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Flash From The Past - 1880


Oconto Lumberman 1880
Jan. 3 1880

A man named Fisher killed a white deer on Little River a few days since.

J.P. Hoeffel, Jr., will start to resume his school duties, at the College of the Sacred Heart, Watertown, on Sunday evening.

John Caravou and wife, of Little River, the former 28 years of age and the latter 27, are the parents of ten children, seven of which are living.  They were married at the ages of fourteen and thirteen, respectively.

Woody Patterson started for his home in Nevada last evening.

Fatal Accident
Death of Thomas Dey.

Early Wednesday morning about 11 o’clock, an accident occurred in Mr. Thomas Deys’s camp, on the North branch, which proved fatal to Mr. Dey. It appears that the deceased was engaged with a number of men in hauling logs cut of a “kettle hole” by means of heavy belt block, when the chain broke, causing the log to roll back, catching Mr. Dey between the log and the tree, injuring him about the abdomen. He helped himself up and walked to the camp, a mile distant, where he remained until late in the evening when he started with a team for his home in the city. Arriving at Mr. McCluskey’s hotel, twenty-five miles from the camp, he got out of his sleigh and walked in, apparently as well as at the time of leaving camp. Shortly after leaving McCluskey’s he felt faint and died a few moments after. The deceased was a native to Canada, about thirty-eight years of age, and leaves a wife and two small children who have the heart-felt sympathies of the community. In all the relations of husband, citizen and member of the church, he fulfilled his duties with a quest and unobtrusive sincerity that endeared him to his friends, and will make all those who stand around his bereaved that truly a good man has been taken from our midst. The funeral will take place at St. Joseph Catholic Church to-morrow, at 10 o’clock.  Oconto County Reporter
Jan. 3, 1880

Personal

We regret to learn that Mrs. Lee, wife of Principal Lee of our high school has been obliged to have one of her eyes removed. The operation was performed at Chicago, and at last accounts the lady was improving. Mrs. Lee has the sympathy of the entire community in her deep affliction.

John Caravou and wife, of Little River, the former 28 years of age and the latter 26, are parents of ten children; seven of which are living. They were married at the ages of fourteen and thirteen, respectively.

A Fatal accident

A very sad accident occurred at one of the Oconto Co.’s. camps up river on Wednesday, by which the boss, Mr. Thos. Dey was fatally injured. The gangs were hauling a large log out of a pit by means of a tackle connected with the log by chain. For some unknown cause the chain broke when the log was partially out of the pit, causing the log to slide back and catch Mr. Dey between it and the side of the pit. It struck him in the abdomen and when removed he walked down towards camp, as if nothing occurred. He started with the supply team for this city where he resides and occasionally as he became tired of riding would get off and walk. He after a while fainted away as the men supposed. Upon seeing him fall they got some water to throw on his face, when they discovered he was dead.

Deceased leaves a wife and two children to mourn his untimely end. The body was brought down yesterday. We could not learn before going to press, when the funeral will be held.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Jan. 10, 1880

Miss Della Davis left for Silver Cliffs, Col., last Sunday evening, where she will take up her home permanently with her sister, Mrs. Ullman, formerly of Oconto.

K. Fischer has been called home to Appleton, during the past week to attend the sick bed of his father.
Chronology of 1879

January.

1.  Mr. Severeaux was injured by a falling tree.
 Infant daughter of Mr. Simons, died.
 H. Baumgartner and Mrs. L. Schette married at Pensaukee.
 State Senator elect Chas. H. Phillips died suddenly.
2.  Died at Oconto Falls, Mary C. Perrigo aged 35.
6.  Grand Central Hotel, Ft. Howard burned.
11. Died at Oconto Falls, Edward Smith, aged 67.
12. Died, Miss Abbie L. Millidge, aged 19 years, 5 months.
15. Marriage of Mr. Byron Perry and Miss Emma Arnold.
21. Circuit court opened by Judge Meyers.
31. Attempt to burn the Reinhart House.

February.

2.  Death of Mrs. S. H. Waggoner.
3.  Death of Michael Murphy. 
12. Three dead Indians found on the ice between Green Island and Menekanne.
24. Married at Appleton, Wis., Mr. Chas. Keith and Miss Kittie L. Fennio,
      Died, at Gillett Centre, Mrs. John White aged 25.

March

6.  Death of Lewis Edwin Hart aged 4 years and 4 months.
8. Married, Mr. Samuel Couillard and Miss Marts Matraverse.
12. H. H. Woodmansee and R. W. Hubbell formed a co-partnership in the practice of law.
27. Escape of Mr. Harvey Thomas from Oshkosh Insane Asylum and appearance here.

April

4. Mr. Durgan's house, Couillardville destroyed by fire.
6. Mr. J. Prickett burned out and Mr. Joe Barnaby's house destroyed by fire.
9. Death of Mrs. Will E. Barlow aged 23 years.
20. Married, Mr. Chas. Chelsey and Miss Susan M. Ames.
21. Death of Abrian R. Gall, aged 69.

May

1. Death of Thomas Williams, aged 17.
15. P. W. Geskie residence destroyed by fire.
20. Fire at T. A. Phelp's barn.
21. Married, Mr. Fenwick B. Stewart and Miss Lillian Lindsey.
26. Married at Gillett Centre, Mr. P. H. Plumb and Miss Lucy Gillett, also at the same time and place, Mr. A. John and Miss Hattie Gale.
31. Total destruction of the Rienhart House by fire.

June

1. Died Mrs. Charlotte Pauley aged 77 years.
4. A yacht containing 17 persons cap sized on Lake Winnebago, one person drowned.
Died, Timothy Sullivan aged 21 years.
5. Extensive forest fires raging, doing much damage to farmers and loggers.
9. Jefferson school building destroyed by fire.
15. Capsizing of a sailboat off Escanaba, drowning six persons.
24. Death of Howard, infant son Mr. and Mrs., McCuilongh.

July

1. First National Hotel at Marinette destroyed by fire.
11. Felix Benoit injured by a buzz saw.
13. Charley Wilson badly hurt by falling with a scythe in his hand.

August

1. Mrs. Scripture of Oconto Falls aged 60 jumped out of a wagon and shot a deer.
4. Mrs. John McDowell of Little River died of dropsy.
11. Suicide of Mrs. Dan Charles.
12. Died, Mrs. Margert J. wife of T. P. Gilkey Esq. aged 41.
13. Married at Stiles, Mr. Jas. A. Glynn and Miss Mary J. Hamilton.
19. Died, Joanna Lamb aged 71 tears.
The barn of Ivory Mathews Esq. struck by lightning and burned.
28. Drowning of Alex McCauly aged 28 years.

September

16. First National Hotel at Peshtigo and three other buildings burned.
23. Paul McDonald at Eldred & son's Mill, injured by falling saw.
24. James Lacy injured severely by run away horse.
27. Frank Adams severely injured by explosion of powder.
28. Married, at Stiles, Mr. Francis Phinney and Miss Ella Robbins.
29. Joseph DeLong injured at Scofield's mill.

October

5. Married at Little Suamico, Mr. Louis Wilson and Miss Jeanette Rymer.
same time and place, Mr. William George and Miss Anna Bell Charlton.
6. Married at Chicago Mr. Jas. N. Johnston and Miss Lizzie Nettles.
28. Accidental wounding of a boy at Maple Valley, by shot gun.

November

3. Miss Mamie Waggoner supposed to be lost.
6. Married at Ripon, Mr. Thos. Milles and Miss Coad.
17. Destructive fire at James Conniff's loss $2000.
23. Married John Ratchford and Barbara Feeny.
Married George Despins and Ella McDonald.
Married at DePere, J. Chase and Flora Call
25. Married, Barrister Alex. Braseau and Emma Morrow.
26. Married A. Watterich and Miss Barker.
27. Married at Brookside, Jas. Wider and Lucy J. Bannock.

December

6. Mrs. Wm. Knowles died at Brookside.
16. Married at Little River, Thos. McDowell and Nettie Pierce.
McIsaac arrested at Peshtigo for theft.
30. Thomas Dey fatally injured up river by log.
 


Oconto County Reporter
January 17, 1880

Brookside

For some weeks since, Mrs. George Lince was called to Unity to see her mother, Mrs. Benjamin who was very sick. Mr. Lince received a dispatch informing him of Mrs. B's death. He started last night for Fon du Lac where they will bring the remains for burial. Mrs. Benjamin was formerly a resident of this county and had many warm friends here who will sympathize with the bereaved family.

Gillett

The infant son of G. W. Donaldson has been ill for some time and little hopes are entertained for his recovery.

Juvenile Heroism

The heroism of three little boys, that should not be permitted to pass unnoticed, was displayed on Thursday afternoon, in saving, from a watery grave, one of their companions, who while skating on the ice, run into an air hole. The facts are as follows:- It seems that as little Eddie LaClaire, was skating on the river he mistook an open place, for a piece of fake ice, and skated into the river. He was not missed, and would have been carried under the ice but for someone noticing a little dog, swimming across the hole. His arm was discovered in the air and Frank Beautot, Eddie Keefe and Peter Martineau. all about the same age, 13 years, quickly ran to his assistance, they formed into a line and clasped hands, thus giving support to Frank Beautot, whose lot fell to the end, nearest the opening, who seized the drowning boys hair as he was disappearing under the ice and pulled him out. Eddie Keefe then in attempting to save the dog, lost his balance and went in also. Martineau quickly came to Eddie's relief, who was also drown into the hole. Young Beautot then pulled them both out.

Young LaClaire, who in the mean time lay up on the ice insensible, was then carried home and Dr. Allen was summoned. He was resuscitated about 10 o'clock in the evening. Great credit was due to the boys, particularly Beautot, for their promptness and courage, for the loss of the instant would have proved fatal. Eddie's dog was swept under the ice and drowned.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Jan. 27, 1880

Camp Burned

O. C. Cooks lost his logging camp, by fire, Thursday, January 15. The camp is situated on the Waupee where he has a contract to put in some 3,000,000 feet of logs. The contents were a total loss, with no insurance. This comes heavy on Mr. Cooks just at this time, but he immediately rebuilt and the way he is putting in logs in is a caution to a novice. He is bound to make up, by enterprise and bone labor what the fire fiend took away.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Jan. 31, 1880

Accident in the Pineries

On Monday last as a party of men were engaged in felling trees, near Charley Bent's camp, a green pine was cut, which in falling struck another tree, hurling a fragment to the ground in such a manner as to hit a man named DeWitt (we could not learn his surname) on the hip and shoulder. He was trying to escape the blow, and had crouched down by the side of a log when he was struck. Dr. Allen was immediately summoned, but found him dead upon his arrival.

Last Saturday was an unlucky day at Chamberlian's camp; four men being hurt within twenty minutes. Two men were engaged in sawing a log when a falling limb struck one of them on the head, cutting the scalp and knocking him insensible, also striking the saw, throwing the end up so as to strike the other man under the chin, knocking him senseless also. The latter, coming to first, crawled over to where his companion lay, and finding him insensible began to cry "murder". A teamster, a short distance away, engaged in rolling a log onto his sleigh, hearing the cry, dropped his cant hook; the log rolling back and breaking his leg. A few minutes after, a man cut his foot severely, striking it near the instep.

Bob Tilford lost a horse at Gillett's camp last week. The horse in hauling down hill slipped, and being caught between a stump and the load was crushed to death.

Charley Chamberlian bought a horse of Albert Richard some time since. He ( the horse) was bulky - Charley was mad - a club was close by - by some means  the club got into Charley's hands, and like by agency the aforesaid club came in contact with the head of said horse. Result - a dead horse.

Gillett

A man by the name of Duette was killed by a falling tree in Mr. Bent's logging camp. The deceased leaves a wife and two children to mourn his untimely death. The remains were taken to Black Creek for internment.

Almost a Holocaust

On Saturday last the family of Robert Newton, at Maple Valley barely escaped a terrible calamity. Mrs. Newton awoke about five A.M. and having lighted the fire, went back to bed; she awoke soon after to find the room on fire and in her excitement ran out of doors to get snow and water to extinguish the flames, forgetting her two children who were in the bed. Finding it impossible to save her home, she sprung into the flames,  and seized her children, barley escaping with life. Had she slept a few minutes longer, her sleep would have been a fatal one.

Mr. Robert Newton is in the woods, and loses all by the fire. Able Tourtilotte is around soliciting subscriptions for their aid and thus far, reports many kind donations.
 

Pensaukee

John Windross has gone into the stone picking business, not at Waupun, but in his own quarry. He has a large contract to fill for several parties.

Michael Barlement, who had an arm amputated several years ago, caused by a cancer, is ailing this time from the same cause. It is coming this time under the arm, and will prove fatal.

McKenny, of Brookside station, is the happy father of a sixteen months boy who can read fluently and talk intelligently upon the political issues of the day. Isn't troubled with the colic to any great extent either.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 7, 1880

Maple Valley

One of our townsmen, William Clark, met with a severe accident, while in Pendelton's camp. He was engaged in loading log, when one log rolled back and broke his leg just above the ankle. Dr. O'Keef was called and set the fractured bone, he is now doing well.

A Sad Accident

A week ago last Saturday a young man named McGuire, employed in Farrel's  camp, met with a serious injury by a log falling from the top of the load on his left leg. He was brought down to Oconto the same day, arriving here in the evening. Dr. Moriarty was immediately summoned and took charge of the case, making the young man as comfortable for the night as possible. Next day, Dr. Allen was called in conciliation and an examination of the limb made when it was found that the thigh bone was fractured a little below the middle and considerable injury done to the knee joint. A long split not being at hand, the limb was placed in proper position and temporary splints applied to the thigh at the seat of fracture. The patients limb seemed to defy all attempts of the doctors, until Friday, when Dr. Allen found that mortification had set in affecting the foot and leg to some distance above the ankle, the rest of the limb being very much inflamed, and upon consultation, it was decided that amputation, was necessary to save his life.  accordingly, last Tuesday morning, Dr. Brett of Green Bay and Dr. Moriarty administering the chloroform. Amputation was done at the middle of the thigh about an inch above the seat of the fracture. The tissues of the thigh were found infiltrated with large quantities of blood from some ruptured vessels, accounting for the great swelling immediately after the injury and favoring the supervention of gangrene by interfering with the circulation. The knee was examined after the operation and was found filled with a large quantity of blood serum. The patient at the present writing is doing well and hopes are entertained that he will ultimately recover.
 

Brookside

Mrs. M. C. DeLano has purchased 120 acres of land. This I believe makes her the owner of 6 forties. They do not allow her to vote but I never knew her to be deprived of the privilege of paying taxes.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 21, 1880

A Close Call

At John Slattery's logging camp, in the town of How, there and near being a fatal accident the first of the week. It appears that as a log was being rolled upon the top of a load, Frank DonLevy placed the end of his hand spike in the Centre of the load to receive and stop the log as it came up to it’s place, instead of at the end where he rightly belonged. John Slattery, who was watching the maneuvers, saw at a glance that Frank would be unable to stop the log; that it would go entirely over the load and fall on the ground on the other side, crushing him in it’s downward course, jumped up and caught the end of the log and checked it’s progress, but not until the fingers on his right hand had been badly crushed and his face more or less lacerated. It was a close call for Frank and a heroic act on the part of Mr. Slattery.

