New Hampshire State Papers

 

 

Provincial Papers.

 

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DOCUMENTS AND RECORDS

 

RELATING TO THE

 

PROVINCE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE,

 

FROM 1692 TO 1722:

 

BEING PART II. OF PAPERS RELATING TO THAT PERIOD.

 

 

CONTAINING THE

 

"JOURNAL OF TEE COUNCIL AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY."

 

 

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE.

 

VOLUME III.

 

 

COMPILED AND EDITED BY

 

NATHANIEL BOUTON, D. D.,

 

Corresponding Secretary of the New-Hampshire Historical Society.

 

 

MANCHESTER:

 

JOHN B. CLARKE, STATE PRINTER.

 

1869.

 

 

 

NOTICE.

 

JOINT RESOLUTION, passed by the Legislature of New-Hampshire.

 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court convened, That his Excellency the Governor be hereby authorized and empowered, with the advice and consent of the Council, to employ some suitable person, and fix his compensation, to be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to collect, arrange, transcribe, and superintend the publication of such portions of the early State and Provincial Records, and other State Papers of New-Hampshire, as the Governor may deem proper; and that eight hundred copies of each volume of the same be printed by the State Printer and distributed as follows: namely, one copy to each City and Town in this State, one copy to such of the Public Libraries of this State as the Governor may designate, two hundred copies to the New-Hampshire Hisュtorical Society, and the remainder placed in the custody of the State Librarian who is hereby authorized to exchange the same for similar publications issued by other States.

Approved July 6, 1866.

 

 

 

EDITOR'S PREFACE.

 

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ALTHOUGH this third volume of Provincial Papers covers nearly the same period as the preceding volume, yet it will be seen on examination that the contents of the volume are materially differュent from the former. The one contains the Records of the COUNCIL, which was the Executive body in the Province, composed of the Governor and not less than five Councillors, who received their appointment and commission from the Crown. The ASSEMBLY was composed of men chosen by the freeholders of the reュspective towns, as their representatives or deputies, having authorュity to enact laws, lay taxes, &c., and constituted the Legislative branch of the government. All laws, acts and ordinances, howュever, passed by the Assembly, must be concurred in by the Council, approved by the Governor and finally be sanctioned by the King.

The "Journal of the Council and Assembly" contained in this volume is a record of the joint transactions of the two bodies in relation to all business which appropriately belonged to the Sesュsions of the General Assembly. No Journal of the House sepaュrate from the joint Journal of the Council and Assembly is found till 1711, and that is very meagre and incomplete till 1722. Occaュsional extracts are made from it, to supplement or elucidate the Journal of the Council and Assembly, but the Editor has not deemed it necessary or expedient to publish it entire.

In this volume, as in the preceding, will be found, in chronoュlogical order, many letters, papers, speeches and authentic facts,

 

 

 

iv EDITOR'S PREFACE.

 

 

of much historical interest and value, which the Editor has gathュered from every available and reliable source, and for which due credit is always given. His intention has been to publish every official paper and document that can be found on record or on file, that serves to throw light on our Provincial History.

The Province Laws, in this volume, from 1692 to 1702, (only two or three of which have ever before been printed) indicate the state of the Province and the manners and customs of the times to which they relate. In this respect they are of much value and should be carefully examined.

 

 

 

GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

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VOLUME III.

 

PAGES.

JOURNAL OF THE COUNCIL AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 1-163

Letter of Lt. Gov. Stoughton of Massachusetts, 37

Speech of Lt. Gov. Usher, 42

Speech of Lt. Gov. Usher and answer to it, 46-47

Speech of Gov. the Earl of Bellomont, 66

Orders of the House, 67-68

Answer to the Gov.'s Speech, 71

New Seal for the Province, 80

A prison ordered to be built, 88

Letter from the Earl of Bellomont, 96

Petition from masters of coasting vessels, 104

Estimates of cost of building a Fort at New Castle, 106-111

Letter from John Bridger respecting trees for tar, 115

Quota of men in. different Provinces, 131

Province Laws, 164-228

JOURNAL OF THE COUNCIL AND ASSEMBLY RESUMED, 229

Letter from Queen Anne respecting salaries, 251

Col. Romer on repairs of Fort Wm. and Mary, 263

Speech of Lt. Gov. Usher, and answer thereto, 269-274

Samuel Allen's title to Province Lands, 275-276

Gov. Joseph Dudley's speeches, 282-289

An act respecting pursuit of Indians in winter, 290

Answer to Gov. Dudley's speech, 294

 

 

 

vi GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

PAGES.

Samuel Allen's Petition, 297

Queen Anne's Instructions to Gov. Dudley, 312-313

Addresses to the Queen, 328, 349, 352, 377

John Bridger's commission as Surveyor-General, 334

Memorial of John Bridger, 337

Expedition to Nova Scotia Fast, 339

An act relating to Troopers, 346

Capt. George Vaughan, agent to England, 353-355

An act for a free Latin school at Portsmouth, 365

Letters from Gov. Dudley, 371, 392, 417

Petition of inhabitants at Quamscott, 405-407

Petition of inhabitants in south part of Hampton, 408, 409, 428

Expedition to Port Royal, 435-440

Speeches of Lt. Gov. John Usher, 443, 448

Addresses to the Queen, 445, 452, 493, 507, 547

Speeches of Gov. Dudley, 448, 462, 501, 511, 530, 540

Capture of Port Royal Annapolis, 453

Letters from Gov. Dudley, 458, 505

Expedition against Canada, 478

Instructions of Queen Anne, 480, 489

Instructions for Henry Newman, Esq., 508

Petition of Nathl Weare, Esq., 514

Petition of the inhabitants of Kingston, 520

Indian Treaty Articles of Pacification (1713) 543-546

Petition of the inhabitants of Bloody Point, 549

Addresses to the King, George I, 576-7

Speeches of Lt. Gov. George Vaughan, 601, 630, 649

Petitions of inhabitants of Oyster River, 606, 714

Notice of Sir Charles Hobby, 631

Notice of Gov. Samuel Shute, 658

Speech of Gov. Shute, 659

Complaint of the Representatives to Gov. Shute, 675

Answer to the foregoing, 677

Petition of inhabitants of Portsmouth, 684

Indian Treaty at Georgetown, Me., 1717, 693-701

Speeches of Lt. Gov. Vaughan, 702-703

Gov. Shute's speech against Lt. Gov. Vaughan, 704

Examination of Jos. Smith, Peter Weare and John

Tuck, . 710-711

Speech of Lt. Gov. John Wentworth, and Gov. Shute, 721, 723

Differences in Portsmouth explained, 729

Original letter of Gov. Shute, 752

John Bridger, Surveyor-General, 759

 

 

 

GENERAL CONTENTS. vii

 

PAGES.

Apology of people of Nutfield to Gov. Shute, 770

Instructions to Henry Newman, Esq., agent, 779

Speech of Lt. Gov. Wentworth, 809

Additional Instructions to Gov. Shute, 813

Conflict of Laws with Massachusetts, 829

Letter from Mr. Newman, agent, 832

Address of Justices, &c., to her Majesty, 839

 

[See General Index at the end.]