New Hampshire State Papers

 

 

The State of New Hampshire.

 

MISCELLANEOUS

 

PROVINCIAL AND STATE PAPERS

 

1725-1800.

 

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PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE.

 

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VOL. XVIII.

 

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COMPILED AND EDITED BY

 

ISAAC W. HAMMOND, A. M.,

 

LIBRARIAN NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

 

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"He who takes no interest in the history of his ancestors does not deserve to be remembered by his posterity."

 

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MANCHESTER:

JOHN B. CLARKE, PUBLIC PRINTER.

1890.

 

 

 

JOINT RESOLUTION relating to the preservation and publication of portions of the early state and provincial records and other state papers of New Hampshire.

 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened:

 

That His Excellency the Governor be hereby authorized and empowered, with the advice and consent of the Council, to employ some suitable person and fix his compensation, to be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to collect, arrange, transcribe, and superintend the publication of such portions of the early state and provincial records and other state papers of New Hampshire as the Governor may deem proper; and that eight hundred copies of each volume of the same be printed by the state printer, and distributed as follows: namely, one copy to each city and town in the State, one copy to such of the public libraries in the State as the Governor may designate, fifty copies to the New Hampshire Historical Society, and the remainder placed in the custody of the state librarian, who is hereby authorized to exchange the same for similar publications by other States.

Approved August 4, 1881.

 

In accordance with the foregoing resolution, the Governor, with advice of the Council, on the twelfth day of October, 1881, appointed and commissioned ISAAC W. HAMMOND as "Editor and Compiler of State Papers."

 

 

 

EDITOR'S PREFACE.

 

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This volume completes the publication of the Miscellaneous Provincial and State Papers from 1725 to 1800. These papers were selected by the editor from a mass of papers in the state house in 1880. The volume also contains all the "Belknap Papers" which were not published in Vols. IV., V., and VI. The appendix conュtains some documents, furnished by Hon. Horatio L. Wait, of Chicago, relative to his Revolutionary ancestor, Joseph Wait, also papers furnished by Frank W. Hackett, Esq., concerning early church affairs, etc., in Portsmouth. To both of these gentlemen the editor is indebted for copies.

The editor regrets the size of the volume, but as he was many times during its compilation earnestly requested by students of history to be sure to leave out nothing that could possibly be of historical value, it could not well be helped. If this volume receives as favorable criticism at the hands of the public as have the preceding volumes edited by him, the editor will feel that his labor has not been in vain.

Under Governor Sawyer's administration, a committee of the Executive Council on the publication of the early province and state papers was appointed, consisting of Hon, A. S. Batchellor and Hon. John B. Smith, to which the Secretary of State was afterwards added. Councilors Batchellor and Smith made the following report, which was accepted by the executive body. As it contains full information relative to the early provincial and state papers of New Hampshire, and as it has not been heretofore printed by the State, the editor has thought it advisable to insert it here. It shows exhaustive research on the part of the committee, for which much credit is due them.

 

I. W. H.

 

 

 

REPORT.

 

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To His Excellency the Governor:

 

The committee appointed to determine what papers in the custody of the secretary of state, or elsewhere, shall be included in a further continuation of the publication of early state and province papers heretofore undertaken, respectfully submit the following report:

The work of publishing the early province and state papers of New Hampshire has progressed in accordance with the provisions of several public resolutions of the Legislature. These resolves, in the order of their enactment, are appended to this paper.

Dr. N. Bouton edited ten volumes, seven of which related to the period between 1623 and the American Revolution. One volume, the eighth in the series, contained papers which related principally to the time of the Revolution. The ninth volume was devoted mainly to town papers of the period prior to the year 1800. It also contained important documents relative to the work of the early constitutional conventions. The tenth and last volume of Dr. Bouton's work contained valuable papers relating to the controversy with Vermont, the results of the first census enumerations, and the journals of constitutional conventions.

It appears that Dr. Bouton published the journals of the assembly (with the exception of the House Journal, 1711 to 1722), and other contemporary papers, without assuming a large discretion to make abstracts from and condense the original text, until his work had been brought down to the year 1754. At this point, with the consent of the Governor, he began to make omission of such matter as he deemed of minor importance (see vol. 6, preface p. 3, and note on page 320). He continued on this method until the end of volume 8. We regard this as a very unfortunate change in the plan of the

 

 

 

VI REPORT.

 

work. It is not possible for the most learned editor to anticipate what part of such records will be deemed especially important and valuable by those who will have occasion to consult them in an indefinite future.

The omission of material parts of such a record from printed copies is a source of endless inconvenience; for, however full and judicious a mere abstract may be, its incompleteness renders it untrustworthy, and often that which is most sought for by those engaged in historical research is hidden in the rejected manuscript.

No period of our history is more important than that from 1754 to 1784, wherein Dr. Bouton's work is fragmentary. It should have included all the manuscript records we have relating to the French and Indian War, the agitation and controversy which preceded the Revolution, and all relating to the Revolution itself, in all the phases of its inception, progress, and consummation.

Much of the official correspondence and other papers illustrative of the period, has been printed in subsequent volumes, edited by Mr. Hammond.

The publication of the journals of the council and legislative bodies was not attempted by Dr. Bouton, later than November, which was the end of the political year 1782-83. The state government, under the constitution of 1784, did not go into operation till June, 1784. We see no good reason why the journals and contemporaneous official papers from November, 1783, till June, 1784, should not be published in the series, From June, 1784, till June, 1793, was a period of great importance and interest in the history of New Hampュshire. In that time occurred the federal and state conventions, from which came the federal union; and, in the same time, questions of internal policy and of government, all of vital importance to the young State, were discussed and settled. All available town papers in the state archives have been published to the year 1800. The rolls of the soldiers of the Revolution have also been given in the same series. It seems very desirable that the matter still unpubュlished, and which relates principally to civil administration and constitutional development, should be arranged and printed as a continuation of the series on a logical and comprehensive plan.

 

 

 

REPORT. VII

 

The material for the additional volumes may be classified and described in parts.

I. THE CHARTERS OF TOWNS. A great portion of the territory of this State, and a part of what is now the State, of Vermont, were granted in townships by the royal governors of New Hampshire. These charters or grants are recorded in five volumes. They contain the names of the original grantees, and a plan of each grant with courses and distances duly indicated. These instruments are the sources to which the owners of real estate must revert to complete the abstracts of title in almost every town in the State. There is but one copy of these records. It is not good policy to hazard the existence of all this important title evidence upon the preservation of these manuscript volumes from fire and other forms of destruction or defacement. They are a part of the documentary history of the towns. When published in this series of state papers, they become freely accessible in the public offices and public libraries of every municipality. As a useful and appropriate feature of such a publication, copies of the early township maps might be included in the books. A sample of such illustration may be seen in the Vermont governor and council records, Vol. VIII. p. 430.