The son of Wm. Rector of this town has been very sick with Typhoid Pneumonia but some hopes are entertained of his recovery.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 28, 1880

Alex MacDonald was the recipient of a very enjoyable surprise party at his home in Frenchtown on Thursday evening.

Miss Anna Farnsworth of Chicago, who is so well known to our young people, is visiting her sister, Mrs. O.A. Ellis.  We hope she may be induced to remain here for sometime.

Rodney Gillett of Gillett Center was strutting around town on Monday.

Mr. Solon Birmingham from Carthage, N. Y. is hand shaking with brothers and sister’s here.

Mr. Byron Whitney, brother of F. L. Whiting surprised his friends by coming suddenly among them after an absence of 15 years among the mines of the Far West. During the last ten years they had not heard from him and they reasonably supposed he had exchanged the terrestrial for a celestial abode.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 13, 1880

Maple Valley
The death of Mrs. Butler has cast a sad gloom over the place and the entire community in their sad bereavement. The funeral sermon was preached by Mr. Yarwood, to a large concourse of people. We are pleased to see Mr. and Mrs. Appleby, Mrs. Lord and Porter, from Oconto; besides the relatives of the family in attendance.
 

A Fiendish Outrage
One of the most dastardly cases of attempted outrage and rape it has ever been our province to chronicle occurred on Friday of last week.

Mrs. Fanny Crockford was sitting at the window of her home, in the town of Oconto; there were no men about, and she was utterly unsuspicious of the terrible scene in which she was about to play so prominent a part. She saw a man enter the yard, but thought he was coming for something to eat. The man, James Pachie, entered the house, closed the door and immediately made indecent proposals to Mrs. Crockford, which she resisted at once. He thereupon threw her on the floor and attempted to violate her person. In the struggle which insued, Mrs. Crockford was much bruised about the neck, arms and body. She finally told him that there were some men coming up from the river and they  would kill him, upon which he sprang up and started for the place where she said they were, exclaiming “God damn you, I’ll come back and kill you if they are not there”. Mrs. Crockford at once arose and made her way to a neighbor’s house for assistance.

Mr. Crockford was not informed of the circumstances until evening, when he immediately procured a warrant for the villain’s arrest. Constable Davis made the arrest and at the examination, before Squire Hart, the ladies testimony was so conclusive as to cause the Justice to hold him in $1,000 bail for trial at the spring term of the Circuit court.

There is no doubt, that Pachie deserves the full sentence of the crime for which he is held, and we think he stands a good chance for a ten year’s pass at hotel d’States Prison.

Burned
A week ago Saturday, a daughter of William Cartright, in Angelica, Shawano county, was so badly burned by her clothes taking fire that she died on the following Monday. The child was ten years old and was alone with the exception of a younger child, and when the accident happened, she ran outdoors, when a neighbor extinguished the fire with water.

Personal
Wm. Crozier, who went to England some time ago, returned on Wednesday last and intends to make America his permanent home.

Prolific
Mr. Lazotte, a man living six miles north of this city, has been, without a doubt, one of the most industrious and enterprising men in this vicinity. He has been the father of 22 children, only five of them now living. Mr. L. has been twice married; his first wife bore him but two children. He is now 58 years of age and his wife ten years younger. He has always attended to his business in a thorough and workman-like manner. His record proves it.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 20, 1880

Drew His Revolver

A traveling man named W. H. McLanahan, was arrested Tuesday evening on complaint of Felix Johnson, for assaulting him with a pistol. An examination was held before Esq. Folsom, who held the prisoner for trial in the circuit court.

Accident

As Mr. John Salchider was attempting to get a heavy chest downstairs at Dr. Coleman’s boarding house Tuesday, and the stairs having no balustrades, he fell from nearly the top, the chest falling upon, and badly bruising him. Dr. O’Keefe attended his injuries.
 


Oconto County Reporter
Feb. 27, 1880

Drowned

The body of Samuel Klaus, who was drowned on Wednesday in the Menominee  river was brought to this city on Thursday evening’s train.

He was driving across the river, a mile and a half above Marinette, when the ice broke and he was thrown into the water. He became chilled, and being impeded by his wrappings, was unable to get out. He was found Thursday morning, with one arm on the boom frozen to death. He was buried Friday.
 


Oconto County Reporter
March 6, 1880

Suicide

We learn as we go to press, that the wife of Charles Butler, of Maple Valley, committed suicide, Thursday the 4th during a fit of temporary insanity.  Mrs. Butler has been in poor health for sometime past, on Thursday she went to the house of her brother-in-law, Simeon Butler. Before starting for home she put some articles in a valise to take with her and among them some paris green which she found in the chamber. After going about a half a mile she went into an old barn and there took the poison, she remained in the barn about 4 hours and then returned to her brother-in-laws. She was in great agony, vomiting freely, but did not state that she had taken the poison until shortly before her death when she became sane and called upon God to witness that she was not in her right mind when she committed the act. Deceased leaves a family of three children to mourn her loss. The bereaved husband and children have the warmest sympathy of a large circle of friends and community at large in their affliction. Funeral to-day.
 

Personal

Mrs. Dan Hall is packing up preparatory to moving to Quinnessee, and her residence will be occupied by Mr. Heller.
 

Upper Pensaukee

New settlers have been coming in the past season, among them are Richard and George Cleveland, who have purchased land for farms, and will build this spring.
 


Oconto County Reporter
March 13, 1880

DIED.

Butler – At Maple Valley, March 4th Elizabeth wife of Charles Butler, aged 35 years and 5 months.
The deceased came to Oconto about 13 years ago, where she resided until five years ago when she moved to this place. She was a faithful wife, a loving mother, an affectionate sister and a kind neighbor. She leaves a husband, three children, two sisters and one brother to mourn her loss.
 

Burned

A week ago Saturday, a daughter of Wm. Cartright, in Angelica, Shawano Co. was badly burned by her clothes taking fire that she died on the following Monday. The child was 10 years old and was alone with the exception of a younger child, when the accident happened she ran out doors, when a neighbor extinguished the fire with water.
 

Prolific

Mr. Lazotte, a man living six miles north of this city, has been, without a doubt, one of the most industrious and enterprising men in this city. He has been a father of 22 children, only five of them now living. Mr. L. has been twice married; his first wife bore him but two children. He is now fifty-eight years of age and his wife ten years younger. He has always attended to his business in a thorough and workmanlike manner. His record proves it.

Personal

Wm. Crozier, who went to England some time ago, returned on Wednesday last and intends making America his permanent home.
 


Oconto County Reporter
March 20, 1880

Drew His Revolver

A traveling man named W. H. McLanahan, was arrested Tuesday evening on complaint of Felix Johnson, for assaulting him with a pistol. An examination was held before Esq. Folsom, who held the prisoner for trail at the Circuit court.
 


Oconto County Reporter
March 27, 1880

Little Suamico

This is a place where the folks think there is no use wasting any time. A Polander buried his wife two weeks ago, and last Sunday he took another partner to share his joys and sorrows.

Fatal Accident

Mike Sullivan was killed and a man named McCarty fatally injured at Escanaba on the 23rd. The men were wipers and were taking an Engine out of the roundhouse; they had no steam up but were shoving it out and were in some manner crushed between the engine and door of the building.
 


Oconto County Reporter
April 3, 1880
Gillett

 On Sunday last the remains of Mrs. Duel of our Town was borne to her long home.  She had been unwell for some time and we hope she has gone to rest.  I have no doubt she found that this life was but a shadow that was passing away. But she has gone to that world of spirits.  The funeral of the late Mrs. Duel which took place Sunday afternoon, was largely attended, from the M.E. Church of which she was a member, Rev. Mr. Couch preached a very appropriate sermon of which the remains were consigned to the final resting place. Charles Rudburg has sold his farm, consisting of forty acres, to Christian Sellnow of Washington, Shawano County

Little Suamico Will Wedgewood smiled on us too, one day last week and we almost forgot what it was that made Willie Willis look so meek and “kinder” fatherly like. It is because they a a new daughter.  Of course, Will Lucia, thinks his baby girl bests all the rest.  Maybe it does.

Brookside

 A select party of about forty, were convened on the evening of the 28th in the parlors of M. D. DeLano to witness the marriage of his eldest daughter, Miss Ida E. DeLano, to Mr. Milton McNeel of Kilbourne City. The marriage was performed by the Rev. T. J. Macmurray.  H. R. Knapp seated as groomsman and Miss Hattie M. DeLano, sister of the bride,as bridesmaid.  The parlors were gayly festooned with evergreens, autumn leaves and flowers.  The bride wore a heavy pale gray silk trimmed with garnet silk and fringe, with the usual complement of white lace, white kid gloves and slippers.  The refreshments do not need any compliments, they were all that could be desired.  The friends of the bride exhibited excellent taste in the selection of useful, substantial, presents.  If the Editor can allow space, we will mention some of them.  From the bridegroom, a gold neck chain.  The father of the bride, a cow and colt.  The mother, a set of scalloped nappies and cream jug.  Mr. and Mrs. L. McNeel a fruit knife and nut pick, Frank McNeel, five dollars.  Dr. and Mrs. E.C. Beebe, a set of silver knives. Mrs. Ackrill of Oconto, a butter knife.  Mrs. and Mrs. R. B. Yeaton, a sugar shell.  Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Lee, sugar shell and pickle fork.   The Mrs. F. L. and E. C. Whitney, L. C. DeLano, the Misses Jennie and Lizzie Lince and John H. Goddard, a silver castor.  The Mrs. G. W. DeLano, Eliza DeLano, M. Sutton, each a quilt.  Mertie Lince, a card case and cigar holder.  Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Bovee, a clock.  Mr. Geo. W. DeLano, a first class sewing machine. Miss Laura M. DeLano, St. Peter, Minn, dessert spoon and pocket handkerchiefs.  Fox and Crosby Leonard, St. Paul, napkin rings.  Hattie M. DeLano a bolt of cotton cloth.  Laura T. DeLano, a rocking chair.  Mrs. Barbank, St. Paul a set of silver teaspoons, 3 table cloths, one dozen napkins, 10 towels and a counterpane.  The newly married and truly happy pair took the south bound train for Kilbourne city.  I understand Mr. McNeel has purchaced a beautiful house in Oconto.  May the good angels guide, guard and smooth their path through lifes uneven way.

A Close Call

 On Wednesday evening Jack Hays, being a little happy, missed Superior St. bridge and walked in the icy flood.  He cried out most lustily for help which came in the shape of Mayor Young, a lantern, a small boy and a boat.  These succeeded in rescuing him in a completely sobered condition.

Burglarized

 The railroad depot at Little Suamico, was buglarized last Sunday evening by Peter McManee, a tramp.  He was arrested and brought before Squire Hart. On his examination he pleaded guilty, and was bound over to the spring term of the Circuit Court.


Oconto County Reporter
April 10, 1880


How

 Perhaps you and the readers of your interesting paper have forgotten that there is such a place as How in this county and this is to remind you that we still exist as a community and to ask you to publish a few items of general interest It is generally healthy in this vicinity but, Mr. Weinholds youngest child has been very sick and although better is not out of danger. There is some men here from Michigan looking the country over with a view of purchasing land for themselfes and others to settle upon, and they express themselves as very highly pleased with the land in this vacinity.

Town of Oconto

 There was a Marriage ceremony performed by Jas. S. Ordway Esq. on the 4th inst. at his residence.   The happy couple was Henry H. Ordway of the town of Oconto and Bertie Bence of Stiles. In the presence of their friends and neighbors.

Corrections.

 We published last week, the marriage notice of Mr. G.A. Prell and Miss Emma Pahl.  We are informed that the announcement was premature, we therefore retract it.  The notice was handed in for publication and we supposed it was genuine.  We beg pardon of the parties interested and will be happy to tast their wedding cake at some time in the near future.

Personal.

 We acknowledge, a generous portion of wedding cake from Mr. Henry Ordway and Miss Bertie Bence, who were united in marriage on Sunday.

 Frank E. Noyes of the Eagle, was elected Justice of the Peace at Marinette on Tuesday last.

 Mr. John Sheridan leaves town Sunday evening for Red Cloud, Webster Co., Nebraska where he will engage in the hardware business.  He has our best wishes for success in his new home.

 Miss Parker is visiting her aunt Mrs. Shufelt of this city.  Miss Parker resides in the southern part of the state.

New Barber Shop

 Frenchtown, once more boasts a first class barber shop, and its citizens are rendered happy thereby.  John Addison has opened up in the Lacy’s old shop opposite the Engine House.  John was the most popular barber in Chicago, before the fire, of course he has been out of practice a few years, but his hand has not yet lost it cunning as his many patrons can testify.  The people of Frenchtown have long felt the need of an institution of this kind and they are full prepared to appreciate it, while John is qualified to give satisfaction in all branches of his profession.


Oconto County Reporter
 April 17, 1880


On a Frolic

 Andrew Chamberlain, being hungry concluded to eat hence made a raid on a chicken roost purloining therefrom three fine fat hens. He was duly arrested, brought before the Police Justice, who fined him only eighteen dollars, six dollars a chick.  He paid the fine and betook himself to Frenchtown, where he indulged in a row, during which he attempted to stab a man, whereupon a warrant was issued, and Luke Welsh started after the prisoner.  Luke was a little late however and the last seen of Chamberlain he was making use of a “tie” pass for the north.  We hope he’ll stay there.

Accident

 Henry Cole was severly injured Thursday by being thrown from a horse he was riding to water.  He fell under the horse who stepped on his neck, cutting a gash 3 1/2 inches long.  Medical aid was summoned and the wound carefully dressed.  Though confined to the house, Mr. Cole is improving rapidly.  We congratulate him on his escape from death, as a few inches either way would have proved fatal.

Personal

 Geo. Wilson of Pensaukee has stolen a march on the good people of his town.  He went away to Ohio, married a handsome Buckeye girl, and returned home where he is preparing a snug home for her.

 The youngest child of Robt. Jones is very ill and we learn fears are entertained for his recovery.

 Mrs. Edwin Hart returned from Menominee on Saturday last where she has been  spending a few days with her daughter, Mrs. B. J. Brown.


Oconto County Reporter
April 24, 1880


 Marinette Eagle

 Mrs. Dr. Adams left town, Tuesday evening for Appleton Wis.  She intends spending some time there as a guest of Mrs. West.

Accident

 Chas. Scott, a man working in Jennings’s camp, on the North Branch, met with a serious accident last week.  He was chopping, and in some manner cut his foot, from the large toe nearly to the ankle partially severing it.  He was brought to Dillion’s Hotel on Saturday last and Dr. Moriarty was called to attend the case.  The patient is doing well under the Doctor’s skillful treatment, and all the injured parts will be saved.

