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                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            209

 

                        TO THE OLD CHURCH IN WEST GLOVER.

 

                                      BY FREDERICK P. CHENEY, ESQ., OF GLOVER.

 

Seated within thy venerable walls,

How many bye-gone days the scene recalls.

The seats once filled by friends in manhood's pride

Now vacant, or by others occupied.

Here the elder and the younger Bliss belonged,

Accustomed both to prayer, the last to song,

Baker, Lyman, Woods and others whom we knew

Come fresh to mind, the face and voice and pew.

Here Mason taught the doctrines of the "Prince of Peace;"

"Inasmuch as to the least of these ye have done good,

Ye did it unto me in giving shelter, rest and food.

If on God's humble poor ye still will heap

Oppression, wrong and outrage, foul, and deep,

Will He His promises forget to keep?

Not He— God's wrath will not forever sleep,

Prophetic words! unyielding champion of right,

Who striving long in an unequal fight,

Desired the freedom of a race, but died without the sight.

Here, too, did Cressey with convincing mode

Lead men to seek the straight and narrow road.

Stone, for rhetoric and dignity renowned.

Here spoke and prayed in periods full and round.

Here the gifted Hough in burning eloquence

Poured forth religion's strong defence.

Here has the serious, philosophic Scott

By precept, and what's more, by practice taught

Lessons of perseverance, patience, thought.

And Windsor, Woodruff, Richardson, and Hatch,

Who, I trow, finds not for serisusness

In every youthful clergy, a match.

Perkins, too, whom Dr. Thayer refused to pass

As fit for duty in the army; lest alas!

He could not read his text, should he lose his convex glass;

Long may he live and preach, and practice long,

Profound in learning and in logic strong.

Here with friends and neighbors we have met in pass­ing years,

In times of sorrow, when choking sighs and blinding tears.

Told the deep grief in stricken hearts that mourn

For missing ones, by death from home's dear circle torn.

Thou dear old sanctuary, built by our frugal sires in early time,

When wearing homespun dress to church was not counted crime

When people had more love, friendship and religion and less pride;

Ere gents with polished "dickies" were from paper mills supplied;

Ere woman was by fashion's fiat doomed to wear

Uncouth, unwieldly waterfalls instead of comely well combed hair;

And ere New York and cruel Paris had presumed to dare

Bid her encounter chilling winter's blast with head—shalt I say bare?

Thine architecture somewhat ancient is no doubt,

And might by facing pews and people "right about"

More nearly ape the modern and fashionable style,

By letting down your preachers,—pshaw! you must not smile,

No levity is meant,—by letting down your preacher somewhat lower,

When he; instead of climbing up aloft, might walk across the floor.

But give one the same old style, a seat where I may sit and gaze

Upon the lips of Israel's sweet singers, as they raise

The solemn, sweet, inspiring song of praise.

                                                        Glover, Dec. 10, 1866.

 

                                           BAPTISMAL HYMN

 

[Sung at the baptism of a child of Mr. B. Thomas and

Mrs. Celestia C. Stevens of Glover, and written for the

occasion by the mother.]

 

O Thou, the cov'nant-keeping God, we come

To dedicate to Thee our little one,

In love Thou gavest him to us, and we

In heart and faith would give him back to Thee.

 

We ask not for him honor, wealth, or power,—

Bubbles of earth that perish in an hour;

We ask not for him length of days on earth,

But O, we pray Thee, grant him the new birth.

 

Keep him from sinful pleasures' fatal lure

And plant his feet upon foundation sure,

E'en on the "Rock of ages" cleft for sin,

Such the petitions we would crave for him.

 

If Thou dost grant him here, with us, to stay,

Help us to lead him in the narrow way,

Or if Thou takest him while life is young,

Thy praise, in grief, be yet upon our tongue.

                                                               May 9, 1869.

 

                                                      ———————————

 

                                    GREENSBORO.

 

                                                     BY REV. JAMES P. STONE.

 

This beautiful township of 6 miles square, lies in the southern extremity of Orleans, County.

Its altitude is considerably above that of the neighboring towns. Indeed, it has been said that in Greensboro, was the highest cul­tivated land in the State. Owing probably to its altitude, its winters are usually some 2 weeks longer than in some of the neighboring towns. But its soil is strong and productive, and its farms, in general, excellent. Few towns exhibit so many indications of thrift, especially among farmers, at Greensboro. Its population, at the present time, is probably between 1000 and 1100. Its lakes and ponds are several and important, the most admired of which is the Caspian, some­times also called "Lake Beautiful," nearly 3 miles in length and about half that in breadth. The waters of Greensboro flow both north and south. Black river, which flows north­ward to the Memphremagog, and also the Lamoille, both have their rise in Greensboro.

 

 

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At the eastern extremity of the Caspian, and just below its outlet, is the beautiful little

 

                                                 VILLAGE OF GREENSBORO,

 

where are some 25 neat dwellings, a hotel, 3 or 4 stores, excellent mills for sawing and grinding, also several shops where mechani­cal business of divers sorts is carried on, 2 churches, Congregational and Presbyterian, the town house and school-house.

Such is Greensboro at the present day. But such it once was not. Less than one hundred years ago, this town and all the sur­rounding country was an unbroken wil­derness, Then "the red man of the forest" might here erect his wigwam, pursue his game, or launch his light canoe, with no fear of being molested by men boasting a higher degree of civilization; or in his absence, the wild bear, the deer and the moose might roam through these forests unscared. But time rolls on, and anon new visions meet the eye. The sound of the axe is heard, announcing the approach of civilized men.

The Red Man retreats, the wild beasts retire, the thick forest is soon converted into a fruitful field, and neat and comely dwellings succeed the smoky wigwam.

As early as during the year 1776, in the midst of the Revolutionary struggle, the road was commenced by Gen. Bailey, which was, in 1779, extended and rendered passable, through Cabot, Walden, Hardwick, Greens­boro, Craftsbury, Albany to Lowell, and called the Hazen road. Upon this road, at different points, were erected block-houses, designed to serve as forts. One of these was in Greensboro, on the western side of the Caspian, on what was for many years known as the Cushing, and more recently as the William's farm.

In the summer of 1781, a party of the enemy from Canada, having boen to Peacham and made prisoners of Jacob Page, Col. John­son and Col. Elkins, then a youth, Capt. Ne­hemiah Loveland, with his company, was stationed there for the protection of the in­habitants. In September, he sent a scout of four men up the Hazen road. They pro­ceeded as far as Greensboro, where, while occupying the block-house above referred to, in an unguarded hour, while at a little distance from it, they were attacked by a party of Indians, and two of them, viz. Bliss of Thetford, and Moses Sleeper of Newbury, were shot down and scalped. Their companions, having offered no resistance, were led captives to Canada, and soon found themselves prisoners with Elkins of Peacham, in Quebec. Sometime subsequently, having been, by an exchange of prisoners released, they returned to Peacham. It was not till their return that the fate of Bliss and Sleeper was known by their friends, a party of whom at once proceeded to Greensboro; found the remains undisturbed, but in that loathsome condition naturally consequent upon long exposure to the weather. A grave was dug, and the putrid masses, unconfined, were rolled in and buried. And there, this day, in calm repose they rest. No monument has ever been erected, sacred to their memory; and the traveler passes near the spot without being reminded, or so much as knowing that there once fell, in their country's service, two of her worthy sons.

In November, 1780, the township was granted, and Aug. 20, 1781, chartered to Harris Colt and 66 associates. It was first named Coltshill, in honor of Mr. Colt. The name was afterwards changed to Greensboro, in honor of Mr. Green, one of the proprietors, and as being more euphonic.

It was not till several years subsequent to this, that attempts were made for permanent settlements here, nor is it known that during these years white men visited the place except in the capacity of huntsmen. There was the mighty hunter, Lyford of Cabot, who spent much time in the vicinity of the Caspian, having his camps at different points along its shore, the precise locations of some of which, it is said, can be pointed out to the visitor at the present day. Near one of these spots, not far from the north-western extremity of the lake, is a spring of water still known as the Lyford spring.

It was in one of those Lyford camps that the Rev. Messrs. Tolman and Wood found shelter, as they spent three days and nights in this wilderness, offering fervent and ear­nest prayers to God for the place and its future inhabitants. Thus was this soil re­ligiously consecrated, and Jehovah invoked to be the God of those who should afterwards dwell upon it, while as yet, not a single building was erected, or a field cleared, and while not a single human being could say, "this is my home."

In December of the following yew., 1788,

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            211

 

was held at Cabot a meeting of the proprie­tors of Greensboro, in attempting to attend which, one of them, Timothy Stanley lost a portion of his foot by frost. For want of surgical instruments, it is said that his toes and the lower part of his foot were removed by means of mallet and chisel, and that too, quite successfully.

 During the following Spring, settlements were commenced in Greensboro. From New­bury, then called Coos, in the Spring of 1789, came to Greensboro, Messrs. Ashbel and Aaron Shepard with their families. From Cabot Plain, a distance of 16 miles, the women had to proceed on foot, and all the furniture for both families was drawn on three hand-sleds. The families consisted of but 5 per­sons, viz. Ashbel Shepard and wife, and Aaron Shepard and wife and one child. Aaron and family went into the block house, formerly designed for a fort; Ashbel erected a log-cabin and began further south, on what has since been known as the Rand farm.

But, in August, Aaron Shepard returned to Newbury, leaving his brother Ashbel and wife through the winter as the sole inhab­itants of the town, during which time their nearest neighbors were, Mr. Benjamin Web­ster in Cabot, and Mr. Nathan Cutler in Craftsbury, then called Minden. At the same time, Col. Crafts and Mr. Trumbull, having for the winter left Minden, the Cutler family was the only family in that town; and the two constituted for a time, the entire population within the present limits of Or­leans County.

During that dreary and lonely winter, Mr. Shepard brought all his grain from Newbury, more than 50 miles; 16 miles of which he drew it upon a hand-sled, upon snow 4 or 5 feet deep. In the same manner, also, he drew hay for the support of his cow, from a beaver meadow of wild grass, 3 miles distant. As in these excursions, he usually had his mus­ket with him, he occasionally took some game; and once, instead of hay, he drew home a fine fat moose, which by a lucky shot he had felled in his path, thus furnishing meat for his household and the sons of the forest who, fatigued and hungry, were wont to visit his cottage.

During this season of loneliness, the two families, of Greensboro and Minden, were cheered by an arrival, not of the cars, nor of a stage coach, nor yet of chaise, wagon or sleigh; but of a hand-sled, drawn by three cheerly young men, and bearing upon it a precious burden, a healthful, comely girl of not quite 14 years. Her name was Mary Gerould. She was the step-daughter of Mr. Cutler of Minden. From Sturbridge, Mass., where a year before she was left by her parents for the purpose of attending school, she was in Jan., 1790, brought on her way by Col. Joseph Scott as far as Ryegate, Vt. Hav­ing been detained some 2 weeks at Ryegate, at the house of Squire Page, she was by him conveyed to the house of Dea. Elkins in Peacham. After a delay there of another 2 weeks, she was enabled to advance a little further. Hon. Aaron Robinson of Benning­ton, brought her to the house of Squire Lev­ensworth in Dewey's Gore, which now con­stitutes parts of Danville and Peacham; there she was subjected to another delay of ten days, when she came on horseback to the house of Lieut. Lyford on Cabot plain, and the next morning proceeded as before described towards Minden, drawn by Jesse Levenworth, Josiah Elkins and Obed Cutler, a son of her step-father. The party reached the house of Mr. Shepard, the only house between Cabot and Minden, about noon. It hardly need be said that Mrs. Shepard, in the absence of her husband for a hand-sled load of hay, gave them a hearty greeting, and as comfortable a dinner as circumstances would allow. Cheered and refreshed, the party proceeded on their way, and just as the sun was going down, reached the house of the parents of Obed Cutler and Mary Gerould. For months previous to this, no female had been seen by Mrs. Shepard or Mrs. Cutler. Who can ex­press the joy of that mother, after such a sea­son of loneliness, at such an arrival? The arrival, not only of a fellow creature of her own sex, but of a tender and affectionate daughter? And who can describe the emo­tions which stirred the bosom of that young maiden, after a dreary and lonely journey of weeks among strangers, and where much of the way human dwellings could not be seen for many miles, on being permitted in this wilderness to behold the face of her own mother?

Those families have long since passed away. But that daughter afterward lived 70 years in Greensboro, where she died in the autumn of 1864, and is still remembered with interest and affection even by the youth and

 

 

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children, and spoken of by the endearing appellation, "Grandma'am Stanley."

