Card from an Oil Painting by Barb Green

 

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Proceeds to benefit the Restoration of the Meeting House - contact Barb Green

The Stockbridge Meeting House

Located at the head of the Stockbridge Common

 

History of Stockbridge's Union Meeting House

Architecture of the Stockbridge Meeting House

Early Members

Ladies Aid Society

Mona's Vision

Restoration of the Stockbridge Meeting House

Photos of the Meeting House


[Stockbridge, VT]  [Windsor County, VT] [VTGenWeb]
 


History of Stockbridge's Union Meeting House  


The Union Meeting House in Stockbridge, Vermont was constructed in 1827 and is
 
presently included on the National Register of Historical Places by the United States 
 
Department of the Interior. This Historic building is located at the head of the town 
 
common where the earliest inhabitants of Stockbridge first settled.
 
 
 
A Union Church Society was organized by the Congregational Society in Pittsfield 
 
(neighboring town to Stockbridge) in 1812; in 1827 a separation was effected, and the 
 
Rev. Gilman Vose held the pastorate from 1829 to 1831. The increasing population in the 
 
vicinity brought a need for a local meeting house. In March 1828, Keyes himself leased 
 
for $10.00 by indenture to the "Union Meeting House Society in Stockbridge" a small piece 
 
of land in front of his former house (then owned by Dr. Timothy Fay, who witnessed the 
 
indenture). The document refers to "a certain piece of land lying on the north end of 
 
the Common so-called in said Stockbridge being the same which stands a new meeting house 
 
belonging to (the) society..." The society was formed in 1827 after Stockbridge residents 
 
withdrew from the earlier union society in the adjoining township of Pittsfield.
 
 
 
The reference to the "new meeting house" appears to confirm the date of its construction.
 
Other sources, however, give the date as 1836. The vernacular Greek Revival style of the 
 
present Union Church strongly indicates the latter date, if not a later renovation during 
 
which the paneled corner pilasters, eaves entablature, gable pediment may have been added 
 
to the building.
 
 
 
The intent of the indenture document was "to convey so much [land] as shall accommodate 
 
the said society in getting to and from the house and on which they may build a suitable 
 
number of horse sheds for the convenience of the society while attending meetings at the 
 
house..." The elongated one-story, gable-roofed horse sheds were constructed in 1837, 
 
oriented diagonally to the south side of the church.
 
 
 
By 1876, the church had apparently fallen into disrepair. Several meetings were held 
 
during the spring of that year to consider the repair or replacement of the building. 
 
The decision was made to repair, and the work was performed during the latter half of the 
 
same year; the slips (pews) were sold to raise the necessary funds. Following the 
 
completion of the repairs, the church was rededicated in February, 1877. Three religious 
 
denominations - the Congregationalists-Universalists-and Methodists- then held interests 
 
in the church, and a director was elected to represent each society in the management of 
 
the church's affairs. Enos Chandler was chosen director of the Congregational Society but 
 
he was succeeded in 1878 by Harvey Morgan. James Baker was then director of the
 
Universalists, and James Bent of the Methodists. Also in 1876, the "Ladies Union Aid 
 
Society " was organized; the group would outlive the individual denominations and become 
 
the owner of the church during the twentieth century.
 
 
 
More repairs were made to the church in 1899. The Ladie's Aid Society took the initiative 
 
for the work, which included painting of both the exterior and the interior, repair of the 
 
shutters, and replacement of the front steps. Nevertheless, the church continued to 
 
contract in membership and activity. Regular services apparently ceased after the death 
 
in 1905 of Rev. Thomas Swan Hubbard, a Congregationalist who had served many years as 
 
pastor (resided in the Keyes House, and had been Stockbridge School superintendent as early 
 
as 1860).
 
 
 
An " Old Home Celebration" held during the summer became the principal event of the year, 
 
attracting both current and former Stockbridge residents. The Ladie's Aid Society assumed 
 
responsibility for the church building, having electricity installed in 1921. Two years 
 
later, the Society formally became "the custodian of the Union church and its affairs".
 
 
 
Usage of the church dwindled to the point that it was closed during the winter months. 
 
Summer services were conducted by ministers of the three denominations from nearby towns 
 
or elsewhere. In 1941, the building was repaired and painted again. Since then, the 
 
Ladie's Aid Society has continued to maintain the church although services are limited 
 
to occasional weddings, funerals, or other special events such as Christmas carol singing 
 
around an outside lighted tree, and gift giving to all the small children in Stockbridge.
 