Fine Shooting

 W. H. Skinner was doing some fine shooting in Town on Tuesday.  He used a rifle but we are unable to state what kind.  He would lay his gun upon the ground, and after throwing two eggs in the air, would pick up the weapon and put a ball through each egg before they reached the ground.

 One reckless youth pitched a silver dollar in the air, and the first bullet struck it square, knocking several feathers out of the Eagle, and an eye out of the “Goddess” of Liberty.

Peshtigo

 The good people of Peshtigo were greatly exercised over a series of burglaries on Tuesday night.  Two men attempted to enter nine different houses, and succeeded in getting several watches and some $90 in money.  Deputy Sheriff Ellis pursued them on Wednesday, but we are sorry to say, without success.

Just Sentence

 Joe Passaic was tried at the recent term of th Circuit Court, and found guilty of attempted rape.  Judge Meyers sentenced him to four years hard labor at Waupon.  The evidence in this case was conclusive, and punishment was fully deserved.  The jury was out 23 hours before returning a verdict.  It is intimated that one of their number was a man of strong Mormon proclivities, which may account for the length of time it took them to agree upon their verdict.

Building Notes

 Mr. Chas. Lynes, is building a new Blacksmith shop on Main St., adjoining the old one.  The latter will be used entirely as a wagon shop hereafter.  Mr. Lynes’ increasing business makes it necessary for him to spread out a little.  We are glad to note these improvements, which show the increasing prosperity of our city.  Give us more of them.

 Earnest Surprise has built a commodious addition to his dwelling on Pecor St., in Frenchtown and will hereafter run a first class boarding house.  He knows how to do it, and his boarders will be fortunate in have as good a land-lord to cater for them.

New Colony

 The Wisconsin Land Company, owning 60,000 acres of land in this county are about to bring in a large colony of immigrants from Europe and the eastern states.  They have already  disposed of 1200 acres in 80 acres farms. The bulk of this vast tract of land is in towns 34 and 35 range 16 and the nearest road is the McCauslin supply road.  The road does not penetrate to this land, and we would earnestly recommend that the County Board open the remaining ten miles, and charge it to the Town of Darling.  The expense is not very great and the benefit to the county will be incalculable.

 Mr. A. T. Couillard, President, and Mr. Ed. T. Lomont, Superintendent of this company assures us that they will have from two to three thousand emigrants here this summer.  Mr. Lomont will be located in Oconto to take charge of the immigrants as they land.  Among other advantages, there is splendid water power, and the company intends erecting a saw mill and grist mill at once.

 The land is of fine quality and well adapted to raising large crops of wheat, corn, etc.

 The timber is largely hardwood although sufficient pine is found for all building purposes.  Of course, the opening of a road through the colony will give all of the trade to this city.  Therefore it is desireable that our board take early action in the matter. Gillett

 On Sunday last the remains of Mrs. Duel of our Town was borne to her long home.  She had been unwell for some time and we hope she has gone to rest.  I have no doubt she found that this life was but a shadow that was passing away. But she has gone to that world of spirits.  The funeral of the late Mrs. Duel which took place Sunday afternoon, was largely attended, from the M.E. Church of which she was a member, Rev. Mr. Couch preached a very appropriate sermon of which the remains were consigned to the final resting place. Charles Rudburg has sold his farm, consisting of forty acres, to Christian Sellnow of Washington, Shawano County

Little Suamico Will Wedgewood smiled on us too, one day last week and we almost forgot what it was that made Willie Willis look so meek and “kinder” fatherly like. It is because they a a new daughter.  Of course, Will Lucia, thinks his baby girl bests all the rest.  Maybe it does.

Brookside

 A select party of about forty, were convened on the evening of the 28th in the parlors of M. D. DeLano to witness the marriage of his eldest daughter, Miss Ida E. DeLano, to Mr. Milton McNeel of Kilbourne City. The marriage was performed by the Rev. T. J. Macmurray.  H. R. Knapp seated as groomsman and Miss Hattie M. DeLano, sister of the bride,as bridesmaid.  The parlors were gayly festooned with evergreens, autumn leaves and flowers.  The bride wore a heavy pale gray silk trimmed with garnet silk and fringe, with the usual complement of white lace, white kid gloves and slippers.  The refreshments do not need any compliments, they were all that could be desired.  The friends of the bride exhibited excellent taste in the selection of useful, substantial, presents.  If the Editor can allow space, we will mention some of them.  From the bridegroom, a gold neck chain.  The father of the bride, a cow and colt.  The mother, a set of scalloped nappies and cream jug.  Mr. and Mrs. L. McNeel a fruit knife and nut pick, Frank McNeel, five dollars.  Dr. and Mrs. E.C. Beebe, a set of silver knives. Mrs. Ackrill of Oconto, a butter knife.  Mrs. and Mrs. R. B. Yeaton, a sugar shell.  Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Lee, sugar shell and pickle fork.   The Mrs. F. L. and E. C. Whitney, L. C. DeLano, the Misses Jennie and Lizzie Lince and John H. Goddard, a silver castor.  The Mrs. G. W. DeLano, Eliza DeLano, M. Sutton, each a quilt.  Mertie Lince, a card case and cigar holder.  Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Bovee, a clock.  Mr. Geo. W. DeLano, a first class sewing machine. Miss Laura M. DeLano, St. Peter, Minn, dessert spoon and pocket handkerchiefs.  Fox and Crosby Leonard, St. Paul, napkin rings.  Hattie M. DeLano a bolt of cotton cloth.  Laura T. DeLano, a rocking chair.  Mrs. Barbank, St. Paul a set of silver teaspoons, 3 table cloths, one dozen napkins, 10 towels and a counterpane.  The newly married and truly happy pair took the south bound train for Kilbourne city.  I understand Mr. McNeel has purchaced a beautiful house in Oconto.  May the good angels guide, guard and smooth their path through lifes uneven way.

A Close Call

 On Wednesday evening Jack Hays, being a little happy, missed Superior St. bridge and walked in the icy flood.  He cried out most lustily for help which came in the shape of Mayor Young, a lantern, a small boy and a boat.  These succeeded in rescuing him in a completely sobered condition.

Burglarized

 The railroad depot at Little Suamico, was buglarized last Sunday evening by Peter McManee, a tramp.  He was arrested and brought before Squire Hart. On his examination he pleaded guilty, and was bound over to the spring term of the Circuit Court.


Oconto County Reporter
April 10, 1880


How

 Perhaps you and the readers of your interesting paper have forgotten that there is such a place as How in this county and this is to remind you that we still exist as a community and to ask you to publish a few items of general interest It is generally healthy in this vicinity but, Mr. Weinholds youngest child has been very sick and although better is not out of danger. There is some men here from Michigan looking the country over with a view of purchasing land for themselfes and others to settle upon, and they express themselves as very highly pleased with the land in this vacinity.

Town of Oconto

 There was a Marriage ceremony performed by Jas. S. Ordway Esq. on the 4th inst. at his residence.   The happy couple was Henry H. Ordway of the town of Oconto and Bertie Bence of Stiles. In the presence of their friends and neighbors.

Corrections.

 We published last week, the marriage notice of Mr. G.A. Prell and Miss Emma Pahl.  We are informed that the announcement was premature, we therefore retract it.  The notice was handed in for publication and we supposed it was genuine.  We beg pardon of the parties interested and will be happy to tast their wedding cake at some time in the near future.

Personal.

 We acknowledge, a generous portion of wedding cake from Mr. Henry Ordway and Miss Bertie Bence, who were united in marriage on Sunday.

 Frank E. Noyes of the Eagle, was elected Justice of the Peace at Marinette on Tuesday last.

 Mr. John Sheridan leaves town Sunday evening for Red Cloud, Webster Co., Nebraska where he will engage in the hardware business.  He has our best wishes for success in his new home.

 Miss Parker is visiting her aunt Mrs. Shufelt of this city.  Miss Parker resides in the southern part of the state.

New Barber Shop

 Frenchtown, once more boasts a first class barber shop, and its citizens are rendered happy thereby.  John Addison has opened up in the Lacy’s old shop opposite the Engine House.  John was the most popular barber in Chicago, before the fire, of course he has been out of practice a few years, but his hand has not yet lost it cunning as his many patrons can testify.  The people of Frenchtown have long felt the need of an institution of this kind and they are full prepared to appreciate it, while John is qualified to give satisfaction in all branches of his profession.


Oconto County Reporter
April 17, 1880


On a Frolic

 Andrew Chamberlain, being hungry concluded to eat hence made a raid on a chicken roost purloining therefrom three fine fat hens. He was duly arrested, brought before the Police Justice, who fined him only eighteen dollars, six dollars a chick.  He paid the fine and betook himself to Frenchtown, where he indulged in a row, during which he attempted to stab a man, whereupon a warrant was issued, and Luke Welsh started after the prisoner.  Luke was a little late however and the last seen of Chamberlain he was making use of a “tie” pass for the north.  We hope he’ll stay there.

Accident

 Henry Cole was severly injured Thursday by being thrown from a horse he was riding to water.  He fell under the horse who stepped on his neck, cutting a gash 3 1/2 inches long.  Medical aid was summoned and the wound carefully dressed.  Though confined to the house, Mr. Cole is improving rapidly.  We congratulate him on his escape from death, as a few inches either way would have proved fatal.

Personal

 Geo. Wilson of Pensaukee has stolen a march on the good people of his town.  He went away to Ohio, married a handsome Buckeye girl, and returned home where he is preparing a snug home for her.

 The youngest child of Robt. Jones is very ill and we learn fears are entertained for his recovery.

 Mrs. Edwin Hart returned from Menominee on Saturday last where she has been  spending a few days with her daughter, Mrs. B. J. Brown.


Oconto County Reporter
April 24, 1880


 Marinette Eagle

 Mrs. Dr. Adams left town, Tuesday evening for Appleton Wis.  She intends spending some time there as a guest of Mrs. West.

Accident

 Chas. Scott, a man working in Jennings’s camp, on the North Branch, met with a serious accident last week.  He was chopping, and in some manner cut his foot, from the large toe nearly to the ankle partially severing it.  He was brought to Dillion’s Hotel on Saturday last and Dr. Moriarty was called to attend the case.  The patient is doing well under the Doctor’s skillful treatment, and all the injured parts will be saved.

Fine Shooting

 W. H. Skinner was doing some fine shooting in Town on Tuesday.  He used a rifle but we are unable to state what kind.  He would lay his gun upon the ground, and after throwing two eggs in the air, would pick up the weapon and put a ball through each egg before they reached the ground.

 One reckless youth pitched a silver dollar in the air, and the first bullet struck it square, knocking several feathers out of the Eagle, and an eye out of the “Goddess” of Liberty.

Peshtigo

 The good people of Peshtigo were greatly exercised over a series of burglaries on Tuesday night.  Two men attempted to enter nine different houses, and succeeded in getting several watches and some $90 in money.  Deputy Sheriff Ellis pursued them on Wednesday, but we are sorry to say, without success.

Just Sentence

 Joe Passaic was tried at the recent term of th Circuit Court, and found guilty of attempted rape.  Judge Meyers sentenced him to four years hard labor at Waupon.  The evidence in this case was conclusive, and punishment was fully deserved.  The jury was out 23 hours before returning a verdict.  It is intimated that one of their number was a man of strong Mormon proclivities, which may account for the length of time it took them to agree upon their verdict.

Building Notes

 Mr. Chas. Lynes, is building a new Blacksmith shop on Main St., adjoining the old one.  The latter will be used entirely as a wagon shop hereafter.  Mr. Lynes’ increasing business makes it necessary for him to spread out a little.  We are glad to note these improvements, which show the increasing prosperity of our city.  Give us more of them.

 Earnest Surprise has built a commodious addition to his dwelling on Pecor St., in Frenchtown and will hereafter run a first class boarding house.  He knows how to do it, and his boarders will be fortunate in have as good a land-lord to cater for them.

New Colony

 The Wisconsin Land Company, owning 60,000 acres of land in this county are about to bring in a large colony of immigrants from Europe and the eastern states.  They have already  disposed of 1200 acres in 80 acres farms. The bulk of this vast tract of land is in towns 34 and 35 range 16 and the nearest road is the McCauslin supply road.  The road does not penetrate to this land, and we would earnestly recommend that the County Board open the remaining ten miles, and charge it to the Town of Darling.  The expense is not very great and the benefit to the county will be incalculable.

 Mr. A. T. Couillard, President, and Mr. Ed. T. Lomont, Superintendent of this company assures us that they will have from two to three thousand emigrants here this summer.  Mr. Lomont will be located in Oconto to take charge of the immigrants as they land.  Among other advantages, there is splendid water power, and the company intends erecting a saw mill and grist mill at once.

 The land is of fine quality and well adapted to raising large crops of wheat, corn, etc.

 The timber is largely hardwood although sufficient pine is found for all building purposes.  Of course, the opening of a road through the colony will give all of the trade to this city.  Therefore it is desireable that our board take early action in the matter.


Oconto County Reporter
May 1, 1880

Dr. Coleman has a crew of men at work placing his mill in repair for a big seasons work “chawing” up the toothsome pine.  All of which is highly proper.
 

Mr. Ed. Mullen, Agent of the C.&N.W. R.R. at this place returned from a brief trip to Chicago.
 

Mr. and Mrs. George Hall reached home on Sunday morning from their bridal journey, George has been showing his genial face as usual, in the domain of letters and postage stamps.
 
 

Maple Valley

 Mr. Klapp met with an accident while felling a tree.  The butt flew round and struck him on the leg, and so jammed and strained the cords that he has been laid up ever since, now more than three weeks.

Little Suamico

 Mrs. Thomas, a destitute widow with a large family, was recently notified by her landlord to vacate the dwelling occupied by her.  The authorities have
frequently lent assistance to parties less needy than she.

A Very Sad Accident

 On Saturday last, about 2 p.m. the little two-year old daughter of Mr. Frank Brabeau (Barabeau) was playing near a stool on which stood a tub of boiling water. In some way she pulled it over, scalding herself in a terrible manner.  Mrs. Brabeau who had gone to the river to get some water, came in to find her child crying piteously and suffering the most excruciating torture.  Her breast and belly were burned so badly the the skin came off at the touch, and when Dr. Allen, who was at once summoned, came, he found the little one hopelessly burned.  Mrs. Brabeau’s neighbors came in and did all in their power to assist the stricken mother, but their efforts as well as those of Dr. Allan, proved useless.  The child lingering in intense agony until 4 p.m. on Sunday, when death released it from its suffering.

Accident

 Frank Whitney was thrown from a horse on Wednesday last and had his collar bone broken.  He had in his hand an agricultural implement, which frightened the horse, and it become unmanageable and threw him off with the result stated.  He was somewhere in the vicinity of John Leigh’s mill.  Dr. Beebe was called who set the bone, and the patient is now doing well.

Log Jam

 The logs at the foot of the slide at the Water Mill, on Monday morning commenced jamming and before it could be broken they piled in about twenty deep.  It was night before the jam was broken and the slide open again for business.

