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Flash From The Past - 1898


Oconto County Reporter
 Jan. 21, 1898

ABRAMS

A cousin of Charles Lear, from Oregon, has been visiting at the latter's home.

CLAYWOOD

L. P. Peterson has moved his family to Suring, where he will be employed in piling lumber with Nels Madison for Carl Anderson.

H. Holm visited H. C. Law at McAllister's camp last Sunday. All of the boys were in good spirits. They keep Ellinger's little mill on a hump twelve hours a day.


Oconto County Reporter
Jan. 28, 1898

Mrs. Robert Telford, in Little River, is seriously ill with kidney trouble. She has been confined to her bed for more than three weeks.

TIMME

Old Mr. Tank who has been ill for some time departed this life Jan. 14th. His body was taken to Hartland.

HAYES

John Holl is hauling stone for the basement of a new store.

Gustav Hieschke, working for Chase & Tilton in a clear swamp, got hurt by a falling tree last Saturday. The tree scraped his shoulder and arm and took the skin and some flesh off, which will lay him up for a couple of weeks.

The cruiser for Chase & Tilton, P. Mueller, has several bad marks from a bursting chain, of which one end flew across his face.


Oconto County Reporter
4 February 1898

Claywood

August Giese has sold his hardware store at Suring for $2,100.

Brookside J. Thiede has sold his creamery.

Harvey Rice of Oshkosh is visiting with his sister, Mrs. L. Tuttle.

Mr. and Miss Warer of Racine are visiting the Pettys and Isabels.

Hayes

Charles Schos of Lomira, Dodge county, is visiting his mother and friend here and will probably stay until spring.


Miss Mary Cook of Green Bay came to Oconto last Sunday for an introduction to her little niece, Catherine Shields Cook, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cook

H.M. Lord of Maple Valley had a horse die of spinal meningitis last week.

William Gill, aged 44 years, and formerly a resident of Oconto, was so badly injured in the woods, while hauling logs, that death resulted after the amputation of one of his limbs.  The funeral was held at St. Josephs church, on Wednesday and interment in the catholic cemetery.

A fire in the residence of Mary O’Neill in Frenchtown, on Thursday evening of last week, damaged furniture to the amount of $ 40.


Oconto County Reporter
 11 February 1898
Researched, transcribed and contributed by: Ron Renquin

Lena

Mrs. Harry Western and children who have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Gidney (Mrs. Wetern's parents) for a few days, returned home at Kelly Lake Wednesday.

Mrs. Zoe Craite, who has been visiting friends and relative here for the last two months, left for Oconto on Tuesday where she will  visit her daughter, Mrs. Fortier, and from there return to her home in Manitowoc.

Mrs. J. C. Cooper of Oconto Falls, recently visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Atkins.

Oconto County Reporter 18 February 1898 Researched, transcribed and contributed by: Ron Renquin

Hayes

Mrs. William Schmidt of the town of Washington, arrived Monday, called by the illness of her daughter in law, Mrs. Robert Schmidt.

Gillett

The Livery has now changed hands and is now run by Albert Zahn.

Mr. Green who has been with us for some time, has removed to Oconto, where he will continue his law practice.

Hickory

Mr. Halstead of Oconto Falls has bought the E. Gilkey place.


Personal and Social

Mrs. George Jones of Green Bay has been the guest of her mother, Mrs. John Van Able of late.

James Sargent and John Slattery left on Wednesday for Seattle, where they will make final preparations for their journey to Alaska.

Madison, Feb. 15. - Paul and George Scofield, sons of Gov. Scofield, have gone to Mexico from Colorado, where they have been for some months.  The trip is made in the home that it will benefit Paul, who has been in poor health. They will remain in Mexico until warm weather.

Marinette Eagle, Feb. 16:  Geo. Scofield leaves tomorrow night for Chicago with Dan Starkey of th Milwaukee Wisconsin, they will preceed to Mexico.  They expect to spend a month in that country traveling for the benefit of Paul's health.  George returned from Madison last night and is here today making preparations.


Oconto County Reporter
 Feb. 25, 1898

ABRAMS

John Banta of Morgan has disposed of his stock of merchandise and moved his family to Pembine, where he is engaged in the manufacture of shingles. George Wilson, a son-in-law of Justice Churchill, of Brookside, has purchased the stock of goods and will in the future run a genearl store in the Banta building.