A few of the grants in New Hampshire were by Massachusetts authorities, and a considerable number of townships in Vermont were New Hampshire grants. These should all be included in the contemplated work, because they are necessary for purposes of completeness, and the increased demand thereby occasioned would amply compenュsate for the small additional expense to the State.

2. The journals of the councils and assembly for the sessions in which they have not yet been reprinted, and those which have been reproduced in a mutilated form, are in order for publication in volumes of this series, so that this class of the early papers may have place in the work. They should be brought down to the year 1800, and thereby the records of legislation will have been made equally accessible with the contemporaneous records of local affairs, already given in vols. 9, I I, 12, and 13, which are limited to a period prior to 1800.

3. The laws of the Province subsequent to 1771, and of the State

 

 

 

VIII REPORT.

 

from 1775 to 1800, are not accessible, except in a few places, and it is doubtful if a complete series is now in the possession of any single custodian. The public acts were in many of those years published separately in sheets, and no complete set of the printed laws can be found. The exception in article twenty of the bill of rights in the state constitution, limiting or qualifying the right of trial by jury, renders it necessary for the courts and the people generally to conュsult the statute law existing prior to the adoption of that instrument, whenever the usage or custom as to modes of trial is in question. It is right and expedient that the laws of the period should be in printed form convenient for the use of the public. This would be effected by publishing in this series all the acts and resolves subsequent to 1771 in the order of their enactment. The manuscript records in the office of the secretary of state, all authenticated publications of those acts, and the contemporaneous compilations should be consulted for that purpose. Careful annotations, having reference to alterations and repeals of these acts, are always important in such works, and thorough indices are indispensable.

4. The miscellaneous papers are not readily classified, being partly related to legislative and partly to administrative matters, but they are an important element in the archives. They grew out of the civil, military, and diplomatic relations of the colony and early state government. There are minutes of the council, messages of the governors and the replies thereto, records of the correspondence and controversies with adjoining provinces about boundary lines and other matters, that are still accessible. Papers are received also from time to time from England, which relate to New Hampshire as a colony of Great Britain. This division includes matter which cannot reaュsonably be omitted from the series. A considerable part of vol. 17 was devoted to this class of papers, and more will be given in vol. 18, now in preparation.

5. Another class of papers which should be included in this publication consists of the records of the provincial council while acting as a judicial tribunal. This matter is subject to frequent reference for the information it contains as to the jurisprudence of the colony. In its present form it is available for use only by the

 

 

 

REPORT. IX

 

expenditure of much labor and time. It is not necessary that names of parties should be given in all cases to the annoyance of any who may be sensitive on matters of ancestral record. With judicious editing of the material, it would be a publication of great legal and historical value.

The prefatory statements in the seven volumes edited by Mr. Hammond give all necessary explanation of the plan, scope, and progress of his own work. There is no better method of ascertainュing its character and quality than by a critical examination of the inュdexes and text. We have no hesitation in asking a full application of these tests of merit.

A few more volumes will complete the work to the year 1800. We have no doubts as to the expediency and necessity of an active and immediate prosecution of it to a consummation worthy the sterュling history of the State.

We were formerly at a disadvantage in the hands of national historians, journalists, and general writers, in the presentation of our part in the military events of the colonial and revolutionary period, and in the development of civil government in the original States. The cause of this lay in the inaccessible condition of our state archives. General and school histories seemed to depreciate or to ignore New Hampshire as a factor in the Revolutionary struggle. "The publication of the rolls of our soldiery in the war for indeュpendence has occupied more than three thousand pages of the work under review, and the evidence of the patriotic effort and sacrifice of the people of New Hampshire can no longer be discredited. That evidence is now in the principal libraries of the country.

The deficiency in authentic and accessible printed works, in which the civil history of the State can be sought from the original records and writings for the period from 1754 to 1800, still exists in too large measure. Those who have in charge the compilations relative to the recent national centennial celebrations are in confusion and error on many points of New Hampshire history touching those events. The recommendations here made point to full and effective remedies of this deficiency. A reasonable pride in the record which our State has made in the building of the American republic, we are confident

 

 

 

X REPORT.

 

will refuse to allow our early records to be kept longer in the seclusion of musty manuscripts and in exposure to decay and destruction.

As one result of our observation and examination of this subject we are able to state confidently that the present official custodians have guarded the public archives with jealous care, and yet, notwithュstanding all that can be done in the way of precaution on their part, the defacement of constant use and the possibility of unforeseen accident convince us that a certainty of perpetuating the contents of these early records comes only from the multiplication of copies by publication.

The dangers to which we refer are those to which all public books and papers existing in single manuscript originals are subject from the inevitable effects of time and the possibility of accident.

Eventually the matter of a general index to the whole work will require consideration. The index in each one of the first ten volumes is very incomplete. Investigators find it necessary to search the text for the contents of the volumes, when anything of detail is wanted, anything beyond what is matter of very general reference. The index work in the eight subsequent volumes is very complete and satisュfactory. Besides a general prefatory table of contents, we have an index of names of places and persons in each book. Whether upon the completion of the entire work contemplated a general index should be prepared and published, or whether a separate index of the Bouton volumes is desirable, are questions not now urgent. If the journals and other papers published by him in an incomplete form should be given in full hereafter in the series, the publication of a general index would best be deferred. Meantime the index cards prepared and used by the compiler in the current volumes should be preserved for use in any general index that may possibly be authorized in the future.

 

NOTE. The original report, of which this is a copy except as to some immaterial changes in phraseology, was adopted by the executive council to which it was submitted, in May, 1889.

 

Councilors, A. S. BATCHELLOR, JOHN B. SMITH.

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

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PART I.