Saloons to be closed on Sunday

 Our city Marshal has instructed the saloon keepers in this city, to close their institutions up on Sunday according to the law.  This will meet the approbation of all right minded citizens who believe in law and order.

Youthful Crookedness

 On Saturday afternoon Apr. 17th, a boy named Zink Primley, in the employ of Charles Collier, who lives on the North Branch of the Pensaukee river, together with a son of Mr. Collier, about 11 years of age, took their departure for parts unknown, taking with them Mr. C’s best horse which they both rode together.  A warrant was obtained from Justice John Major and placed in the hands of Sheriff McGoff, who started in pursuit of the gentlemen.  The horse was found in the vascinity of Duck Creek where the boys had sold it for thirty five dollars.  They took the train on Wednesday for Watertown.  Sherriff McGoff started Thursday from Green Bay on their track.  Mr. Collier who was at the Florence Iron Mine has been notified and can find his horse safe in Green Bay.  We learn that the boy Primley has been in the Industrial School at Waukesha and was released for some cause before he had been there a year.  He is about 18
years old.

Oconto County Reporter May 8, 1880

Personal

 Wm. John McGee, formerly of this city, but at present hailing from the Commonwealth and Florence mines spent Monday in Oconto looking up carpenters, to work on his contracts for building at these nw “cities.”  John reports, business as booming and has contracts for a number of buildings.  We are glad to hear of the success of our fellow townsman and hope it may continue.

 Mrs. Edward West of Appleton, Wis. arrived in this city Monday morning, on a brief visit to her sister Mrs. Charles Keith.

 Col. J. A. Watrous has removed his family to Milwaukee, and will soon devote his undivided attention to the Sunday Telegraph, the best society paper in the state.

 Mrs. N. C. Gilkey started for Milwaukee last week, to have her little boy examined and treated for deafness.

 Mrs. Berry returned home from Escanaba the first of the week, looking quite ill.  She has been ailing for some time.

A Narrow Escape

As jailer Call was attempting to take Joseph Thomas, an insane person into the jail, on Wednesday, Thomas struck him twice over the arm and wrist with a club that he was carrying at the time.  Assistance was at hand and he was confined without further trouble.  Mr. Call has a lame arm to remind him of the recounter..

Attempted Suicide

 The latest sensation in the West Ward, is the attempted suicide of a well known landlady. She attempted to hasten her departure, from this cold and cruel world, by swallowing a quantity of Green Vitrol, but Dr. Paramore was called in, and she was under his prompt treatment brought back to life.  It seems a little hard that in this free country, one cannot be allowed to die, but such is the case It is rumored that domestic difficulties, led the lady to attempt the rash act, which was so nearly successful.

A Misfortune

 Mr. George Bermingham of Brookside, suffered a severe loss on Tuesday afternoon about two o’clock, in the total distruction of his house and barnes by an accidental fire.

 Mr. B. was carrying some coals of fire, between two boards, out to the field for the purpose of burning some brush and in passing out of the kitchen, cautioned his wife to look out that none of the coals in dropping should set fire to the house.  He was at work, in the field, the house hidden by the barn, when a loud shout from his man called him to the house.  He ran quickly, but found it impossible to extinguish the fire; more especially, as he could not get at the pump, it being surrounded by the wind driven flames.  From the house it spread to the barn, the other out buildings, all of which were completely consumed oweing to the strong wind.  Mr. Bermingham’s loss was a large one,  aggregating nearly $1,000, on which there is no insurance.  His little three year old baby had a very narrow escape from burning to death.


Oconto County Reporter
 May 15, 1880

West Pensaukee

 If rumor is true, Mr. Charles Dutton is now ready to report himself to the census enumerator as the head of a family.  Miss Lina Porter having joined her fortune to his, for life, and many a long and happy life be theirs, is my wish.

Little Suamico

 On Friday, May 8th, a bright little son of Mr. Jno. Race, having stepped barefoot in the smoldering remains of a fire in the back yard, burned his feet severely.  The family are having their share of mishaps and have the sympathy of the people.

 Mrs. Otterstein has taken the adopted infant left by Mrs. Storr.

Personal

 Mr. Cleve Keigh left for a visit to his old home in Vermont on Wednesday last.

 Mrs. Chas. McDonald of Pensaukee lost his house by fire on Saturday last, we were unable to learn the amount of his loss.

 Mrs. Edwin West of Appleton, Wis. who has been visiting here sister, Mrs. Charles Keith, the past week, left for her home by Sunday evenings train. Master George Ellis, packed his gripsack, and acted as her escort, on her journey.

Conflagragation.

 One of the most disasterous fires that ever visited Oconto, occurred on Tuesday about 2:30 p.m.  A man in passing a large red barn belonging to the Oconto Company opposite their boarding house, discovered smoke issuing from the door at the north end, he immediately gave the alarm and the cry of “Fire!” “Fire!” and the shrill tooting of the mill whistles speedily gathered a large crowd. At first the fire was thought to be a small matter, but on entering the barn, the whole interior of the barn was found to be smouldering, which the acession of air caused to burst into flames.  The fire companies were speedily on hand, and at once commenced playing upon the barn.  The wind being from the south carried the flames away from the boarding house to the saving of which all efforts were at first directed.  About this time the men from the other mills, which had shut down, began to arrive; some running along the booms and other hurrying across the meadow and up the streets to render all the aid in their power.

 The wind, though light, was still of sufficient force to carry the sparks to the houses and lumber piles lying to the north, thereby endangering all that portion of town lying adjacent to the railroad track.  Gangs of men were promptly organized, who with buckets and barrels of water, promply extinguished the scattered fires in the saw dust and lumber yard.  At this time it was found impossible to save the barn, the flames having extended to Moses Thompson’s house, and to the little yellow house occupied by Joe Bluker and Mrs. Monihan, and the house occupied by Alex McDonald.

 The fire spread so rapidly that the lumber yard and houses lying low and three blocks beyond the fire were only saved by the greatest exertion.  As it was, the roofs of several houses took fire, but were extinguished by the inmates.

 All efforts were not directed to confining the fire to the block in which it started.  Moses Thompson’s house was alive with men pouring water and tearing off the burning shingles.  The yellow house and the Alex McDonald’s home were a blazing mass utterly beyond the control of the fire department;  Charles Keith’s house had now caught and it was only by super human exertions that it was saved from total destruction.

 Summarizing the losses we find that the Oconto Company lost two barns, Charles Keith’s house, Moses Thompson’s house and Alex McDonald’s  house; Wall Phillips one house, insured for $500; and Mrs. Welch, the little yellow house.

 The Company loss approximates $5.000 on which there is an insurance of $3,000.  The other property, so far as we can learn, was not insured.  Joe Blucher and Mrs. Monihan lost part of the household goods.  Charles Keith succeeded in saving all of his effects.  Moses Thompson’s furniture was badly damaged by removal, fully covered by insurance.

 Among the debris were found the remains of two horses, which in the hurry and confusion had been forgotten.

 The total loss, aside from the Company’s is not far from $2,000.  The origin of the fire is not positively known.

Went Through Him

 A man by the name of Thomas Wilson, robbed his “chum” on Monday morning at Albert Richard’s Hotel, Frenchtown.  They had been at work all winter in the same camp, and were apparently much attached to each other.  After receiving their winter wages, Mr. Williams had about $40.00 which he carried with him.  Sunday night they put up at Richard’s Hotel, and roomed together. About 2 o’clock a.m. Mrs. Richards , who happened to be up, saw Wilson come down stairs in a stealthy manner and leave the house.  Upon Mr. Williams arising, the next morning, and ascertaining that his “pard” had left during the night, he became suspicious that “things were not as they seemed,” and forthwith examined his pockets, which revealed the fact that his friend had “gone through him,” in the highest style of the art.  Not leaving a nickle to console himself in even a glass of ale.  Marshal Walsh was notified, who at once started in pursuit and overtook the light fingered gentleman at Duck Creek.

 It seems that Wislon had walked as far as Big Suamico before deeming it safe to purchase a railroad ticket.  He then continued his pedestrian exercise until he arrived at Duck Creek where he attempted to board the South bound 2 p.m. freight and was nabbed at once by the Marshal who had taken the same train and was on the lookout for him.  The gentleman was brought back to the city and after disgorging about $31 of his ill-gotten gain, all he had left, he was permitted to make himself scarce, which he was not slow to appreciate.

Baby  Carriages

 Going at cost, at N. B. Mitchel’s.  Those having present need of these useful articles, or those who expect to need them in the near future, will find it for their interest to call and make their selection at once.



Oconto County Reporter
May 22, 1880

Little River

 A wedding and dance, at Mr. Leon Belonga’s (Belongia) on Monday.  Mr. Joseph Pocaun to Miss Netty Belonga.  A number of friends were invited who took part in the doings.  There were some 25 couples to supper where all the luxuries of the season was served, with a liberal hand, by Mr. Leon Belonga and lady.  A general invitation was given to all to attend the dance.  This brought a full house where the light fantastic toe was tripped to the music of the Bellon string band, which was secured for the occasion.  The dance kept up until day light when all retired to their homes well pleased with the performance of the night, leaving their best wishes with the newly married couple, who were the means of giving us a treat, seldom excelled in this neighborhood.  Who is the next to do likewise. Do not forget to extend an urgent invitation to us.

Brookside

 Mr. and Mrs. G. W. DeLano will leave Thursday, for St. Paul and St. Peter, Minn., for a month recreation with relatives there.

Obituary

Mr. Peter Feeney, whose injuries were noted in our columns last week, died on Monday last.  He was buried from St. Joseph’s C. T. A. Society, and his remains were escorted to their last resting place in the Catholic Cemetery, by the Society, who wore their full regalia and were led by the C.T. A. band.  The Society made a fine appearance, clothed in their rich and tasty regalia, and the band, under the directo of Prof. Kupt, furnished some excellent and appropriate music.  The beautiful banner of the Society was draped in black, and their flag furled.

About forty carriages followed the remains to the tomb.  The procession and ceremonies were very imposing, and reflect great credit upon the Society, under whose auspices they were arranged.

Personal

 The death is announced, at Sun Prairie Wis., on the 13th inst., of Dr. Isaac Noyes, father of Luther B. Noyes of the Marinette Eagle.

 Wm. Luck has removed his family to Quinnesec, Michigan.  They left on Monday.

New Arrivals

 On Wednesday last, Mr. Ed Casson became the proud and happy father of a boy; Mrs. Joseph Labbe also presented her husband with a boy and the family of Patrick Duffy was increased by the advent of a brand new girl baby. These new arrivals reached town on the same day, and it wasn’t much of a day for babies either.  These gentlemen, we are happy to state are subscribers of the REPORTER.  We make this statement for the benefit of those who are less favored, and would say to them: - If you aspirre to be like these happy fathers, subscribe for this paper and wait patiently for another year.

Accident

 ( reference to the accident to the late Peter Feeney) In regard to the accident reported in last week’s REPORTER and Lumberman, each giving a slightly different view of the case, I wish to state that I am not responsible for the account of in the REPORTER, although it was correct, so far as the broken rib is concerned, but no further, as there were internal injuries to the spleen and kidneys, and consussion of the great sympathetic nerve ganglia which He in that region.

 According to the Lumberman, Dr. Allan found the patient’s symtoms indicating injury to the brain, and of course, very naturally, this would call his attention to the hips, (perhaps the C. M.’s brain lies in that region.)  He found a serious fracture of the thigh and applied a Liston Long Splint.  This is the first time I ever heard of the Dr’s having the appropriate splint at hand, his usual plan being to make the patient as comfortable as possible until he gets the splint. The reason that he was prepared in this case is that he diagnosed a fracture to suit his splint.

 Now I wish to state that I made a very careful examination of the hips and limbs, and found no evidence of injury to them, and I maintain the the symtoms, and later, death, were caused by the internal injuries from the same blow which broke the rib.  Fracture of the thigh would not acount for them, as there are no vital organs there.  Not even the brain. P. O’Keef.

A Sad Case of Drowning

 The Sturgeon Bay Advocate says that on Friday afternoon of last week, Jerome B. Wright, the keeper of the hotel at Idlewild, started for that place from the village in a small sail boat.  He was accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Jos. Graham, and his only son, Elmer, aged about ten years.  When a little below the Spear mill a gust of wind struck the boat and capsized it so suddenly that the inmates were instantly thrown into the water.  Mr. Wright and his daughter managed to clear themselves from the overturned skiff and cling to the bottom, but the boy was caught under it and consequently beyond the reach of his father, who had all he could do to keep his daughter and himself from being washed from their frail support by the fierce wind and heavy sea which swept over them.  When the boat capsized it was near the bar just below the Spear pier, and on this the spar caught and held the skiff in place bottom up.  Several parties on shore attempted to reach the imperilled ones, but there were no boats in the vicinity, and the wind, which now had become a living gale, made it extremely hazardous for a skiff to venture out.  In this manner a half hour or more elapsed before substantial aid was forthcoming.  Capt Jno. Vaughn, with a sail boat from the village, set out to the rescue, who was soon joined by the tug Piper which was coming up from the mouth of the bay.  When this assistance arrived Mrs. G. was well-nigh exhausted and could not have held out much longer.  They were got on board the tug and the capsized boat righted when the inanimate form of the unfortunate lad was found.  He was at once taken up to the village and the work of recuscitation begun by Dr. Mullen, but all efforts in this direction proved futile, as the vital spark had been extinguished.


Oconto County Reporter
May 29, 1880

William McKenny has sold a part of his farm and removed back to the city.

Nearly every passenger train going north this week, has carried form one to three carloads of emigrants, mostly Swedes.

As Mr. and Mrs. Beebe were riding on the Pier road last Wednesday their horse stepped upon one end of a loose plank about 9 feet long that was lying in the road.  The horse struck it in such a manner that it flew up between the forward spring and through the bottom of the buggy.  The horse became frightened and commenced to kick but fortunately help was at hand else & serious accident might have been the result.

Ed. Sargent came down from the north Wednesday evening.  He keeps right on lumbering in the summer the same as the winter.

Little Suamico

 On awaking last Sunday Morning, the R. R. Agent missed his pantaloons containing some $70 in money and other valuables, from is bed side.  Soon after he had gone to the depot the missing clothing was returned to his wife, by a man passing who found them lying on the public road a few rods from the house.  No valuable missing.

Little River Special Correspondence To the Reporter

A PRIVATE POUND

 Mr. John Caravo (Carriveau) has erected a private pound, for the purpose of extracting a few dollars from his neighbor’s pockets.  The fence between him and the land owned by P. T. Williams was burned down last Summer and has not been rebuilt, also the fence in front on the road had been thrown down to entice cattle to come on their premises.  The neighbors have volunteered to build his fence, but to this Caravo objects, he doesn’t want a fence.  Caravo made an assult with a knife on Frank Amore, a boy 14 years old who was hearding his cow in a field owned by P.T. Williams, and used as a commons, but was prevented from doing any damage by J. Pocan who was passing at the time and ordered Caravo to the house, or he would slap his ears.  For this threat he had Pocan arrested on Friday.  The following day he had Old man Belonge arrested, a man of some 65 or 70 years of age, for a similar remark.  On Friday, the 21st, Mr. Amore found his cow tied to Caravo’s wagon.  He presented a bill of $10 damages; this was objected to, and three men were appointed to appraise the damage, but could not learn that the cow had been in the field at all.  Mr. Amore paid $2 and called it square.