About the middle of March, Mrs. Cutler, prompted by a sense of duty, as well as desire, visited her neighbor, Mrs. Shepard, making the trip with her best carriage the hand-sled; and with her she remained some little time. During this visit, Mar. 25, 1790, Mrs. Shepard became the joyful mother of the first white child ever born in Greensboro, and probably, within the present limits of Orleans County; viz. William Scott Shepard,—late of Southport, Wis. To him the proprietors voted a hundred acres of land near the center of the town.

About this time Mr. Aaron Shepard and family, who had left, the summer previous, returned, and with them came Mr. Horace Shepard and family. Thus were there in town three families instead of one. At or near the time of the coming of those families, came also their sister, Miss Susan Shepard, some of the way, it is said, on foot, or other­wise upon a hand-sled, to reside in the family of Ashbel, as helper and nurse.—She after­wards became the wife of Col. Levi Stevens.

The same year, also, came Timothy Stan­ley, and erected, near the outlet of the lake, a saw-mill. Soon came his brother, Joseph Stanley, in the capacity of blacksmith, and put up a shop. During the following year, 1791, arrived Mr. John Law, Dea. Peleg Hill, Peleg Hill, Jr. and James Hill and their fam­ilies, and probably some others; about which time a grist-mill was erected by Timothy Stanley, who, early in the following year, 1792, was married to Miss Eunice Hunting­ton, of Shaftsbury, whom he removed to Greensboro, having previously built a log-house near the spot where now stands the house of Mr. Ingals.

Quite a number of families were now fairly settled here, and Mar. 29, 1793, the town was organized, the first town meeting being held at the house of Ashbel Shepard.

The precise time of the arrival of each of the first settlers it is impossible to ascertain. But we now fall upon another item of history by which we are enabled to ascer­tain pretty nearly who were the dwellers in Greensboro in 1793. That year, on the 25th day of July, in a frame-house, standing on the eminence west of the road about half way from the mills, to the Congregational meeting-house, where is what, was recently known as Maj. Waterman's garden, was a wedding, the first in the town or county. Mr. Joseph Stanley of Greensboro and Miss Mary Ger­ould of Craftsbury, were then and there joined in marriage by Timothy Stanley, Esq. As there was no minister or qualified justice in Craftsbury, and as the couple were to reside in Greensboro, it was arranged that the wedding dinner should be at Craftsbury; after which the parties, upon horses which had been procured for the occasion from Peacham, proceeded to Greensboro for the marriage ceremony. To this wedding all the inhabitants of the town were invited, and it is believed, with the exception of five adults and a few children, attended. Mr. and Mrs. Smith who lived near Craftsbury, and Ash­bel Shepard and Levi Stevens, who had gone to Newbury for provisions, and also Mrs. Vance, failed of being present. But these were present, as remembered by Mrs. Stanley, Dea. Hill, Peleg Hill, Jr. and Jas. Hill and their wives, Mr. John Law and wife, Capt. David Stone and wife, Capt. Timothy Hin­man and family, Mr. Silas Davidson and wife, Mr. Aaron Shepard and Mr. Horace Shepard and their wives, Timothy Stanley, Esq. and wife, Mr. David Vance, Mrs. Ashbel Shepard and Mrs. Levi Stevens, and perhaps some children. After the marriage ceremony, at the house of the groom, the wedding sup­per was served up in good style, out of doors, in front of Judge Stanly's log-house. This newly married couple constituted the fifteenth family in Greensboro.*

From this period, new settlers were from time to time coming in, and new roads were being opened, and fruitful fields began to multiply. According to Mr. Thompson, there were in town in 1795, 23 families, and 108 persons. These were probably the families of the three Shepards, the three Hills, the two Stanleys, Col. Levi Stevens, Mr. David Vance, Mr. Jonathan Nay, Mr. John Law, Capt. David Stone, Mr. John Carpenter, Mr. Amos Smith, Mr. Amos Dodge, Mr. Ichabod Dagget, Mr. Jonahan Pottengill, Thomas Tolman, Esq., Mr. Asahel Jerould, Mr. Josiah Elkins, Mr. Obed Cutler and Capt. Timothy Hinman. Capt. Hinman soon removed to

—————

* The second wedding in Greensboro was that of Mr. Samuel Stevens of Hardwick, and Miss Puah Millen of G., at the house of Capt. David Stone. The bride Was Mrs. Stone's sister.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            213

 

Derby, where he was afterwards known as Judge Hinman.

Soon other names began to be known among the settlers. In 1796, came Mr. Wal­ton as miller, and lived in the mill-house. In 1797, came Dr. Samuel Huntington and com­menced where is now the large house, owned and occupied these 40 years past, or more, by Col. Samuel Baker, also, Mr. Samuel Elkins, and commenced at the N. W. extremity of the Caspian, and also Mr. Amos Blanchard, where now lives H. S. Tolman Esq.

In 1798, came John Ellsworth Esq, and commenced some 2 miles east of the lake. In 1799, came Aaron Farnham and commenced towards the north part of the town, and in February of the same year Mr. Williard Lin­coln succeeded Josiah Elkins on what has since till recently, been known as the Lincoln farm.

The came year, or early the year following, came Ephriam Strong and Ashbel Hale, as merchants, with a large stock of goods, with which they commenced trade in a large bedroom in Timothy Stanly's new frame house. In 1800, they built the large house still stand­ing on the place just vacated by Capt. Hin­man, a short distance south of the village near the forks of the two roads leading to, Hardwick Street, in which both John and O. W. Ellsworth have since lived; the south­west room of which was fitted up for a store; in which they did business for 2 or 3 years, when they removed their goods into a large store which they had just completed, a little below the house and nearer to the road. In 1801, Mr. John Law, having sometime previ­ously removed from his original pitch, was succeeded by Mr. Charles Cook, on the farm where he lived and died, and where his son Charles Cook, Esq. lived till his death in March, 1803. During, the following year came Asahel Washburn, as clothier. His house stood upon the ground now occupied by the dwelling of Jabez Pinney, Esq.

About these years began, also other settlers, among whom are remembered, Capt. Marvin Grow, afterwards known as Elder Grow, Mr. Aaron Rice, Mr. Seth Eddy, Mr. Jacob Bab­bitt, Mr. James Rollins, Mr. Nathaniel John­son, Capt. George Risley, Mr. John Phipps, Mr. Elnathan Gates, Mr. Peter Randall, and Richard Randall, Mr. Luther Scott; and Mr. Moses K. Haines, and soon his father, Mat­thias Haines, and his family, so that already was the population of the town by no means inconsiderable. Of the period that has elapsed since those early days, we can speak but very briefly. Suffice it to say, that the population has increased slowly, but gradually and regu­larly from the first until now. The census re­turns for the several decades have been re­ported thus. In 1791, the population was 19 persons. In 1800—280; in 1810—560; in 1820—625; in 1830—784; in 1840—884; in 1850—1008; in 1860—1065.

Public roads have become sufficiently nu­merous. It is said that the first ever laid through the town after its settlment was the old road to Glover, formerly known as the Norton road, and that was done through the agency of Cap. Hinman, who was anxious to prepare the way for the settlement of Derby, by extending it to that town, in which he finally succeeded. That old Norton road, up to the time of the running away of the great pond in 1810, and the subsequent laying of the road through its bed, called the Runaway Pond Road, was the principal thoroughfare between Central and Northern Vermont; but has since been superseded by others, and is now comparatively little known to travelers.

Of schools, the first ever taught in Greens­boro, was in the Summer of 1794, in Aaron Shepard's barn. The teacher was Miss Anne, Hill, who also taught, the following Summer in the barn of Ashbel Shepard. In the same place soon after, Miss Eunice Stoddard, taught a school. She afterwards became the wife of Col. Elkins of Peacham. The third teacher ever employed in the town was Miss Jane Johnson, who occupied the first school­house over built in Greensboro, which stood on an eminence on the old road from Greensboro village to Hardwick street. That house, not many years after, was destroyed by fire , but another was soon built on, or near the same spot, afterwards known as the South school-house, to distinguish it from an­other also built at an early date, known as the North school-house, still standing, in a dilap­idated condition, a little north of the center of the town. Since those days schools have multiplied, so that instead of one or two, the No. of school districts in 1850, was 15, in most of which, schools were sustained both Summer and Winter.

In regard to general health, Greensboro has usually been considered as, favorably lo­cated. Some of its inhabitants have lived to

 

 

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a great age. A Mr. Bush who died in March 1845, was supposed, by his children, to have reached his 115 years. Next to him in age was Mrs. Susan Corlis, formerly Shepard the mother of the Shepards who were the first settlers of the town. Her age, at the time of her decease, Oct. 4, 1840, was 100 years and 25 days. For many years the place has been much visited by persons from abroad in quest of health. But here as well as elsewhere have been from the first, sick­ness and death. The first adult person who was by death removed from among the inhab­itants, was Mrs. Hill, wife of Dea. Peleg Hill. The precise date of her death cannot now be ascertained. Her remains still sleep upon the farm recently owned and occupied by her grandson Samuel Hill, Esq., and more recent­ly by her great grand-son, the late Mr. Joseph Hill. In the year 1802, from 7 families, 14 persons were suddenly removed by dysentery. These were the wife and 3 children of Col. Levi Stevens, 3 children of Wm. Sanborn, 2 of Timothy Stanley, 2 of Joseph Stanley, one child of Cap. David Stone, one of Cap. James Andrew, and one of Stephen Adams. Mrs. Stevens was the second adult who died among the settlers. Scarcely had this season of ter­rible distress passed away, when small pox, was introduced, occasioning very much suf­fering, and by which two or three children, of the families of James Hill and Jonathan Nay, died.

As, for many years, since those early days, no record of the deaths in town was kept, or at least that can now be found;* of the mor­tality from the first, nothing definite can be ascertained. But the writer of this sketch, having been 11 years a pastor in Greensboro, remembers, that during those years, ending with December 1861, he had recorded the names of 200 of the inhabitants, who had during those years been removed by death. And he knows that during the 12 years pro­ceeding Jan. 1, 1862—no fewer than 215 had died, while doubtless some had died, of whose deaths he was not informed.

 

                                                CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

 

Of the different religious organizations in Greensboro, something should be brifly said. But first it may be remarked that from the first settlement of the town, God has ever had a church in it. True there was not at first nor for many years any regularly organized Christian body; but with gratitude be it said, the fathers of Greensboro, were Christian men.

From the time when those ministers of the Lord Jesus, encamping on the Lake shore, poured forth prayer to God for the future in­habitants of the place, and pronounced as it were a benediction upon its soil, and reared upon it an altar unto the Lord; it has been, by the great hearer of prayer, ever held in kind remembrance. From the log-cabin of Ashbel Shepard, prayer and praise ascended as sweet incense before Jehovah's throne. When a few families had settled here: Ash­bel Shepard and Dea. Hill, were wont to as­semble the people upon the Sabbath and at other times for divine worship. At private dwellings, at first, and afterwards in school­houses, the fathers and mothers of Greensboro were accustomed to meet and worship, long before any church was organized, generally without, but once in a great while with, the aid of a minister. The first of these ministers remembered long by the people, was Rev. Mr. Sparhawk, of Worcester county, Mass. Another was Rev. Mr. Strong, of Connecti­cut. But still there was no regular organiza­tion, no regular church, no administration of the ordinances, no power of church discipline, and there were no seasons of communion. These Christian fathers and mothers perceiv­ing the inconvenience and the wrong of this, resolved upon becoming a regularly organized Christian body. Accordingly, on the 24th day of November, 1801, in the store chamber of Messrs Hale and Strong, twenty-one per­sons, hopefully pious, of whom nine were males and twelve females, convened for the purpose of being organized into a Christian church. With them were, present at their re­quest, Rev. Leonard Worcester of Peacham, Rev. Samuel Collins of Craftsbury, and Elder Tuttle of Hardwick, and other Christian friends from Congregational and Baptist churches out of town, to witness the solemn business about to be transacted. Rev. Mr. Worcester offered a solemn and pertinent prayer. Then in the presence of many wit‑

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* The town records were destroyed by fire, with the store, and extensive stock of goods, belonging to Storrs and Langdon, Aug. 9, 1831

There was another extensive conflagration, Dec. 6, 1838, when the large store of Babbitt and Gleason, on the ground where is now the store of A. C. Babbitt, was consumed, with 7 or 8 other buildings. The fire origin­ated, as was supposed, in Col. Stevens' oat-mill.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            215

 

nesses, the individuals who were to constitute the Congregational church of Greensboro gave some account of their religious experi­ence, and the reasons of the hope that was in them; after which they were "banded togeth­er in a Christian form, as a church of Christ."

