Governor Nelson Dewey Chapter

Governor Nelson Dewey Chapter

National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution

Maple Bluff, WI  
  

The U.S. Flag

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag
"I pledge allegiance to the Flag 
of the United States of America,
and to the Republic for which it stands, 
one Nation under God, indivisible, 
with liberty and justice for all."

APPROPRIATE OBSERVANCE AND RESPECT TO THE FLAG

The flag should always be hoisted quickly and lowered with ceremony.


When hung from a building, the stars should always be away from the building.

When hanging over the center of a street, the stars should face to the North in an East/West street, and East in a North/South Street.

When more than one flag, is displayed, The Flag of the USA should be in the highest and centermost point available.

The flag, when flown at half-staff, should be first hoisted to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day.

On Memorial Day the flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon only, then raised to the top of the staff. By order of the President, the flag shall be flown at half-staff upon the death of principal figures of the United States Government and the Governor of a State, territory, or possession as a mark of respect to their memory. In the event of the death of other officials or foreign dignitaries, the flag is to display at half-staff according to Presidential instructions or orders, or in accordance with recognized customs or practices not inconsistent with law. In the event of the death of a present or former official of the government of any State, territory, or possession of the United States, the Governor of that State, territory, or possession may declare the flag to flown at half-staff.

During rendition of the national anthem when the flag is displayed, all present except those in uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. Those not in uniform should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should render the military salute at the first note of the anthem and retain this position until the last note. When the flag is not displayed, those present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed there.

INAPPROPRIATE CONDUCT REGARDING THE FLAG

  • It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed twenty-four hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.

    • The flag should never be allowed to touch the floor or ground.

    • The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.

    • The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade except from a staff.

    • The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or boat. When the flag is displayed on a motor car, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the chassis or clamped to the right fender

    • The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.

    • The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free.

    • The flag should never be used as covering for a ceiling.

    • The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designated for temporary use and is to be discarded.

    • During the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the flag or when the flag is passing in a parade or in review, all persons present except those in uniform should face the flag and stand at attention with the right hand over the heart. Those present in uniform should render the military salute. The salute to the flag in a moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes.

    • The flag should never be flown upside down except as a signal of extreme distress due to threat of danger to life or property.

 


DAR Facts

Founded: October 11, 1890, incorporated 1896 by an Act of Congress

Mission: To promote historic preservation, education, and patriotism

Motto: God, Home, Country

Membership: 168,000 members, 3,000 chapters in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., International chapters in Australia, Austria,The Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, and the United Kingdom. More than 836,000 women have joined the DAR since it was founded.

Management: Policy for the Society is made by the National Board of Management composed of the President General, 11 Executive Officers, 21 Vice Presidents General, and 53 State Regents. The National Board of Management meets six times a year at DAR Headquarters in Washington, DC.

Continental Congress: The DAR annual national meeting is named after the original Continental Congress that governed the American colonies. DAR Continental Congress attracts over 3,000 members to Washington, D.C., each summer.

Become a Member

Eligibility for Membership: Any woman 18 years or older, regardless of race, religion, or ethnic background, who can prove lineal descent from a patriot of the American Revolution, is eligible.

Ways to learn more about DAR membership:

1) Visit the DAR web site (www.dar.org) to read about steps to membership and to fill out a prospective membership form,

2) Talk to local DAR chapter members in your area,

3)E-mail inquiries to prospectivemembers@dar.org