 

Vote relative to building a state house, 1725 1

Copy of a letter to Governor Vaudriel, 1725 2

Summons to Samuel Emerson, 1725 3

Governor's order in favor of Richard Wibird, 1726 3

Proceedings in Council relative to Samuel, Thing, 1726 4

Memorial of John, son of Sir Charles Hobby, 1726 5

Memorial of Samuel Waldo, 1727 6

Proceedings of the Council and Assembly, 1728-29 7-10

Proclamation of peace with the Indians, 1727 10

Copy of commission to Lt. Governor John Wentworth, 1727 11

Warrant for arrest of Benjamin Rust, for slander, 1728 12

Copy of letter to Lt. Governor Dummer, 1728 13

Petition from Sarah, widow of Rev. N. Rogers, 1729 14

Petition from John and Tamson Tibbetts, 1729 15

Governor Jonathan Belcher's commission, 1730 17-24

Instructions to Governor Belcher 24-32

Proclamation concerning the king's woods, 1730 32-35

Memorial from deacons of Boston churches, 1730 36

Petition from military officers, 1730 36

David Dunbar to a deputy-surveyor, 1730 37

Governor's orders to examine Fort William and Mary, 1730 38

Anthony Reynolds appointed a collector at Piscataqua, 1731 39

Petition from the Quakers, 1731 40

Expenses of committee on boundary line, 1731 41

Richard Wibird's commission, 1731 42

Letter from Secretary Waldron to Secretary Willard, 1731 43

The Governor's coming into the Province, 1731 44

Instructions to Governor Belcher, 1732 45

Benjamin Gambling's mandamus, 1732 45

Proceedings in Council, May, 1732 46

Theodore Atkinson's account of powder money, 1732 47

 

 

 

XII ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Committee appointed on boundary lines, 1733 48

Governor's order to the committee on loan, 1733 49

R. Waldron to N. Gilman concerning intemperance, 1733 50

Instructions to Governor Belcher, 1733 51

Depositions about lumber trouble, 1734 52

Peter Greeley's deposition, 1734, 54

Proclamation relative to riot at Exeter, 1734 55

Proceedings in Council concerning the riot, 1734 56

Letter from Belcher to Dunbar, concerning a warrant, 1734 57

Copy of Exeter forged letter to Sir Charles Wager, 1734 58

Report of committee on condition Fort William and Mary, 1735 60

Dedimus, Nath. Sargent, Paul Wentworth, and B. Thing, 1735 61

Quakers' petition concerning oaths, 1736 61

Commissioners on boundary line recommended, 1736 62

Communication from Mass. on boundary line, 1737 63

Petition of appeal, John Thomlinson to the King 64-73

Answer to the foregoing 73-76

Extract from charter of Kingswood, 1737 76

Letter of marque to Captain Joshua Newbold, 1739 77

Land grants to members of the Legislature, 1739 79

Documents relative to the province seal and its use 79-92

Testimony of Secretary Waldron 79

Deposition and letter of Richard Waldron, 1738 80

Waldron to Atkinson, November, 1738 83

Governor's orders respecting the seal, 1732-34 83

President Walton's demand of the seal, 1739 84

Secretary Waldron's answer to the foregoing 84

Application to have seal affixed to documents, 1739 85

George Jaffrey to Richard Waldron, 1739 86

Richard Waldron to George Jaffrey, 1739 86

Petition relative to affixing seal to documents, 1739 86

Order of the committee of Council, December 9, 1738 88

Governor's order relative to the seal, 1739 89

Petition of Thomas Packer for copies of depositions, 1739 89

Governor's order to Waldron in answer to above, 1739 91

Rindge, Packer, and Atkinson for seal, 1739 92

Instructions to privateers in war with Spain, 1739 92-102

Committee to invoice stores at the fort, 1740 102

Instructions relative to war with Spain, 1740 103-107

Governor's proclamation concerning the war, 1740 107

Instructions to Governor Belcher, May 20, 1740 109

Proclamation to encourage enlistments, 1740 110-112

Account for the intended West Indian expedition, 1740 113

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XIII

 

Instructions to the Governor, about money, 1740 113

Separation of New Hampshire from Massachusetts, 1740 115

Governor Belcher's address to the Assembly, 1740-41 117

Copy of Admiral Vernon's letter, 1740 118

Petition of John Eyre, 1740-41 119

Account of John Rindge for expenses in England, 1740-41 121

Quakers' petition relative to taking oaths, 1741 122

Governor Belcher to commissioners of trade, 1741 123

" " " " 1741 124

Richard Wibird appointed member of the Council, 1741 125

Thomas Wentworth to Governor Wentworth, 1741 126

Ex-Governor Belcher to Board of Trade, 1741 126

Petition for a township from Methuen, 1741 127

Report of committee on boundary lines, 129

Memorial from justices of the Superior Court, 1741 130

Costs in case of Phillip Kenniston 131

" " Sarah Simpson 132

" " Penelope Kenney 132

Action of the Legislature on the foregoing, 1741 133

Bill for repairs on Fort William and Mary, 1741 134

Letter from Governor Wentworth to Board of Trade, 1741-42 135

Petition relative to Governor Vaughan, 1742 136

Act granting assistance to church in New Castle, 1742 138

Governor Wentworth to Board of Trade, 1742 139

Authorizing commissioners to build a road, 1742 142

Governor Wentworth to Board of Trade, 1742 142-146

Report of the Board of Trade on New Hampshire Acts, 1743 146-148

Attorney-General Livermore's opinion, 1743 148

John Thomlinson to Theodore Atkinson, 1737-38 149

Mr. Paris to John Thomlinson, February 4, 1737 151

Thomlinson to Atkinson, February 10, 1737 153

Atkinson to Thomlinson, May 16, 1738 154

Thomlinson to Atkinson, July 14, 1738 156

" " " September 1, 1738 157

" " " February 8, 1738 158

" " " February 23, 1738 159

" " " April 4, 1740 160

" " " June 23, 1740 161

Atkinson to Thomlinson, August 4, 1740 163

Thomlinson to Atkinson, September 20, 1740 164

Atkinson to Thomlinson, November 26, 1740 165

" " " December 20, 1740 166

Thomlinson to Atkinson, February 6, 1740-41 168

 

 

 

XIV ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Thomlinson to Christopher Rymes, February 10, 1740-41 169