Legal matters between the state of Wisconsin and Horace Waldron, Joseph Haas appearing as complainant, were straightened out last Saturday, in Justice Johnson's court, to the complete satisfaction of at least the defendant of a charge of using abusive language, complainant paying the cost.

About 300 pounds of butter is the weekly output of the creamery this winter.  In the summer season from 1,200 to 1,500.

STILES

Fred Foss, who was seriously injured by falling off a load of hay about a month ago is convaleasing and expects to be out in a week.

Station Agent Duvall, at Stiles Juction, who nearly severed the thumb from his left hand last week by the careless handeling of a hatchet, informs us that the injured member is growing together. Hereafter he will be more careful and endeaver to keep the prominent points of his soul-holder intact.

On account of urgent business, C. Farrell undertook to drive to Lena, Tuesday. He encountered some very big snowdrifts near Fagen's Crossing, but thinking that he could force his way through, he urged his horse into a 10 foot drift. Both horse and cutter sank into the snow out of sight. Mr. Farrell managed to scramble out of the snow, and with help of neighbors made an effort to save the horse, but the animal died shortly after it was taken out of the snow.

KELLY LAKE

The worst storm of the winter has been raging here since last Saturday, and at present writing (Tuesday noon) it shows no sign of abatement. Most of the time the wind has blown furiously, and the snow lies piled up in huge drifts, in some places to the depth of eight to ten feet deep. All travel is stopped across the lake, but Mr. Beyer's men are trying to break out their logging road today.

Our school, taught by Mrs. T. Reirdon, is closed for the month of February on account of deep snow and bad weather.


BRIEFLY MENTIONED

The Pabst Brewing company is erecting a large ice house at Gillett and that will be a distributing point for beer for a considerable section of country. S. V. Oleson will manage the business.

D. B. Butler of Abrams was arraigned before Judge Jones on Thursday of last week for examination as to his mental condition. An adjournment was taken until Friday afternoon, when testimony was heard by a jury consisting of P. G. Esson, M. Eggleston, Carl Delaporte, I. S. P. Hoeffel, Dennis Davis and Joseph Marek, who rendered a verdict of sanity and he was accordingly discharged.

A young man named Fredenberg, logging on the Indian reservation, while on his way to camp, sickened and died, being found on the ice by his fellow-workmen, where he had cut a hole through which to procure a drink of water. The body was taken to Gillett, where an inquest was held last Friday before Justice Finnegan, the following comprising the jury: N. Henter, Willaim Warner, L. Hanstedt, A. C. John, John Wranovsky, M. Lang, who rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.


Oconto County Reporter
 March 4, 1898

ABRAMS

Mrs. J. Betts, widow of the late James Betts, is seriously ill.

Deserved a Better Fate

In the storm of last week, Joseph Langlois, conductor on the Northwestern Road, running into Milwaukee, had an unpleasant experience which nearly cost him his life. He is a brother of the late Ezra Langlois, engineer on the Ashland division for several years, who reside in this city.

Between Sheboygan and Port Washington the train became stalled in a mountain of snow which filled a cut-the snow piled up half as high as the coaches-and the train could not move either way. He started to walk to Mequon, a distance of six miles, to telegraph for assistance but was overcome when within one mile of the staion and fell helpless in the snow, where he was found by section hands, partially covered with snow, his lamp still flickering. He was rescued and cared for.

LENA

Mr. Underwood of Kelly Lake left for Canton, Ill., to visit his brother.

I. M. Adams purchased a span of mules on Monday, of Aug. Lutahan, which he is going to take up to the summer resort of his son, L. J. Adams, at Witbeck, Mich.


Oconto County Reporter
Mar. 25, 1898

Marinette

Hold-ups, robberies and other irregularities are still common enough to excite little comment. Judge Hastings, at Green Bay, has granted a divorce to Mrs. Serget Humphreville from her husband Wm. Humphreville, after a very short honeymoon, and she has assumed her maiden name. The cause was failure to support. She was granted $40 suit money and $15 a month alimony. The defendant did not appear.

Oconto Falls

Mr. John Volk, sr., says the first mill built on the Oconto river was built in the winter of 1846-47 at Oconto Falls.

Ira Sawyer and family will leave for the west next Monday.