 On the night of the 22nd, five head more found their way into this yard, a calf owned by T. Bolin, and four yearlings belonging  to George Smith.  Bolin traced his calf to this were a demand of $2 was made for the safe keeping of the same.  Mr. Smith was the next victim that came along and ordered his stock turned out, a demand of $8 was made by Caravo.  This was objected to;  Mr. Smith let the fence down and turned his cattle out, Caravo drew his shot gun on Smith and threatened to shoot him, Caravo’s better half stood by, giving the order to shoot.  She delivered a free lecture in a foreign tongue to Mr. Smith, he did not wait for the closing remarks.

 We have if from good authority that those cattle of Smiths and Bolin’s had been driven from the state road, some 3/4 of a mile and put into this pound, for the purpose of collecting $2 per head.  Mr Caravo has in his employ one Jo Petau.  This individual acted in the capacity of chambermaid, nurse, washwoman and general roustabout; and this Petau is used as a tool to do the dirty work which he is capable of not knowing the difference between right and wrong, and is a fit subject for the lunatic asylum, and steps are talked of to place him therein.

 An exciting chase took place the 25th, J. Petau and the proprietors of the pound, men, women and children tried to capture a neighbor’s horse.  They followed the horse 1/2 mile from  their premises but failed to capture it.  If there is anything more degrading than the above business, we would like to know it. Uno.

Fatal Accident

 Rev. Father Goetz, of Seymour accompanied by Rev. Father Fox, of Green Bay, left the latter place in a buck board  on the evening of Tuesday May 18th, they were going to New Franken.  When near the Chas. Brandt place, the horse became frightened and started off at a rapid gait.  Father Goetz jumped from the wagon and Father Fox remained in.  The horse was stopped after running about half a mile, when Father Fox returned and found Father Goetz lying beside the road, partially insensible.  He was taken to the residence of Mr. Paul Fox, but declined to have a physician called.  Later in the night he became delirious and Dr. Rhode was summoned.  He was however, beyond the reach of medical aid and died at 2 o’clock Wednesday morning.  It was found upon examination that the spinal cord had been broken and the small brain injured, which was the cause of his death.  The deceased was but 27 years of age, Seymour being his first pastorate.  He was loved and respected by all who knew him and his untimely death is sadly lamented.  The funeral services were held in the Cathedral at Green Bay on Thursday morning, and was largely attended, nine priests assisted at the services, six of them acting as pall bearers.  The remains were interred at New Franken.

That Accident.

Audi alleram Partem

 Editor Reporter:  - In the last issue of the REPORTER I noticed a communication with reference to the accident to the late Peter Feeney over the signature of Pat. O’Keef.  In reply I wish to state in a few words the facts in the history of the case.  The accident occurred on Wednesday the 12th inst.  Dr. O’Keef treated the patient for a broken rib till the 15th when he was discharged. When called on Friday I found the patient lying in a profound stupor from which he could be roused for a moment, but would relapse again into speedy insensibility, surface cold, pulse feeble and pupils contracted.  From this condition he never fully rallied.  The symtoms following such an accident would be, to any educated Surgeon, plainly diagnostic of concussion of the brain and shock to the general nervous system, terminating in this case, in death.  A poisonous dose of opium or morphia would produce symtoms somewhat similar but this was evidently not another Tenzier case.  There was found to be a fracture of the upper part of the right thigh bone, which was reduced and a proper splint applied.

 Dr. O’Keef states that he made a careful examination of the hips and limbs and found no evidence of injury to them.  The public, after reading the certificates attached will be in a position to estimate at its full falue his “very careful examination.”  After the first account of the accident was published in the REPORTER the Dr. made up his mind that, besides a broken rib there were internal injuries to the kidneys and spleen.  No symptoms of injury to these organs were present, but, no doubt, he arrived at his conclusion after another “very careful examination.”  The public, I am firmly convinced, will appreciate the merits of the case.

 I hereby certify that, at the request of Dr. Allan of this city, I, on Saturday the 15th inst., examined the injuries sustained by the late Peter Feeney in the Railroad accident of the 12th inst., and found a fracture of the upper third of the right Femur, hereby corroborating Dr. Allen’s diagnosis made the previous day. D. P. Moriarty, M. D. Oconto May 27th 1880 H. Allan, M.D. , C. M. We the undersigned, citizens of Oconto, hereby certify, that we were present when Dr. Allan examined the late Peter Feeney’s injuries, that each of us, in succession, placed our hands on his right thigh, near the hip joint, and distinctly felt, and heard the grating together of the broken ends of the bone, when the leg was slightly rotated. JAMES MEGAN, ROBERT BURKE, JOHN R. JAMES, JOHN RATCHFORD, THOMAS FEENEY

An Oconto Boy in Trouble

 Considerable interest has been felt by our citizens during the past week, on account of the arrest of Herbert Smith in Milwaukee, charged with arson.  As many of our readers have probably heard but meagre reports of the affair, we will give a brief synopsis of the case as it has been published in the Milwaukee dailies.

 Young Smith is the youngest son of Geo. Smith Esq., of this city.  He is about 16 yrs., of age, and has worked for the past year as a compositor, upon the Saturday Telegraph, Milwaukee.  The building in which the office is located was fired twice, once on the night of Friday May 21st.  Young  Smith slept in the building, and was arrested upon suspicion of having set the fire.  Mr. Geo. Smith went to Milwaukee immediately upon hearing of the matter, and his son was released upon bail, and the hearing of the case set for this Saturday forenoon. Mr. Smith has engaged Jas. G. Jenkins Esq., as his attorney in the case, and is satisfied of his sons innocence.

 Young Smith is a boy of very reserved habits, and has made but few acquaintances during his stay in Milwaukee.  He has worked very hard, often working nights, and his being so slightly known, and sleeping in the building was the cause of suspicions against him.  His father is confident of his acquital upon examination.

 He learned the rudiments of his trade in this office, and while here we always found him to be faithful and trustworthy.  A boy of good habits, and we cannot believe that he could be guilty of such a crime.

Personal.

 Constant Noel, left this city for Depere Wedesday night, to attend the funeral services of his sister.

 Mrs. L. M. Pierce of Marinette was in the city during he past week visiting relatives and friends.

 Wm. McKenny, has sold a part of his farm and removed to this city.  We are please to welcome his back.

 The Rev. C. Kunst, evangelical minister, made us a pleasant call on Wednesday last.  The Rev. gentlemen has just become a resident of our city, having moved here from Shawano.  He will preach in Pensaukee and other places through the Co.

Crystal Lake

 The Oconto Reporter  says that Judge Hubbell and Mr. Wilcox formerly of Oconto, have purchased lands on Crystal Lake, and are opening farms there. Crystal Lake was formerly in the town of Gillett, but has recently been added the town of Howe (HOW).  A correspondent of the Advocate regrets that these two gentlemen, who were recently located at Kelly Lake, could not content themselves there, and hopes they will come back. - Green Bay Advocate

 The REPORTER said nothing of the kind.  The article the Advocate refers to, was written by our Maple Valley Correspondent, who has resided in that town for the last nine years, and within 1 1/2 miles of the lake refered to above.  It has been known as Kelly Lake, until recently, but the goodpeople of the town of Maple Valley (in which town the lake is situated,) have seen fit to re-name it Crystal Lake, it being more appropriate on account of the pureness of its water. The lake is about a mile in diameter and is surrounded with a beautiful sloping beach, and is considered, by those who visited it, as being one of the most beautiful and pictureszue bodies of water in this section of the state.  Judge Hubbell and District Attorney Woodmansee have spendid farms bordering on this lake.

Accidents

 Tuesday afternoon John A. McDonald, and employee of one of the mills, received severe injuries of the side and arm by a fall of about ten feet; a quantity of shingles falling on him.  Dr. Beebe has the case in charge and hopes to bring him around aright.

 Last Sunday a number of men at work on the boom at Stiles, were carrying a stick of timber, when the men behind, unavoidably, dropped it from their shoulders; Robert Chamberlain being the front one, received the full force, sending him against an iron windlass, causing an ugly wound of the scalp.  He was immediately brought to Dr. Beebe’s office where his wound was dressed.


Oconto County Reporter
 June 5, 1880

Little Suamico

 Mr. Frank Bailey, mentioned in a former communication, still has his ankle in splints, and is confined to the house.  Many partly decayed fragments of bone were discharged from the ulcer.  He is full of hope and thinks he is improving.

 Miss Lina Conn who went with her father from here to Florida some years ago, and a Miss Gerkie who accompanied her are now married there.

Personal.

 Mr. S. A. Gibbs and Miss Ida M. Bishop were married at Joseph Newton’s last Tuesday evening.  Miss Bishop is well and favorably known in the village, and bears with her the congratulations of many friends.  The young couple took the Wednesday morning train form Menominee were Mr. G. has charge of business for a lumber firm. - Peshtigo Eagle

 Mrs. John O’Neil, left Wednesday night for Rochelle Ill.  Hurriedly summoned to her mother who is dangerously ill.

 Joseph Porrier has sold his tonsorial business to Antone Sharrow.  He left by the Tuesday evening train for Colorado and will probably locate at Leadville if the country suits him.

 Last week we stated that Rev. Mr. Macmurray and family had gone to Manistee, Mich., to spend a vacation.  We should have said Monistique, Mich. Monistique is situated at the northern extremity of Lake Michigan, north east from Escanaba.

Fully Acquitted

 Herbert C. Smith was examined Tuesday on the charge of Arson and fully acquited.  The Milwaukee Daily News says:  “After hearing all of the testimony, judge Mallory quickly announced Smith’s discharge from custody to the young gentleman’s great gratification as well as that of his friends, many of whom were in the court room, including his father Mr. George Smith, a highly respected citizen, and ex-Mayor of Oconto; his sister, and accomplished teacher of the same place, and other relatives.  The examination throughout was a credit to all concerned, and the Daily News unites its congratulations with those of Herbert Smith’s relatives, over the happy termination of a most trying situation.

Accident

 C. G. Folsom Esq., met with a severe accident on Thursday of last week, in the following manner:  He was sitting on the back end of Mr. Fisher’s wagon, and upon the horse taking a sudden start was thrown out and fell on his left shoulder, seriously spraining it.  He is very choice of that shoulder just now, and will probably have occasions to remember it for some time to come.

Accidental Shooting.

 An Indian boy in the town of How, accidentally shot himself on the 23rd of May. The particulars of the affair were as follows:   In the evening he went out to watch a deer lick, about a half mile from where he lived, and climbed up into the lower limbs of a tree, and then reached down for this gun, which he had left standing on the ground leaning against the tree.  Upon pulling it up the hammer scraped against the bark, which raised it enough to set the gun off upon falling back.  The load, consisting of a very large ball, passed entirely through his body, just above the right lung, and came out just below the shoulder blade.  The Indian, by his own carlessness, is now lying in a very precarious condition, but the surgeon has hopes of his ultimate recovery.  The most singular thing of the whole affair was, that upon receiving the wound he managed to get down from the tree and walk nearly to the house before losing his strength.  He then hallooed for help,  which was at hand, and assistance was at once rendered. Upon searching for the gun it was found against a tree, muzzle down to keep it from becoming damaged by damp weather, a forethought truly remarkable under the circumstances.

Fires

 Dick Johnson of Maple Valley lost his barn by fire on Saturday night last. It was insured for $250.

 T. A. Chisholm’s cedar post mill burned on Tuesday afternoon last.  The mill was located at Comstock’s.  It was insured  in the Royce agency for $1,400. This is quite a heavy loss for Mr. Chisholm, coming as it does just when the season's business is fairly opened.  But Thomas has plenty of enterprise and a week or so will see his mill again in full blast.

 John McIver of Stiles suffered a heavy loss by fire on Tuesday last.  All his buildings, except the blacksmith shop were entirely destroyed.  They consisted of a dwelling house, 2 barns, root house, ice house, etc. Mr. McIver estimates his loss at $5,000.  Insured for $2,000.  He proposes to rebuild at once.  The fire was first discovered in the kitchen and is supposed to have originated from the chimney.  Mr. McIver’s loss is very heavy and he has our warmest sympathy.

A Narrow Escape

 The steamer Hawley came near burning up on Thursday of last week at Green Bay.  A log of life preservers had been placed aft of the cabin, and a spark from the smoke stack had lodged among them and ignited the pile.  Before the fire could be extinguished the fan tail was burned off and the entire after part of the cabin ruined.


Oconto County Reporter
June 12, 1880

Florence

 Mr. Fisher, who has been visiting his old home in Penn., for the past three weeks, returned last week and has a crew of men at work chopping down the trees upon the lots, grading streets and making a general cleaning up.

Personal. Jas. Darrow came home from the North last Wednesday, quite sick with Typhoid fever.  He is improving as we go to press.

 Robert Jones is seriously ill with erysipelas.

 We understand that Daniel Charles is very sick,  not expected to recover.

 Sandy McNair returned to Florence yesterday morning.

 J. C. Timothy has sold out to Mrs. McAuley.  He proposes going to Leadville, Col.  We wish him success wherever he may go.

 Dr. H. Allen leaves Monday night for Milwaukee as a delegate to the Grand Lodge of Masons.  From there he will visit his old home at Ottowa C. W. He will be absent for about two weeks.  (C. W. is Canada West)


 Editor Reporter: - The proclamation bearing the heading, “To all whom it may concern” and signed Pat O’Keef which appeared in the last REPORTER, demands very few words from me in reply.  As regards the main point at issue, the injuries sustained by the late Mr. Feeney, the facts in the history of the case given by me in the REPORTER of the 29th ult., have not been refuted in a single instance.  That there was a fracture of the right thigh bone has been abundently proved, and the publication by O’Keef of all the blackguardism of which he is master will not disprove it.  That he attended this case three days, and after making a “very careful examination of the hips and limbs” failed to detect this injury is simply a proof of his ignorance and incompetency.  The first paragraph of his article, copied from a Surgical Work, and description of concussion of the brain, is part of the alphabet of every educated surgeon, and had O’Keef know it at the time he was attending Mr. Feeney he would have had an opportunity of verifying it at the bedside.  In the Appendix to Webster’s Dictionary explained how to apply these surgical writings to cases in practice as fully as it does all O’Keef knows about Latin, he would have been able to “account for the severe collapse” present in this case.  He says “Eriches, Ashhurst, and other authorities in Surgery tells us that when the shock is too serious to accounted for by other injuries, and we know that the abdomen has been struck, we must conclude that some important abdominal organ has bee seriously affected.”  This information made Mr. Feeney’s case as clear as noon-day to the Baeotian intellect of Pat O’Keef. The “10th rib on the left side,” he imagined, “was fractured near the spine,” plainly from a bloy upon the abdomen and had been struck,” and therefore he must  conclude that the kidneys and the spleen were seriously injured because they happen to be abdominal organs, and “therefore, he cannot agree withe learned surgeon.”  By such reasoning O’Keef arrived at his conclusion.