" " Atkinson, March 21, 1740-41 170

Atkinson to Thomlinson, May 31, 1741 171

" " July 11, 1741 172

Thomlinson to Atkinson, July 13, 1741 173

Atkinson to ThomIinson, May 19, 1742 174

" " " July 19, 1743 175

" " " May 26, 1742 176

Thomlinson to Atkinson, July 14, 1742 177

Atkinson to Thomlinson, July 26, 1742 178

" " " September 9, 1742 180

Thomlinson to Atkinson, November 27, 1742 180

Atkinson to Thomlinson, December 18, 1742 181

" " " February 8, 1743 182

" " " February 6, 1743 183

Thomlinson to Atkinson, February 20, 1743 185

" " " March 18, 1744 185

" " " March 22, 1743-44 186

Atkinson to Thomlinson, May 19, 1744 187

Thomlinson to Atkinson, October 3, 1744 188

Atkinson to Thomlinson, November 16, 1744 189

List of men taking the 」25,000 loan, 1743 191-195

Governor Wentworth to Board of Trade, 1743-44 196-201

Committee's report relative to men raised in 1743 201

Warrant for arrest of Cyprian Jaffrey, 1744 202

Bill for powder furnished a detachment, 1744 203

Bill for repairs at Fort William and Mary, 1744 204

Letter from Governor Clinton to Governor Wentworth, 1744 205

George Jaffrey, Jr., relative to court records, 1744 206

List of men sent to manage gondolas, 1744 206

Matthew Livermore's memorial, 1744 207

Receipt for an Indian delivered to Colonel Willard, 1744 209

Material for Fort William and Mary, 1744 209

Account for repairs on Fort William and Mary, 1744 209

Governor Shirley to Governor Wentworth, September 25, 1744 210

" " " " October 16, 1744 212

" " " " January 1, 1744-45 212

" " " " January 7, 1744-45 213

" " " " January 15, 1744-45 214

Governor's order to enlist a scouting party, 1745 214

Orders to Captain Meservey to enlist men, 1745 215

Shirley to Wentworth, February 25, 1744-45 216

Petition of Abraham Trefethen of New Castle, 1745 216

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS XV

 

Shirley to Wentworth, March 1, 1744-45 217

" " March 4, 1744-45 218

Atkinson to Thomlinson, March 29, 1745. 219

Message from the House to the Governor, 1745 220-223

General Pepperell's order relative to attack on Louisbourg, 1745 223

Report of committee on men raised for scouting, 1745 223

Shirley to Wentworth, April 15, 1745 224

" " May 5, 1745 224

Petition from soldiers' wives for aid, 1745 225

Crew of the ship Endeavor, 1745 226

Benjamin Thomas, wounded soldier, 1745 227

Proclamation for enlistment of seamen, 1745 228

Shirley to Wentworth, June 17, 1745 229

" " July 6, 1745 230

" " July 10,1745 230

Thomlinson to Atkinson, August 5, 1745 231

Lt. Governor Phipps to Governor Wentworth, August 14, 1745 231

" " " August 19, 1745 232

Shirley to Captain Bradbury, July 22, 1745 233

George Creighton's leave of absence, 1745 234

Committee to examine accounts of ship Bien Aim, 1745 234

Report of the committee on Louisbourg prisoners, 1745 235-238

Statement of condition of men at Louisbourg, 1745 238

List of Greenland impressed men, 1745 239

Petition of Benjamin Lewis, Louisbourg soldier, 1745 240

Robert Tufton Philbrook's account, 1745 241

Atkinson to Thomlinson, November 13, 1746 242-245

Petition from Louisbourg soldiers, 1745 245-247

" Joseph Sleeper, Louisbourg, 1745 248

Soldiers' losses at Louisbourg, 1746 248

Petition of Edward Card, Louisbourg soldier, 1745 250

" Moses Meader of Durham, 1745-46 251

" Edward Hopkins of Portsmouth, 1745-46 252

Shirley to Wentworth, January 12, 1746 253

" " January 27, 1746 254

Petition of Timothy Clement of Concord, 1746 255

" " Mary Welch of Portsmouth, 1746 256

Joseph Sleeper's statement, 1745-46 256-258

Petition of Francis Mason of Stratham, soldier, 1745-46 258

Louisbourg soldiers' petition, Hampton men, 1746 259

Petition of Hugh Montgomery, 1745-46 260

" " Benjamin Thomas of Portsmouth, 1746 261

Louisbourg soldiers' petition, Portsmouth men, 1745-46 262

 

 

 

XVI ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Petition of Sarah Trefethen, soldier's widow, 1745-46 263

Zachariah Foss of Portsmouth, soldier, 1746 264

" " Deborah Tucker and Hannah Kenniston, 1746 265

" " Lt. Edward Brooks of Portsmouth, 1745-46 267

Louisbourg expedition account, 1745 268

Thomas Millet, relative to sloop Abigail, 1746 269

Petition of Lt. Jonathan Gilman of Keeneborough, 1746 269

" Tabitha Cass, soldier's widow, 1746 270

" James Wood, 1746 271

" Mary, widow of Jeremiah Marston, 1746 272

" Benjamin Kemming of Exeter, 1746 273

" Joseph Rawlins, Louisbourg soldier, 1746 273

Major Gilman loses his coat at Louisbourg, 1746 274

Petition of Ezekiel Gilman of Portsmouth, 1746 274

John Goffe's account and memorial, 1746 275

Petition of George Thompson, 1746 276

" Lt. Ezekiel Worthen of Kensington, 1746 277

" Theodore Atkinson about his slave, 1746 278

Louisbourg soldiers' petition for allowance, 1746 279

List of rations not received by the above 281

Petition of William Prescott, Louisbourg soldier, 1746 282

" John Griffith, Jr., Louisbourg soldier, 1746 282

" Deborah, widow of Nicholas Dunn, 1746 283

" John Ladd, relative to his son, 1746 284

Memorial of Spencer Colby, mariner, 1746 285

Certificate of Dr. Benjamin Rowe, 1746 286

Summary of Louisbourg petitioners, 1746 286-288

Walter Warren's account 288

Atkinson to Thomlinson, recommending Capt. Sherburne, 1746 289

General Pepperell's orders to Captain Sherburne, 1745 290

Warren and Pepperell's certificate, 1746 290

Shirley to Wentworth, September 13, 1746 291

Petition from Louisbourg soldiers, 1746 292

Widow Sarah Jackson's petition, 1747 294

King's instructions to Governor Wentworth, 1746-47 294

Mark Hunking Wentworth's bill, 1747 295

Letter from Captain Stevens to Governor Shirley, 1746-47 295

William Johnson to John H. Lydius, 1746-47 296

Action of Mass., relative to Crown Point expedition, 1746-47 297

Shirley to Wentworth, February 7, 1746-47 298

" " February 8, 1746-47 298

" " February 9, 1746-47 299-301

Thomlinson to Atkinson, February 24, 1746-47 301

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XVII

 