H. C. Macrorie has bought a lot of D. Caldwell on which he will erect a dwelling. A baby girl arrived at his home on Wednesday evening.

HAYES

Mrs. Schirrow, mother of Charles and Mary Schores, went to Dodge county to visit her mother-in-law and grandmother.

Gustav Shores was taken ill last Monday with cramps but is improving.

Otto Shores is laid up with a lame back.

J. Wescott moved here from Shawano with his family. He is a knot-sawyer and employed in the mill.

Carl Zahn and wife of Underhill were called here to see their son-in-law, Gustave Schoss, who is very sick.

GREEN BAY

Mrs. Pearl Getts Whipple, wife of Fred Whipple, after a month of wedded life, eloped last Friday, it is said, with a former lover. Mr. and Mrs. Whipple were married at Oconto, Feb. 19, and their domestic life had apparently been happy. The husband, however, objected to attentions the wife received from the former lover. On returning home last friday, he found that she had left him. Mrs. Whipple is less the 20 and her husband is about the same age. Whipple says he is determined to locate the elopers.


Oconto County Reporter
April 1, 1898

MARINETTE

Judge Hastings has refused to recomend the pardon of Patrick McCann, and the prosecuting attorney, Mr. Eastman, will contest it vigorously before Gov. Scofield at Madison on the first of April.

GILLETT

Among the arrivals in town are Miss Mathews of Clintonville, and Charles Watts. Miss Mathews taught in the Gillett schools two years ago, and is now engaged in the city schools at Clintonville.

Miss Allender, who has made her home in Gillett for some time, has moved to Emabarrass, where she will live with her father.

OCONTO FALLS

Mr. and Mrs. Shellenberg were called to Abrams Monday, by the death of Mrs. Shellenberg's father.

Cock fighting is becoming quite a mania here. It is bad business, boys. Better go a little easy.

Barney Flatley is very ill. Recovery is doubtful.

Mr. Marek, shoe and harness maker, has quit business and he and his family will leave town soon.

Joseph Zivney, who recently had a severe attack of pneumonia, is now suffering from quick consumption, He will be taken this week to his home in Manitowoc.

ABRAMS

Oscar Haas of Gillett and Johnny Haas of Gren Bay were home on Tuesday, on account of the sever illness of their father.

HAYES

Mr. Murray has gone to Emabarrass river, to look after the Chase drive.

Otto Zahn is visiting his brother-in-law, Gustav Schoss; he intends to remain several weeks.


Oconto County Reporter
 April 8, 1898

BREED

Wilbur Moody has taken up his residence on the bank of Anderson Lake.

A.W. and G. M. were called to Clintoville to attend their mother's funeral.

George Breed's hotel burned down last Saturday morning; no insurance.

KELLY LAKE

Mr. Glynn, who was thrown from a cutter a short time ago and quite severely injured, is able to be out again.

Miss Mina Saunders began teaching on Monday in what is known as the Gribler school, in How.


The Oconto Lumberman
April 30, 1898

Company M. W. N. G. Leaves for Milwaukee with a Full Quota of Men

Over Three Thousand People Escort the Boys to the Depot

Thursday was beyond a shadow of a doubt one of the most exciting and eventful days ever witnessed in Wisconsin. The departure of the troops from the various cities occasioned an outpouring of people which has never been equaled in this state. Factories were closed, stores were abandoned, houses were locked up and everyone went to the trains to wish the soldier boys God speed and safe return from their hazardous mission. Mothers and sister, wives and sweethearts gathered at the station to say farewell. In every city the crush was tremendous. The boys are swallowed up in the crowds. They are overwhelmed with blessings and benedictions. At 6:15 Thursday morning the water works whistle sounded the call to arms, notifying Co. M. to assemble. From that time until they left for Milwaukee all was excitement. At nine o'clock the boys left the armory 101 strong, headed by the city brass band and followed by 3,000 people of the Northwestern depot, until the train came in bringing Co. I of Marinette there was continuos cheering and firing of cannons. Capt. Lee did not receive instructions until late Wednesday afternoon to enlist more then sixty-eight men, but in three hours after the telegram was received he had his full quota of 101 men. Then he had his pick for many more had asked to enlist. Preference was given to single men, and only a few married men were taken. Especial praise should be given to Joseph Pecor and his wife of the Westward. They have a family of ten grown sons and Co. m. took five of them. The last to enlist was a farm boy from Pensaukee. He was six feet four inches tall. When the train pulled out relatives and friends were bountiful with tear stained faces. The public and catholic schools suspended and almost all the business houses in the city were closed until 11 o'clock.