The names of the persons that day organ­ized into a church were; Seth Eddy, Ashbel Shepard, Wm. Sanborn, Matthias Haines, John Phipps, Ephraim Strong, Wm. Sher­burne, George Risley, Daniel Johnson, Zilpha Ring, Sarah Haines, Elizabeth Eddy, Dor­othy Lincoln, Elizabeth Sanborn, Sally Ells­worth, Clarissa Strong, Peggy Sherburne, Mary Gates, Abigail Haines, Rebecca Haines, and Sally Johnson.

On the same day, the little band made choice of Ashbel Shepard, as moderator, Eph­raim Strong, as clerk, and Seth Eddy, as deacon.

On the following day, which was the Sab­bath, Rev. Mr. Worcester being present, the church publicly assented to their articles of faith—the same still in use—took upon themselves the covenant; and were by Mr. Wor­cester declared to be a regularly organized Christian church. To this little band others were soon added. In January, 1805, George Risley became a member; and in April Asa­hel Washburn; and before the close of that year, Horace Shepard, Jonathan Nay, Cyn­thia Phipps, Jerusha Shepard, Abigail Cham­berlain, Israel Bill, Elizabeth Nay, Aaron Farnham, Florilla Farnham, Peter Farnham, Catherine Farnham, Betsey Parmelee, Mary Bill, Sally Libbe, Obed Cutler and Azubah Cutler, making the whole number 40 persons, up to the close of the year 1805. After that additions were frequent, so that during the first 50 years of its existence, the whole list of names upon the church catalogue numbered 326. The greatest numbers however, were received during the years, 1810, 1817, 1831, 1840, 1851 and 1854, during which years re­spectively were added, 19, 57, 29, 17, 33 and 23 persons. Up to the first of October, 1867, the total membership of this church, from the date of its organization, had been 384. But owing to the great number of re­movals by death, dismission, or otherwise, its actual membership at that time was but 96.

Upon the list of its members are to be found the names of five ministers, not including its own pastors; 11 wives of ministers, 7 missionaries and missionary teachers; and at least 3 physicians.

The pastors and acting pastors have been as follows: First, Rev. Salmon King, regu­larly installed July 11, 1810; dismissed, Jan. 25, 1814. He removed to Silver Lake, Pa. During the following 11 years, only occasional ministerial labor was enjoyed. Of the minis­ters who during this interval preached more or less frequently to this people, sometimes at the north school-house, and sometimes at the south, may be found the names of Hobert, Goddard, Williston, Randall, Davis, Lawton, Bingham, Low, Clement and James Parker, Levi Parsons, and once in a great while, Wor­cester of Peacham, Washburn of Royalton, Lyman of Brookfield and Wright of Montpelier. Oftenest, it would seem, were the people fa­vored with the labors of Rev. James Hobert, who for a time appears to have taken a kind of oversight, visiting the place and adminis­tering the sacrament once in 3 months.

But in September, 1825, Rev. Kiah Bailey became acting pastor, and continued such till Match, 1829. It was duriug his ministry the meeting-house, the first ever built in town, was erected and dedicated. The dedication took place Sept. 25, 1827. Mr. Bailey preach­ed. Mr. Loomis and Mr. Case assisted in the services.

After Mr. Bailey had left, the desk was, for a while supplied by Rev. Lyman Case. Then there was only occasional preaching, by Rev. E. W. Kellogg, Rev. Amariah Chandler, Rev. R. Page and others, till May, 1833, when ap­pears the name of Rev. Jacob Loomis, who was acting pastor, during that and the follow­ing year. But, near the beginning of the year 1835, he was succeeded by Rev. Wm. A. Chapin, who in January, 1841, was regularly installed as pastor, and continued in that re­lation till his death, which occurred Nov. 27, 1850, making the whole period of his very useful ministry with this people, almost 16 years.

Mr. Chapin was succeeded by Rev. James P. Stone, who became acting pastor in Decem­ber, 1850, and remained till the close of the year 1861. During these 11 years, 84 per­sons were received to the church, a good par­sonage was built, the meeting-house remod­eled and improved, a fine church bell procured and $2,787.83 contributed for the various ob­jects of Christian benevolence. At the end of this period Mr. Stone removed to West

 

 

216                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

Randolph, having declined the call of the church to be at that time installed as regular pastor.

During 1862 and 1863, Rev. Andrew Royce was acting pastor, but his health failed and he removed to Waterbury, where he died. In May 1864. Mr. A. W. Wild began to labor with the church, and on the 26th of the fol­lowing October, was ordained and installed as pastor, and is pastor at the present time.

The deacons of this church have been as follows: Seth Eddy, chosen at its organiza­tion; died Oct. 21, 1814; Ephraim Strong, chosen Oct. 4, 1810; dismissed in May, 1814; Aaron Farnham, chosen Sept. 27, 1817; dis­missed June 22, 1821; William Conant, chosen Sept. 27, 1817; died April 8, 1868, having been deacon 51 years; Frederic Ells­worth, chosen Feb. 14, 1828; dismissed after a few years; Samuel Baker, chosen Oct. 1834; died April 9, 1868; Benjamin Comings and Matthew Marshall, chosen Dec. 2, 1864; still acting.

 

                                                BAPTISTS AND METHODISTS.

 

A Baptist church was organized at an early date, which was once somewhat large, and for a time seemed prosperous, but whose continuance was brief. That church first en­joyed the ministerial labors of Elder Mason, of Craftsbury: and afterwards of Elder Mar­vin Grow, who was regularly ordained and installed as its pastor. Its organization has long since ceased to be maintained and noth­ing of it now remains. Methodist organiza­tions have had a being in the central and north part of the town; but without much prosperity, and sustained preaching but a small part of the time.

 

                                     THE ASSOCIATE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,

 

was organized Jan. 13, 1845, at the house of Mr. John Taylor, consisting at first of 20 members. Their neat and comely house of worship was dedicated in 1850. About the first of October, of that year, their first pas­tor, Rev. Gawn Campbell, was installed. He remained as their pastor 11 years, when, in Oct. 1861, he was dismissed having accepted a call from a church in the city of New York. During Mr. Campbell's pastorate, his people were favored with a good degree of union and prosperity; and the little church of 20 in­creased to nearly 100 members. Since then it has had sore trials and less of prosperity, but has sustained preaching the greater part of the time.

In June, 1814, was organized, in Greens­boro, by Col. Asahel Washburn, the first Sabbath school ever organized in the State. Two years previous he had commenced the catechetical instruction of children, in his own house, on Sabbath evenings, and occa­sionally these exercises were by request held at the houses of some of his neighbors. They were interesting and profitable; but not till June. 1814, was the Sabbath school strictly so called, publicly and formally organized in the old South school-house. But here, why not let Col. W. tell his own story, in his own words, as published in the Vt. Chronicle of Aug. 10, 1842.

 

"SABBATH SCHOOLS IN ORLEANS COUNTY, THEIR ORIGIN AND EARLY HISTORY.

 

Messrs. Bishop and Tracy: It is always pleasant to review the dealings of Providence with us, and His blessing upon Christian ef­forts, especially when those efforts have been connected with the good of children and youth. In looking back upon a long life, I am led to exclaim, 'A word fitly spoken, is like apples of gold in pictures of silver," I allude here to a question proposed more than half a century ago in an assembly of minis­ters of Christ in the State of Connecticut, (most of whom I trust are now in Heaven) and related to me by one of its members. The question was this, 'What shall we do to be more useful?' and the answer, 'Do more for the children and youth.' The question and reply were set home to my heart, and followed me for many years with their influ­ence on my thoughts and actions. In remov­ing from a more favored part of New Eng­land where Gospel privileges were fully enjoyed, into the town of Greensboro, in the northern part of Vermont, which was then comparatively a wilderness, and where the preaching of the Gospel was seldom enjoyed, the question came home, with more solemn emphasis, 'What can I do for the young and rising generation?' I would here state an in­teresting incident previous to the first settle­ment of the town. Two ministers knelt upon this soil and prayed most earnestly that the town might be settled by a moral and relig­ious people. The event showed in a great measure the answer to their prayers. A large proportion of the first settlers of the town were professedly pious, among whom were three liberally educated men.* With these and others, I frequently convened on the great subject which lay near my heart. Having at the time never heard of Sabbath schools, our first effort was, to go from house to house, with our children, to pray with them and instruct them in the Assembly's catechism. This course was continued for 2 years or more. At length one brother, allud‑

—————

* Thomas Tolman, Esq., Ashbel Hale, Esq., and Dea. Ephraim Strong.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            217

 

ing to my desire to benefit the young, said: 'Perhaps we have stood in this brother's way too long; we will try to help him.' At this time an influential sister of the church, who had not previously engaged with us in the work, led her children to my house, on a Sab­bath evening, requesting me to instruct them as I did my own children. From this period we date the commencement of a Sabbath school; for on the next Sabbath, in conse­quence of information given, that instruction in the Scriptures and Catechism would be given publicly. The children came in, like an overflowing stream. This was in June, 1814. The books which were committed to memory, were the Bible, various hymns, the Assembly's shorter Catechism, and Watts', Wilber's and Emerson's catechisms. One of the educated men before alluded to, * though not pious, engaged in the Sabbath school with great interest. While hearing his class recite in the Assembly's Catechism, on respecting the question, 'What doth every sin deserve? was so much affected that he could not finish hearing the class, and shortly after be obtain­ed hope in Christ. At the time to which I allude, the wilderness state of the country was so great, that three bears were hunted and killed within half a mile of the school-house, in which our first Sabbath school was held. Yet the bears were not sent to devour the children, for it is a remarkable fact that for 4 or 5 years after the first establishment of our Sabbath school, containing some 500 children, no death occurred among the schol­ars. We were much assisted in our efforts by the Hartford, (Ct.) Bible Society; the Hamp­shire County (Mass.) Missionary Society, by Maj. Edward Hooker, Farmington, Ct., and Mr. Andrews, a book binder, Hartford, Ct. in donations of books &c.

We formed a Sabbath school union of 8 towns, in the vicinity and held frequent ex­amination, (or exhibitions, as they were some­times called,) of the schools. One of these, (the first of the kind ever held in the State, was in the large barn of Ashbel Hale, Esq.) fitted up for the occasion. This was in June 1817. At this gathering, where were present more than 400 children, the spirit of the Lord began to move on the minds of the assembled youth, many of whom were affected to weep­ing, and then followed a powerful revival of religion. It is an interesting fact that of those families who had zealously labored in the Sabbath schools, many, and in some in­stances, all the members, were sharers in the work, as some of the first fruits of which 53 were added to the Congregational church, of Greensboro that same year. The work spread more or less, into all the towns belonging to our Sabbath school union. At that time there were no ministers in those towns.

From those associated, in that first Sabbath school in Greensboro, nine have been sent as Missionaries, or assistant missionaries to the heathen, and eight have become ministers to labor in our own land.

I would now say, that though I have often been tired in the Sabbath school, I have nev­er been tired of it; and I would exhort those on whom the burden now rests, to be faithful in their good work, knowing that great will be their reward in Heaven. In view of the spread of this blessed work, and the happy and glorious results which have followed, I would now say, with good old Simeon, 'Lord now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace; for mine eyes have seen thy Salvation."

 

                                                                  SENEX.

 

It is said that during the first 3 years of the existence of that Sabbath school union, mentioned in Col. W.'s letter, there were committed to memory and recited by the children connected with it, 500,000 verses of Scripture, besides catechisms, hymns and other good things.

From the days of Col. Washburn until now Sabbath schools have ever been well sustained in Greensboro. In the Congregational church always, and in the Presbyterian church, for the most part, since its organiza­tion, there have been good Sabbath schools; and frequently during the Summer months there have been mission Sabbath schools in the different school-districts in the remoter parts of the town.

During the Summers of 1858 and 1859, there were in town 9 interesting district Sabbath schools, all well sustained and furnished with good libraries, besides the two in the churches, making 11 in all. In these, several hundred of children and youth were gathered, and scores of thousands of verses of Scripture an­nually committed, and recited, in addition to the regular question-book exercises.

That the general prosperity, intelligence, good order and good morals of Greensboro has been in part the result of the healthful influence of its Sabbath schools, so early in­stituted, and so faithfully and persistently sustained, there cannot be any reasonable doubt.