Shirley to Wentworth, March 10, 1746-47 302

Major Thomas Davis, relative to government stores, 1747 303

Soldiers' petition for further allowance, 1747 304

Petition from wives of soldiers, 1747 305

" " Lt. Eliphalet Daniels, sloop Warren, 1747 306

Petition from Samuel Drown, 1747 307

Bill for nursing Samuel Drown, 1747 307

Petition from Lt. John Flagg of Portsmouth, 1747 308

Theodore Atkinson to Thomas Jones, 1747 309

Atkinson to Thomlinson, June 6, 1747 310-312

Connecticut resolutions on Crown Point expedition, 1747 312-314

Gov. Law to Gov. Shirley on Crown Point expedition, 1746-47 314

Colonel Stoddard concerning the "Six Nations," 1747 315

Shirley to Wentworth, about the "Six Nations," 1747 316

Petition of Robert Miller, Louisbourg soldier, 1747 317

Supplies sent to New Hampshire soldiers, 1747 318

Shirley to Wentworth, October 12, 1747 319

" " November 3, 1747 319

" " November 9, 1747 320

" " November 24, 1747 320

Knowles' and Shirley's letters, 1747 321-323

Extracts from Duke of New Castle's letter, 1747 323

Shirley to Wentworth, October 29, 1747 325-327

" " January 17, 1747-48 327

" " February 2, 1747-48 328

Commissary Penhallow's petition, 1748 328

Shirley to Wentworth, March 15, 1748 329-331

Summons to the Council, to Court of Admiralty, 1748 331

Shirley to Wentworth, April 26,1748 331

Memorial of Captain Joseph Sherburne, 1748 332-334

Letter from Captain Sherburne to Admiral Warren, 1748 334

Soldiers at Fort William and Mary, 1747 336

Shirley to Wentworth, May 31, 1748 337

Shirley to Wentworth, on the Albany affair, 1748 337

Court of Massachusetts relative to the "Six Nations," 1748 338

Instructions to Governor Wentworth, 1748 339

Fragment endorsed "W. to S.," July 8, 1748 341-351

Shirley to Wentworth, August 24, 1748 351

Order to Captain Job Clement, 1748 352

Shirley to Wentworth, September 27, 1748 352

" " November 7, 1748 353

" " November 28, 1748 353

Precept for election of Assemblymen, 1748 354-356

 

 

 

XVIII ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Shirley to Wentworth concerning some Indians, 1749 356

Duke of Bedford to Governor Wentworth, 1749 357

Document relative to Fort Dummer, 1749 357

Plan of the Fort, by M. Patten 359

Wentworth to Shirley, August 27, 1749 360

Answer to the foregoing, August 28, 1749 360

Copy of warrant, 1749 361

Report of committee named in warrant, 1749 362

Proclamation relative to peace with the Indians, 1749 362

Lt. Governor Phipps, relative to exchange of prisoners, 1749 363-365

Instructions to Governor Wentworth 365

Quakers in militia companies 366

Thomlinson to Atkinson, November 18, 1747 367

" " November 22, 1748 367

蕩 " March 15, 1748-49 368

" " November 27, 1749 369

" " March 4, 1750 370-373

" " March 29, 1750 373

Atkinson to Thomlinson, May 26, 1750 374

His Majesty's instructions, 1750 375-377

Governor Wentworth to the Duke of Bedford, 1750 377

Duke of Bedford, transmitting act of Parliament, 1750 378

Petition of Jonathan Stanhope, 1750 379

Acts approved by the Privy Council, 1750 380

Warrant for expenses of Canada expedition, 1750 381-383

" reimbursing New Hampshire, 1750 383

Thomlinson and Trecothick to Atkinson, 1751 384

" to Atkinson, September 21, 1750 385

" to Atkinson July 19, 1751 385-388

Trade between New Hampshire and West Indies, 1751 388-390

Depositions of Nath. Jones, Samuel Frost and John Briard 389

Depositions of Matthias Haines 390

Governor Wentworth to Board of Trade, 1751 390-400

Thomlinson and Trecothick to Atkinson, 1752 401

" to Atkinson, March 2, 1752 402-405

John Greenwood to Richard Waldron, 1751 405

Waldron to Greenwood 406

Greenwood to Waldron, about Mrs. Mason, etc. 407

Waldron to Greenwood, 1752 407

Greenwood to Waldron, March 16, 1753 408

" " " 1752 409

Waldron to Greenwood, March 27, 1752 410

" " March 20, 1752 410

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XIX

 

Earl of Holdernesse to Board of Trade, 1752 411-413

To Governor Phipps about murder of Indians, 1752 413

Action of the House or the foregoing, 1752 414

Land grant from Massachusetts to Jonathan Belcher 414

Petition of Daniel Rindge for compensation 415

Soldiers' petition for their pay, 1753 416

Soldiers' certificates, 1753 417-419

Deposition of John Hodgdon, soldier, 1753 419

Communication from selectmen of Northfield, Mass. 419

Petition of Captain Phinehas Stevens, 1753 420

" " Timothy Clement of Haverhill, 1753 421-423

Power of attorney to John Thomlinson, 1754 423

Resolve of the N. Y. Assembly on Indian affairs, 1754 424

Petition for division of Province into counties, 1754 424

" of Sheriff Thomas Packer, 1754 425-427

" of Robert Hale, 1755 427

Proclamation against Indians, 1755 427

Memorial of Kneeland and Russell, printers, 1755 428

Governor's orders to Colonel Hindsdale, 1755 429

" " " Gilman, 1755 430

Atkinson to Thomlinson, December 9, 1755 431-433

Petition from towns for assistance, 1756 434

Atkinson to Weare, court matters, 1756 435

Chaplain Emerson's petition, 1756 436

Thomas Rowe's statement, 1756 437

Abiathar Sanborn's statement, 1756 437

Wages and rations, Crown Point expedition, 1756 438

H. Fox's letter to Governor, Crown Point expedition, 1756 439

John Carty, wounded soldier, 1756 441

Charges on money sent to the Provinces, 1756 441

Account of gold and silver purchased for New Hampshire, 1756 443

Pilot's commission, 1756. 444

John Shepard taken prisoner, 1757 445

Petition of Francis Tucker, assistant commissary, 1757 446

" Joseph Avery, Fort Edward soldier, 1757 447

" Mason Rendall, taken prisoner, 1757 448

" Benjamin Carpenter, prisoner. 1757 449

W. Pitt to Governor Wentworth, 1757 449

" " " 1757 450

Memorial of William Clifford, 1757 451

Material at the Fort, 1757 452

James Nevins appointed collector of customs, 1757 453

Lord Loudoun to Governor Wentworth, 1757 454

 

 

 

XX ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Governor Wentworth to General Webb, 1757 454

