THE MENOMINEE COUNTY GENWEB PAGE HAS MOVED... the NEW SITE will be the only one with the current updates!  Please change your bookmarks to our NEW ADDRESS at: http://wigenweb.org/menominee/ and we'll see you up at the new page!

"It takes a thousand voices to tell a single story."


Welcome to the Menominee County, Wisconsin Genealogy & Family History website -- part of the WIGenWeb Project.  My name is Anne and I also host the Shawano GenWeb Project.  Since Menominee was part of Shawano County until 1961, some of the older records will be located in the Shawano site as well.  This site is not to replace any official Menominee Tribal pages -- just an additional resource for history & genealogy and a place to share your research.  And I do mean SHARE YOUR RESEARCH -- we have plenty of space for:
 
FAMILY HISTORIES PHOTOGRAPHS
BIOGRAPHIES OBITUARIES
MILITARY RECORDS BIRTH, MARRIAGE & DEATH RECORDS
NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS POST CARDS
FAMILY GROUP RECORDS MAPS & GAZETTEERS
CENSUS RECORDS CEMETERY RECORDS
SCHOOL RECORDS and ASK ME - I'll make a page!
LOCAL TOWN HISTORIES  
   
Since this webpage is NEW, the data is limited but with a little time, I'm hoping to make this as successful as the Shawano GenWeb site which gets approx. 1000 visits a week.  But I am going to need your help -- anything that you have that is related to Menominee County would be greatly appreciated and we always credit the contributor.  And you can send it via email, snail mail, and we have a 24/7 fax line as well.

People always ask a little about me & my projects... so here it is in a nutshell.  I grew up in Shawano County & we raised our children in Gresham.  I've done genealogy research for the past 34 years as a hobby & professionally did research for the past 15 years, along with teaching genealogy classes & seminars.  My mother is from German heritage and my father's family is part Native American & part Canadienne French.  One of his maternal great-grandmothers was Nah-Kah-Kah-Nah-Piew from the Marinette - Menominee area and another great-grandmother was Josephine Elizabeth Teller, daughter of John Teller & Wy-a-we-wee.

One of my greatest passions in life is FAMILY HISTORY or GENEALOGY.  It is my goal to keep genealogy FREE - meaning I do not charge for my time & I donate my talents & resources to help people find their family roots.  This is what I strongly  believe in and this is what my genealogy web pages stand for -- FREE GENEALOGY FOR EVERYONE.  If you find someone financially profiting from any of my free web pages, please email me the details.  If you have a genealogy & research questions, please feel free to ask & if I don't have the answer, I'll find out who does.  And if you want to volunteer for projects, you are an answer to a prayer & email me! (big grin) 

We all have mentors in our lives and one of the kindest people I have had the pleasure to work with was Jim "Swift Otter" Nesbitt  -- he shared with me his expertise & love of Native American research (as well as Scottish!) and he left us way too soon.  God speed, Jim, and rest assured that your work with Native American people will continue.

*** NOTE *** Within these Menominee County GenWeb pages, you will find materials gathered from many sources.  We try to be as accurate as possible but if a mistake is in the original source, we transcribe it as we see it.  Also, it is not our intent to hurt or offend anyone -- today, we use the term Native Americans.  In prior years, the records would have referred to Native Americans also as Indians.

 

Now to the "good stuff" - not all of these are up and running...yet!
WHAT'S NEW??? MILITARY RECORDS
BIOGRAPHIES OBITUARIES / QUERIES
CEMETERIES PHOTOS & POSTCARDS
CENSUSES (Federal & State) RESEARCH LINKS
CHURCHES SCHOOL RECORDS
COUNTY HISTORY SURNAMES
FAMILY GROUP RECORDS TOWNS & HISTORIES
FUNERAL HOMES VITAL RECORDS
LIBRARIES & ARCHIVES US GENWEB
LOOK-UP VOLUNTEERS FAMILYSEARCH
MAPS & GAZETTEERS ANCESTRY
MICROFILMED RECORDS  

To discuss Menominee research in Wisconsin, subscribe to the WIMenomi-L mailing list. Send the message: SUBSCRIBE to WIMenomi-L-Request@rootsweb.com

OFFICIAL MENOMINEE TRIBAL PAGES


 
Have questions or comments? Please send them in!  Just click on the Dream Catcher... We love to hear from you!

Looking for neighbouring towns?  Phlox records can be found at LANGLADE GenWeb & our parent project is SHAWANO GenWeb which has information on the older Menominee records prior to 1961.

Thanks for stopping by and we welcome your input & contributions.  If you have favorite sites that you would like to share, just send us the links!

Again, it takes a thousand voices to tell a single story.  We'd appreciate hearing your voice & your story.

 


Very brief history...

Also spelled Menomini, Menominee is derived from an Algonkian word —manomin—for “wild rice”. The French called the Monominee Folles Avoines—“the wild oats people”. The Menominee Reservation contains 235,000 acres of northeastern Wisconsin forest land, a small part of the area in which Menominees have lived for more than 5,000 years. The reservation is home to approximately 2,500 American Indians, over 2,000 of whom are enrolled Menominees. The Menominees originally occupied approximately 9.5 million acres of what is now Wisconsin and the upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Before European contact, the Menominee were a relatively small tribe on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. Conservative estimates of their original population are less than 2,000, while the most optimistic do not exceed 4,000. When the French reached Green Bay in 1667, wars and epidemics which had swept Wisconsin after refugee tribes arrived in the 1650s had reduced the Menominee to about 400.

From that point of near-extinction, the Menominee population slowly recovered reaching 850 in 1736, 1,100 in 1764, and 1,350 by 1806. A census in 1854 numbered the Menominee at 1,930 in seven villages. Despite adding a group of landless Potawatomi and French mixed-bloods during the 1870s, the Menominee dropped to 1,422 by 1910. Current enrollment of the federally recognized Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin is close to 7,200 —3,400 of whom live on their reservation just west of Green Bay.

In 1961, the federal government terminated the Menominee’s tribal status, and their reservation became a Wisconsin county. The saw mill could not provide enough tax base to pay for all of the services a county government was required to provide, and the Menominee instantly went from being one of the most self-sufficient tribes in the United States to the lowest standard of living in Wisconsin. To meet their obligations, the Menominee were forced to sell part of their reservation as lakefront lots for vacation homes (Legend Lake). Federal recognition was restored in 1973.

 

And be sure to try out our SEARCH ENGINEIt will search the entire Menominee WIGenWeb site, BUT NOT the message boards for queries and obituaries board.  A drawback is that if the surname is spelled differently than what you type in, you won't find it.  So be sure to check various spellings and even check by town/place names.  When we "transcribe" records, they are entered as they are in the original document, mistakes and all.  
 

And, I'd like to acknowledge Tina Vickery, the WI State Co-ordinator;  Marcia "MAK" Kuehl, the WI Assistant State Co-ordinator; and Kelly Mullins, our WI Project Web Mistress -- the folks that help keep the WIGenWeb sites up and running!  We're proud to be part of the WisconsinGenWeb Project which is part of the USGenWeb Project.


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Thank you for stopping by!

 

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As you journey through the Menominee website,
you can always return home to this page by clicking on the canoe.