The following are the members of Co. M.


CAPTIAN – W. M. LEE
First Lieutenant – A. J. CUMMINGS
Second Lieutenant – W. B. HALL
Quartermaster Sergeant – JAMES GERHARD
First Sergeant – JOHN FOLLETT Jr.
Second Sergeant – CHARLES McFADDEN
Third Sergeant – PETER PETERSON
First Corporal – W. G. HARRIS
Second Corporal – NELS JOHNSON
Third Corporal – EDWARD HARRIS
Musicians – P. NYGARD
                    W. D. BUTLER
A. P. ANDERSON
NELS J. ANDERSON
GEO. S. ANSORGE
OTTO ANSORE
ERNST BALDWIN
ANTON BECKMAN
OTTO BLOCH
JOSEPH KOHLER
JAMES C. BROWN
ANTON KOKET
D. G. CLASSON
JOHN LESPERANCE
PETER DAVIS
EMORY LORD
DAVID DILLON
CHARLES LYNES Jr.
FRED FORD
FRANK MAIGRAY
JULIUS P. FRANK
PETER MAIGRAY
CHAS. FREWARD
CHARLES F. MEYER
WILLIAM FUMELL
WILLIAM MEYER
J. V. GREEN
GIL MORROW Jr
.
JOHN MINNICK
R. L. HALL
DAN McDONALD
GEORGE HAINES
ALBERT PECOR
HERBERT HASKINS
EDWARD PECOR
WILLIAM C KIEHL
JOHN PECOR
A. KLOZOTSKNY
JOHN KLASS
JOSEPH PECOR
EDWARD G. PARKS
XAVIER POCQUETTE
FRANK PORTER
QUERIN ROUTHEAU
STEPHEN RICHER
LOUIS H SIMONS
CURT E. SIMPSER
JOSEPH SKOCHPOL
WILLAIM A. SMITH
HERBERT STWART
GEO. TALLMADGE
HENRY TIEGS
WM. VAN ABEL
FRANK VAN BOVEN
ALBERT WERTH
RAY C. WHITNEY
HERNY WRIGHT
ARTHUR YOUNG
ANTON ANDERSON
L. BAUMGARTNER
OLIVER PAPINEAU
HENRY PUZIN

WILLIAM PARRISH
HARRY B. HANSON
J. C. WRIGHT
HAYES ROSS
JAMES MALONEY
CHARLES NORTON
MANUS HENNING
HENRY DEKASTER
FRANK BRANDIES
ZEPHIR PETIT
B. GREENBERG
MEL COUILLARD
H. GILKEY
P. JORGENSON
GEORGE WRIGHT
F. OWENERNST MEYERS
MARTIN VAN ABLE
HERMAN WERTH
CHARLES WEIDNER
JOHN PAYETTE
HARRY FUMELL
CARL HANSEN
JOHN McDOUGAL
GEORGE PECOR
EDWARD BETTIN
H. W. CLARK
J. P. JANETT
HENRY TERNENS
JOHN VAN BORN
FRED ROHRLOCK
JOHN JOHNSON





Oconto County Reporter
May 6, 1898

Town of How John HOLL is at work on his monster new store.

Masons are at work on the foundation of William BORK's new house which will be built this season.

A hired man of Henry JOHNSON nearly lost two fingers by blasting stumps with dynamite, He also got injured a little in the face.


Oconto County Reporter
May, 13, 1898

Mr. Morton, the engineer on the Wabeno branch, has brought his family here with the expectation of making this his permanent home.


Oconto County Reporter
June 17, 1998

ABRAMS

Charles Wellington of Chicago is visiting at the home of his father and sister, Mr. K. Wellington and Mrs. Mary Wilson.

LENA

Main street, through the village and far into the country is being graveled to an average depth of 8 or 10 inches.

Rosa Rosera is visiting her sister in Chicago.

Emil Luisier has sold his farm of 60 acres, situated 3 and a half miles west of the village, to Joseph Wacek of Cooperstown, Manitowoc county, for $1,100, and the former has purchased 40 acres of his brother Oscar in the town of Stiles, for which he paid $425. Ten acres are cleared.