Sir Charles Hardy, 1757 455

Earl of Holdernesse to Governor Wentworth, 1757 455

Letter from Captain George Christie, Fort William Henry, 1757 456

" " " " " 457

Capture of Fort William Henry, 1757 458

Captain Christie to Governor Wentworth, 1757 459

Captain Ladd's account, 1757 460

Lord Loudoun to Governor Wentworth, 1757 461

Secretary Pitt to " 1757 462

Governor Wentworth to Lord Loudoun, 1757 463

Secretary Pitt to Governor Wentworth, 1757 464-466

Captures by English privateers, 1757 467-469

Atkinson to Thomlinson, 1758 469

" " 1758 470-474

" " Trecothick, Apthorp and Thomlinson, 1758 474

Commissary King's certificate, 1758 475

Ebenezer Copp's deposition, 1758 476

Soldiers' petition, 1758 476

Allowance to soldiers, 1758 477

Soldiers' petition, 1758 478

Petition from officers in Colonel Meserve's Regiment, 1758 479-482

Hercules Mooney's loss at Fort William Henry, 1758 482

Ensign John Moor's loss at Fort William Henry, 1758 482

Impress order, 1758 483

Clement March's bill, mustering men, etc., 1758 484

Petition relative to Charles Row, 1758 485

Expenses of two funerals, 1758 486

Bill for care of Lt. Wilder Willard, 1758 487

Secretary Pitt to Governor Wentworth, 1758 488

" " " 1758 489

Petition from Pickering and Spear, 1759 490

Proclamation relative to enlistments, 1759 491

Enlisting orders to Colonel Weare, 1759 492

Lord Loudoun to General Pepperell, 1759 493

Names of substitutes for Quakers, 1759 494

Colonel Schuyler's account, 1759 495

King's instructions concerning courts, 1758 496

General Amherst to Governor Wentworth, 1759 497

" " " 1759 498

Atkinson to Trecothick and Thomlinson, 1759 499

Certificate concerning Isaac Towle, 1759 500

Account of the Canada expedition committee, 1759 500-503

 

 

.

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XXI

 

Petition of Susanna Johnson, 1760 503

Petition from Lebanon, Conn., men, 1760 505

Instructions about raising troops, 1760 506-508

Petition of Elijah Denbo, 1760 508

Account of Thomas Packer, 1759 510-513

Soldiers' petition to reduce sutler's accounts, 1760 513

Certificate of impressment, 1760 514

Recommendation from Governor Wentworth, 1760 515

Petition from Morrison and Pickering, 1760 515

Atkinson to Trecothick, Apthorp, and Thomlinson, 1760 516

Petition from selectmen of Holden, Mass., 1761 518

Soldiers' petition, 1761 520

Account of Thomas Packer, 1761 521

Account for printing paper money 1761 523

Ransoms of vessels taken by French privateers, 1761 524

John Sanborn's certificate, 1761 525

Petition of Moses Swett, 1761 525

Governor Wentworth's proclamation, 1761 526

Petition of Nathaniel Thing, 1761 527

Petition of Joseph Swett 528

Deposition of Timothy Blake, Jr., 1761 528

Petition of Samuel Hobart, 1761 529

Petition of mast contractors, 1761 530

Bill for victualing soldiers at Sudbury in 1757 531

Instructions to Governor Wentworth, 1761 532-541

Atkinson to Thomlinson, 1761 541

" " " 1761 542

Nevin to Atkinson, 1761 543-545

Commission to administer oaths, 1762 545

Notification in regard to Court of Inquiry, 1762 545

Petition from three soldiers, 1762 546

Account for building Governor's boat, 1762 547-549

Atkinson to Thomlinson, 1762 549

" " " 1763 551

Petition of Nathaniel Porter, 1763 551-553

" Richard Bartlett, 1763 553

Colonel Bedel's letter asking for relief, 1763 554

Petition for a road to Cos, 1763 555

Atkinson to Thomlinson, 1763 556

" Trecothick and Thomlinson, 1763 557

Letter from Jacob Bayley, 1764 558

" Timothy Walker to James Nevin, 1765 559

Defence of Governor Wentworth, 1765 560-567

 

 

 

XXII ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Atkinson to Trecothick and Thomlinson, 1765 567-569

" " " 1766 569

Petition of George Meserve, stamp commissioner, 1766 575-573

" Daniel Sanborn, 1766 573

Atkinson to Wentworth and Trecothick, 1766 574

Proclamation of Governor John Wentworth, 1767 575

Address of welcome from the Council, 1767 576

Action of the House in regard to counties, 1767 577

Report of committee on counties, 1767 578

Atkinson to Trecothick, 1767 579

Deposition of Isaac Colton about counterfeiters, 1768 580-583

Report of committee on road from Durham Falls to Coos, 1768 584

Petition from the House to the King, 1768 585-587

" John Wendell of Portsmouth, 1768 587

Petition of James Hudson, salt manufacturer, 1769 589

Proclamation in regard to deserters, 1769 589

Petition of Samuel Hall for damages, 1769 590

" about county lines, 1769 591

" of Dr. Hall Jackson, 1769 592

Deserters from ships in Boston Harbor, 1770 594-596

Proceedings of the House sent to Agent Trecothick, 1770 597

Committee to examine bills of credit, 1770 598

Instructions to Governor Wentworth, 1770 598

Dissent of Peter Livius from vote of Council, 1771 599-602

Trecothick to Atkinson, 1771 602

Writ for election of representatives, 1771 602-605

Road from Pemigewasset River to Dartmouth Coll., 1771 605

Complaint from custom-house officers, 1771 606

Proclamation in regard to foregoing, 1771 606

Memorial of John Cochran, 1771 607

Committee on Fort William and Mary, 1772 608

Strafford and Grafton county petition, 1772 609

Instructions to Governor Wentworth, 1772 610

Road from Conway to Connecticut River, 1772 611

Petition from James Breckenridge, agent, 1772 611

Memorial from province treasurer, 1772 613

Proceedings of House in regard to road, 1772 613

Lord Hillsborough to Governor Wentworth, 1772 614

John Cochran's promise, 1772 614

Hubartus Neal's report on road, 1772 615

Governor Wentworth conveys his defence, 1772 615-623

Memorial of Peter Livius, 1772 623-625

Depositions of Theodore Atkinson, 1772 625-628

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XXII,

 