 
 
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Architecture of the Stockbridge Meeting House


 
 
 
The Stockbridge Meeting House remains remarkably intact and has statewide significance 
 
as a surviving representative of both the architectural styles and historic trends in 
 
Vermont. The Stockbridge Union Meeting House, located at the head of the Common, is a 
 
beautiful example of vernacular Greek Revival architecture in Vermont. 
 
 
 
Vernacular architecture is the practice of design and construction based on regional forms 
 
and materials, unique to the state and or the region. The Meeting House building is a 
 
simple, straightforward example of this type of architecture. Some character defining 
 
features of the style include its temple front with closed pediment, rectangular form, 
 
gable roof, and symmetry. Also significant are the stylized wooden trim elements such 
 
as wide entablature at the top of the roof, cornice returns of the rear gable, pilasters 
 
or engaged columns with capitals at the corner boards, projecting hood molding at the doors 
 
and windows, 6-panel doors, and 7 nine-over-nine wooden sash windows. Although very 
 
sparsely trimmed even for Vermont standards, the assembly of built-up flat boards on the 
 
Union Meeting House is a clear reference to high-style Greek Revival architecture.
 
 
 
Presenting its temple front to the Common, the one-story, three-by-three bay, gable-roofed 
 
Union Church of rectangular plan displays the basic elements of vernacular Greek Revival 
 
style. The main (east) gable facade possesses twin entrances placed in the side bays. 
 
Each single-leaf door with six raised panels is enframed by a stepped-out plain surround 
 
below a molded cornice cap. the doors are approached by individual two-riser concrete 
 
platform steps; these steps replaced the previous plank platform with end steps that 
 
spanned nearly the entire facade. The central bay is occupied by a nine-over nine sash 
 
with plain surround below a simple entablature; the upper half of the window is shielded 
 
by a louvered wood shutter while the shutters for the lower half are left open. The 
 
horizontal eaves entablature returns across this facade to enclose the pediment with a 
 
blind clapboard tympanum.
 
 
 
The matching side (north and south) eaves facades are lighted three regularly spaced bays 
 
of windows identical to that on the main facade. Each group of windows identical to that 
 
on the west end of each facade, reflecting the interior position of the auditorium; the 
 
entrance vestibule lacks windows on these facades. The rear (west) facade contrasts by 
 
being blank, and possesses only short horizontal returns of the eaves entablature. An 
 
exterior brick chimney bisects this facade, culminating in a corbeled cap.
 
 
 
The interior of the Meeting House exhibits the same simple, unadorned quality as the 
 
exterior. The interior finishes are quite simple, wooden trim, wooden floors and 
 
plastered walls, defined by seven tall windows. The interior space has changed very 
 
little since the late nineteenth century. The interior of the church is partitioned into 
 
a shallow entrance vestibule with a low ceiling and the auditorium occupying most of the 
 
interior space. Three doorways lead from the vestibule into the auditorium; a double-leaf, 
 
four-panel doors are aligned with the central longitudinal aisle of the auditorium and 
 
flanked by single-leaf doors corresponding in position to the exterior doors. Free standing 
 
wood pews occupy the main floor. The wood window and door openings are crowned by cornice 
 
caps. Suspended from the center of the ceiling, an elaborate six-lamp metal chandelier 
 
of Victorian style has been adapted from oil to electricity. 
 
 
 
The building has survived virtually unaltered for nearly 200 years and buildings with this 
 
degree of integrity are becoming more and more rare in Vermont. 
 
 
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Early Members


 
Names of members taken from the 1st.& last page of the Stockbridge Ladies Aid Record Book 
 
dated 1912--1960:
 
 
 