 

Soldiers of 1861 or the Memorial Record of the soldiers who enlisted from Greensboro, Ver­mont, to aid in subduing the Great Rebel­lion of 1861-5, accompanied by a brief history of each regiment that left the State. Prepared by E. E. Rollins.

 

The inhabitants of Greensboro felt as deeply as any portion of the country the responsibility resting upon them, of helping to crush out the spirit of rebellion existing among the people of the south, and, with few

—————

* Ashbel Hale, Esq.

 

 

218                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

exceptions, with strong arms and willing hearts, performed well their part in the great work. If they did not enlist, they encour­aged others to do so, by offering various inducements to them. And while the fallen brave are held in grateful remembrance by all true patriots, let not the surviving soldiers be entirely forgotten. Let us remember those who sacrificed all the pleasures and comforts of home, to stand is the battle's front between their fellow citizens and the rebel horde who sought to destroy this glori­ous union, and the institutions of the land.

There were no better soldiers in the army than those who enlisted from Greensboro, and while none of them attained to a high rank, yet the cause is sufficiently plain without be­ing in any way detrimental to them. There was no company, or majority of a company, organized in this town. There were only eight from this town in any one company, with the exception of Co. I, 15th Regiment, in which there were about 20. As a result of this, they had, as it were, no voice in the election of officers, either commissioned or non-commissioned — that is, in comparison with other and larger towns. But their ser­vices were just as valuable to the country, and they are entitled to as much praise as though they had all been generals. They periled their own lives fbr the sake of those who remained at home. They did so wil­lingly and cheerfully.

The most that can be said in favor of any soldier is, that knowing his duty, he perform­ed it; and this can be said of nearly every soldier that enlisted from this town. There were four or five who became discouraged by the prospect of a long and tedious service, and disgracefully deserted their comrades in arms; but their punishment, which will last during their lives, will be sufficiently severe without addition by any one. Before giving an account of each soldier, a short account will be given of the action of the town, in regard to enlisting them, in connection with the various calls of the President under which they were enlisted, and in the last chapter an account of each regiment. The move­ments of each soldier while with the regi­ment, can thus be easily ascertained, and when absent, a detailed account of his doings will he given after his name.

The various calls of the President for troops during the war were as follows:

 

Apr. 15, 1861—                                      9 months men,                            75,000

July 22, 1861—                                     3 years men,                              500,000

July 5, 1862—                                       3 years men,                              300,000

Aug. 4, 1862—                                       9 months men,                          300,000

Oct. 17, 1863—                                     3 years men,                              300,000

Feb. 1, 1864—                                       3 years men,                              200,000

Mar. 14, 1864—                                     3 years men,                              200,000

July 18, 1864—                                     3 years men,                              500,000

Dec. 19, 1864—                                     3 years men,                              300,000

                                                            Total,                                     2,675 000

 

Of the 75,000 three months men, none enlisted from this town. Three enlisted at the same time for the Second Regiment, and were the first who enlisted from this town. There names were Seth P. Somers, George Withers and Elisha E. Rollins. The Third Regiment was raised shortly after, and six of our citizens enlisted in that organization. The First, Second and Third Regiments were recruited in the State at large, and when the State soon after adjusted its accounts with the United States, it found itself accredited to a large number of men who had not been accredited to the various towns. The surplus was immediately accredited to the towns according to their population, and appears in the report as miscellaneous men, not ac­credited by name.

Under the call of July, 1861, the quota of this town was fixed at 32. These who had previously enlisted were accredited on that number. Recruiting was immediately com­menced for the Fourth and Fifth Regiments. Eight men from this town joined the Fourth Regiment, but none enlisted for the Fifth. Recruiting was continued by the selectmen, and five were enlisted for the Sixth Regi­ment, three for the Seventh, one for tho Eighth, and three for the Ninth Regiment. Under the call of July 5, 1862, the quota of this town was fixed at 15, and recruiting pro­gressed rapidly for the Tenth and Eleventh Regiments. Only one of our citizens enlisted in the Tenth, and six in the Eleventh. A call was issued Aug. 4, 1862, for 300,000 nine months men, and the quota of this town was fixed at 18. But twenty-two men enlisted for the Fifteenth Regiment, and the town gave them a bounty of $25 each.

A town meeting was held Dec. 12, 1862, and it was voted to pay the balance due for soldiers' bounty, amounting to $40, deducting that paid by individuals. And it was also voted to raise fifty cents on a dollar of the grand list, to pay bounties and town expenses. A draft was made Aug. 28, 1863, with the

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            219

 

following result: Whole number drafted 12, of whom four entered the service. One (Thomas Abraham) procured a substitute, and seven paid $300 commutation, which amount exempted them from being liable to perform military duty for 3 years. Their names are as follows: Samuel P. Campbell, Benjamin Cate, Joseph A. Crane, Robert Esdon, Wallace W. Goss, George W. Wood and George Young. There were two persons not drafted, Henry Tolman and Clark Baker, who procured substitutes.

A call was issued Oct. 17, 1863, for 300,000 3 years men, and a town meeting was held Dec. 3, 1863, when it was voted to pay each recruit enlisted to fill the quota of the town on the last call for 300,000, $300; also to pay each recruit enlisted to fill the quota on the draft, $300, provided they were called for; and it was also voted to raise one hundred cents on a dollar of the grand list to pay town expenses.

Two calls were subsequently issued for 200,000 men each,—one on Feb. 1, 1864, and the other March 14, 1864. A town meeting was held June 15, 1864, when it was voted to pay each volunteer, enlisted and mustered in, $350; also to pay $300 to all drafted men who enter the service, either by themselves or by substitutes.

In December, 1863, an opportunity was offered by the government for soldiers who had served 2 years to re-enlist, and they were assured by their officers, that they would receive the $100 bounty to which they were entitled, as well as all other bounties then being paid, including the local bounty then being paid by the various towns. Such was the confidence of the soldiers, then at the front, in the patriotism, generosity and good faith of the people at home, that many read­ily accepted the offer, and were furnished with a 35 days furlough, enabling them to proceed home and conclude a bargain with their own town officers, or with those of some other town, for the local bounty then being paid. Four men re-enlisted to the credit of this town for 3 years, as follows: Elnathan Bailey, Wm. K. Montgomery, Stephen B. Rogers and George Shepard. They entered upon their next 2 years full in the faith that they would receive as much bounty as was then being given to other recruits. But in this they were mistaken. The recruiting officers had got their names by dallying with them, without making any definite bargain, and when the time came that the bounty should be paid, they refused to pay what was justly due to four as valuable men to the service as ever left the town.

A call was issued July 18, 1864, for 500,000 3 years men. A town meeting was held Aug. 10, 1864, when it was voted to raise two hundred cents on a dollar of the grand list to defray town expenses; also to instruct the selectmen to deposit money in the State Treasury for the purpose of obtaining recruits from the Southern States, the amount depos­ited being left discretionary with the select­men.

Another meeting was held Aug. 24, 1864, and it was voted to rescind a vote passed June 15, 1864, in regard to bounties; also voted to leave the question of bounties solely with the selectmen; and it was also voted to pay a bounty, at the discretion of the select­men, to any man who should furnish himself with a substitute.

At a meeting held Sept. 29, 1864, it was voted to pay a bounty for the five extra vol­unteers, above the quota of the town, on the last call, as procured and paid by the select­men; also voted to raise three hundred cents on a dollar of the grand list to pay bounties and the indebtedness of the town.

A call was issued Dec. 19, 1864, for 300,000 3 years men. And a town meeting was held Jan, 19, 1865, when it was voted to instruct the selectmen to procure volunteers as cheaply as possible, not exceeding the number required from the town on the last call for 300,000, Another meeting was held Sept. 21, 1865, and it was voted to raise two hundred cents on a dollar of the grand list to pay the indebtedness of the town and necessary expenses.

Thus it will be seen that eight hundred and fifty cents on a dollar of the grand list had been raised, which amount left the town nearly even, as $22,000 had been paid for bounties and other expenses of the town.

Dec. 3, 1864, six men were required from this town to fill its deficiency under all calls. These men were promptly enlisted.

The whole number of men who enlisted during the war is as follows:

Different men enlisted to the credit of the town,                                                                    100

Re-enlisted in the field, accredited to the town,                                                                         4

 

 

220                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

Discharged and enlisted, accredited to the town,                                  3

                                                                                              ———

                                    Total actual enlistments,                            107

Miscellaneous, not accredited by name,                                               7

                                                                                              ———

                                    Aggregate,                                               114

Enlisted for 9 months,      22

Enlisted for 1 year,          17

Enlisted for 3 years,        68

                                                                                              ———

                                    Total,                                                     107

Killed in action,               6

Died from wounds received in action,                                                 7

Died of disease,              19

                                                                                              ———

                                    Total deaths,                                             32

Deserted,                       5

Discharged,                    63

                                                                                              ———

                                    Total,                                                     100

 

In the following account, received from the soldiers themselves, or their friends, all soldlers not otherwise designated, enlisted for 3 years. An account is also given of ten of our citizens who enlisted in other States or towns. Their names are Wirt Blake, John B. Cook, Luther M. T. Calderwood, John M. Hammond, Fletcher E. Kenniston, Sumner P. Rollins, Andrew J. Rollins, J. R. Wood­ward, John Olmstead, Sherman S. Pinney.

 

                                                         WYMAN H. ALLEN

 

age 21, enlisted at Montpelier, May 7, '61, Co. F, 2d Reg., mustered June 20, at Bur­lington; proceeded with the company to Washington, and remained with it until acci­dentally wounded in the knee by a bayonet; sent to Douglas Hospital, Washington, Mar. 1, '62, and remained there until May 1; taken with the small pox, sent to Kalarama Hospital; remained until June 1, returned to Douglas Hospital; received his discharge July 19, '62. Feb. 7, '65, re-enlisted in 8th Reg., for one year; assigned to Co. C, mus­tered in at Burlington, Feb. 7th, proceeded to Conscript Camp, Fair Haven, Ct.; remained 3 weeks; sent to the Reg. at Summit Point, W. Va.; with it until mustered out at Ball's Cross Roads, Va., June 28, '65; received $625.00 bounty from this town on last en­listment.

 

                                                     FREDERICK ATHERTON

 

enlisted at Greensboro, July 8, '61; age 30. He was mustered in at St. Johnsbury, July 16, in Co. G, 3d Reg.; deserted to the rebels Oct. 10, '61, since which time nothing has been heard from him.

 

                                                          LUMAN E. AMES,

 

son of Royal Ames; born in Greensboro; enlisted at Barton, age 18, Sept. 3, '62, and was mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, '62, Co. I, 15th Reg. While in camp at Fairfax Station, in February, was taken with the lung fever, and sent to the regimental hospital, where he remained about 6 weeks; when nearly recovered, returned to the com­pany; taken with the measles, sent to the Methodist Church Hospital, at Alexandria, where he remained until discharged from the service, July 2, '63.

 

                                                        DANIEL W. BAILEY,

                                                                       

son of Samuel Bailey, born in Barnston, P. Q.; enlisted at the age of 20, at Greensboro, Jan. 29, '62, and was mustered in at Brattleboro, Feb. 12th, an original member of Co. H, 7th Reg. He proceeded to Pensacola, Florida, with the command, where he died of chronic diarrhœa, Jan. 29, '63, and his body was there buried.

 

                                                        THERON L. BAILEY,

 

brother of Daniel W. Bailey; born in Sutton, enlisted at the age of 24, at Greensboro, Sept. 24, '61, mustered in Oct. 15th, Co. E, 6th Reg.; served faithfully with the company until killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, '64. His body was there buried.

 

                                                           ABIJAH BAILEY,

 

born in Potton, P. Q., enlisted at the age of 44, in Co. I, 15th Reg., at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62. Mustered in with the company at Brattleboro, Oct. 22d; remained with the company until discharged Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                         ELNATHAN BAILEY

 

born in Greensboro; enlisted at the age of 24, at Barton, Aug. 21, '61. Mustered in as corporal of Co. D, 4th Reg., at Barton, Sept. 20th; followed the fortunes of the regiment faithfully, but was reduced to the ranks in the Fall of '63; re-enlisted Dec. 15, '63, and came home on a 35 days furlough; returned to the company at its expiration, and par­ticipated in the following Spring campaign; was captured by the rebels at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64, and sent to Anderson­ville prison, where, after severe suffering, he died Feb. 3, '65. His body was buried there.