Deposition of Peter Gilman and Thomas W. Waldron, 1772 628

" from the Council, 1772 629

Memorial from the Council, 1772 630-636

Letter accompanying the memorial, 1772 637

A fragment 638

Livius versus Moffat at Court of Appeals 639-641

Memorial from justices of Superior Court, 1772 641

Petition to change county lines, 1773 642

Report on Conway, Connecticut River road, 1773 643-645

Letter of introduction to John Pownall, 1773 645

Barlow Trecothick to Lord Dartmouth, 1773 645

Testimonial from inhabitants of Portsmouth, 1773 646

" " " Francestown, 1773 647

Petition for protection of fish, 1773 648

Testimonial from Dartmouth College, 1773 649

Summons to Captains Stickney and Chandler, 1773 650

Road from New Britain to Hanover 651

State of the light-house at the Fort, 1773 651

Statistics of the Province, 1773 652

Petition of Joseph Senter, 1774 652

New Hampshire House to Mass. House, 1774 654

Memorial from justices of Superior Court, 1774 654

Southern boundary of New Hampshire, 1774 655

Grafton County justices, 1774 656

Hillsborough County justices, 1774 656

Colonel Atkinson's orders to Captain Dennett, 1774 657

" " " Lt. Beck, 1774 657

Letter from Paul Wentworth of London, 1775 658

Rules and regulations of a militia company, 1775 659

Address to King from Provincial Congress, 1775 660-663

Deposition of William Pearn and Jacob Sheafe, Jr., 1775 663

Minutes of Council, May 29, 1775 663

" " May 29, 1775 664

Governor Wentworth to Theodore Atkinson, 1775 665

Committee to remove records, 1775 665

Governor Wentworth to Theodore Atkinson, 1775 666

Atkinson's proposed answer to the committee, 1775 666-668

" answer as delivered, 1775 668

Atkinson accountable for books of charters, 1775 669

Atkinson's account to the Governor, 1775 669

Records removed from office of recorder of deeds, 1775 670

Atkinson to Governor Wentworth, 1775 671

Wentworth to Atkinson, 1775 672

 

 

 

XXIV ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Captain Barkley's conditions, 1775 672

Atkinson to Wentworth, 1775 672

Wentworth to Atkinson, 1775 673

Answer to the foregoing, 1775 673

George Jaffrey to Noah Emery, 1775 674

Atkinson to the captain of the Boyn, 1775 674

Wentworth to Atkinson, 1775 675

Governor's proclamation, 1775 675

" " 1776 676

Counterfeit money, 1776 677

Act to establish the legality of certain taxes, 1776 679

Justices of the peace for Rockingham County, 1776 680

Justices in the State of New Hampshire, 1776 681-684

Naval office table of fees, 1776 684

Lead mine discovered, 1776 685

Chief Justice Weare's certificate, 1776 685

Act regulating election of county officers, 1776 685-687

Protest of Benjamin Giles and others, 1777 687

Petition of Thomas Casey, 1777 688

" James Richardson of Dover, 1778 689

Business letter to Joshua Wentworth, 1778 690

Petition from town of Westmoreland, 1778 690

" for liberty to choose a minister, 1778 691

Minutes of Council, 1778 692-694

Petition of Joseph Davenport, agent, 1778 694

Letter from J. Fisher to his wife, 1778 695

Petition from Londonderry, 1778 696

Vote of the town on the foregoing, 1778 697

Eben Hazard to the House of Representatives, 1778 697

Certificate from selectmen of Boothbay, Mass., 1778 698

Petition from Murray and Brown of Boothbay, 1779 698

" from Jonathan Ingersoll of Salem, Mass., 1779 699

" for roads, 1779 700-702

" of the heirs of John Griffith, 1779 702-704

" of Sarah Wills, of Portsmouth, 1779 704

" from slaves, 1779 705-707

Minutes of court, 1776, 1780 707-709

Olcott and Woodward to Colonel Chase, 1780 709

Samuel Hunt declines a commission, 1780 710

Petition of Patrick McDonnell, 1780 710

Report of a committee 711

State accounts to February 9, 1782 712

Memorial of Nathaniel Peabody, 1782 713

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. XXV

 

Petition for re-incorporation of Monson, 1782 714-716

Eleazer Russell to Meshech Weare, 1782 716-718

Letter in regard to ship "Ellen," 1782 718-720

Another about the same affair, 1782 720

Petition for increase of currency, 1782 721

John Sullivan to John Langdon, 1782 723

Petition from inhabitants of Cheshire County, 1782 723

" John Hale, of Hollis, 1783 . 725

Receipt from Stephen Gorham to John T. Gilman, 1783 726

Certificate from Stephen Gorham, 1783 726

John Prentice to Speaker Dudley, 1783 726

Precept for representatives, 1783 727-729

Nominations for sheriff and judges in Grafton County, 729

" " " Cheshire County 730

Recommendations for Cheshire County judges 730

Credentials of Marbois L'Etombe, 1784 731

Monsieur Toscan, vice-consul at Portsmouth, 1784 732

Monsieur Toscan's credentials, 1784 732

Abiel Foster and Pierce Long, delegates to Congress, 1784 733

Jonathan Child to Meshech Weare, 1784 733

Petition to tax non-resident proprietors, 1784 735

Memorial from committee for adjusting accounts, 1784 736

Petition for road from Merrimack to Connecticut River, 1784 737

Joseph Gilman to President Weare, 1784 739

Letter from Loan Officer Gilman, 1784 739

Elisha Payne accepts election to Congress, 1784 741

Letter from Adams, Franklin, and Jefferson, 1784 741

Recommendations for officers of a regiment, 1784 742

Letter from De Marbois to Congress, 1784 743

Joshua Wentworth to Ebenezer Thompson, 1784 744

A fragment of testimony 744

Petition for increase of currency 745

Sale of excise on spirituous liquors, 1785 746

Petition in favor of Colonel David Webster, 1785 747

Letter from John Sullivan to the Senate, 1785 748-750

Petition of Treasurer Gilman for larger salary, 1785 750

Taverns and retailers licensed in Strafford County, 1785 751

Report of committee on accounts, 1785 752

Letter from treasury board at N. Y., 1785 753

" Stephen Gorham, 1785 754

Petition to make real estate a legal tender, 1785 755

Report of committee on accounts, 1785 756

" road committee, 1785 757

 

 

 

XXVI ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Account of New Hampshire taxes, 1785 759