Mrs. Mary Chandler Mrs. Lizzie Whitcomb
 
J. F Chandler Miss Eva Chandler
 
Mrs. G. B. Fish Harris Holland
 
Edwin N. Whitcomb Mrs. A. L. Morse
 
Ella Amsden Reverent R. Haseltine--1914
 
Mrs. Haseltine Mrs. Nellie LeBarr
 
Mrs. Herbert S. Dean Mrs. Nellie M. Costigan
 
Harrison J. Costigan F. F Kezer
 
Reverent Percival Hewitt--1919 Mrs. P. Hewitt
 
Mrs. Charles Grant Minnie Leonard Morgan--1915
 
Mrs. Jessie Butterfield--1916 W. E. Butterfield
 
Bernice H. Putnam Ordway M. Faith Holland Whitcomb--1919
 
Reverent Maybelle Whitney--1921 Mrs. Clyde Hunt
 
G. A. Clough George T. Mills
 
Wm. Leonard Ruth A. Putnam Ainsworth
 
Ernest Ordway--1923 Henry R. Wilcox
 
Mrs. Gaius Blackmer Mrs. Hugh A. White
 
Reverent Hugh White--1925 Mrs. Julia Patno--1916
 
Mrs. Bertha L. Barrows--1915 Minnie Leonard
 
Ruth Leonard G. H. Martin
 
Mrs. Jessie Butterfield W. E. Butterfield
 
Adeline W. Green Pearl W. Green
 
Mrs. Julia Patno G. B. Fish
 
Sarah T. Maynard James Mussy
 
Lenna Mussy Mrs. Hulda Woodruff
 
Mrs. William Johnston Mrs. Henerietta Katham
 
Mrs. Albert Lary Mrs. J. F. Chandler
 
Miss Eva Chandler Mrs. L. U. LaFrana
 
Mrs. Blanche Mills Mrs. Charles Grant
 
Bernice H. Putnam May Spurr
 
M. Faith Holland Flora Race
 
C. A. Pinkham Mrs C. A. Pinkham
 
Mrs. E. A. Packard Mrs. Frank Forsha
 
E. E. Ordway --1923 H. R. Wilcox
 
E. C. Whitcomb Mrs. George Aubey
 
Reverant Harry Jenness-1923 Mrs. Harry Jenness
 
Minnie R. Sweet Henry P. Sweet
 
F.R. Ainsworth Stella J. Bent
 
Ada Mills Mrs. R. H. Holland
 
Mrs. J. V. Dutton Mrs. Mendall ( Ruth) Blackmer
 
Mendell W. Blackmer John V. Dutton
 
Iris Holland Angie R. Barrows
 
Rita V. Brown Maude L. Mills
 
Mabel W. Holmes Mrs. Diana Maxham
 
Mrs. Ralph Maynard Fred S. Bowen----1931
 
Bertha I Bowen Annettie Boutwell
 
H. S. Longley Mrs. G. H. Coffin
 
Mrs. R. H. Blodgett N. Robert H. Blodgett
 
Mr. G. H. Coffin Mrs. Alfred Chandler
 
Miss Myrtle Mussey Mrs. Roy Pratt
 
Mrs. A. Scambler Reverant A. H. Scambler--1931-1932-1933
 
Mrs. J. E. Wilson 
 
Mrs. Fred Farrington Mrs. Ralph Bird
 
Mrs. Fred Perron Mrs. Ted (Marie) Green
 
Mrs. Eva Ascheuberg Mrs. Rix Williams
 
Mrs. Garold A. Rhodes Mrs. Fitzgerald
 
Reverant Fitzgerald--1931 Mrs. Clayton Mills, Jr.
 
Mrs. Henrietta White Mrs. Doris Olmstead
 
Mrs. Mary Pultz Mrs. Leonard Mills
 
Mrs. John Stevens Marion Whitcomb
 
Shirley Blackmer Ramona Blackmer
 
Mr. G. H. Blackmer Mrs. Winona Blackmer
 
Eunice Mills Mildred Hunt
 
Charlotte Goddard Mrs. Jacob Omland
 
Maude Fish Queenie Ida Temple
 
Evelyn Folsom Barbara Green--1960
 
Robin Wright May Nichols
 
Betty Brown Smith Roger Smith
 
Marion ( Mrs. Victor) Whitcomb Chris Martell
 
Margaret Mills 
 
 
 


 
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Ladies Aid Society


 
 
 
The Ladies Aid Society of the Union Church Society was formed in 1876; The following is 
 
taken from the Ladies Aid Book #1 at its creation:
 
 
 
 Constitution
 
Article 1st.
 
 This society shall be called the Ladies Union aid Society. Its object is social, moral 
 
 and intellectual improvement and enjoyment of all old and young.
 
 
 
2nd:
 
 It shall have President and Vise-President who shall preside over the affairs of the 
 
 Society. The Vise-President acting in the absence of the former.
 
 
 
3rd:
 
 It shall have a Secretary who shall keep the records of the Society, collect the funds 
 
 and pay them into the Treasury and keep a record of the same.
 
 
 
4th:
 
 There shall be a Treasurer who shall receive and disburse the funds as the voice of the 
 
 Society may direct.
 
 
 
5th:
 
 The funds of the Society shall be used to promote the interests of the Sabbath School 
 
 and the religious instruction in such ways as the Society may think the cause demands.
 
