Town of Brooklyn

Extracted from the "History of Green County, Wisconsin" published by Union Publishing Company, Springfield, Ill. 1884; page 718:
The town of Brooklyn forms the northeastern corner of Green county, comprising congressional township 4 north, range 9 east and the north half of section 6, township 3 north, range 9 east of the fourth principal meridian. Dane county bounds the town of Brooklyn on the north. Rock county lies adjacent to the east, while to the west and south lie the towns of Exeter and Albany.
The first settler to come to this town was W. W. McLAUGHLIN in 1842.
Other settlers to follow were: J. F. EGGLESTONE, Leonard DOOLITTLE, Charles SUTHERLAND, Martin FLOOD, Sylvester GRAY, C. S. GRAY, Alonzo FENTON, J. W. HAZELTIONE, Harvey P. STARKWEATHER, W.R. SMITH, Robert GODFREY, and William R. SMITH all coming before 1846.
The first child to be born was Delila Victoria GILBERT on 01 Jan 1846.
The first marriage was that of D. R. CORSAW and Caroline SMITH.
The first death was Henry MONTGOMERY in 1846.
Religions were Methodist Episcopal.
There was no formal burying ground for Brooklyn until 1853 when the Brooklyn Cemetery Association was formed.




1860 Mortality Schedule
(extracted from 1860 Federal Census for Green County, Wisconsin)


NAME AGE SEX MARITAL
STATUS
BORN MONTH
DIED
OCCUPATION CAUSE NO.DAYS
ILL
Samuel BROADBENT 40 years male married England July farmer unknown sudden
Charles Jr. GREEN 22 years male   Ohio May laborer accidentally shot sudden
Joseph MOOR 25 years male   England September carpenter heart disease 3 weeks
Sarah HAZELTINE 4 years female   Wisconsin October   inflamation 3 days
unnamed infant   female   Wisconsin April   unknown sudden
Roena BENSON 2 months female   Wisconsin March   unknown 8 days
Francis AMIDON 4 years female   Wisconsin March   consumption 3 weeks
William KING 12 years male   D.C. June   mortification 8 days
Loualla STOCKWEATHER 5 years female   Wisconsin February   inflamation 8 days
Warren ROSACRONCE 50 years male   New York February farmer bellious colic 9 days




BIOS
Extracted from the "History of Green County, Wisconsin" published by Union Publishing Company, Springfield, Ill. 1884; page 718:
STEPHEN SMITH page 732
Stephen Smith is mentioned among the pioneers of 1847, having comehere from Walworth county in May of that year, accompanied by his wife and six children. He settled in what is now the town of Brooklyn, and entered the southwest quarter of section 11, whre he erected a log house. Here he resided, giving his attention to farming until the time of his death in 1856. Mrs Smith died in August, 1877. They were the parents of six children-- Jonathan, Charles, Emmarilla, Euphrsia, Emory and Caroline. Stephen Smith was born in Massachuesetts in 1798. He removed with his parents to Ohio, where he was married to Philura Love, a native of the State of New York. After his marriage he followed farming in Ohio until he came to Wisconsin in 1843 and settled in Walworth county. In politics Mr Smith was formerly a whig, and afterwards a republican. he would not accept office, but always attended elections and voted. His religios preferences were with the Congregational church, but after coming to Wisconsin he did not unite with any Church.
EMORY SMITH page 732
Emory Smith was born in Ohio, May 12, 1833 and came with the family to Wisconsin in 1843, and in 1847 to Green county, since which time he has been a resident of Brooklyn. He is still living on the land entered by his father, of which he owns 120 acres, and has first-class improvements. In November, 1856, he was married to Almira Smith, dughter of Roswell and Jane Brown Smith. She is a ntive of Michigan. Mr Smith is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry. He is a member of the republican party and has held local office.
CHARLES SMITH page 732
Charles Smith, son of Stephen Smith came with his parents to Green county. He was married to Saray Earl, and afterwards moved to Iowa. He now resides in Missouri.


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