or hereafter may be married... Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940", by Marian L. Smith (Prologue, Summer 1998)

o    By Way of Canada: U.S. Records of Immigration Across the U.S.-Canadian Border, 1895-1954, By Marian L. Smith (St. Albans Lists) (Fall 2000) A guide to using immigration records of the U.S.-Canada border.

o    Military Records available from the National Archives

o    Military Service and Pension Records: Requesting Pre-WWI

o    Civil War Records: An Introduction and Invitation, By Michael P. Musick  (Prologue, Summer 1995)

o    Women Soldiers of the Civil War, by DeAnne Blanton (Prologue, Spring 1993)

o    Sailors, Soldiers, and Marines of the Spanish-American War: The Legacy of USS Maine, By Rebecca Livingston (Prologue, Spring 1998).

o    They Answered the Call: Military Service in the United States Army during World War I, 1917-1919  (Prologue, Fall 1998). -- A guide to looking for information about World War I army veterans - By Mitchell Yockelson.

o    State-level Lists of Casualties from the Korean Conflict (1951-1957) and the Vietnam Conflict , By Theodore J. Hull, (Prologue, Spring 2000).

o    Genealogical Fallout from the War of 1812, By Ruth Priest Dixon (Prologue, Spring 1992) - "...The impressment of American seamen by the British was one of the causes of the War of 1812. The practice also resulted in the creation of extensive records about merchant seamen that are of great value to genealogists and historians..."

o    Genealogical Records of the War of 1812, By Stuart L. Butler (Prologue, Winter 1991) - "...National Archives records created during and after the War of 1812 offer the genealogist a diverse and fertile ground in which to obtain invaluable family information..."

o    Preserving the Legacy of the United States Colored Troops, by Budge Weidman (Prologue, Summer 1997)

o    A Guiding Light: Black History: A Guide to Civilian Records in the National Archives, By Debra Newman Ham (Prologue, Special Issue, Summer 1997).

o    Riding the Rails Up Paper Mountain: Researching Railroad Records in the National Archives, By David A. Pfeiffer (Spring 1997).

o    Prologue Magazine

         U.S. Census Bureau Interactive County Maps for VT .

         Vermont Geography.

         Vermont Genealogy Resources, by Jalanne C. Barnes.

         Library of Congress: American Memory All Collections Search - enter topic or Indiana town and/or county location to find available online photos, maps, and more!


PROFESSIONAL HISTORICAL GENEALOGY RESEARCH
Ann McRoden Mensch, Professional Historical Genealogist
Researching on-site, and with the vast resources of The Allen County Public Library, holding one of the largest genealogical collections in North America.  Search the Library's online catalogue to see some of the printed resources available for a location or topic.


Printed resources include:
 

1.      Burial Grounds of Vermont. Bradford, Vermont, by Arthur Lee and Frances P. Hyde (editors), Vermont Old Cemetery Association, 1991.

2.      History of Windsor County, Vermont, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.  Lewis Cass Aldrich and Frank R. Holmes.  (Editors).  Syracuse, N. Y. : D. Mason & Co., Publishers, 1891.

3.      The Vermont Atlas & Gazetteer.  Eighth Edition, Third Printing.  Freeport, Maine:  Delorme.  1988.

4.      School and Library Atlas of the World.  Fred W. Foster, Ph.D. (Editor).  Sycamore, Illinois:  School and Library Publishing Company.  1982.

5.      Vermont: A Bibliography of Its History. T. D. S. Bassett.  (Editor). Boston: G. K. Hall, 1981.

6.      Bibliography of Vermont: Or a List of Books and Pamphlets Relating in any Way to the State.  Gilman, Marcus D. (Editor). Burlington: Free Press Association, 1897.

7.      State and Province Vital Records Guide. Michael Burgess, et al. (Authors). San Berardino, CA: Borgo Press, 1993.

8.      Vermont Historical Gazetteer. 5 vols. Abby M. Hemenway.  (Author). Burlington: The Author, 1867-1891.

9.      Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. Jacob G. Ullery.  (Editor).  Brattleboro: Transcript Publishing Co., 1894.

10.  Encyclopedia, Vermont Biography: A Series of Authentic Biographical Sketches of the Representative Men of Vermont and Sons of Vermont in Other States. Prentiss C. Dodge.  (Editor). Burlington: Ullery Publishing Co., 1912.

11.  Vermont, the Green Mountain State : past, present, prospective. Greene, Frank L.. unknown. Vermont Commission to the Jamestown Tercentennial Exposition. 1907.
 

Contact: Ann Mensch

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Copyright 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003-2013, by Ann Mensch.  All Rights Reserved.