 
 
6th:
 
 The Society shall meet once in two weeks as it shall be appointed from one meeting to 
 
 another and at every meeting each person present is required to pay the sum of three 
 
 cents into the hands of the Secretary for the benefit of the Society.
 
 
 
An Amendment made August 27, 1878.
 
 No person shall be considered a member of this Society or be allowed to vote at any 
 
 of its meetings without first having paid 25 cents and signing their names to the 
 
 Constitution and By Laws after which the same amount shall be paid yearly to 
 
 "enshure" them a membership. And no member shall be allowed to vote until the 
 
 meeting following the one at which they joined the Society.
 
 
 
Seven members shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of transacting business.
 
 
 
By-Laws:
 
1st:
 
 Such methods for mental and moral improvement shall be introduced as shall be 
 
 acceptable to a majority of the members.
 
 
 
2nd:
 
 Any amusements are admissible that do not conflict with the moral sense or good taste 
 
 of any of the members and such as may be offensive are at all times prohibited.
 
 
 
3rd:
 
 There are to be no attempts at display or emulation in dress or otherwise we are to 
 
 shut our eyes to each others failings, forgive each others faults and overlook or 
 
 forget all mistakes we are to cherish toward all the largest charity and the 
 
 greatest goodwill.
 
 
 
4th:
 
 The suppers shall be plain and furnished by each family what may be required for the 
 
 members representing the same.
 
 
 
5th:
 
 Exercises to close invariably at half past 10 o'clock P.M.
 
 
 
The members at this time were:Mrs. M. Cook, Henrietta Collins, C.A. Ballard,W.E. Copeland, 
 
Mary L. Richardson,H. D. Morgan, Julia Whitcomb, S. A. Copeland, Susan Everett, 
 
Jennie L. Pierce, Joel Blackmer, E. P. Baker, Sumner Hodgkins, T. A. Wheeler, Mary 
 
Hodgkins, E. D. Morgan, Willie Chamberlain, M. R. Tupper, Stella Hodgkins, R. H. Tupper, 
 
W. H. Durkee, H. L. Durkee, H. W. Blackmer.
 
 
 
The first Ladies Aid Meeting:
 
 
 
 Stockbridge Vt., Feb. 21st. 1876
 
The Ladies of Stockbridge Common met to organize a Society at the C. S. Carroll house. 
 
Chose Mrs. Baker Chairman and Mrs. J. Whitcomb Secretary for the eve. Chose Mrs. 
 
Romain Sawyer President, Mrs. Mary Richardson Vice President, Mrs. Julia Whitcomb 
 
Secretary. Mrs. Augtusta Carroll Treasurer. Voted to meet at Mrs. James Bakers next 
 
Friday afternoon and Eve. 
 
 Julia L. Whitcomb, Sec.
 
 
 
The Ladies Aid Members today in 2005 still pay the sum of 25 cents to belong to the 
 
Society. Though the dues have not increased the cost of the maintenance of the House 
 
certainly has gotten greater. Check out our 2005 Restoration Project section.
 
 
 
 LADIES AID MEMBERS TO 1912
 
 
 
 The following names were entered in the preface of a"new" Stockbridge Ladies Aid Society 
 
 record book dated 1912 by May Holland. This book contains the monthly minutes of the 
 
 Society with similar problems and solutions that we still today share in the preservation 
 
 of the Stockbridge Meeting House. 
 
 
 
 OLDEST MEMBERS
 
 
 