 

                                                           HENRY BAILEY,

 

son of A. M. Bailey; born in Montpelier; enlisted at the age of 27, in Co. D, 4th Reg., at Barton, Aug. 1, '61, mustered in at Brat­tleboro, Sept. 20; was with his regiment during all its engagements, until wounded in the thigh by a minnie ball, at Banks' Ford, May, '63; was immediately taken prisoner and remained in an old barn ten

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            221

 

days, was then paroled and sent into the Union lines, and remained in the general field hospital one week, thence to Howard Hospital, Washington, where he remained 3 weeks, thence to hospital at Brattleboro, where he remained a short time. He was then sent to Marine Hospital at Burlington, where he remained until transferred to the Invalid Corps, Nov. 20, '63, and was sta­tioned at the following places: Brattleboro, Clifton Barracks, Washington, Hospital Boat Connecticut, in the Potomac River; remained there until the expiration of his term of enlistment, and was discharged from the service at Clifton Barracks, Oct. 18, '64,

 

                                                         PHILIP D. BADGER,

 

son of Sam'l Badger, enlisted at Greensboro, age 39, in the 2d Battery, Nov, 29, '61; was mustered into the U. S. service, Dec. 16th, at Brandon; remained with the company until taken sick with fever and ague, originating from sun-stroke, Aug. 1, '62; was in the hospital at New Orleans until discharged Jan. 20, '63.

 

                                                        JOHN W. BARTLETT

 

was not a resident of this town; enlisted at the age of 21, Jan. 13, '62, and mustered in Feb. 12th, Co. K, 7th Reg.; was discharged June 23, '63.

 

                                                      WILBUR E. BICKFORD,

 

son of Stillman Bickford, enlisted at the age of 18, May 9, '63, in Co. L, 11th Reg., and was mustered in June 10; was reported wounded, in general hospital, Aug. 31, '64. Mustered out June 22, '65.

 

                                                      ZEBINA Y. BICKFORD.

 

son of Paul Bickford, enlisted at the age of 18, Oct. 7, '61, mustered in Co. D, 6th Reg. Died April 30, '62.

 

                                                      JAMES H. BICKFORD,

 

son of Paul Bickford, enlisted at the age of 21, at Barton, Sept. 3, '62, and was mustered in Oct. 22, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; was mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63; subsequently enlisted in Co. L, 11th Reg., Dec. 5, '63, and mustered in Dec. 17; promoted corp., April 10, '64; died June 7, '64, of wounds received in May '64.

 

                                                      HARLEY A. BICKFORD,

 

son of Paul Bickford, enlisted at the age of 18, at Barton, Sept. 3, '62, and mustered in Oct. 22, in Co. I, 15th Reg., mustered out Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                     GEORGE P. BUCKMAN,

 

a resident of this town a short time, enlisted at the age of 36, at Greensboro, Aug. 18, '62, and mustered in Sept. 22d, in Co. D, 4th Reg. During his service was sick with rheumatism and came home on a furlough. Mustered out July 13, '65.

 

                                                           HENRY BUSSEY

 

was born in Canada, and never a resident of Greensboro. He enlisted at the age of 18, Feb. 9, '65, and mustered in Co. F, 7th Reg. Mustered out Feb. 9, '66.

 

                                                         WM. WIRT BLAKE,

 

son of Henry Blake, born in Greensboro; enlisted in Wisconsin, at the breaking out of the rebellion, in the 2d 'Wisconsin Reg., and served with it faithfully until wounded through the face by a minnie hall. He was subsequently discharged.

 

                                                           JOHN B. COOK,

 

son of Charles Cook, born in Greensboro; en­listed in Co. A, 14th Iowa Infantry, Sept. 23, '61, at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and was mustered into the U. S. service Sept. 25; proceeded to Iowa City, and thence with the Regiment to Fort Randall, Dacota Territory. He ar­rived there Dec. 5, and remained, doing duty and building block houses, to prevent Indian depredations. He was detailed in the Q. M. department, taking care of stock and driving team. In Nov., '63, he was sent to Sioux City with Q. M. stock, and remained there until the expiration of his term of enlistment. He was transferred with the company to Co. K, 7th Iowa Cavalry, in the Fall of '63. Mustered out of service Oct. 31, '64.

 

                                                          DENNISON COOK

 

was born in Glover, and not a resident of Greensboro; enlisted for one year, at the age of 36, Aug. 23, '64, and was mustered at same date, recruit for Co. I, 6th Reg. He was transferred to Co. G, Oct. 16, '64; was missed Oct. 19, '64, and not since accounted for.

 

                                                        CHARLES P. COOK,

 

son of James Cook, enlisted at the age of 19, for one year, Feb. 28, '65, and mustered into the U. S. service at the same time in Co. B, 8th Reg. He was mustered out June 28, '65. He was not a resident of Greensboro.

 

                                                LUTHER M. T. CALDERWOOD,

 

son of John Calderwood, was born in Glover; enlisted for one year, at the age of 18, for Co. F, 1st Reg. Cavalry, Aug, 31, '64, at Burlington, and was mustered in the same day. Joined the company about Oct. 10th, he served with it until wounded in the foot with a minnie ball, at Berrysville, Nov. 12, '64; was sent to hospital at Winchester,

 

 

222                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

thence to Camden Street Hospital, Baltimore, where he remained 10 days; was then sent to the hospital at Brattleboro, thence to Montpelier, where he remained from Dec. 10 until Mar. 25, '65; was home during the time on a thirty days' furlough; left Mont­pelier March 25, and taken sick with the typhoid fever at Bedloe's Island, N. Y. Har­bor, and sent to Willet's Point, Long Island; thence to David's Island, N. Y. Harbor, where he remained until discharged June 21, '65. He was credited to Craftsbury, for which he received $625.00.

 

                                                   ANDREW CALDERWOOD,

 

son of J. Calderwood, was born in Glover; enlisted at the age of 20, in Co. I, 1st Reg. Cavalry, at Burlington, Sept. 1, '64, for one year; was mustered in at the same time, immediately joined the company, and served with it in several engagements. Once, while away from camp for water, he was taken prisoner, but made his escape by running from his two captors, preferring the risk of being killed by a bullet to the horrors of a rebel prison. He was killed near Petersburg, by a minnie ball entering his side and passing through the heart, April 23, '65. He received $625.00 from the town.

 

                                                         SAMUEL W. CATE,

 

son of N. Cate, was born in Greensboro enlisted at the age of 19, in Co. B, 3d Reg., at Craftsbury, June 1, '61; was mustered into the U. S. service July 16th, and remained with the company until Sept. 17, '62, at which time he deserted and went to Canada, returning after the close of the war.

 

                                                    RODOLPHUS CLEMENT,

 

for a short time a resident of this town, enlisted at the age of 44, Aug. 16, '62, and mustered in Co. I, 4th Reg., Sept. 22d. He was discharged at Brattleboro.

 

                                                     GEORGE W. CLEMENT,

 

son of R. Clement, age 19 years, Oct. 29, '63, and mustered in Co. D, 11th Reg., at the same date. He died Mar. 8, '64.

 

                                                     RUSSELL L. CLEMENT,

 

son of R. Clement, age 18; enlisted Oct. 29, '63, and mustered in Co. D, 11th Reg.; at the same date, was reported sick in the general hospital, Aug. 31, '64, and died Dec. 4, '64.

 

                                                       WILLIAM T. CHURCH

 

was never a resident of this town; enlisted at Burlington, for one year, as a member of Hancock's corps, since which enlistment the State has received no account of him.

 

                                                         HENRY W. CROWN

 

enlisted for one year, at Burlington, as a member of Hancock's corps, since which enlistment nothing has been reported to the State concerning him. He was never a resi­dent of this town.

 

                                                  WASHINGTON J. CHAFFEE

 

enlisted at the age of 28 years, in Co. F, 11th Reg., at Greensboro, Dec. 14, '63; mustered in Jan. 6. '64; immediately joined the com­pany and remained with it (being wounded in the heel at Cold Harbor, June 1, '64), until sent to the hospital sick with dysentery; was placed in general hospital at City Point; rejoined his company when it passed through that place on its way to Washington, to aid in driving Early from Maryland; remained with it till killed at Winchester, Sept. 19, '64. He received $300 government bounty and $300 from the town.

 

                                                      CORNELIUS L. CLARK,

 

for a short time a resident of Greensboro, age 32, enlisted Aug. 27, '63; mustered U. S. Mar. 2, '64, an original member of Co. C, 17th Reg.; wounded in the battle of the Wilder­ness; discharged Jan. 3, '65.

 

                                                           JOEL CHRISTIE,

 

born in Glover; age 23; enlisted at Greens­boro, Sept. 3, '62, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; mus­tered at Brattleboro, Oct. 22; remained until mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                          EDWIN E. DEWEY

 

enlisted at the age of 29, at Greensboro, Aug. 8, '62, in Co. F, 11th Reg.; mustered Sept. 1, at Brattleboro; remained until taken sick with lung fever, at Washington, Jan. '63, sent to the regimental hospital, returning to the company at the expiration of 3 weeks; pro­moted to artificer, June 23, '64; received grape-shot in the knee at Cold Harbor, June 30, '64, which shattered the bones above and below the knee; was immediately sent to the White House, amputation performed; thence to David's Island, N. Y. Harbor; suffered most excruciating pain from gangrene having set in; died Aug. 7, '64, leaving a wife (a sister of Seth P. Somers) and 2 children.

 

                                                         BYRON E. DEWEY,

 

never a resident of Greensboro, age 20, enlist­ed for one year, Aug. 27, '64; mustered for Co. E, 9th Reg.; mustered out June 13, '65; received by town order, $602.10 bounty.

 

                                                          SAMUEL H. DOW,

 

son of S. Dow, born in Greensboro; age 19; enlisted at Greensboro, Aug. 29, '61, in Co.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            223

 

D, 4th Reg.; mustered at Brattleboro, Sept. 20, '61; remained with the company at Camp Griffin, Va., until taken sick with dysentery, Mar. 1, '62; sent to Cliffburn general hospi­tal, Mar. 10, '62; remained there sick two months, and, as nurse, two months; was then sent to Fort Ellsworth, near Alexan­dria; his health remaining poor, sent to Fairfax Seminary Hospital; in a few weeks again went to Fort Ellsworth, rejoin­ing his company when it arrived from the Peninsula; proceeded with it to the second Bull Run battle and back; went to Fort Ellsworth again, when the company started on the Maryland campaign; remained there until about Feb. 15, '63; rejoined his com­pany at Belle Plain, Va.; was with it during the battles at St. Marie's Heights, second Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Funkstown, Rap­pahanock Station and Mine Run; re-enlisted, Feb. 10, '64, and went home on a 35 days' furlough, rejoining his company at Brandy Station, Mar, 17. He was wounded by a minnie ball in the thumb, at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, and sent to Fredericks­burg, thence to Washington, and thence to Brattleboro; from Brattleboro he was sent to Cliffburn Hospital, Washington, D. C., and rejoined his company July 11, at Washing­ton, and continued with it during the battles of Charlestown, Winchester and Fisher's Hill. He was detailed as officer's cook soon after the latter engagement, remained detailed at Petersburg until shortly before the capture; sent to his company; with it until mustered out at Ball's Cross Roads, Va., July 13, '65.

 

                                                            AMOS S. DOW,

 

son of S. Dow, was born in Greensboro; age 18; enlisted at Greensboro, Nov. 7, '63; mus­tered for Co. F, 11th Reg.; remained with the company until about June 20, '64; taken sick, sent to the general hospital at City Point; remained about 6 weeks; rejoined his company; was with it during all its move­ments; transferred to Co C, 11th Reg, June 24, '65; mustered out with the regiment, Aug. 25, '64.

 

                                                         ERASTUS DROWN,

 

born in Sheffield, for a short time a resident of this town; age 29; enlisted at Greensboro, June 6, '62; mustered in Co. E, 9th Reg.; served with the regiment a short time; des­erted; arrested almost immediately; placed in confinement, discharged Jan. 14, '63; in a short time enlisted in the regular army; was stationed at Fort Pebly, Mo., from which place he again deserted and escaped to Pro­vince of Quebec.

 

                                                          NELSON DROWN,

 

born in Swanton, P. Q., resided in this town but a short time, age 26; enlisted in Co. I, 15th Inf., Sept. 3, '62; mustered at Brattle­boro, Oct. 22; remained with the company until taken with typhoid fever, and was then sent to Fairfax Seminary Hospital, May 7, '63. He was detailed as nurse, June 7, and remained at the hospital until Aug. 1; mus­tered out with the regiment at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                       ALVARO R. DARLING

 

was never a resident of this town; enlisted, age 22, Sept. 2, '64, for one year; mustered at the same time, as a recruit for the 1st Bat­tery; mustered out July 31, '65.