Joseph Willard has exchanged his farm of 80 acres for city property in Green Bay, owned by Theodore Arkens.

BREED

Wibur Moody found a homestead with 300,000 pine, without a compass.

Miss Mary C.Johnson is on the sick list.


Oconto County Reporte
r 24 June 1898
contributed by Ron Renquin

DEATH In Oconto, last Friday night, of heart failure, John McMillian, aged 40 years.  Mr. McMillian had been in ill health, afflicted with dropsy and heart trouble, for a long time.  He was unable to lie down for some time preceding his death and was obliged to take what rest he could get in a chair, and had been helped from one chair to another but a few moments before his death.  He was a native of New Brunswick and came to Oconto about a dozen years ago.  He is survived by a wife and three small children.  Mrs. McM. is a niece of Mrs. Archie McAllister of Marinette, who with other Marinette relatives, attended the funeral services, conducted by the Rev. J. Robertson Mccartey at Presbyterian Church on Sunday afternoon.  The local lodge of Modern Woodmen, of which Mr. McMillian was a member, attended the services in uniform and escorted the body to the cemetery where the funeral rites of the order wer administered. CARD OF THANKS We desire to thank many friends and neighbors for their sympathy and assistance during the period of the illness of our husband and father and at the time of his death and burial.  The good deeds of his brethren of the Modern Woodmen can never be forgotton, nor indeed the kindness of very many others. Mrs. Jennie McMillian Resolution of Respect WHEREAS, It has pleased Divine Providence to call from our midst Neighbor John McMillian: and WHEREAS, While bowing submissively to the decree of the All-wise and Supreme head of the Universe, we recognize in the death of Neighbor McMillian a loss to our order of a worthy and royal neighbor, to the family a kind and loving father and husband, and to the community at large a respected and law abiding citizen:  therefore, be it Resolved:  That the charter of our Camp be draped for a period of thirty days, that a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the records of our order, and that a copy be forwarded to the family of the deceased. W.L. Porter, GEO. WRIGHT, WM. H. Matthews, Committee Oconto Camp, No. 1435, M. W. of A., June 20.

 Dr. J. H. Rozell, who kept the store at Leigh’s mills, in town of Stiles, between the springs of ‘96 and ‘97, died at his former home, in Plainfield, Wis., last Sunday.  He had not been in good health for several years and had quit the practice of his profession for that reason.  He was about 50 years old and is survived by his wife and their three daughters.  The family moved from Leigh’s mills to Green Bay little more than a year ago.

IT WAS A BIG FIRE.
______


LEIGHTOWN FLOUR AND SHINGLE MILLS BURNED DOWN
_______


Loss of Several Thousand Dollars - The Flour Mill a Landmark, and Will Not Be Rebuilt
____________


 The Leightown flouring mill and shingle mill were destroyed by fire on  Tuesday afternoon.  The fire was discovered in the engine room of the flouring mill.  It soon spread to the dust room, causing an explosion, and thence to the shingle mill, 90 feet distant.  Everthing was like tinder and of course was soon ashes.  Mrs. Leigh estimates her loss on the flour mill at upwards of $6,000, with only $3,000 insurance.  Lincoln Leigh’s loss on the shingle mill is about $1200, besides a quarter of a million shingles and $250 worth of shingle bolts, all without insurance. The flour mill was built by John Leigh more than 20 years ago.  It will not be rebuilt.  The shingle mill was built by Nutt & Leigh last summer.  It will probably be rebuilt by Lincoln Leigh.


Oconto County Reporter
July 22, 1898

SURING

Christ Nelson, formerly of Logan, has opened a shoe shop near A. C. Averson's. He also repairs harnesses.

Lightening struck Charles Krueger's house, in course of erection, on Monday night, and slivered the rafters and studding.

GILLETT

The parents of James Sorenson are expected from the old country, soon.

E. Barkman is expected home from Elgin, Ill., next week, where he has been visiting his parents.

Conductor Presgrave of the Wabeno branch has rented part of Mrs. Richmond's residence and expects to move his family here soon.

HAYES

H. E. Zeenize, a former resident, now living in Iowa, visited old friends here last week.

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Brooks and son Ted and Frank Morrison are visiting relatives in Iowa.