  The stuff this illiterate defamer has published regarding my treatment of Mrs. Shufelt’s arm is a malicious lie.

 I regret having allowed myself to be drawn into this discussion, and in future, shall treat with contempt all attacks emanating from such a disreputable soureel. H. ALLAN,  M. D., C. M

 Editor Reporter: - My attention has been called to an article in last week’s REPORTER, over the signature of P. O’Keefe, in which the author has taken the liberty of making use of my name, in connection with a controversy at present going on between Dr. Allen and himself.  I take this means of informing the public that what he has seen fit to publish in that article concerning Dr. Allen’s treatment of my wrist, injured some time ago, is false in every particular. Mrs. E. H. Shufelt.

Struck by Lightning.

 John Merhlien’s house was struck by lightning Thursday.  It came down the chimney, and passed out along a partition, forcing the plastering off each way.  Mr. Merhlien and Father Bushy was in the house at the time; both were rendered insensible by the shock but soon recovered.

 Mr. Warner’s barn, on the Bay shore was struck with lightning during the heavy shower Thursday.  Two men and a horse were in the barn at the time, but were uninjured.  The barn was not much damaged.

Pulled

 One Vankoffsky has been keeping a desreputable house on Main street, for some time past, to the great annoyance of the citizens who reside in that locality.  Complaint having been made to the proper authorities, Marshal Walsh, assisted by officers Davis and Leroy, called around Sunday night and arrested the inmates of the house.  In order to make a clean sweep at once, the visited another house at the same stamp, on the south side, presided over by a woman named Morris.  The inmates of both houses were lodged in jail until Monday morning, when they were brought before Justice Hart for examination on the charge of keeping, and being inmates of, houses of ill fame.  The whole catch amounted to six persons, two male and four female.  The parties all pleaded not guilty, the the evidence was deemed conclusive, and the Squire imposed the following fines:  Mrs. Vankoffsky and her husband $20 each or 40 days in jail; Mrs. Morris $16, or 30 days in jail; Maud White $9, or 23 days in jail; Delia Montrose $5, or 14 days in jail; No. 6 was a young man whose name we will not mention this time; we will simply say that this youth was once innocent, (that was when he was very young) but in an evil hour he listened to the voice of the “siren” and fell from the path of rectitude and virtue, in consequence of which he received an introduction to the police court.  In consideration of his former innocence and the fact that he had been for several months past in the woods and on the drive, the Squire let him off for the small sum of $5, which he promptly paid.  We trust this young man’s fate may have a salutary effect upon those of his companions, who were fortunate enough to get out of the house before the officers got hold of them.  Wonder how the fellow feels who jumped from the second story window.

Indian Agency Mismanagement

 Editor Reporter: - I would like to say a few words in your columns in regard to the Indian Agency which is located near Keshena, in Shawano Co. The way the present Agent manages business is a disgrace to the Government he represents, and a fraud upon the people at large, as well as an imposition upon the poor Indians, who are, unfortunately for them, under his charge.  It is evident that at some time in the past, a man has filled the position of Indian Agent, who has done his duty.   There is between 1,000 and 2,000 acres of land cleared in one body, which has at some time been under cultivation.  But now only about 75 acres are cultivated at that point, and the houses which formerly stood there, are going to decay.  A man bought 160 acres at this point from the state, and plowed 12 acres when the Agent drove him off.   There is a good saw mill and grist mill belonging to the Government.  They are run but a small portion of the time, and might just as well do the sawing and grinding for the white settlers in the vicinity as not.  By so doing they would greatly benefit the settlers and at the same time make quite a revenue for the government, or for the Agency.  But the Agent will not do it, and the settlers in the town of How are forced to haul there lumber from Oconto, a distance of nearly 40 miles, while there is a good mill almost within sight of their door, standing idle. The Indians went to Picket’s store and bought 150 sacks of flour, paying for it in maple sugar.  The Agent went to Picket and demanded the sugar, but he did not get it.  They bought the flour from Picket much cheaper than they could at the Agency.  At the north end of the reservation where the Agent seldom goes, the Indians are doing well, which proves conclusively that he is a detriment to them, and that they would be better off without him.  Fully two thirds of the Indians on the reservation are desirous of becoming citizens.  I certainly think it to be the duty of the government to investigate this matter.  The way it is now managed is very detrimental to the settlement of the country in the neighborhood of the reservation.  I will say no more at this time although there is much more to say, and I am fully prepared to substantiate any statement I make. J. M. Armstrong. Town of Howe, Oconto Co., Wis.


Oconto County Reporter
une 19, 1880

Brookside

 Last week I stated that Mrs. Isabelle had the measles.  She has a babe a few days old; is very low but Dr. Beebe thinks she will recover with the best of care.

Personal.

 M. J. McCourt, the veteran Architect and builder never does things by halves.  When he puts up a building he never stops until he has made a complete job.  He made us a call this week and renewed his subscription to the REPORTER, paying for the same in advance up to 1883.  Such subscribers as that are worth having.  And while we are about it we may as well state that Wm. McCourt Superintendent of Eldred’s works at Fort Howard is a “chip of the old block.”  His wife presented him with twins a short time ago, a boy and a girl. That is doing very well to start on.  Good blood is bound to show itself.

 Mrs. Muir of Kansas city arrived in Town Thursday morning.  She will spend the summer with her sister, Mrs. W. K. Smith.

 Miss Ida Jones is acting as enumerator in lieu of her father who is sick, in taking the census of the east and south wards.  She is doing thorough work.

 All members of the firm of McDonald & Billings Lumber Company were in town on Tuesday looking over the wreck of their dam.



THE FLOOD! _______

OCONTO CITY INUNDATED, AND THE STREETS WASHED AWAY! ______________

Four of the Principal Dams Carried away by the Fearful Torrent.  50, 000,000 feet of logs piled pro-miscously Together. ____________

2,500,000 ft of Logs and 20,000 Ties Lost in Green Bay. Damage to City and Lumber in-terests fully $100,000

 One of the most terrible floods, it has ever been our duty to chronicle, was at its height in this city at 12 o’clock last Saturday night June 12th.

 Our citizens had been expecting it as stated in our last issue, and had made all the preparations in their power.  During the whole of last week we were visited by frequent and heavy showers which rapidly raised the river to such and extent that on Friday night much anxiety was manifested as to what the water might do. About 1 o’clock Saturday morning, we has a shower which eclipsed all preceeding ones.  It seemed as though all the flood gates of Heaven were opened at once, and the water poured down upon us in torrents, for several hours.  The river rose rapidly and by noon the running logs would pass under none of the bridges except the one on Section street.  At 5 o’clock Coleman’s boom broke; it was just above Section street bridge and contained about 300,000 ft., of logs.  The draw of the bridge was partially closed, just enough to let foot passengers cross, and Pat Maloney, the bridge tender, stood on the draw with his hands on the lever, he hurried to open the draw, but the logs struck it a little to soon and the lever flew around like a top, Pat., hung on like grim death however, and succeeded in keeping it under control, while the immense mass of logs passed through and the the bridge was uninjured.

Spies and Scofield’s booms broke below the bridge at about the same time letting 2,000,000 feet of logs and ties into the bay.

 About 6 o’clock a portion of the Water mill dam was carried away which caused the water to rise more rapidly; at 9o’clock two-thirds of the city was flooded, being covered with water from 2 to 5 feet deep. The water was the highest point at about 2 o’clock Sunday morning.

A DAY TO BE REMEMBERED

 Sunday was a day which will be long remembered in Oconto.  We could almost imagine ourself in the ancient city of Venice, where canals take the place of streets, and gondola’s the place of carriages.  Every boat of any description which could be found, was brought into requistion, and they could be seen in almost any parat of the city.  It was a gala day for the youngsters, who sported in the water to their hearts content, and many  of the older ones took an involuntary bath for the first time probably, in many long months.   We heard of a few citizens whose feet got such a soaking that they now wear a boot two sizes smaller than before.

 Notwithstanding the great loss which our citizens were suffering, they seemed able to take in, and appreciate all that was amusing and ludricrous, and there was of course many incidents at such a time which could not fail to excite the risibilities of the spectators, however unpleasant it might be for the unfortunate victim.  Many of our young men were out boat riding with their ladies, and in some instances their boats failed to hold them.  Prof. Knapp and Miss Keith were among the latter, their boat filled and they were both thoroughly wet, but reached dry land in safety.

THE SIGHT

was grand and magnificant, although we hope never to witness the like again. As far as we can learn more than 100 families were driven from their houses by the water while many more were forced to move everything into the second story.  The following are among those who were forced to vacate their premises or remove to the upper story:

R. L. Hall  D. O’Keef  P. Becker  Jos. Hoeffel J. Bowen  W. E. Barlow  J. A. DonLevy E. Surprise P. Shannon  J. Meagan  E. B. Hulbert  P. Dutrak C. D. Hulbert  S. Brazeau  Ed. Tift  J. Gonyou Carrie Links  S. Talmage  J. K. Davis  P. Brabeau E. Despins  Eldred’s Store T. Cameron  M. Kane __ Pecor  A. Sloup  Ed. Flanders  F. Leroy J. Patterson  H. Ansorge  F. Wilson  J. Noonan J. Surprise  J. Scanlin  M. Applebee  Mrs. Feeney A. McDonald  J. Ratchford  G. C. Morrow  C. Noel F. X. Brazeau J. Houd  M. Maloney  G. Baldwin Geo. Branshaw W. P. Shurtliff S. McCullough Mrs. Smith G. F. Trudell  Mrs. Palmer  Mrs. Martineau Mrs. Dea Maj. Scofield

 Some of our citizens had hard work to preserve their stock.  Earnest Surprise had to hoist his cow up into the barn loft, and E. B. Hulbert done the same with his hog.  One house on Main St., sheltered fourteen families, who had been forced to leave their own homes.

THE WATER MILL.

 We visited the Water mill Wednesday afternoon and found it a sorry looking place.  About 50 ft. of the dam on the south side of the river is entirely gone, and over one half of the balance is washed away to about half its depth. Probably 1,000,000 ft., of logs are jamed on and about the north end of the dam, reaching down as far as the track  to the fire bank. The mill is uninjured.  The bridge below he mill is entirely gone and probably another million of logs are piled upon the low ground on the south side, between the end of the bridge and Mr. McDonald’s house.  We have no estimate of their loss, but we are informed that they will proceed at once, with their usual enterprise to repair damages. The heavest jam of logs commences at the mouth of Little river and extends nearly to Stiles.  It is variously estimated to contain from 30,000,000 to 40,000,000 ft.  It is a sight well worth seeing, and probably such an one as no man ever saw before on the Oconto river.

 The logs are piled up in every conceivable shape, some of them on end, and in many places they are 12 or 15 logs deep.  There is some smaller jams below, and one below the the water mill at the dividing pier which contains some 2,000,000 ft.

  About 100 feet of the Flat rock dam in the town of Gillett was carried away.  The dam and bridge at the Falls stood the pressure nobly and was only slightly damaged.

THE LOSES

by the logs going into the Bay is as follows:  Bertise and Chisholm 20,000 sawed ties, and 20,000 cedar logs, J. Speis 2,000,000 ft. logs, Holt and Balcom 300,000 ft., Ed Sargent 160,000 ft. of white ash worth $17 per thousand.  Of course many of the logs lost will be recovered, but is will entail great expense upon the owners.  It is impossible to estimate the damage which this freshet  has caused to the city and that portion of the county extending along the river.  The various dams, bridges, booms etc., must be replaced and most of them at once.

 The amount of damages will not aggregate as much as was first estimated.  Directly and indirectly the damage to the city and county will probabley approximate $100,000.  Our people are not at all despondent over their losses, but are ready to go in with renewed energy and recover them as soon as possible.   If the passengers who passed through here Sunday and Monday and supposed we were a total wreck, will pass through again in a few weeks they will see tht we are by no means a used up community, as some of them reported after passing through.  In a short time all traces of the flood will have been removed, and we shall be as good as new, but we don’t care to go through the same experience again.

CROPS DESTROYED.

 Growing crops on the bottom lands are in many places entirely destroyed; many gardens and yards in the city to which the care and labor of years has been given, are now a complete wreck.  The streets of the city are badly washed, adn the loss of time by our mills and laboring men foots up heavily. Several head of cattle were caught on the marsh and drowned.  Holt and Balcom lost 14 pigs, several others  lost pigs and any amount of chickens were destroyed.

 Real Estate was transfered by the lot, without indentures, one or more lot’s in the rear of A. Cole’s beautiful yard was badly damaged.

THE RAILROAD

suffered considerably.  Portions of the track were moved between Main St., and the river so that trains could not pass, but it was not allowed to suspend travel. Road Master Reeves was on hand with a force of men seeing to the transfer of passengers, in which he was ably assisted by  Agt., E.G. Mullen; under the energetic supervision of thos gentlemen by little delay was experienced.  Teams enough were procured to haul the passengers and baggage across the river to Eldred’s switch, where a train ran up from the south to receive them.  The procession containing  from twenty to thirty wagons made quite an imposing apearance as it passed down Main street., bridge, thence to the race course, and then up Eldred’s sawdust road to the track.  A crowd of people generally assembled at the bridge to see them cross.  The roads were badly cut up and the passengers had to hang on with all their power to avoid being thrown into the water.  When a wagon came very near going over the occupants were subjected to much good humored bantering from the crowd, which was always received good naturedly.

 Monday night a foot walk was completed which enabled the passengers to walk from one train to another.

 Just as soon as the water subsided sufficiently to allow it, the track was repaired and Tuesday night the express train passed over safely.  The officials of the C. & N. W. Railway deserves great credit for the energy which was displayed in repairing the damages to their road.

LEIGHTON.

Leigh’s dam was carried away, and also the bridge at that point.  Mr. Leigh’s loss is estimated at $1,000.

STILES

The dam and old bridges was swept away at John Doyles, and the Main river bridge and a portion of Little river bridge gone.


Oconto County Reporter
June 26, 1880

Parents should not allow their sons to bathe during the day time in view of our residences, nor near our most traveled thoroughfares.  It would be both interesting and instructive to read section 4588 of the “Revised Statutes of Wis.”

Pensaukee.

 Mr. Joseph Weasing, and Miss S. Plucker, were joined in the holy bonds of wedlock on Tuesday last at Oconto.  In the eveing a reception was given by the Bride’s parents Mr. and Mrs. Plucker, at their residence. The house was well filled with guests and the “light fantastic” was hoed down in good shape.  The tables groaned with a feast of good things, and the happy couple were given a hearty “God speed you” with a will.  We understand a similar occasion will occur where an Ocontoite plays an important part on Thursday of this week.

Personal.

 Miss Agnes Keigh left Monday for her home in Vermont.