 

                                                       CHARLES E. DOYING,

 

born in Irasburg; never a resident of Greens­boro, age 23, enlisted Aug. 25, '64, and was mustered in for Co. F, 11th Reg.; mustered out June 24, 65; received, by order on town treasury, a bounty amounting to $652.25.

 

                                                            JOHN ESDON,

 

son of James Esdon, born in Scotland, age 33; drafted at Greensboro, Aug. 28, '63; mus­tered as a recruit for Co. D, 4th Reg.; joined the company at Brandy Station, Va.; re­mained with it until wounded by a minnie hall in both knees, at the Wilderness, May 5, '64; sent to the Union House Hospital, at Fredericksburg; died May 18, '64, and bur­ied there.

 

                                                          LEWIS FLOWERS,

 

age 22; born in Canada; enlisted at Greens­boro, Aug. 8, '62; mustered at Brattleboro, Sept. 1, in Co. F, 11th Reg.; served with the company until captured by the rebels at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64; sent to An­dersonville; remained until exchanged and sent to Washington, at which place he died, Jan. 7, '65; interred there.

 

                                                           JOHN FOLSOM,

 

age 43; born in Stanstead, P. Q.; enlisted at Greensboro, July 29, '62; mustered at Brat­tleboro, Sept, 1, Co. A, 10th Reg.; served with the company until, for a slight illness, went to the surgeon for some medicine; by a mistake of the steward, was given poison and immediately died, Oct 31, '62, at Seneca Creek, Va.; buried there.

 

 

 

224                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

                                                     AUGUSTUS P. FOLSOM,

 

age 20, son of John Folsom, born in Mans­field; enlisted Dec. 14, '63; mustered at Brattleboro, Dec. 24, '63, for Co. D, 6th Reg.; immediately joined the company at Brandy Station, and remained with it until wounded through the neck with a minnie ball at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, '64; was sent to Fredericksburg; remained three days; sent to Alexandria; received 30 days' fur­lough, at the expiration of 3 days, proceeded home; at the close of his furlough reported at the hospital at Montpelier; remained as a patient 2 months; as a ward-master remain­der of his term; transferred to Co. G, 6th Reg., Jan. 1, '65; discharged May 29, '65; received $300 bounty from the town and $300 from the United States.

 

                                                      ELISHA D. FRANKLIN,

 

age 28, not a resident of Greensboro; enlist­ed Sept. 9, '64; mustered at the same time for Co. I, 9th Reg.; transferred to Co. D, June 13, '65; mustered out Dec. 1, '65.

 

                                                       THOMAS W. GRIFFIN,

 

age 27, son of James Griffin, born in Marsh­field; enlisted at Barton, Aug. 28, '61; mus­tered at Brattleboro, Sept 20, in Co. D, 4th Reg., with the rank of sergeant; remained with the company doing duty, until taken with the measles in December; the 27th same month, with typhoid fever; went home Feb. 1, '62; recovered, and joined his company on the Peninsula, at the siege of Yorktown, about Apr. 10, '62; remained with it until detailed to take charge of a portion of the ambulance train, belonging to the division, in the Fall of '62; remained in that service 10 months; rejoined his company; re-enlist­ed Dec. 13, '63, credited to the town of Hard­wick, receiving $300 from that town, and $100 from the government; received a 35 days' furlough; came home—returned to his company at its expiration; recommended for promotion to 2d lieut, which commission he would have received had he not been mortal­ly wounded by a minnie ball, which entered his groin, at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, '64. He managed to get to the rear, but died that night, and was buried by his comrades near the cross roads in the Wilder­ness, where his body now remains. He was a true son of Vermont, thoroughly patriotic, endowed with a lively intellect and mind not to be contaminated by the follies of the camp.

 

                                                        JAMES O. GRIFFIN,

 

age 18, brother of Thomas W. Griffin, born in Peacham; enlisted at Brattleboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; remained with the company till taken with typhoid fever, sent to the reg­imental hospital Jan. 14, '63; transferred to the post hospital at Fairfax Court House, Jan. 19, and remained there until March, when he was taken to Fairfax Seminary Hospital; rejoined his company, June 15; marched to Gettysburg and Westminster, from which place he was sent to Philadelphia general hospital, where he remained 3 weeks; went to Brattleboro; mustered out with the regiment, Aug. 5; came home; in the Fall of '64, enlisted at Greensboro for one year, as a recruit for the let Cav. Reg.; went to Burlington, but was not accepted; went to Fairlee and enlisted for that town; received $500.00 from the town and $66.66 from the government; mustered in at Windsor, Sept. 24, '64, in Co. B, 1st Cav.; sent to the rendez­vous camp at Fairhaven, Ct.; detailed to play in the post band; remained until April 28, '65; was sent to the Dismounted Camp at Chapel Point, Va.; there until June 1, when he joined his company near Washington, and remained with it until mustered out at Bur­lington, June 21, '65.

 

                                                         WILLIAM R. GRAY,

 

age 19, not a resident of this town; enlisted Dec. 21, '61; mustered in Co. E, 8th Reg., Feb. 18, '62; killed at Bayou Des Allem'd, Sept. 4, '62.

 

                                                       CARLOS O. GIBSON,

 

age 29, never a resident of Greensboro; enlisted Aug. 24, '61; mustered in Co. H, 4th Reg., Sept. 20; discharged Apr. 7, '62; en­listed for one year, and, by town order, re­ceived $520.25 bounty.

 

                                                         SIMEON J. GILLIS,

 

age 20, son of James Gillis, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 6, '64, for one year; mustered in at Burlington, Sept. 26, in Co. D, 1st Cav.; sent to the camp at Fairhaven, Ct.; detailed as guard; remained until March, '65; sent to Baltimore; thence to Dismounted Camp, at Harper's Ferry; taken with fever and sent to the general hospital; transferred to Co. F, June 21, '65; mustered out July 18, '65; received $625.00 bounty from the town and $66.66 from the government.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                           225'

 

                                                       JOHN M. HAMMOND,

 

age 28, son of F. Hammond, born in Wind­sor; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 8, '62; credited to Coventry; mustered in at Brat­tleboro, Oct. 22, '62, as corp. of Co. H, 15th Reg.; served with the company continually until mustered out with the regiment at Brattleboro; returned home; Sept. 3, '64, re-enlisted at Windsor, credited to Wardsboro, for one year; received $1000 bounty; mus­tered in at Windsor for Co. I, 1st Cav; joined the company at Winchester in about 2 weeks, remained with it about 6 weeks; got his hip broke; sent to the Lincoln Hospital, Wash­ington, D. C., thence to Montpelier Hospital; remained until June, '65; rejoined the com­pany at Burlington, mustered out with it there.

 

                                                   EPHRAIM E. HARTSHORN,

 

age 30, son of H. Hartshorn, born in Dan­ville; enlisted at Greensboro, Dec. 5, '63, in Co. D, '4th Reg.; joined the company at Brandy Station, Va.; remained with it until wounded at the Wilderness, May 5, 64, by a minnie ball entering his side; sent to Fred­ericksburg; suffered severely with the wound until relieved by death, May 18, '64; buried there by strangers, may he never be forgot­ten. He received, by town order, a bounty of $ 316.88.

 

                                                       LOREN HARTSHORN,

 

age 24, son of H. Hartshorn, born in Hard­wick; drafted at Greensboro, Aug. 28, '63; mustered in at the same time, and assigned to Co. D, 4th Reg.; immediately joined the company at Brandy Station, Va., and re­mained with it until mustered out July 13, '65.

 

                                                  CHARLES H. HARTSHORN,

 

age 19, son of H. Hartshorn, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Greensboro, Dec. 6, '63, in Co. D, 4th Reg.; at once joined the company at Brandy Station, Va.; remained with it until taken sick in June, '64; sent to the hospital; deserted Sept 4, '64.

 

                                                 CHAUNCEY F. HARTSHORN,

 

age 18, son of H. Hartshorn, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Northfield, Jan. 1, '62, in Co. K, 17th Reg.; mustered in at Brattleboro, Feb. 12; was at Camp Parapet, Ship Island, N. O., also at Camps Williams and Carney; sent to the general hospital, at N. O., sick with diphtheria; remained 2 weeks; sent to the regimental hospital; remained until dis­charged, Feb. 25, '63; participated in the battle of Baton Rouge; re-enlisted at Greensboro, Dec. 6, '63; mustered in at Brattleboro, Jan. 5, '64, for Co. D, 4th Reg.; went imme­diately to the company at Brandy Station, Va.; remained with it, participating in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna River and Petersburg, until taken prisoner at the Weldon Railroad, June 24, '64; sent to Lynchburg, Va.; marched thence rapidly to Danville, 75 miles; furnished with short rations, 20 hard crackers or pilot bread, and three-fourths pound bacon only, be­ing allowed for 5 days, and water given three times a day; with the other prisoners kept at Danville a week; sent to Andersonville, Ga., by railroad; placed in a stockade or prison with 32,000 others, subject to the following treatment; rations per day, ½lb corn-meal, ¼lb meat, plenty of water, muddy and extremely filthy; no coffee nor tea; when corn and meat not given, 1 pint cooked rice, or 4 table spoonfuls uncooked, and a very little molas­ses; allowed only half a blanket; suffered extremely with the cold; sick with scurvy and diarrhœa; exchanged Nov. 20, '64, on account of sickness; went home for 40 days, rejoining his company Mar. 1, '65; partici­pated in the capture of Richmond; discharged with the company July 13, '65; received $300 bounty from the town, and $400 from the government.

 

                                                            SAMUEL HILL,

 

age 41, son of Aaron Hill, born in Greens­boro; enlisted in Co. I, 15th Reg., at Barton, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, 1st serg.; reduced to the ranks Jan. 1, '63; soon after detailed to drive an ambu­lance, which duty he performed during the remainder of his term of enlistment; mus­tered out with the regiment at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                          EPHRAIM P. HILL,

 

age 28, brother of Samuel Hill, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, '62, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; remained with it till mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                       WILLIAM HILDRETH,

 

age 22, enlisted Aug. 24, '61; mustered in Co. I, 4th Reg., Sept. 20; died Jan. 8, '63.

 

                                                      BURBANK HODGDEN,

 

age 43, a citizen of Canada, enlisted Aug. 17, '64; mustered in Co. K, 17th Reg.; deserted June 17, '65.

 

                                                        FRANKLIN B. HUNT,

 

age 21, born in Jay, not a resident of this town; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62

 

 

226                                      VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE

 

mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, in Co. I, 15th Reg; served with it until taken with pneumonia, in December, sent to the general hospital at Fairfax Court House, where, after suffering a severe illness, died Jan. 25, '63. His holy was sent to Jay for burial.

 

                                                       ELLIOT F. KENISTON,

 

age 19, son of David Rollins and adopted son of N. Keniston, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Somerville, Mass., Aug. 12, 62, in Co. E, 39th Mass. Reg.; served with the regiment in Maryland and Virginia, until taken sick Jan. 1, '63, sent to the St. Aloysius Hospital, Washington; there until discharged Apr. 21, '63; returned to Somerville, died coon after of diphtheria; interred in Cambridge Cem­etery.

 

                                                      CALVIN E. LUMSDEN,

 

age 25, son of J. J. Lumsden, born in Rye­gate; drafted Aug. 28, '63; mustered the same time in Co. I, 4th Reg; immediately joined the company at Brandy Station; with it until taken prisoner at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64; sent to Andersonville; after suffering severe illness, died Feb. 8, '65; buried there.

 

                                                       ALBERT E. LINCOLN,

 

age 30, son of W. Lincoln, born in Greensboro; enlisted for one year, Aug. 22, '64; mustered in Co. I, let Cavalry; mustered out June 21, '65; died July 22, '65; received $625.00 bounty from the town.

 

                                                          JAMES LOWELL,

 

age 26, enlisted Aug. 24, '64, mustered the same time, in Co. I, 1st Cav; killed in action Oct. 8, '64; received, by town order, $ 705.27, bounty.