Joseph Pearson resigns from committee on accounts, 1785 760

Certificate in regard to General Sullivan's account 760

Letter from Loan Officer Gilman, 1786 761

Monsieur Ducher, vice-consul at Portsmouth, 1786 761

An act of repeal, 1786 762

Leverett Hubbard to President Langdon, 1786 763

Circular in regard to French and Dutch loans, 1786 763

Admission of town inhabitants, 1786 764

Eben Hazard to Jeremiah Libbey, 1786 765

Letter from Postmaster Libbey, 1786 765

Intention to leave the State, 1786 766

Concerning the Mason-Allen controversy, 1786 767

" " " 1786 768

Petition from heirs of Allen, 1786 769

Report of committee on standards, 1786 770

Postmaster Libbey to Samuel Dearborn, 1786 771

Report of committee on continental accounts, 1786 772

Joshua Wentworth to President Sullivan, 1786 772

Report of committee on accounts, 1786 773

Elisha Payne's letter of excuse, 1786 774

Petition for pardon, from Exeter prisoners, 1786 774

State's quotas for Indian warfare, 1786 775-777

Instructions to officers, 1786 778

Petition of Benjamin Dearborn of Portsmouth, 1786 779

Major McGregore recommended, 1786 780

W. Sargent to President Sullivan, 1786 780

Protest of George Gains and others, 1786 781

Militia arrangements for Cheshire County 782

Petition of James and William Sheafe, 1786 783-785

Report of committee on Sheafe petition, 1787 785

" " " unimproved lands, 1787 785

Removal of Commissioner Gorham, 1787 786-788

Samuel Hobart's proposal, 1787 788

Courts in Hillsborough County, 1787 788-790

Extract from Nicholas Gilman 's letter, 1787 790

Petition for road from Barnstead to Northwood, 1787 791

" organization of alarm company, 1787 792

Samuel Hobart's petition, 1788 794

Petition for a new county, 1788 794

" a company of horse in Twelfth Regiment, 1788 795

" protection of fish, 1788 796

J. Gilman transmits his public accounts, 1788 797

 

 

 

ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS. xxvii

 

Accounts of confiscated estates, 1789 798

Joseph Blanchard's survey of waste lands, 1789 799

David Hide's petition, 1789 800

Report of committee on road from Barnstead to Northwood 801

Memorial of Archibald McMurphy, 1789 802

John Hubbard recommended, 1789 803

Petition of three men to be restored to office, 1789 804

" Lemuel Sargent 804

Dissent of James Sheafe and others, 1790 805

New Hampshire "State Advertiser," 1790 806

Report of committee on waste lands, 1790 807

Memorial of Samuel Hobart of Exeter, 1790 809

" Joseph Whipple, 1790 810

Letter from Joseph Whipple, 1790 811

" to Joseph Whipple, 1790 812

Resolve of the House in regard to pensions, 1790 813

Petition of Charles Henzell of Portsmouth, 1789 814

Joshua Wentworth's certificate, 1789 815

Charles Henzell's bill against the State, 1790 816

Articles of agreement, 1790 816

James Sheafe's letter of transmittal, 1790 818

Petition of Ozias Silsby, post-rider, 1790 818

Report of committee on county lines, 1796 819-821

Samuel Livermore, member of Congress, 1790 821

Titus Salter's agreement, 1790 821-823

Letter from John Langdon, 1791 823-825

Petition for a new county, 1791 825

Letter from Joseph Whipple, 1791 826

" " " 1791 827

Petition for a half-shire, 1791 828-830

" aid to duck manufacturers, 1791 830

Resolve of Massachusetts House, 1791 831

Memorial of Robert L. Fowle, 1791 832

Report of committee on Odiorne's petition, 1791 833

Memorial of Samuel Hobart of Exeter, 1791 833

John T. Gilman to President Bartlett, 1791 834

Colonel Shepard claims a general's commission, 1791 835

Records of candidates for " 1791 836

Letter from Tench Cox, 1791 837

Petition for road from Concord to Durham, 1791 838

" of Mary Tufton Mason, 1791 839

James McGregore, commissioner of claims, 1791 840

Petition of Dudley B. Hobart of Exeter, 1792 841

 

 

 

XXVIII ABSTRACT OF GENERAL CONTENTS.

 

Ratable polls in New Hampshire, 1792 842

General Bellows's resignation, 1792 843

Stephen Harriman's statement, 1792 843

Statement from selectmen of New London, 1792 844

Act to establish Washington County, 1792 844

Petition for a lottery, 1792 845

Report of Treasurer Gilman, 1792 847

Sir William Pepperell's petition, 1792 848

Road from Concord to Durham, 1792 849-854

Petition for road from Dover to Northwood, 1792 854

" Chester to Walpole, 1792 856

" from Page and Morris, 1792 856

" from William Gardner, 1792 859

Road from Dover to Northwood, 1792 859

" Conway to Shelburne, 1792 861

Report of road committee, 1792 861

Petition for more courts, 1793 862

Papers received from Colonel McGregore, 1793 863

Petition of Samuel Morey, 1793 865

Petition for more courts, 1793 866

Memorial of Jabez Parsons and others, 1793 867-871

More facts relative to the same matter, 1793 872

Instructions from Secretary of War, 1794 873-876

Memorial of Jabez Parsons, 1795 877

Petition to construct canals, 1795 878

" for protection of fish, 1795 878

" to clear Piscataqua River, 1796 879-881

" of Tom Powers, 1796 881-885

Letter from Oliver Whipple of Hampton, 1798 886-888

Petition from proprietors of "Paddy Seine," 1798 888

" for a new road, 1798 889-891

James McHenry to Jacob Sheafe, 1798 891

Nathaniel Head's commissions, 1798 892

Petition for road from Lancaster, 1798 892

Turnpike from Charlestown to Surry, 1799 893

Road from Enfield Pond to the "Burnt Lands," 1799 895

Proceedings in memory of Washington, 1799 896-899

 

 

 

APPENDIX. XXIX

 

APPENDIX.

 

Captain Wait's weekly return, 1759 903

" " monthly return, 1759 904

Wages of Captain Wait's company, 1759 905

Captain Wait's bill for allowance, 1761 906

" men sent to Detroit, 907

Article from Edes' "Boston Gazette," October 2, 1775 907

Orders to Lieutenant-Colonel Wait, 1776 908

" from Benedict Arnold, 1776 908

Colonel Wait's account to General Sullivan, 1776 909

French Canadians in Colonel Hazen's regiment 912-916

Rev. Joshua Moody's account, 1676 917

Rates for Great Island, 1677 918-920

Summons to delinquent rate payers, 1678 920

Nathaniel Fryer's account, 1679 920

John Brewster's order, 1679 921

Bill of Robert Elliott, 1680 921

Mr. Moody to the selectmen, 1680 922

Shipping at Portsmouth, 1681 922

Letter of Elias Stileman, 1682 924

Notice to rate payers, 1682 924

Letter of John Light, payment of town rate, 1682 924

" Splan Lovell, 1682 924

Bill of Obadiah Morse, 1682 925

Governor Cranfield's proclamation, 1682 925

Permit to call a town meeting, 1683 926

Order of Governor and Council, 1683 926

Summons for contempt, 1683 927

Order of justices of the peace, 1684 927

John Pickering's bill, 1705 928

Letter to Colonel Hilton about powder supply, 1705 928

Report on school-houses, 1716 929

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS

 

PROVINCE AND STATE PAPERS.