Oconto County Reporter
Aug, 5, 1898

Marriages

At St. Joseph's Church on Monday morning, by Rev. Fr. Lochman, Thomas McNulty of Oconto and Miss Agnes McLean of lena. After a breif honeymoon at Green Bay and Kaukauna they will reside in this city.


It Might Have Been a Fatal Accident

Mrs. Mary Freward, aged 60 years, mother of George M. and Henry Freward and Mesdames W. M. Lee and F. E. Rice, had a narrow escape from death yesterday morning. The family had arranged to attend a picnic at the bay shore, and Henry Freward and his mother drove over to the millinery store for a box containing lunch. While Mr. Freward was in the building, Mrs. Freward raised her parasol, which so frightened the horse that it ran away, and at the intersection of Main and Superior streets Mrs. Freward was thrown from the viechle and sustained sever injuries. D. E. Wilcox and H. F. Becker hastened to her rescue and assited her into the millinery store, where a physcian was summoned to dress her wounds. The upper portion of her face was badly cut, the skin was removed in several places and her right hip was hurt. The horse was stopped in front of Heller's meat market.

OUR NEIGHBORS

In drilling for water on the farm of J. C. Albrecht near Peshtigo a vein of black oil was struck at a depth of 45 feet. A professed oil-expert from Pennsylvainia says that indications point an enormous yield. The odor is noticeable at a long distance and much excitement prevails.


STILES

Last Monday A. Shedore, an employe at Eldred's mill, while cleaning up about the mill had a foot caught between two pulleys, smashing two toes. At noon, same day, Henry Grade, during a friendly scuffle with a fellow workman, fell onto a protruding bolt, breaking a knee cap. On Tuesday, Henry De Caster stepped on a peice of wet bark. He slipped and fell near a saw in motion, which lacerated his right hand. He may lose two fingers.

Mrs. R. S. Browning of Green Bay is the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Digan.


HAYES

Gottfield Gust is carrying the mail between Hayes and Suring.

A little boy of Charles P. Schimmel, aged 6 years, seriously burned his face while playing with gun powder.


Oconto County Reporter
Aug, 5, 1898

It Might Have Been a Fatal Accident

Mrs. Mary Freward, aged 60 years, mother of George M. and Henry Freward and Mesdames W. M. Lee and F. E. Rice, had a narrow escape from death yesterday morning. The family had arranged to attend a picnic at the bay shore, and Henry Freward and his mother drove over to the millinery store for a box containing lunch. While Mr. Freward was in the building, Mrs. Freward raised her parasol, which so frightened the horse that it ran away, and at the intersection of Main and Superior streets Mrs. Freward was thrown from the vehicle and sustained sever injuries. D. E. Wilcox and H. F. Becker hastened to her rescue and assisted her into the millinery store, where a physcian was summoned to dress her wounds. The upper portion of her face was badly cut, the skin was removed in several places and her right hip was hurt. The horse was stopped in front of Heller's meat market.

OUR NEIGHBORS

In drilling for water on the farm of J. C. Albrecht near Peshtigo a vein of black oil was struck at a depth of 45 feet. A professed oil-expert from Pennsylvainia says that indications point an enormous yield. The odor is noticeable at a long distance and much excitement prevails.

STILES

Last Monday A. Shedore, an employe at Eldred's mill, while cleaning up about the mill had a foot caught between two pulleys, smashing two toes. At noon, same day, Henry Grade, during a friendly scuffle with a fellow workman, fell onto a protruding bolt, breaking a knee cap. On Tuesday, Henry De Caster stepped on a peice of wet bark. He slipped and fell near a saw in motion, which lacerated his right hand. He may lose two fingers.

Mrs. R. S. Browning of Green Bay is the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Digan.

HAYES

Gottfield Gust is carrying the mail between Hayes and Suring.

A little boy of Charles P. Schimmel, aged 6 years, seriously burned his face while playing with gun powder.


Oconto County Reporter
Oct. 7, 1898

OUR NEIGHBORS

"Uncle" Robert Mailer, aged 75 years, died at his home, in Depere last Sunday afternoon. His death was without previous premonition, while seated in a chair. He was born in Scotland and settled in Depere in 1856. He was unmarried. Senator Mailer of the Brown-Oconto counties district is a nephew.

HICKORY

Fred Butler will take the Rice store. Mr. Rice will move to a point in Northern Indiana.