 

                                                        NELSON D, MASON,

 

age 27, son of Abel Mason, born in Derby; enlisted at St. Johnsbury, June 1, '61; mus­tered in there, July 16, ' 61, in Co. B, 3d Reg; served with the company although suffering with ill health nearly all the time, until Aug, 1, '62, sent with several others from Harrison's Landing to Newark, N. J., in the hospital there until he died, Sept. 16, '62; buried there, but subsequently removed and interred at Craftsbury Common.

 

                                                        WILLIAM R. MASON,

 

age 28, brother of Nelson D. Mason, born in Derby; enlisted at St. Johnsbury, June 1, '61; mustered in at the same place, July 16, '61, in Co. B. 3d Reg.; served with the regi­ment until mustered out at Burlington with the original members of the regiment, who did not re-enlist July 27, '64.

 

                                                         JOSEPH TISDELL,

 

age 18, son of Joel Tisdell, of Barton, enlisted under the name of Joseph Mason, at Greensboro; mustered in at Burlington, Aug. 30, '64, for Co. B, 9th Reg.; transferred to Co. C, 3d Reg., Jan. 20, '65; remained with the latter company till mustered out July 11, '65.

 

                                                    CARLOS S. MACOMBER,

 

age 26, son of William Macomber, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Greensboro, Dec. 15, '63, mustered in at Brattleboro, Dec. 24, Co. D, 6th Reg.; joined the company at Brandy Station, Va., remained with it until Feb. 26, '64, sent to the general field hospital, sick with typhoid pneumonia; died there Mar. 4, '64; body sent home and interred in the vil­lage burying ground. He received, by town order, $ 371.46 bounty.

 

                                                    WILLIAM A. MACOMBER,

 

age 21, son of William Macomber, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; served with his company till mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                  WILLIAM K. MONTGOMERY,

 

age 19, was born in Dalton, N. H.; enlisted at East Hardwick, Sept. 23, '61; mustered in at Montpelier, Oct. 15, Co. E. 6th Reg.; taken sick with lung fever about Mar. 1, '62; sent to the general hospital, Philadelphia. Re­joined his company about Nov. 1, '63; soon after re-enlisted and came home on a 35 days' furlough; rejoined his company at its expira­tion; remained with it until transferred to Co. K. 6th Reg. Oct. 16, '64; mustered out June 26, '65.

 

                                                            JOHN MOODY,

 

age 22, son of John Moody, deceased, born in Scotland; enlisted in Co. D, 6th Reg. Sept. 28, '61; mustered in with the regiment, at Montpelier, Oct. 15th. In a short time sent to the hospital; transferred to the Invalid Corps, Sept. 30, '63; since which no account has been received of him by the State. He was never a resident of this town.

 

                                                     FREDERICK D. MARSH,

 

age 44, son of Wm. Marsh, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, Co. I, 15th Reg.; taken with pneumonia in Decem­ber, and sent to the hospital at Brattleboro, where he remained until mustered out, Aug. 5, '63.

 

 

                                                            GREENSBORO.                                                            227

 

                                                      WILLIAM M. NESBITT,

 

age 28, son of John Nesbitt, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Barton, Aug. 20, '61; mustered in as corp. of Co. D, 4th Reg. at Brat­tleboro, Sept. 10th; served with the regiment in all its campaigns until he re-enlisted, Feb. 10, '64, and came home on a 35 days' fur­lough; rejoined his company when his fur­lough expired; remained with it till wound­ed in the left arm by a minnie ball, at the Wilderness, May 5; '64, sent to the hospital, his arm amputated; remained some time in the hospital in Vermont; discharged July 30, '65; on the last enlistment credited to the town of Sutton, for which received $300.00; his government bounty $100.00.

 

                                                   BENJAMIN G. OLMSTEAD,

 

age 23, son of Emery Olmstead, born in Ly­man, N. H.; enlisted in Co. I, 15th Reg, at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in Oct. 22; discharged Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                         JOHN OLMSTEAD,

 

age 18, son of Emery Olmstead, born in Ly­man, N. H; enlisted at Glover, Oct. 16, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct 22, Co. C, 15th Reg.; with the company till mustered out with the regiment at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63; credited to Glover, from which town he received his bounty.

 

                                                      SHERMAN S. PINNEY,

 

age 22, son of Jabez Pinney, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Morrisville, May 27, '61; mustered in at St. Johnsbury, with the 3d Reg. in Co. B; served with the company until the following Oct., taken with diphtheria, sent to the regimental hospital; returned to the company at the expiration of a few weeks, but again sent to the hospital, Jan. 1, '62; rejoined his company, Mar. 1; proceeded with it to the Peninsula, but his health re­maining feeble, returned at the end of the first day's march toward Yorktown, to New­port News, where he stayed three weeks; thence he was taken to Fortress Monroe and kept 6 weeks; thence to Georgetown, D. C., where discharged on a surgeon's certificate of disability, May 28, '62; came home and died in Wolcott, Nov. 19, '64. His body was bur­ied in Greensboro. His name was credited to Wolcott.

 

                                                  JOHN M. C. PADDLEFORD,

 

age 32, was born in Lyman, N, H.; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22d, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; served until mustered out with the regiment, at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63, not having been of duty a single day.

 

                                                        GEORGE W. PETTIE,

 

age 35, was born in Cambridge, Vt.; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; served with the company until about 3 weeks pre­vious to the expiration of his term of enlist­ment, when detailed for train guard; remain­ed as such until the regiment was relieved from duty in the field, when he rejoined it and was mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                   CHARLES W. PHILBROOK,

 

age 39, was born in Hardwick; enlisted at Greensboro, Dec. 7, 63; mustered at Brattle­boro, Jan. 6, '64, as a recruit for Co. F, 11th Reg.; at once joined the company at Wash­ington, remained with it until taken with rheumatic fever, sent to the hospital; died, Mar. 18, '64, leaving a wife and four children. He received $300.00 bounty from the town, and $300.00 from the government.

 

                                                         HORACE W. PAGE,

 

age 28, was born in Walden, never a resident of Greensboro; enlisted, Aug. 21, '64; mus­tered at the same time in Co. H, 4th Reg.; transferred to Company C, Feb. 25, '65; mus­tered out June 19, '65; received a bounty amounting to nearly $533.00

 

                                                      ANDREW J. ROLLINS,

 

age 24, son of J. S. Rollins, born in Greens­boro; enlisted in Boston, Mass., in June, '61, in Co. D, 12th Mass. Reg.; proceeded with the regiment to Maryland, remained near Frederick City until the spring campaign; participated in the movements of the 5th Corps, through Northern Virginia, while un­der command of Gen. N. P. Banks; under Gen. Pope, took part in the battles of Slaugh­ter Mountain, Thoroughfare Gap, South Mountain, Md., and was killed at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, '62, by a minnie ball enter­ing his side. He was taken to the rear, but died almost immediately, and was buried there.

 

                                                        ELISHA E. ROLLINS,

 

age 20, brother of Andrew J. Rollins, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Montpelier, Vt., May 7, '61; mustered in at Burlington, June 20th, in Co. F, 2d Reg.; served with the company till mustered out, at Brattleboro, June 29, '64; promoted to corp. Feb. '62.

 

                                                       DUDLEY A. ROLLINS,

 

age 19, son of J. S Rollins, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, in

 

 

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Co. I, 15th Reg.; mustered at Brattleboro, Oct. 22; July 4, '63, promoted to corp.; re­turning to Brattleboro, came home on a 35 days' furlough; mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug, 5, '63.

 

                                                       SUMNER P. ROLLINS,

 

age 17, son of David Rollins, born in Greens­boro; enlisted at Somerville, Mass., Aug. 12, '62, in Co. E, 39th Mass. Reg.; served with the company in Maryland and Virginia until taken with fever; died Feb. 12, '62; interred at Sheffield, Vt., Dec. 3, '62; subsequently removed to the cemetry at Cambridge, Mass., where he rests in peace beside his brother, Elliot F., adopted son of Nathan Keniston.

 

                                                      STEPHEN B. ROGERS,

 

age 22, son of W. Rogers, deceased, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Barton, Aug. 20, '62, Co. D, 4th Reg.; mustered in Sept. 20th; re­mained with the company until he re-enlist­ed, Dec. 15, '63, when he went home on a 35 day's furlough; reported at Brattleboro at its expiration. Being sick with consumption, sent to the hospital, remained until about June 1, and returned to the company at Cold Harbor, Va., with it until taken prisoner at Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64, and sent to Andersonville; remained there until April, 1865, when taken to Annapolis, Md.; died Apr. 13, '65, and was buried there. He was a faithful and devoted soldier, and participa­ted in the battles of Lee's Mills, siege of York­town, Williamsburgh, Golden Farm, siege of Richmond, Savage Station, 2d Bull Run, Crampton Pass, Antietam, Eredericksburg, St. Marie's Heights, Banks' Ford, Gettysburg, Funkstown, Rappahannock Station, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.

 

                                                           PETER ROGERS,

 

age 22, son of W. Rogers, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Irasburgh, June 9, '62; mustered at Brattleboro, July 9, '62, in Co. E, 9th Reg; (in the engagement at Harper's Ferry, Sept. 14th and 15th, '62,) until sent to the hospital at Chicago, sick with erysipelas, Mar. 10, '63; returned to the company, April 10, '63, and was with it till mustered out at Burlington, June 13, '65.

 

                                                         ROBERT ROGERS,

 

age 24, son of W. Rogers, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Irasburgh, June 2, '62, an original member of Co. E, 9th Reg.; mustered with the company at Brattleboro, July 9; re­mained with the company until taken sick with inflammatory rheumatism, at Winchester, last of July, '62; discharged for disabili­ty, at Chicago, Nov. 6, '62; returned home, re-enlisted in Co. D, 4th Reg. Dec. 14, '63; mustered Jan. 6, '64; joined the company at Brandy Station; with it until wounded in the arm by a minnie ball, at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, '64; sent towards Fred­ricksburg, but died from the loss of blood be­fore reaching there, May, 7, '64, and was im­mediately buried.

 

                                                         EDWARD C. REED,

 

age 23, enlisted in Co. K, 3d Reg. July 10, '61; mustered in July 16, and out July 21, '61; re-enlisted at Worcester, Dec. 8, '64, in Co. E, 8th Reg.; mustered in at Brattleboro, Feb. 18, '62; proceeded with the company to Ship Island; taken sick and sent to the Marine Hospital, in Apr. '62; returned to the com­pany in June, remained a short time; then sent to the Marine Hospital, N. O.; thence to Fort Hudson; thence to Marine hospital; where he remained until being discharged Feb. 9, '63.                          '

 

                                                              HIRAM RICE,

 

age 24, son of W. Rice, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, Co. 15th Reg.; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22; with the company during its service, re­turned to Brattleboro the last of July, '63; went home on a short furlough, returned, mustered out with the company, Aug. 5, '63; immediately went home, and died Aug. 17, '63, of typhoid fever and chronic diarrehœa, contracted while in the service.

 

                                                        GEORGE SHEPARD,

 

age 29, son of M. Shepard, born in Stannard; enlisted July 10, '61, in Co. K, 2d Reg.; mus­tered in at St. Johnsbury, July 16; remained with the company until Dec. 31, '63, when he re-enlisted and went home on a 35 day's fur­lough; returned to the company at Brandy Station, March 17; sent to the Howard Hos­pital, D. C., April 25, sick with rheumatism, remained till July 10th; sent to Clifton Bar­racks, thence to Camp Distribution; rejoined. his company at Bolivar Heights, July 29, '64; remained with it until wounded in the leg by a minnie ball, at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, '64; carried to the hospital at Newtown, and his leg amputated; then taken to Martins­burg and Jarvis Hospital, Baltimore; Jan 1, '65, sent to Montpelier Hospital; remained until discharged, Sept. 1, '65.

 

                                                       CALVIN J. SHEPARD,

 

age 25, son of M. Shepard, born in Greens­boro; enlisted Dec. 14, '63, and mustered in

 

 

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Dec. 24th, Co. D, 6th Reg.; proceeded to the regiment, then at Brandy Station; remained with it until wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, '64, by a minnie ball passing through the hand; sent to the hospi­tal at Fredericksburg; after 3 days transferred to Fairfax Seminary Hospital, near Alexandria. Having obtained a furlough, went home and remained 60 days; on his return sent to Camp Distribution, from there to the regiment at Charlestown, Va.; detailed in the ambulance train, remained 2 months, until the regiment started for Petersburg, Dec. 1. From that time with his company, constantly under fire or within shelling distance of the enemy, until April 2, '65; detailed as train guard, but rejoined his company April 12, at Burkville Junction; proceeded with it to Danville, Richmond and Alexandria; mus­tered out June 26, '65, near Alexandria.