Mrs. Mary F. Hubbard - dead Mrs. Henrietta Collins-dead
 
Mr. W. E. Copeland d Mrs. S. A. Copeland 
 
Mrs. E. D. Morgan d Mr. H. D. Morgan d
 
Miss Jennie Pierce Mrs. E. P. Baker d
 
Mrs. L. A. Wheeler Mr. R. H. Tupper d
 
Mrs. M. R. Tupper d Mrs. H. L. Durkee d
 
Mr. W. H. Durkee d Mr. H. W. Blackmer d
 
Mrs. M. Cook d Mrs. C. M Ballard 
 
Miss Susan Everett d Mr. Sumner Hodgkins d
 
Mrs. Mary Hodgkins d Miss Stella Hodgkins 
 
Mrs. Ellen Everett d Mr. C. S. Carroll d
 
Mrs. Rosa E. Wilcox d Mrs. Maria Holland d
 
Mrs. Olive Smith d Mrs. Esther E. Burnham d
 
Mrs. Abbie L. Durkee d Mrs. Julia L. Whitcomb d
 
Mrs. Mary L. Richardson Putnam d Mrs. Nora E. Larnard d
 
Mrs. Augusta S. Carroll d Mrs. Idella F. Hubbard 
 
Mr. Frank Boutwell Mr. Harry Holland 
 
Mr. E. S. Burnham d Miss V. L. Chamberlain 
 
Mrs. Mary A. Savage d Mrs. Mary L. Packard d
 
Mrs. Mary C. Packard d Miss Alice M. Sheldon 
 
Mrs. Harriet Durkee d Mrs. Sarah Blackmer d
 
Mrs. C. L. Chamberlain " Mr. Joel Blackmer d
 
Mrs. J. M. Chamberlain d Mrs. Ada B. Leonard 
 
Miss. Anna A. Whitcomb d Mrs. Lucy A. Gilman 
 
Miss Alice Blackmer Smith Mrs. Genie O. Twitchell dead
 
Mrs, May Holland Mrs. Minnie Mills
 
Mr. Lucian Blackmer d Mrs. Alice M. Holland
 
Mrs. F. Sawyer d Mrs. Abbie Colby d 1-29-1896
 
Mrs. Effie Holland 2-12-1896 Mr. Julius Blackmer 5-27-1896
 
Mrs. Ida M. Packard d 10-6-1896 Mrs. E. Sheldon d 10-20-1897
 
Mrs. Dora Clark d 10-20-1897 Mrs. Sumner French d 11-3- 1897
 
Mrs. Lorilla Baker d 12-29-1897 Mrs. Harriet Grant d 3-19-1898
 
Miss Flora Baker d 10-19-1898 Mrs. Bertha Jackson d 3-14-1900
 
Mrs. Lydia Cady d 9-11- 1901 Mrs. Ransom Durkee d 9-11-1901
 
Miss Lizzie Burditt 9-11-1901 Mrs. Ruby Hunt Blackmer d
 
Mr. A. E. Baker d Mr. A. W. Chamberlain d 1904
 
Mrs. C. H. Durkee 6-15-1904 Miss V. M. Mack Martin 11-15-1904
 
Mr. Geo. A. Stott Mrs. Effie M. Allen dead
 
Mr. W, Calvin Green d 2-21-1904 Mrs. Lula M. Baker 6-27-1906
 
Mrs. F. E. Barnes 6-26-1907 Miss Bessie A. Barnes 6-26-1907
 
Miss Bessie E. Sawyer Hunt d 8-7-1907 Miss Josie Mills 8-7-1907
 
Mrs. Ed. Norton 3-11-1911
 
 
 
Note: "d" indicated person dead in 1912 and the date indicates the date of becoming a 
 
member in the Ladies Aid.
 
 
 


 
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Mona's Vision for the Meeting House


 
For many years, until her death in 2000, Ramona Blackmer was a staunch caretaker of, and 
 
advocate for,
the Stockbridge Meeting House.
 
In 1986 she wrote the following, to rally the community to preserve this important landmark.

 
Now, 20 years later, her gauntlet has been taken up. 
 
 
 On March 16, 1876, a small group of men joined together to "determine the feasability of 
 
building, or repairing a meeting house or to furnish some suitable place to hold meetings."
 
 
 
It was voted that each man present at that meeting, should "act as a committee of one 
 
to talk to his neighbors and gain their minds in regards to building new, or repairing a 
 
meeting house or building a hall."
 
 
 
How ironic that in 1986 our footsteps have brought us full circle to determine these 
 
same answers to questions that sound very familiar to our present situation.
 
 
 
Our journey through time bears witness to many similar concerns and proposals made 
 
by our forefathers 100 years ago.
 
 
 
It fosters a deep need for us in 1986 to carry on a steadfast commitment instituted 
 
for the purpose of serving our loved ones through years past and through many more 
 
years to come.
 
 
 
The Stockbridge Meeting House was built in 1828. Fifty-two years later, on February 21, 1876,
 
the Stockbridge Ladies Union Aid Society was formed. "The ladies of Stockbridge Common met 
 
at the home of Mrs. C. S. Carroll to organize a society. Mrs. Sawyer was elected President, 
 
Mary Richardson, Vice-President, and Mrs. Joseph Smith was elected to arrange the 
 
Constitution and By-Laws."
 
 
 
Through the years the ladies have found many diverse ways to earn money to support the 
 
church. Box socials, quilt raffles, ice-cream socials, oyster suppers, apron sales, 
 
chicken pie suppers, and lawn parties to name a few. They responded to the same problems 
 
that have be-set each generation. In October, 1896, the church roof was leaking. 
 