 We regret to announce that Mr. Geo. Hodgins, Town Clerk of Maple Valley, is suffering from a Paralytic stroke.  His right side is entirely useless.  Mr. Hodgins was similarly affected about one year ago.  He has our warmest sympathy and we hope to see him recover.

Accident.

 Last week as we were going to press, Mr. Hall and three of his household were capsized in a small boat, and narrowly escaped drowning.  We stated the facts as we understood them then, but have since learned that we were not fully informed in the matter.

 Miss Kate Hill, Mr. R. L. Hall, his oldest son Eddie and third son Ben were in the boat.  The water was very high and the current rushed fiecely under the bridge.  However Mr. Hall with Eddie had passed them safely the day before and anticipated no danger especially, as Mr. H.  had for many years been accustomed to run rapids and even dangerous places.

 As she passed under the bridge Eddie in the bow of the boat misunderstood a directions of his father’s and drew the boat a little across the current and under the iron rods, but Miss Hill who had not placed herself low enough in the boat, was caught against the iron; this swung the boat across the current and in spite of efforts to keep her trim and the upper side was drawn down and the boat swept under and away from Miss Hill and Eddie who were clinging to the iron rods.  Eddie raised himself partly upon the rods, reached Miss Hill and with an arm around her gave great help in keeping her hold which she could hardly have done without him.  Cedar posts struck them but were partly warded off by Eddie and they held on  until help reached them.  Ed Flanders, who was on the boom above the bridge, saw the accident and gave the alarm instantly.  Help came soon by swinging the bridge so that Miss H. and Eddie were carried toward the boom.  Mr. Levi Bagley was the first to climb down upon the boom and look after them.  His good natured phiz looked comfort and assurance as he reported them all right.  Mr. Wm. Young was as usual in the right place at the right time, willing hands with glad faces above then lifted Kate and Eddie upon the boom, then the bridge, and they were safe.  Neither of them seemed much frightened and both displayed much presence fo mind.

 When the boat rolled over Mr. Hall and Ben, in the stern, were to far from the irons to reach them and were carried under the boat.  They came to the surface below the bridge and Mr. H. tried to swim to Balcom’s boom, thinking to reach and aid Miss Hill and Eddie.  The current was too strong and swept him away from the boom and down river.  He then swam to the boat which Ben and already reached, without oar or paddle they floated directly toward the pile below Balcom’s R. R. bridge, where the fierce current was rushing through lodged floodwood.  The boat struck, partly rolled over again, throwing them off.  Ben swam below the floodwater, quickly climbed upon the pile, looked up stream, swung his hand and cried lustily “Hurrah! she’s safe!  She’s all right!” and then “Help! Help! My father is drowning,” and without a seeming thought of himself repeated his calls again and again.

 Miss Hill and Mr. H. both heard him and each thought he meant that the other was safe and were thus reassured, some men in a boat rescued Ben from his rather ticklish perch on the pile.

 Mr. Hall reached an oar which came from under the boat when she struck the pile and paddled to the shore near Coleman’s mill.  He describes the suspense and sense of utter inability to help Eddie and Miss Hill, while fearing that they must be torn from their hold and carried to certain death, as the most terrible sensation he ever experienced.

Oconto County Reporter
July 3, 1880

Col. J.A. Watrous has been elected president of the Wisconsin Editorial Association.

Squire Yeaton and lady of West Pensaukee were in town Wednesday.

Wall Phillips is having the wing on his residence on Oconto street raised another story.  This will make a very pleasant looking place when completed.

A young man named Farlott got two of his fingers slightly sawed on the slabber at Coleman & Essons mill Wednesday morning.
 


Oconto County Reporter
July 10, 1880
transcribed by Ron Renquin

 It is generally known that J. I. Bovee spent fourteen months in confederate prisons during the last war.  At the re-union he met a fellow prisoner who was with him seven months in the Andersonville prison.  He is now Judge Barger, county judge of Nebraska.  He came to Brookside to visit his former companion and Johnnie” gave a dinner in honor of his guest.  The Judge wore a watch chain made by his host when they were fellow prisoners, and I never saw two happier boys, and as they sat side by side at the table glistening with silver and loaded with every with every delicacy of the season.  I could imagine them sitting in the Andersonville prison pen, cooking their scanty bit of corn meal by one very small stick of wood.  Long may they live to enjoy the honors they so dearly won. 

Personal.
 Harry McIver, a brother of John and Robert McIver of Stiles took his departure from this city on Monday evening for Minnesota, where he intends purchasing a farm and locating permanently. 

 George DonLevy left for Iowa Wednesday last.  He has gone for the purpose of buying a farm if the country suits him.  We suppose of course that when he gets the farm and everything all ready, he will come back to Oconto for a Bride.

 Miss Ida Jones, census enumerater for the East and South wards, informs us that she  found twenty five infants in the East, and Seventy-five in the South Ward, which were born during the month of June 1880.  Dr. Bentz reports thirty five, making a total of 135 births for the month of June.

Accident
 A boy about 12 years of age, son of Henry Butler had the two last fingers of right hand badly shattered by a pistal ball on Monday last.  Dr. Moriarty dressed the wounds and the fingers will probably be saved.  The boy was fooling with the pistol and was injured by his own carelessness.

Notice
 Whereas my wife Georgia Anna has left my bed and board without just cause or provocation, I hereby forbid anyone from trusting or harboring her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting from thie date.
EDWIN SIGNER
Pensaukee July 7th 188
 


Oconto County Reporter
July 17, 1880

 Joseph Cox M.D. keeps on hand a good stock of drugs, paints, and chemicals.  It is a curiosity to see Joe’s  “Phiz” when his customers pop in  their prescriptions.  His drug store is first-class, and he pronounces business far ahead of whe he anticipated.

 Sandy McNair has opened up his new grocery store and is doing a smashing business.  He, as usual, meets all his customers with a pleasant smile and says he can accommodate them with anything from a needle to an anchor. 

Personal.

 Ben. Dixon has sold his residence to Mames Cooper, the capitalist of Ahnapee for $275.  We learn that Ben intends moving to Marinette.  We are sorry to lose one of our old settlers, and hope our Marinette friends will use him well, as he deserves it at their hands.  His is a good citizen.

 Miss Ida Gray, left for Omro last week, where she will spend sometime, visiting relatives and friends in her childhood home.

 Mrs. H. B. Bacon , of Ishpeming, is visiting friends and relatives in the city.  She is a sister of the ex-Treasurer Tibbetts.

Storm at Peshtigo

 Our Peshtigo friends were visited by a severe storm on Friday of last week.  A party of children were out berrying at the time and sought shelter from the storm under of porch of Mr. Gould’s house.  Among them was Michael Keyser a boy leaning against  a post of the porch when lightning struck the house and passed down the post, instantly killing the lad, and knocking down a girl who stood near him; burning her considerably.  Others of the party were more or less stunned, but no others severely injured.  The room of Robert Dunn’s “half way house” was blown off, two cows were killed, and a colt blown into the river and drowned.

Feminine Unpleasantness

 Two members of the human sex  which is usually denominated the gentler one, had a little altercation last Saturday, which might have resulted seriously.  One of them attacked the other with a well pole, and she returned the blow with a hoe, inflicting quite a cut in the head of the attacking party.  These women reside on the south side of Main street and not more than four blocks from the R. R. crossing.  There is a few women in that locality who we are sorry to learn indulge to some extent in fighting whiskey, and made themselves very disagreeable to their peaceably disposed neighbors.  If they continue to disturn the quiet of the neighborrhood with their discraceful brawls we shall publish their names, that all may know and shun them.

Got Left.

 Agent Mullen has a horse which was supposed to stay where he was left until ordered elsewhere, but on a certain evening, not long since, he failed to stay.  The day had been sultry, and Mr. Mullen accompanied by Mr. Boylan drove down to the river on the south side for the purpose of bathing in the pure water of the Oconto river.
 The horse left in a convenient place and the gentlemen proceeded to the business at hand, leaving a portion of their clothing in the wagon.  After awhile they concluded to return to the city, when they found that their horse had already departed and had forgotten to leave what clothing was in the buggy.  It was dark, and after praying for the horse they wended their way homeward.  Fortunately Homer DonLevy happened to meet the horse and knowing where they had gone he drove back and met them.  No casualties only Mr. Boylan accidentally tried to climb a stump, and in so doing removed a few square inches of cuticle, from that portion of his anatomy which is vulgularly termed “Shin.” Oconto County Reporter 
July 24, 1880

West  Pensaukee
 Our Mormon settlement has come to grief, and our contemplated church is liable to collapse, as I hear that Justice Hart is to investigate the institution.

Personal.
 Mr. Wm. Davis an old time Oconto boy, now of Detroit accompanied by his sister and mother are visiting relatives and friends in this city.

 Miss Mary Spice of Wallace Mich., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Whitney in this city.

 Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Ford started Saturday night for Oneida to visit Mr. Ford’s father.

 Mrs. Weber of Chicago arrived in the city Monday.  She will spend the balance of the season with her sister, Mrs. Geo. E. Hart.

 Mr. Waren Calligan who had his eye severly injured in Oconto Company’s mill on Tuesday last, started for Milwaukee on Wednesday evening for occular treatment.

Fined.

 Mr. H. B. Palmer, of Oconto, was arrested here last Saturday for rapid driving on one of the bridges and on Monday paid fine and costs amounting to something more than $10. - Green Bay Advocate.

New Post Office

 A new post office has been established in the Town of Maple Valley.  George Trecartin is posmaster, and it is called Hickory P.O.  Any of our Maple Valley subscribers who want their papers sent to the new office should notify us at once.

Accident

 Mr. Warren Calligan met with a painful accident on Tuesday last in the Oconto company’s lath mill.  While at work upon the machine a lath flew and struck him in the eye, injuring it so badly, that it is feared he will entirely lose it.
*********************************************

researched by Richard LaBrosse

Mrs. Adams and her daughter Estella started for Fond du Lac on Thursday evening.  They will be absent several months.

A very pleasant affair was the party given at the residence of Mr. T.H. Phelps, Esq., on Saturday last, to celebrate the eighth birthday of his youngest daughter, Frances Estella.  About 25 of her young companions attended to do honor to the event.  A large canvass was spread over a portion of the yard, and the young Misses enjoyed themselves to their entire satisfaction.

A party consisting of R.W. Gilkey of Green Bay, Sheriff McGoff, Ed. Lord, Charles Hall and George Lynes of Oconto, left this city on Saturday, July 3 for a trip up to Lake Michigame, with all the utensils and grub necessary for the trip.

Wal Phillips is fixing up his house on Oconto street in good shape.  We understand he is now putting in a bay window.  We understand that Dr. Beebe will occupy it when it is completed.

Mr. George Knapp has purchased the old Odd Fellows building on Superior street where he is at present located and will place the same in first class repair for an active fall trade.

Miss Osca Soyer has been seriously ill during the past week.  She is no better at this writing.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Belaire returned from their Canadian tour Thursday morning.  They report a very pleasant trip.
 


Oconto County Reporter
July 31, 1880

West Pensaukee

 To whom it may concern:  As my husband has seen fit to inform the public, that I “left his bed and board without cause &c.” I will just say that it was not much of a bed to leave and furthermore that he left it first.  I suppose he had cause for doing so, and that  cause I believe to be a certain Dutch girl who slept upstairs, whither he went also.
 As for Board, it is quite well known how I was provided for last winter.  If he wishes to see a bill of fare, I can give it, and let the public judge whether I ought to have complained or not.
 I am prepared to give my reasons for leaving and expect to do so at the proper time, under oath, then let the public judge whether I did right in leaving his apology for bed or not.
GEORGIA ANN SIGNER

 Mr. H. LeClair, Holt & Balcom’s millwright had his foot badly mashed on Monday afternoon, by a heavy iron falling on it, the iron struck on his instep, and without breaking eh boot, the foot burst open on the bottom.  Mr. LeClair has worked for Holt and Balcom
for 17 years.

 Mrs. M. B. Morse of East Saginaw Mich., accompanied by her friend Miss Tenick came in on the Schooner Mott last week.  They are the guests of Mrs. Captain Soyer and will make quite an extended visit.  Mrs. Morse is the sister of Capt. Soyer.

Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Ellis were among the guests at the wedding of Mr. Seton and Senator Howe’s niece, which took place Wednesday night last at Green Bay.

Lightning

 The festive lightning played some queer freaks with the house of E. D. Lesperance last Sunday.  It first struck the chimney and passing down, entirely demolished it, throwing most of the bricks on a pile upon the floor, and the balance on the bed.  It struck the sewing machine which stood near the middle of the room, burned a hole through the cloth which was spread over it, split the box  to pieces and otherwise damaged the machine.  It passed through both floors of the house, burning holes through the wire screens as it passed, twisted off several of the floor timbers above and the main sill of the house below.
 The strangest part of it is the fact that three persons were in the house at the time and were uninjured, while the the lightning apparently, must have played all around them.  The state that at the time, they were all engaged in reading their prayer books, which is probably the cause of their being spared.  Take warning by this and spend more time with your prayer books, especially on the Sabbath when lightning is tearing around promiscuosly. Oconto County Reporter
August 1880

Contributed by Dave Cisler
Transcribed by  Cathe Ziereis

Hickory

Hickory is becoming famous. Strangers from abroad are surprised and pleased to see our excellent roads. Robbers turn up their noses at little places like Marinette and Oconto and honor our metropolis. The creamery to the west of us and a cheese factory about to locate to the south of us suggest that the cow has come to stay. With the new homes of the Reirdons, the Elliotts, the McMahons, the Olesons, and the others in sight, the foolishness is not likely to take root in this neck o’ the woods.
 


Oconto County Reporter
September 11, 1880

Brookside

 Wm. DeLano and family from Manitowoc are spending this month with their friends here.

 Mr. G. Birmingham has a new barn and a new house where the old ones burned down.

Personal.

 Rev. Burdick has a small sore upon his hand the first of the week which suddenly commenced to pain him severely.  He called upon his physician, who informed him that he had got animal poison in the sore and it must be cauterized.  It was done but had to be repeated the next day.  The Dr. stated that in a few hours more the gentlemen’s life could not have been saved.

 Dr. Coleman’s sister and aunt returned to their homes in Ohio on Monday last.

 Eli Urquhart, Sheriff of Taylor county and formerly an Oconto boy was in the city the first of the week visiting old haunts, and renewing acquaintances.

 Grier Orr, son of Mr. Hunter Orr of West Pensaukee left for Ohio on Tuesday last.

 Mr. Ed Berry, who has been visiting his mother in this city for a week or so past returned to his home in Calumet, Michigan, on Tuesday.

 Mrs. Joseph Harris, of Bay View, who for some time past had shown signs of mental derangement, was recently adjuged insane and has since been conveyed to the asylum at Oshkosh.

 Miss Ida Jones, leaves for Milwaukee Sunday night, where she expects to make her future home.  We wish her success.

 George Don Levy has returned from Iowa.  We understand that he was pleased with the country and intends to go back again at no distant day.