 

                                                         SETH P. SOMERS,

 

age 19, born in Barnet; enlisted at Montpe­lier, May 7, '61, in Co. F, 2d Reg., mustered in at Burlington, June; 20; remained with the company until Oct. 1, '61, detailed as blacksmith; returned to the company in a short time by request; remained with it, faithfully discharging his duties, until wound­ed in the leg by a minnie ball, at the battle of Savage Station, June 29, '62; was una­voidably left with others, under the care of surgeons; taken prisoner the next morning, sent to Richmond, where he was kept 2 weeks then taken to the general hospital at Balti­more, remained till discharged Nov. 9, '62; went immediately home, and died Jan. 16, '63, from disease contracted from exposure on the Peninsula campaign. An earnest patriot, a noble soldier, a faithful and generous friend and a true comrade, his memory will ever be cherished by those who knew him.

 

                                                         HORACE SULHAM,

 

age 35, son of Thomas P. Sulham, born in Pelham, N. H.; enlisted at Greensboro, Aug, 8, '62, mustered in at Brattleboro, Sept. 1, in Co. F, 11th Reg.; with the company until taken with the measles, the following December, and subsequently with a fever; recovering his health performed duty in the company until he received an 11 day's furlough, Feb. 11, '64, came home; afterwards was with the company until instantly killed by a minnie ball at the battle of Cold Harbor June 1, '64, and buried there by his brother Lemuel H. Sulham.

 

                                                       LEMUEL H. SULHAM,

 

age 33, son of Thomas P. Sulham, born in Woodstock, N. H.; enlisted at Greensboro, Aug. 8, '62; mustered in at Brattleboro Sept. 1, Co. F, 11th Reg.; remained with the com­pany until taken with the measles in the win­ter of '62-3, sent to the hospital; after 2 weeks returned to the company, his health remained poor, subsequently went to the hos­pital, sick with fever when able returned to the company; performed duty, until captur­ed at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64; sent to Andersonville with the others captured at that time, remained in that vile enclosure until the Union troops approached near that place, when he was transferred to Charleston, S. C., where he died Dec. 26, '64, and was buried there.

 

                                                          HIRAM SWITZER,

 

age 19, son of Gordon Switzer, born in Shef­field; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, and mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22, Co. F, 15th Reg.; served faithfully until taken sick, sent to the hospital at Fairfax Court House; died Jan. 31, '63, and his body sent to Shef­field for burial.

 

                                                     EPHRAIM B. STEBBINS,

 

age 42, enlisted Dec. 8, '63, mustered Jan. 6, '64, in Co. F, 11th Reg; transferred to Co. C, June 24, '64; mustered out Aog. 25, '65; re­ceived, by town order, $313.85 bounty; was a resident of this town but a short time.

 

                                                     NATHAN L. SPAFFORD,

 

age 42, was born in Salem; enlisted at Greens­boro, Sept. 3, '62, Co. I, 15th Reg.; mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct 22, as corp.; reduced to the ranks by request, Nov. 14; detailed as commissary guard at Fairfax Station, May 15, '63; rejoined his company June 15, mus­tered out with it at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                        FRANK E. SAWYER,

 

age 22, son of Silas W. Sawyer, born in Low­ell, Mass.; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, in Co. I, 15th Reg., and mustered in at Brat­tleboro, Oct. 22; remained with the company until mustered out with it at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                      CHARLES A. SAWYER,

 

age 19, son of Silas W. Sawyer, born in Greensboro; enlisted at Burlington, Sept. 13, '64, for one year, and mustered in at the same time and place Co. I, 1st Cav.; went to the camp at Fairhaven, Ct., joining the company at the end of a month; remained with it until taken sick at Nottaway Station, and sent to

 

 

230                                     VERMONT HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.

 

Jarvis Hospital, Baltimore; there until dis­charged June 2, '65; received $625.00 bounty from the town.

 

                                                    CARLOS W. THOMPSON,

 

age 22, son of Z. Thompson, born in Wood­stock; enlisted at Worcester, Aug. 2, '62, Co. I, 11th Reg., and mustered in at Brattleboro, Sept, 1; was with the company until sun-struck, and sent to the regimental hospital at Fort Slocum; remained there until transferred to the Invalid Corps, March 15, '63; was at Clifton Barracks until discharged, Feb. 17, '64.

 

                                                        ISAIAH THOMPSON,

 

age 18, son of Z. Thompson, born in Greens­boro; enlisted in Worcester, Aug. 9, '62, Co. I, 11th Reg.; mustered in at Brattleboro, Sept. 1; proceeded with the company to Fort Lincoln, Washington, and was sick with fe­ver in the regimental hospital a short time; returned to the company soon as able; was with it at Fort Thayer and Fort Stevens; taken sick about Aug. 15, '63, sent to the reg­imental hospital; remained until transferred to the Invalid Corps. Mar. 15, '64. He was discharged the same year.

 

                                                      AMASA F. THOMPSON,

 

age 19, son of Z. Thompson, born in Glover; enlisted for one year, at Burlington, Feb. 7, '65, mustered in at the same time and place, Co. C. 8th In.; was sent to Fairhaven, Ct.; re­mained 3 weeks, then joined the regiment at Summit Point, Va.; Apr. 16, moved to Camp Russell, after a few days, back to Sum­mit Point, ordered to Washington to ship for South Carolina; the order countermanded, was sent to Munson's Hill, Va.; remained until mustered out near Ball's Cross Roads, June 28, '65; received a bounty amounting to about $500.00

 

                                                        MYRON C. TIFFANY,

 

age 21, son of C. Tiffany, born in Cambridge, Vt.; enlisted in Barton, Sept. 3, '62, in Co. I, 15th Reg.; soon came home sick, remained until the company was about to start for Brattleboro, rejoined the company, was mus­tered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22; remained with the company, enjoying excellent health, faithfully performing the duties assigned him, until taken sick with typhoid pneumonia, about May 12, '63; died in the regimental hospital at Union Mills, May 20; his body embalmed at Union Mills, sent home, and buried in the burying ground near Mr. Mar­shall's. His loss was severely felt in the company.

 

                                                    CHARLES W. WALLACE,

 

age 19, born in Stowe, Me.; enlisted in East Hardwick, Oct. 2, '61; mustered in at Mont­pelier, Oct. 15, in Co. E, 6th Reg.; served with the company until taken sick and sent to the hospital; discharged Jan. 10, '63. He was not a resident of Greensboro.

 

                                                        GEORGE WITHERS,

 

age 23, born in Bath, N. H.; enlisted at Montpelier, May 7, '61, in Co. F. 2d Reg., mustered into the State service, May 20, at Montpelier, and into the U. S. service June 20, at Burlington; was with the regiment and participated in all its engagements, until wounded in the arm by a minnie ball at Savage Station, June 29, '62. He was assist­ed one mile to the rear by George Flagg, a member of the company from Braintree, and left in a temporary hospital; was taken by the rebels next morning, was sent to Rich­mond; exchanged July 26, carried to the general hospital at West Philadelphia, died July 28, '62; was buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

 

                                                   GEORGE F. WOODMANCY,

 

age 18, son of E. Woodmancy, deceased, born in Greensboro; enlisted in Greensboro, Dec. 7, '63, mustered in at Brattleboro, Jan. 6, '64, in Co. F, 11th Reg.; immediately joined the company, and served with it until taken with the measles; recovered in a short time, and performed duty until captured at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64, and sent to Andersonville; was taken sick there with typhoid pneumonia, and after severe suffer­ing, died Sept. 9, '61. His body was buried there. He received, by town order, $ 381.63 bounty.

 

                                                      GEORGE S. WHITNEY,

 

age 19, enlisted Aug. 23, '64; mustered in at the same time, for Co. I, 1st Cav.; mustered out June 2, '65; received by town order a bounty amounting to $626.56.

 

                                                         ROBERT S. WHITE,

 

age 22, son of R. White, born in Craftsbury; enlisted at Greensboro, Sept. 3, '62, Co. I, 15th Reg., and mustered in at Brattleboro, Oct. 22; served with the company until taken with the measles, April 14, '63, when in the general hospital at Alexandria, 6 weeks; mustered out at Brattleboro, Aug. 5, '63.

 

                                                        EDWARD C. WARD,

 

age 24, son of Nathan Ward, born in Ceylon, Indian Ocean; drafted in Greensboro, July 28, '63, and mustered in at the same time for

 

 

                                                                HOLLAND.                                                               231

 

Co. D, 4th Reg.; was in the hospital nearly all his time of service; but little is known of his proceedings; was discharged June 27, '65.

 

                                                    FRANKLIN WOODWARD,

 

age 19, son of J. Woodward, born in Peach­am; enlisted in Greensboro, and mustered in at Brattleboro, Jan. 4, '64, in Co. F, 11th Reg.; at once joined the company, served with it till taken prisoner at the Weldon Railroad, June 23, '64; sent to Andersonville, died of starvation and exposure, some time in Sept., '64. He received a bounty, accord­ing to town orders, amounting to about $600.

 

                                                    JOSEPH R. WOODWARD,

 

age 20, son of J. Woodward, born in Peach­am; enlisted at Concord, N. H., in July, '62, mustered in Co. E, 5th N. H. Reg.; served with the company at Point Lookout, Mary­land, and in Virginia, until wounded at Petersburg, June 17, '64; sent to the hospital at White House Landing—died from wound.

 

                                                        ——————————

 

 

                                 HOLLAND.

 

                                                    BY MRS. GEO. A. HINMAN.

 

This township is situated in the N. E. corner of Orleans County; bounded N. by the towns of Stanstead and Barnston, in Canada, and lies just south of the 45th deg. N. lat., and extends 7 miles, 13 chains, on Canada line, and 5 miles, 7 chains from north to south lines; and is bounded E. by Norton in Essex County, S. by Morgan, and W. by Derby; and lies in the calcareo-mica slate region of Orleans County, though a bed of gneiss extends through the central part of the town, north and south, of about a half a mile in width.

The soil is very retentive, and excellent for grass, and all the cereal grains. It is prob­able the average yield of hay, wheat, and oats per acre, is, at present, greater in the town of Holland than in any other town in the County, notwithstanding the fact that much of all these products have been carried to other towns every year, and the soil thus impoverished.

The surface of the township is diversified by considerable elevations, and it lies on the slope of land on the east of Lake Memphre­magog, the eastern boundary being properly the eastern ridge of the Green Mountains,—though there is no elevation bearing the name of mountain, except Mount John, in the S. E. part of the town. Neither is the surface at all broken, but the highest hills are susceptible of cultivation, and their soil as good as any in town. There are several small ponds in town. One is in the S. W. part, from which rises a stream emptying into Salem pond, after passing through a part of Derby and Morgan. Another branch of Clyde River, in the N. E. part of the town, and about Mount John, emptying into Sey­more Lake in Morgan, is called Mad Brook.

But the largest stream of water in town is Barlow River, which runs nearly west from Holland Pond, making, however, a little north, so as to keep most of the way in Can­ada, till it arrives near Beebe's Plain in Stanstead, where it turns north and runs into Massawippi Lake. This stream supplies nu­merous mill-sites all along its course. There are 4 saw-mills in the town of Holland, on this river, all within less than a mile of each other, and chances for more. There are also many mills on it, in Canada. It supplies the water-power of Derby Line Village.

There is also a stream of water rising near the middle of the town, known as Mill brook, which empties into Barlow River before it reaches Derby Line Village. It was upon this stream that the first saw-mill was erected in town, and just above where Paran Huntoon's mill now stands. There have also been built a grist-mill and starch-factory, at the same place, both of which were destroyed by fire.

The town was chartered, Oct. 26, 1789, to Timothy Andrews, and others.

The first proprietors' meeting of which any record can be found, was held at Greensboro, June 8, 1795, at the dwelling-house of Timo­thy Stanley. This meeting was adjourned to June 13; and on the 13th the meeting adjourned, to meet at Derby on the 29th, at the house of Isaac Hinman.

Many meetings were held at Derby, till on the 16th of November, following, a meeting was held at the house of Eben Strong, at which it was voted that Col. Benjamin Hin­man, Jonathan Gazley, Sheldon Leavitt, Tim­othy Andrus, William Sabine, jr., Daniel Holbrook, and Eben Strong, be allowed to pick lots of land, on condition that they each clear off 4 acres a year for five successive years,—they giving a bond of £100 each for the fulfillment of the condition,—one fifth of the bond to be collected for each year of