"Joel Blackmer will see that needed repairs are made. The Ladies Aid to furnish funds for 
 
it, providing the men of this community lack sufficient "gimp" to do it."
 
 
 
The preceding excerpts and quotations were taken from the Ladies Union Aid Society 
 
Secretaries time-worn books and records.
 
 
 
These sturdy veterans have presented a fine example for us. Now, let us pick up the gauntlet.
 
 
 
As we bend to the problems before us, let us remember well the spirit of hope and promise 
 
that live and dwell within these precious walls.
 
 
 
Let us re-dedicate ourselves to upholding this spirit of love and hope in a positive and 
 
progressive manner………
 
 
 
 written by Ramona Blackmer -1986
 
 
 
 
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Restoration of the Stockbridge Meeting House


 
 
 
The Stockbridge Union Meeting House has not been used as either a church or a meeting 
 
place on a regular basis; other than an occasional wedding, funeral or a town function, 
 
the dignified old building has stood idle, and in increasing disrepair.
 
 
 
There have been many starts and stops to the actual business of organizing a complete 
 
renovation of the Meeting House; one important reason of course was the lack of funds. 
 
Therefore over the last 20 + years only the simplest and most necessary repairs were done. 
 
 
 
In 2001 a meeting was held at the Meeting House and a small group began planning to restore 
 
the building to once again serve as a center to the community. Aided by a grant from the 
 
Preservation Trust of Vermont, a restoration specialist inspected the building and a report 
 
was prepared as to work necessary and its costs.
 
 
 
In 2003 the Stockbridge Ladies Aid had a meeting at the new Town Office and it was decided 
 
that they were going to do it this time! An antique auction was planned for July 24,2004 
 
on the Common in front of the Meeting House; monies realized from this endeavor amounted 
 
to about $6,500.00. This was the beginning!
 
 
 
A committee of four was formed to "carry the ball" to raise more money and find a 
 
contractor willing to do the work. The McKernon Group,Inc. consented to work with us and 
 
they have been a guiding hand to the huge task of restoring this important building. 
 
The McKernon Group Inc. has been responsible for renovations and restorations of many 
 
historic properties in Brandon, Rochester and Stockbridge, Vermont and built the new 
 
Stockbridge Town Office in 2003. 
 
 
 
Grants were written and well received by the JGA Foundation in New Jersey and two of the 
 
local banks; Christmas cards, note cards and antiques sold at town fairs, and donations 
 
given us by several very generous Stockbridge residents added to the total, and soon we 
 
had more funds. 
 
 
 
With the addition of these funds the building could be pulled off its rubble foundation 
 
and in October 2005 a new foundation was built. The building was pulled back over what 
 
is now a large community room that is handicap accessible. 
 
 
 
On March 8, 2006 a standing seam roof, black in color is replacing the rusty metal one. 
 
In front of the building concrete supports have been poured in preparation for the 
 
construction of the new front entrance that will replicate the original ones shown in the 
 
earliest photo of the building. It will span the width of the building with two steps 
 
up on three sides. 
 
 
 
The next phase will be the painting of the exterior after minor repairs to the bottom 
 
boards where the old steps caused damage from water set back. The clapboards are in 
 
excellent shape as are the windows, sills and casings. With scraping, primer and two 
 
coats of paint, the exterior walls will be completed. 
 
 
 
Because we must now meet State Safety Codes we have to incorporate handicap ramps and 
 
additional exits. A door will be added at the back of the auditorium for fire safety, 
 
a staircase in the front vestibule leading downstairs to the community room, an outside 
 
door (metal for fire) leading into the community room on the ground level accessed by a 
 
handicap walkway.
 
 
 
The interior walls come next; the plan is to remove the old cracked horsehair plaster, 
 
insulate, replace old electric wiring and put up wallboard with a thin coat of plaster 
 
to duplicate the old walls.
 
 
 
There is more to do, but we are confident that with the generosity of the Foundation and 
 
the individual donations received and those yet to come we will be able to accomplish our 
 
satisfying and rewarding job. We hope to have saved this building for another 179 years 
 
for the future generations of Stockbridge.
 
 
 
 
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Photos of the Stockbridge Meeting House


 


 
Older photos of the Meeting House on the Common

 
Photos of the Restoration 2005-2006
 
 
 
 
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Stockbridge, VT Town Coordinator E-mail: Barb Vellturo

 

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