 A little girl 26 years old and only 3 ft. high and weighing but 34 pounds, will be on exhibibition at Surprise’s Hotel, Frenchtown, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week. Admission 25cts. for adults, children 10 cts.  The girl is a resident of this county, and lives at Jones creek.

Benefit Balls

 As will be seen by posters, two more benefit balls are to come off next week.  One on Tuesday night for Uncle Richard, and old citizen whom every one knows.  And one Friday night for Herman Grunert who has been unable from disease to do any work for nearly two years past.  Both men are worthy and need all the help they can get.  And our people who are fond of dancing may just as well turn out now as at any other time.  They are sure to have a good time and get the worth of their money, while at the same time they will be confering a benefit upon worthy citizens who stand in need of it. Oconto County Reporter
September 18, 1880

 Mrs. Bell Mott, a sister of H. W. Mott, and Mrs. David Wright of this city, is the guest of Mrs. Wright.  She resides at Detroit and has been visiting friends in Deluth. She arrived on Friday evening of last week and will remain here about one month.

 Mssrs. Chas. Pendleton, and Henry Sargent started for Dakota, last week where it is rumored that they intend investing in a farm of no small dimensions.

 Mrs. Emma Nuthill, of London, England, with her son, Mr. Charles Russell, Esq., Barrister, and his wife, were visiting AT Judge F. J. Bartels last Wednesday.  Mrs. Nuthill is a sister of Mr. Joseph Hall, of Oconto, and has been visiting at his house for some days past.  It is the first time either she or her son has visited the United States, and they express themselves very much charmed with the country and its people.  They talk quite seriously of making eh United States their future home. --- Peshtigo Eagle

 About 12 Tuesday nitght at Marinette a chap hailing from Quinnesec, and named Welsh, shot and dangerously wounded Hose Marsh, the man who keeps the house of ill fame on the Peshtigo road.  The ball passed through one of the lungs and it is thought he cannot live.  Welsh has made his escape but the officers are on his track.  No further particulars up to going to press.
 


Oconto County Reporter
September 25, 1880

Orange Blossoms

 We acknowledge and invitation to the wedding of Robt. T. Jones, son of our fellow townsman, Mr. Huff Jones, to Miss Elida K. Miller.  The happy event will take place at the residence of the brides parents, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Tuesday evening, Oct. 5th, 1880.  Robert is an Oconto boy, having been born ans spent his boyhood days here, and we feel as though we had a personal interest in his happiness.  The REPORTER joins with his many friends in this city in wishing him the greatest joy in his new life.  May nothing blight their hopes and prospects bright.  May their days be long and fair, free from the withering touch of care. 

Personals.

 Postmaster Hall’s sister and her daughter took their departure for England on Tuesday night last.

 Mrs. T. F. Snover, owning to the contemplated absence of her husband during the coming winter, has broken up house keeping and will spend a portion of the winter visiting her daughter “Lottie” in New Jersey.

Come to Grief.

 Mr. Charles Joyce, well known to fame in this city, came to grief at Ahnapee, on Saturday last.  It seems that Mr. Joyce went to the above named place, and opened a blacksmith shop, some time ago, and on Saturday night broke into the post office, and after breaking open some fifty letters to see if any contained money, entered an adjoining store and helped himself to what money the till contained, and then arming himself with some dozen revolvers, that he found in the show cases, made good his escape.  He was detected by giving away two of the revolvers, and upon being arrested nine others were found on his person.  At the preliminary examination he was bound over to stand his trial at the Circuit Court to the amount of $300, failing to get the same he was remanded to jail, where he will probably remain until his trial takes place.

Oconto County Reporter
October 2, 1880

Personals.

  Mrs. A. W. Pierce, returned last Saturday from her visit to Green Lake Co.  Her half sister Clara Van Auken, accompanied her home and will remain for sometime.

 Mrs. O. A. Ellis, took her little son George to Chicago, on Tuesday evening for the purpose of having his injured arm examined by some eminent surgeon.
  Our readers will remember that the little fellows arm was crushed at the elbow, by a lumber car passing over it some two weeks ago.

 Rev. Mrs. Burdick is confined to her bed by typhoid fever.  She is seriously ill.

 Mrs. Edwin Hart is quite sick with billious fever.

 Our fellow townsman Louis P. Pahl, who has been laid up for some time past with Rheumaatism and fever we are pleased to state is able to be around with the help of a cane.

Cold Blooded Murder

 A cold blooded murder was committed in the town of Rockland, Manitowoc County, Sunday of last week.  It appears that a maiden lady named Nancy Heywood was residing with her brother Ephraim Heywood, on his farm in that town.  Mr. Heywood left home for a ride and on returning that night the body of his sister was found with her feet protruding from under a wood pile. The body was pulled out and it was found that the throat had been cut from ear to ear, with several gashes with a knife on the face; the nose was broken, cheek bone and upper jaw all broken in, as though struck by some heavy blunt instrument.  Suspicion pointed to a servant girl named Strocher as being the perpetrator of the foul deed and she was arrested and lodged in jail to await a trial.

Oconto County Reporter
October 9, 1880
Personals.

 Will Waggoner, left last Sunday night for Neenah, where he will make his future home.  He has accepted a position in a mercantile house which he is well qualified to fill in a satisfactory manner.  The REPORTER, as well as host’s of freinds in Oconto wish him success in his new home.

 Mrs. Newboy of Marinette, is visiting her brother, Mr. Ackrill of this city.  She arrives on Wednesday.

 Mr. and Mrs. Huff Jones started for Grand Rapids on Saturday evening last for the purpose of attending the wedding of their son Robert.

 We are sorry to learn that Uncle Paul McDonald is quite sick.  We hope that he may soon be around again.

 We observe by the Oconto REPORTER  that Mr. and Mrs. John Volk of Oconto Falls, WI will celebrate their 59th anniversary of wedded life in a public manner.  The old couple will be remembered as pioneers of Kewaunee county, and they have the good wishes of their old freinds and acquaintances of this county. - Anapee Record

 Mrs. A. P. Call started on Wednesday for St. Nathans (now Chase), Oconto Co. to make her sister, Mrs. Chase, a visit.

 We are pleased to see the genial all though emaciated form of our friend, Thomas Simpson, on our streets again, after his serious illness.

Fire.

 The house of Chas. B. Alvord, Town of Oconto, was burned on the morning of the 6th.  A portion of the furniture was saved but the house was entirely destroyed.  The house and furniture were insured for $400, in the Westchester fire Insurance Co. of N.Y.  That amount will not cover Mr. Alvords loss.  It is a hard blow for him coming at this time, just as cold weather is approaching.

Marine.

 The tug Wm. Livingstone Jr., owned by the Peshtigo Lumber company, while off the Lake entrance to the Sturgeon Bay Canal yesterday morning about 10 o’clock, sunk in forty two fathoms of water. The crew reached one of her barges in safety.  The accident was caused by the main shaft breaking in such a way that the wheel pulled out a portion of it, and the water pouring through the fourteen-inch hole soon caused the boat to sink  The barges were towed to the harbor of refuge by the propeller Favorite.  The Livingston was the largest and finest tug on fresh water.  She was built at Port Huron in 1874, measured 291 tons burden, animated A 1, with an insurance register valuation of not less than $30,000.  She will never be raised. 

Mammoth Cabbage

 John Windross has excelled himself this time.  Last Tuesday he entered our office staggering under the weight of a cabbage the proportions of which fairly frightened us.  The cabbage was of the variety known as marblehead mammoth and balanced he scales at 45 1/2 pounds. If any one can beat this we should like to know it.  We claim that John Windross of Oconto county can beat any gardener in the state of Wisconsin, both in the size and quality of his vegetables. 

Oconto County Reporter
October 16, 1880
Personals.
 Dan Turvey started for the upper Menominee, Monday morning, to run a camp for D. Bush.  Dan is an old hand in the woods, and knows just how it is done.

 Mrs. Beals, from Michigan, sister of Mrs. Burdick, arrived on the Wednesday evening train.

 Rev. Mrs. Burdick, who has been laying at the point of death, during the past week, is decidedly better, although not our of danger.

 Mrs. Peter Shufelt returned during the past week from La Crosse, where she has been for some time past visiting her son Ed.

 Mr. Brown, of Vermont, is the newest addition to the clerical fore at the Oconto Co.s store.

 Mrs. Edwin Hart has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. B. J. Brown, at  Menominee, during the week.

 Sheriff McGoff took Robert Smiley who had been pronounced insane to the State Asylum last Saturday night.  Mr. Smiley is a sad and peculiar case, from the fact that he became insane on his wedding night.

A Miserable Wretch

 Henry Harmson alias “Lump” got outside of too much inebriating fluid on Thursday last, and out of pure cussedness went to the applestand of Mrs. Lynch and choked the old lady until all the colors of the rainbow were depicted in her physiognomy.  He also struck and kicked the woman in a shameful manner.  He was escorted to jail by the marshal for his doings. On Friday morning he was brought before Justice Hart on a charge of drunk and disorderly,  and sentenced to jail for twenty one days to give him a chance to sober up.


Oconto County Reporter

October 23, 1880

Brookside Bubbles.

 John H. Goddard is again with his friends here.  He has been to Nebraska during his absence, has bought two city lots there, but he would not advise people to sell here and to go there.

Pensaukee Pellets.

 The Misses Mary and Hannah Windross have returned home from Omro, where they had been visiting relatives and friends.
Personals.

 Mrs. Samuel Orr, of Quinnesec, is in the city visiting her mother Mrs. George Knapp.

The Wind’s Wreck

 The storm of Friday night and Saturday of last week was the worst experienced on the lakes for years.  Many a noble vessel went down during the terrible gale, and many persons were hurried to eternity by the angry waters.  From all directions reports of disasters come in thick and fast, while the death list keeps increasing with fearful rapidity.  But the saddest of all is the loss of the Goodrich steamer Alpena, which went down on Lake Michigan with all on board - over one hundred persons in all.  So far as is known, not a soul is left to tell the tale.  When the news reached this city considerable anxiety was felt for the safety of Mrs. McConnell of this city, stewardess on the ill-fated steamer.  The slender thread on which their hopes hung was broken on Thursday forenoon when the following telegram was received:

 GRAND HAVEN, Mich., Oct. 21, 1880 -  MAYOR OF OCONTO: 
Tell Mrs.  Lamkey we think we had the body of Mrs. McConnell. 
What disposition  shall we make of the body?
 Z. G. WINSOR

 According to the statement of the Goodrich folks at Chicago, Mrs. McConnell left the boat some ten days ago, and they do not think that she was on board.  But her trunk has been washed ashore, and there is scarcely a doubt but that she has met a watery grave.  Her nephew, John Lamkey, left for Grnd Haven, Thursday night, to take charge of the body if found. 
 Five bodies, at last advices, had been washed ashore.  The beach for miles near Holland, Mich., is strewn with the debris of the ill-fated craft.

An Old Landmark Gone

 Many citizens will remember, when, years ago, they attended the old school - the first one Oconto ever had.  It stood - or did a few days ago - near Section Street bridge.  There are men in Oconto today, no doubt,  who do not forget the wallopings they got in that old school house on the banks of the Oconto years ago. Great changes have come over the scene since then.  Boys and girls have grown to men and women; some have left the scenes of their childhood for other climes; some of them sleep the sleep that knows no waking; while those who have “grown up with the town” oft think of the good old times they spent in and about Oconto’s pioneer school house.  But it is no more; it was pulled down a few days ago, and the place that knew it once will know it no more forever.  The building was erected by Edwin Hart in the year 1851, twenty nine years ago.  In it was opened up the first store ever in this place, exempting one belonging to a mill company that was doing school-room was in the back part of the building.  In it, also, the first Sabbath school met, and in the days of long ago it was looked upon as the prominent building of the “town.”  But its usefulness is o’er and it has had to make way for the continued improvements that are being made in our growing and prosperous city.

Hannah’s Hilarity.

 Hannah Lyons came down from Menominee some days ago to have some fun with somebody, and she is now enjoying herself as a boarder at the county’s expense.  She loaded up with liquid lightning on Tuesday night, and, in company with a lot of boys, was having a big time over in Frenchtown.  She was taken into custody by an officer.  On the following day she was brought before Justice Hart and sent over the river to keep company with Henry Harmson for fourteen days.

 Oconto County Reporter
November 13, 1880

Personel.

 A married daughter of Mrs. Desjarlis, of this this city, died at Nanitoba, on Wednesday of last week.

ATTEMPTED RAPE. 

 On Thursday night, between nine and ten o’clock, while a certain lady was passing along Oregon street on her way home she was suddenly seized by the throat by a brute in human form and shoved up against the fence between Joseph Pririer’s residence and Aug. Ellman’s saloon.  There is scarcely a doubt but what his intention was to commit rape.  And he probably would have accomplished it had it not been for constable Frank Leroy who happened along at the time.  Frank had been to a meeting at the Garfield and Arthur club room, and was on his way home.  When he saw the man and woman he took in he situation at once, and made a charge on the brute with his cane, but he failed to hit him as the distance was too great between them for the cane to reach its mark.  The whelp immediately made off across the street at a rapid gait.  Frank drew his revolver and fired five shots at him, but as the pistol was very small it is not likely that any of the bullets caromed on the retreating scoundrel.  As near as Frank could make out in the darkness the man was dressed in checkered clothes, and was a stranger here.  The woman did not know what the man looked like, as he held her head up so she could not see his face.  He had hold of her, only a few seconds when Frank came to her relief.  Frank looked throught the city for him on Friday, but up to the hour of our going to press had failed to find any trace of him.  Frank has secured a piece of artillery that will do good service in furture should he have occasion to use it.

In The River.

 George Hodges, town clerk of Maple Valley, walked off Section street bridge into the river on Wednesday evening.  The draw had been opened for the passage of a boat.  As the evening was dark and the gentleman near sighted, he did not notice it.  People in the vicinity that noticed on the bridge called to him to look out for the draw, but the warning was given to late.  A young man named Clarence Brooks immediately jumped down on the boom to his assistance.  By hanging on to the boom with his hands and stretching his body out in the water the old man was saved from his perilous position.  He must soon have drowned had not assistance come promptly, as he was unable to swim.  Mr. Hodges expresses his earnest and heartfelt thanks to the young man who saved his life.

Oconto County Reporter
November 13, 1880

Frozen

 Joseph Lebree, an old man, a resident of Frenchtown, became delirious on Saturday night, and arising from his bed wandered down to the Superior street bridge, where he spent the remainder of the night.  The old man is upwards of eighty years of age and is subject to slight attacks of delirium.  The night was very cold, and as had nothing on but his shirt, he was badly frozen.  He was discovered early Sunday morning, sitting on the bridge, by some of the workmen from Holt and Balcom’s mill. His feet and limbs were frozen, and he was well nigh dead from the effects of the cold.  They conveyed him to his home, when a physician was called in to attend him.  The old man is getting along as well as can be expected under the circumstances, but he is suffering terribly. ***


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