BREED

John Johnson is visiting his wife, who is cooking in Netzer's camp on Peshtigo brook.

Mrs. G. M. Breed celebrated her 48th birthday anniversary on Saturday.

James Johnson, who has charge of loading cars for the Torrey Cedar company, returned to Clintonville.

Suring -

Mrs Timme and son from Green Valley, visited Mr and Mrs Frank Peterman over Sunday. Mrs Timme is Mrs Peterman's mother.

The Chase & Tilton Lumber Company is putting in a new machinery in the sawmill -- one edger, one trimmer, carriage and steam feed have already arrived. A plainer and matcher, also a boiler and engine will be here in a few days. The company intends to put in nearly 30,000,000 feet of logs next winter.


Oconto County Reporter
Oct. 14, 1898

HAYES

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Hierschke was increased by the addition of a baby boy last week.


Oconto County Reporter
Dec. 2, 1898

SURING

August Giese will open business in his new hardware store in about two weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. William Voss (nee Emma Groninger) Of Hortonville, are visiting the latter's parents in this village.


KELLY LAKE

James A. Glynn has been very feeble for seven weeks. Mrs. Glynn has also been layed up with a lame foot, caused by stepping on a rusty nail. Both are now at the home of their son George, near the city of Oconto, that they may more readily have professional assistance.

PULCIFER

Miss Minnie Bergner was pleasantly surprised on Sunday evening by a number of friends calling upon her to bid her good-bye ere her departure for Pittsville, where she will engage in millinery business.

Willaim Zenk & Sons have purchased 75 feet on Main street of O. A. Risum for $350, upon which they are erecting a two-story building for a hardware store.

Herman Brantenberg and Peter Peterson are going to build a sawmill. They expect to start about Jan. 1. Mr. Brantenberg is looking for men for the woods. He reports a scacity of men in the labor market.

Peter Kettleson returned recently, from Chicago, to enjoy a breif visit with mother, who resides here.

OCONTO FALLS

A. Seymour has resigned his management of the blacksmith shop. It will be continued by R. F. Volk ans Mr. Seymour will remain in his employ.


HAYES

The family of Charles Weise moved here from Milwaukee a couple of weeks ago.


Oconto County Reporter
Dec. 9, 1898

STILES

A sad accident occurred near stiles Junction last Sunday afternoon, while a party of young boys were hunting in the woods. Johnnie McIver, who was carrying a loaded shotgun on his shoulder, put an arm over the stock of his gun in order to have the use of both hands to put on his gloves, and while so engaged the gun slipped from under his arm and was discharged by falling on the frozen ground. Little 8 year old Eddie Grade, who was walking only a few feet from where the gun fell, received the full charge of shot in his right leg, tearing away the knee cap and shattering the bones of the leg. The other boys immediately lifted up their helpless and bleeding companion and carried him to his home, nearly two miles distant. Dr. Armstrong, assisted by Drs. Humphrey and Stoelting, amputated the leg above the knee. Eddie is a bright boy, a great favorite of all who know him and the sad occurance is much deplored by everybody. At the last account the little sufferer was resting as well as may be expected, under the circumstances. Johnnie McIver is almost insane with greif.

AMANDA

Arthur Reed of Menominee is visiting his folks here.

Last Monday, while getting out cedar posts, Herman Daily's black horse got down in the mud and run a knot into her abdomen, letting her bowels out. She had to be killed.

H. Tourtlott and George McMann will put in logs this winter near the Waupee.

Roy Reed, the boy with the broken leg, is doing well.

SURING

P. P. Miller of Menominee has been spending the week most pleasantly with his daughter, Mrs. H. A. Cooley.

Mat Gardner and Abe Fredenberg returned on Tuesday with Dudly Fredenberg, nephew of Mr. Fredenberg. He has been at the hospital for some time and lately had to have his leg taken off above the knee. He is getting along nicely.

John Anderson has bought out his father's interest in the saw mill and expects to do a big business this winter. The former expects to buy logs.

LENA

Peter Netzer has a camp on Peshtigo brook with a crew of 20 men. He expects to put about 30,000 pieces of cedar and 300,000 feet of pine; stock not yet sold. He recently purchsed six forties of H. U. Cole of Oconto for which he paid $375. It is from this tract that he will operate this winter.  


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